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  • ByronicByronic Posts: 3,578

    Glad Parliament is spending all day talking about the important issue of.....speaking a bit more nicely to each other.

    What was it Cox said yesterday about it being a "dead" parliament? Deader than the Dodo.

    I note the Labour benches weren't as vocal about their Shadow Chancellor inciting the lynching of a female MP.

    Or when he said no Tory MP should be able to walk down the street unmolested.

    McDonnell also praised "the bombs and bullets of the IRA" for bringing Peace (sic) to Ireland.

    That's some way beyond "humbug". That's open admiration for terrorist murder which killed many Britons and Irish.

    Labour are repulsive.
  • philiphphiliph Posts: 4,697
    edited September 2019
    TOPPING said:

    .

    Byronic said:

    tlg86 said:

    Byronic said:

    EVERYONE CALM DOWN

    In other news, I think we have to accept that there will be deaths now. Brexit is going the full-spectrum Vietnam.

    How many people are actually paying attention to all of this nonsense in parliament? I reckon the vast majority of people are just getting on with their own lives.
    I would guess most just see it in passing, oh look they are back and arguing among themselves again and no progress on Brexit.
    The Arse of Commons is a grotesque embarrassment. All that sound and fury to get the prorogation reversed, and then with much fanfare they return to duty, and.... they just argue and whinge and hurl insults.

    Every time I think our politics has reached a new low, and can go no further, it manages to surprise on the downside. What a shedload of root vegetables they are.
    And here we seem to need another lesson in civics.

    Let's start with an easy one - who do you suppose caused all those "root vegetables" to be there?
    Malcolm?
  • malcolmgmalcolmg Posts: 37,946
    Byronic said:

    OllyT said:

    Byronic said:

    OllyT said:

    Foxy said:

    DavidL said:

    eristdoof said:

    While the politicians in the UK and the US were knocking seven bells out of each other, I got some good news yesterday evening. I will gain German citizenship on 9th October!

    I only became eligible for citizenship on 1st August after being a resident here for 6 years. The default minimum residency is 8 years, so with 6 years I needed to make a good case. I am happily surprised that the immigration office has been so quick at processing and approving my case.

    I am delighted that my citizenship comes through before brexit, which means that I will remain both a UK citizen and a citizen of a EU country REGARDLESS of when and what type of Brexit occurs. I was at one stage quite worried that I would lose my British passport due to a No Deal Crash Out.

    Have you felt a sudden urge to invade Poland?
    British obsession with the war is why we are in such a mess as a country.

    @eristdoof congratulations, I would if I could too.
    You beat me to it. When I read Eristdoof's comment I thought how long will it be before a Brexiteer brings up the war. I didn't have long to wait.

    If you ever look at any Brexit discussion on CH you won't go along without WW2 coming into it. It ended three quarters of a century ago yet they bring it up like it was last year. It is pathetic. Everyone else seems to have moved on but us.
    To nuclear bombs. It is arguably the most pivotal moment in the human story.
    I disagree, nobody bangs on about WW2 in the way many Brits do.
    Simple error. They don't go on about it so much, because they either feel the guilt of atrocity (e.g. Germany) or the shame of defeat (e.g. France).

    It's still a huge brooding presence in national psyches across the Channel. Notice how the EU rolls up the continental sleeve to show the scars of war, whenever Brits ask why we need the EU in the first place.

    Brits bang on about WW2 openly, whereas others whisper and mutter, because we won it, and we are very proud that we won it.
    I think more accurate is that we were on the winning side, to say we won it kind of misses the fact that we had lots and lots and lots of help.
  • kinabalukinabalu Posts: 32,897
    Dreadful HoC yesterday and the vibe at the moment IS very angry. Even I'm affected. I don't feel calm let alone sunny. I bought a pair of polyester slacks for just £12 this morning in the sales - and they fit perfectly - but the usual afterglow of quiet satisfaction from such a transaction is wholly absent. This thing is impacting everyday life and mental health.
  • ByronicByronic Posts: 3,578
    TOPPING said:

    .

    Byronic said:

    tlg86 said:

    Byronic said:

    EVERYONE CALM DOWN

    In other news, I think we have to accept that there will be deaths now. Brexit is going the full-spectrum Vietnam.

    How many people are actually paying attention to all of this nonsense in parliament? I reckon the vast majority of people are just getting on with their own lives.
    I would guess most just see it in passing, oh look they are back and arguing among themselves again and no progress on Brexit.
    The Arse of Commons is a grotesque embarrassment. All that sound and fury to get the prorogation reversed, and then with much fanfare they return to duty, and.... they just argue and whinge and hurl insults.

    Every time I think our politics has reached a new low, and can go no further, it manages to surprise on the downside. What a shedload of root vegetables they are.
    And here we seem to need another lesson in civics.

    Let's start with an easy one - who do you suppose caused all those "root vegetables" to be there?
    The public wants an election. To replace them. The prime minister wants an election.

    It's a rancid cabal of Remainers and lefties that refuse to leave the Commons, they are the problem.
  • malcolmgmalcolmg Posts: 37,946
    Byronic said:

    To Brexiteers - serious question.

    What would be wrong with an NI only backstop?

    I think a sizeable majority of the country - Leave AND Remain - would take this in a heartbeat, if it got us out of this endless and dreadful nightmare.
    England will throw any other part of the UK under the bus to suit its own interests , great advert for the caring sharing union.
  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 37,000
    philiph said:

    TOPPING said:

    .

    Byronic said:

    tlg86 said:

    Byronic said:

    EVERYONE CALM DOWN

    In other news, I think we have to accept that there will be deaths now. Brexit is going the full-spectrum Vietnam.

    How many people are actually paying attention to all of this nonsense in parliament? I reckon the vast majority of people are just getting on with their own lives.
    I would guess most just see it in passing, oh look they are back and arguing among themselves again and no progress on Brexit.
    The Arse of Commons is a grotesque embarrassment. All that sound and fury to get the prorogation reversed, and then with much fanfare they return to duty, and.... they just argue and whinge and hurl insults.

    Every time I think our politics has reached a new low, and can go no further, it manages to surprise on the downside. What a shedload of root vegetables they are.
    And here we seem to need another lesson in civics.

    Let's start with an easy one - who do you suppose caused all those "root vegetables" to be there?
    Malcolm?
    None other.
  • FlannerFlanner Posts: 359

    Drutt said:

    Your regular reminder to chill the f*ck out, everyone.

    PB increasing turning into this...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=STIvNjWobzA
    I object to this post on the grounds that it's Scousophobic.
  • Does anyone else find politics at the moment exhausting? I seem to have a cycle of emotions - hope, fear, anger, depression.

    At times I just have to turn off the news.
  • philiphphiliph Posts: 4,697
    HYUFD said:
    She deleted the last bit:

    "and I stand ready to replace him"
  • Byronic said:

    EVERYONE CALM DOWN

    In other news, I think we have to accept that there will be deaths now. Brexit is going the full-spectrum Vietnam.

    In other news, Julian Clary has asked that everyone should stop camping it up and Joey Barton has issued a plea for for football to clean up its act.
  • ByronicByronic Posts: 3,578
    I'm a middle aged man, and I'm certainly not angry at Dear Greta.

    I am unnerved by her. She has a definite charisma, yet there is also something very disturbing about her, and not necessarily in a good way.
  • malcolmgmalcolmg Posts: 37,946
    HYUFD said:

    Prince Harry supports Greta Thunberg's climate change strikes

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-49836292

    What a bellend, is he doing that in between his private jet flights and 20+ foreign holidays
  • spudgfshspudgfsh Posts: 1,135
    Byronic said:

    TOPPING said:

    .

    Byronic said:

    tlg86 said:

    Byronic said:

    EVERYONE CALM DOWN

    In other news, I think we have to accept that there will be deaths now. Brexit is going the full-spectrum Vietnam.

    How many people are actually paying attention to all of this nonsense in parliament? I reckon the vast majority of people are just getting on with their own lives.
    I would guess most just see it in passing, oh look they are back and arguing among themselves again and no progress on Brexit.
    The Arse of Commons is a grotesque embarrassment. All that sound and fury to get the prorogation reversed, and then with much fanfare they return to duty, and.... they just argue and whinge and hurl insults.

    Every time I think our politics has reached a new low, and can go no further, it manages to surprise on the downside. What a shedload of root vegetables they are.
    And here we seem to need another lesson in civics.

    Let's start with an easy one - who do you suppose caused all those "root vegetables" to be there?
    The public wants an election. To replace them. The prime minister wants an election.

    It's a rancid cabal of Remainers and lefties that refuse to leave the Commons, they are the problem.
    That's not quite true. there are a majority of MPs who don't want what they perceive to be the Prime Ministers primary aim (to leave without a deal). The problem for them is that the default position is that happens if nothing is done. The only thing that can do is make sure that Boris follows the law and requests an extension of A50 from the EU.
  • MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 47,251
    kinabalu said:

    Dreadful HoC yesterday and the vibe at the moment IS very angry. Even I'm affected. I don't feel calm let alone sunny. I bought a pair of polyester slacks for just £12 this morning in the sales - and they fit perfectly - but the usual afterglow of quiet satisfaction from such a transaction is wholly absent. This thing is impacting everyday life and mental health.

    Is there a Polyester Slacks Helpline?
  • Byronic said:

    I'm a middle aged man, and I'm certainly not angry at Dear Greta.

    I am unnerved by her. She has a definite charisma, yet there is also something very disturbing about her, and not necessarily in a good way.
    She’s The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo incarnate.
  • Its all kicked off in the rugby....
  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 37,000
    Byronic said:

    I'm a middle aged man, and I'm certainly not angry at Dear Greta.

    I am unnerved by her. She has a definite charisma, yet there is also something very disturbing about her, and not necessarily in a good way.
    It's great that a middle aged man can still hold down a career as an international male model and also has the time, amidst his PB postings, to work on his pecs.
  • mwadamsmwadams Posts: 2,382
    I've seen a lot of comments about a LibDem surge gifting the Tories the election.

    But AFIACT of the top 100 LD targets, only 18 are non-Tory.

    And in all of those, it is the tactical voting patterns of Tory remainers that count. The Tories can be deprived of a majority (or even largest party) without any risk of putting Corbyn into No 10 (as, avowedly, no coalition partner would allow it).

    So if I were Boris, I'd be very worried about 2017 Tory remainers in those seats, before I even started to think about the BP on the other flank.
  • 148grss148grss Posts: 1,477
    Byronic said:

    Mr. grss, the EU does deserve some blame too.

    The sequencing is demented, and the demand for regulatory annexation was ridiculous.

    Even when the deal was clearly doomed in the Commons they refused to countenance any change (beyond the UK submitting to the customs union, contrary to what both sides in the referendum campaign said would happen).

    Going further back, we should've had a referendum, as promised by all major parties at the time, on Lisbon. EU and pro-EU types certainly don't want us to leave but this crop that's being harvested was, to a large extent, planted by them.

    The EU’s modus O in these things is to bully and harangue until the weaker party crumbles. They did it with Greece. They did it with Italy and Ireland.

    Their expressed intention was to force us into a deal so bad we would reverse the referendum. As has happened to so many EU referendums before. With Brexit trashed and the British humbled the Project could march on proudly.

    The trouble is, this time, the irresistible economic force of the EU met the immovable political object of a British referendum vote. The result was a horrible crash that has shaken Britain and now menaces the EU.

    Idiots.

    I think there are problems with the EU, but if the 27 countries disagreed on the tactics the "divide and conquer" strategy we've attempted may have worked.

    The issue for the EU is they have a small member state that is very close to us in Ireland. They need to prove being in the EU gives more clout than being out of the EU, otherwise what is the point. Therefore Ireland basically is the most important issue. Sans Ireland I think much of this would have been fudged earlier.

    I do not think the EU negotiated with the intent of keeping the UK in the EU. Firstly, we are a pain in their arse. If they truly do want ever closer union, we will always stop that happening. If they want uniformity we will always demand opt outs. We have always been a part of this project for the economic benefits and have ignored the rest. Much of the reporting from the continent just seems to be about how little the politicians of the UK understand the EU or how it works.

    As for bullying, the UK's history of bullying outweighs anything the EU has done, even if I disagree with what happened in Greece.
  • malcolmgmalcolmg Posts: 37,946
    viewcode said:

    Byronic said:

    OK, we're either waffling about the war, or repeating ourselves endlessly about Brexit. We're no better than the Arse of Commons.

    Time to do some real work. Lates.

    Enjoy the photo shoot.
    I'm sure Byronic is not the only PBer who sits around in his pants while posting.
    Pause

    LOOK, I FREQUENTLY WORK FROM HOME, OKAY???!!!

    oh, dammit (slinks away shamefaced...)
    I work at home but do not sit in my pants for sure
  • TOPPING said:


    And here we seem to need another lesson in civics.

    Let's start with an easy one - who do you suppose caused all those "root vegetables" to be there?

    And those 'root vegetables' know they are going to be harvested at the next GE which is why they are desperately battling to avoid facing the electorate.

    All under the guise of 'stopping no deal' of course...which is fooling precisely nobody (except a few on here).
  • viewcodeviewcode Posts: 11,965

    kinabalu said:

    Dreadful HoC yesterday and the vibe at the moment IS very angry. Even I'm affected. I don't feel calm let alone sunny. I bought a pair of polyester slacks for just £12 this morning in the sales - and they fit perfectly - but the usual afterglow of quiet satisfaction from such a transaction is wholly absent. This thing is impacting everyday life and mental health.

    Is there a Polyester Slacks Helpline?
    Yes. It involves picking up the phone, saying "Don't. Just don't. Ew." And putting the phone down.
  • ByronicByronic Posts: 3,578
    Good decision. Horrible shoulder butt.
  • MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 47,251
    HYUFD said:
    Given the amount of corruption that Chirac was involved in, might be a bit more careful with the "generous", Tony. Or is there something you want to share with the goup?
  • All these amateurs actually wearing pants.
  • spudgfsh said:


    That's not quite true. there are a majority of MPs who don't want what they perceive to be the Prime Ministers primary aim (to leave without a deal). The problem for them is that the default position is that happens if nothing is done. The only thing that can do is make sure that Boris follows the law and requests an extension of A50 from the EU.

    And if Boris isn't PM on 31/10.

    What then?
  • 148grss148grss Posts: 1,477
    mwadams said:

    I've seen a lot of comments about a LibDem surge gifting the Tories the election.

    But AFIACT of the top 100 LD targets, only 18 are non-Tory.

    And in all of those, it is the tactical voting patterns of Tory remainers that count. The Tories can be deprived of a majority (or even largest party) without any risk of putting Corbyn into No 10 (as, avowedly, no coalition partner would allow it).

    So if I were Boris, I'd be very worried about 2017 Tory remainers in those seats, before I even started to think about the BP on the other flank.

    I think the argument is whilst LDs will make most of their gains in Tory seats, a rise in their vote share will allow Tories to come up the middle as LD votes are mainly coming from Lab remainers. I think this likely isn't the case and that many models at the moment (including the recent change in Flavible) massively overestimate the voter realignment on Leave / Remain grounds. Labour leavers are labour first, leave second, and Labour remainers are remain first, labour second. During an election I think many Labour remainers will prefer the idea of a 2nd referendum to full revoke and come back to the fold. I also have no idea how Tory remainers now feel about LDs full revoke policy; many of those who are switching from Tory to LD may find that too far as well, but where they go instead, who knows?
  • eristdooferistdoof Posts: 4,446
    Byronic said:

    TOPPING said:

    .

    Byronic said:

    tlg86 said:

    Byronic said:

    EVERYONE CALM DOWN

    In other news, I think we have to accept that there will be deaths now. Brexit is going the full-spectrum Vietnam.

    How many people are actually paying attention to all of this nonsense in parliament? I reckon the vast majority of people are just getting on with their own lives.
    I would guess most just see it in passing, oh look they are back and arguing among themselves again and no progress on Brexit.
    The Arse of Commons is a grotesque embarrassment. All that sound and fury to get the prorogation reversed, and then with much fanfare they return to duty, and.... they just argue and whinge and hurl insults.

    Every time I think our politics has reached a new low, and can go no further, it manages to surprise on the downside. What a shedload of root vegetables they are.
    And here we seem to need another lesson in civics.

    Let's start with an easy one - who do you suppose caused all those "root vegetables" to be there?
    The public wants an election. To replace them. The prime minister wants an election.

    It's a rancid cabal of Remainers and lefties that refuse to leave the Commons, they are the problem.
    You do realise that the vast majority of MPs will be reelected, certainly way over half. An election won't "replace them" it will just change the numbers in each party a bit.
  • eristdoof said:



    Yes, and Churchill said as much in his "we will fight them on the beaches ... we will never surrender speech". It continues:
    and if, which I do not for a moment believe, this island or a large part of it were subjugated and starving, then our Empire beyond the seas, armed and guarded by the British Fleet, would carry on the struggle, until, in God's good time, the New World, with all its power and might, steps forth to the rescue and the liberation of the old.


    So I am agreeing with @Cyclefree we were not alone, but disagreeing this is somehow a secret.

    That's not really right. Yes, we had the empire, but that wasn't much practical use in 1940. If anything it was a bit of an additional burden.
    That is quite an insult to all those Indian and Australian soldiers who fought in WWII to call them an "additional burden"
    What a completely daft comment. Why do people say such stupid things?
    I suppose it's because "debate" has degenerated into a playground scuffle where one tries to win by tricking your opponent into making a mistake, rather than in having a productive exchange of views where one tries to reach a degree of mutual understanding, if not agreement.
  • malcolmgmalcolmg Posts: 37,946
    kinabalu said:

    Dreadful HoC yesterday and the vibe at the moment IS very angry. Even I'm affected. I don't feel calm let alone sunny. I bought a pair of polyester slacks for just £12 this morning in the sales - and they fit perfectly - but the usual afterglow of quiet satisfaction from such a transaction is wholly absent. This thing is impacting everyday life and mental health.

    Did they have expandable elastic at the sides, if so just plunk them and you will feel better
  • malcolmgmalcolmg Posts: 37,946
    TOPPING said:

    philiph said:

    TOPPING said:

    .

    Byronic said:

    tlg86 said:

    Byronic said:

    EVERYONE CALM DOWN

    In other news, I think we have to accept that there will be deaths now. Brexit is going the full-spectrum Vietnam.

    How many people are actually paying attention to all of this nonsense in parliament? I reckon the vast majority of people are just getting on with their own lives.
    I would guess most just see it in passing, oh look they are back and arguing among themselves again and no progress on Brexit.
    The Arse of Commons is a grotesque embarrassment. All that sound and fury to get the prorogation reversed, and then with much fanfare they return to duty, and.... they just argue and whinge and hurl insults.

    Every time I think our politics has reached a new low, and can go no further, it manages to surprise on the downside. What a shedload of root vegetables they are.
    And here we seem to need another lesson in civics.

    Let's start with an easy one - who do you suppose caused all those "root vegetables" to be there?
    Malcolm?
    None other.
    Did I hear me name being called
  • MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 47,251
    viewcode said:

    kinabalu said:

    Dreadful HoC yesterday and the vibe at the moment IS very angry. Even I'm affected. I don't feel calm let alone sunny. I bought a pair of polyester slacks for just £12 this morning in the sales - and they fit perfectly - but the usual afterglow of quiet satisfaction from such a transaction is wholly absent. This thing is impacting everyday life and mental health.

    Is there a Polyester Slacks Helpline?
    Yes. It involves picking up the phone, saying "Don't. Just don't. Ew." And putting the phone down.
    Thanks for a little levity in these dark, dark times......
  • IanB2 said:


    Bipolar and balanced are so close.

    Accusing another poster of being bipolar is sailing pretty close to the wind.

    Or are you a remainer? In which case you can crack on lol.
  • AlanbrookeAlanbrooke Posts: 21,648
    eristdoof said:

    Byronic said:

    TOPPING said:

    .

    Byronic said:

    tlg86 said:

    Byronic said:

    EVERYONE CALM DOWN

    In other news, I think we have to accept that there will be deaths now. Brexit is going the full-spectrum Vietnam.

    How many people are actually paying attention to all of this nonsense in parliament? I reckon the vast majority of people are just getting on with their own lives.
    I would guess most just see it in passing, oh look they are back and arguing among themselves again and no progress on Brexit.
    The Arse of Commons is a grotesque embarrassment. All that sound and fury to get the prorogation reversed, and then with much fanfare they return to duty, and.... they just argue and whinge and hurl insults.

    Every time I think our politics has reached a new low, and can go no further, it manages to surprise on the downside. What a shedload of root vegetables they are.
    And here we seem to need another lesson in civics.

    Let's start with an easy one - who do you suppose caused all those "root vegetables" to be there?
    The public wants an election. To replace them. The prime minister wants an election.

    It's a rancid cabal of Remainers and lefties that refuse to leave the Commons, they are the problem.
    You do realise that the vast majority of MPs will be reelected, certainly way over half. An election won't "replace them" it will just change the numbers in each party a bit.
    thats generally what happens. Its that change in the numbers which is the interesting bit since currently nobody can call it.
  • malcolmgmalcolmg Posts: 37,946
    TOPPING said:

    Byronic said:

    I'm a middle aged man, and I'm certainly not angry at Dear Greta.

    I am unnerved by her. She has a definite charisma, yet there is also something very disturbing about her, and not necessarily in a good way.
    It's great that a middle aged man can still hold down a career as an international male model and also has the time, amidst his PB postings, to work on his pecs.
    Did you mean Specs
  • spudgfshspudgfsh Posts: 1,135

    spudgfsh said:


    That's not quite true. there are a majority of MPs who don't want what they perceive to be the Prime Ministers primary aim (to leave without a deal). The problem for them is that the default position is that happens if nothing is done. The only thing that can do is make sure that Boris follows the law and requests an extension of A50 from the EU.

    And if Boris isn't PM on 31/10.

    What then?
    Someone else will be. I suspect that either the Jo Swinson or Jeremy Corbyn will have blinked and allowed someone to be caretaker PM (HH or JC depending). they then get their extension and an election.
  • viewcodeviewcode Posts: 11,965
    kinabalu said:

    Dreadful HoC yesterday and the vibe at the moment IS very angry. Even I'm affected. I don't feel calm let alone sunny. I bought a pair of polyester slacks for just £12 this morning in the sales - and they fit perfectly - but the usual afterglow of quiet satisfaction from such a transaction is wholly absent. This thing is impacting everyday life and mental health.

    I was going to mock this post. Then I remembered I spent a hour online upset yesterday that Waterstones sell three of Gibson's Sprawl novels in editions with the same cover design, height and width, but the fourth has the same cover design, height BUT A DIFFERENT WIDTH, and so will not line up on the shelves... :(

    Bastards.

    :(
  • eekeek Posts: 22,056
    eristdoof said:

    Byronic said:

    TOPPING said:

    .

    Byronic said:

    tlg86 said:

    Byronic said:

    EVERYONE CALM DOWN

    In other news, I think we have to accept that there will be deaths now. Brexit is going the full-spectrum Vietnam.

    How many people are actually paying attention to all of this nonsense in parliament? I reckon the vast majority of people are just getting on with their own lives.
    I would guess most just see it in passing, oh look they are back and arguing among themselves again and no progress on Brexit.
    The Arse of Commons is a grotesque embarrassment. All that sound and fury to get the prorogation reversed, and then with much fanfare they return to duty, and.... they just argue and whinge and hurl insults.

    Every time I think our politics has reached a new low, and can go no further, it manages to surprise on the downside. What a shedload of root vegetables they are.
    And here we seem to need another lesson in civics.

    Let's start with an easy one - who do you suppose caused all those "root vegetables" to be there?
    The public wants an election. To replace them. The prime minister wants an election.

    It's a rancid cabal of Remainers and lefties that refuse to leave the Commons, they are the problem.
    You do realise that the vast majority of MPs will be reelected, certainly way over half. An election won't "replace them" it will just change the numbers in each party a bit.
    Does the country really want an election. Personally I want to seal Parliament in an air tight media free room until they reach a collective decision on Brexit.

  • AlanbrookeAlanbrooke Posts: 21,648

    Byronic said:

    I'm a middle aged man, and I'm certainly not angry at Dear Greta.

    I am unnerved by her. She has a definite charisma, yet there is also something very disturbing about her, and not necessarily in a good way.
    She’s The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo incarnate.
    I struggle to believe shes 16, she looks like a twelve year old which makes her order the adults around routine even weirder.
  • IanB2 said:


    Bipolar and balanced are so close.

    Accusing another poster of being bipolar is sailing pretty close to the wind.

    Or are you a remainer? In which case you can crack on lol.
    Och, it's difficult to move for all the honest outrage cluttering up this place.
  • kinabalukinabalu Posts: 32,897
    philiph said:

    She deleted the last bit:

    "and I stand ready to replace him"

    Now that WOULD be something.

    Especially if the courts proceeded to Lock Him Up.

    Perhaps she could visit.
  • viewcodeviewcode Posts: 11,965

    viewcode said:

    kinabalu said:

    Dreadful HoC yesterday and the vibe at the moment IS very angry. Even I'm affected. I don't feel calm let alone sunny. I bought a pair of polyester slacks for just £12 this morning in the sales - and they fit perfectly - but the usual afterglow of quiet satisfaction from such a transaction is wholly absent. This thing is impacting everyday life and mental health.

    Is there a Polyester Slacks Helpline?
    Yes. It involves picking up the phone, saying "Don't. Just don't. Ew." And putting the phone down.
    Thanks for a little levity in these dark, dark times......
    Thank you.
  • spudgfshspudgfsh Posts: 1,135
    eristdoof said:

    Byronic said:

    TOPPING said:

    .

    Byronic said:

    tlg86 said:

    Byronic said:

    EVERYONE CALM DOWN

    In other news, I think we have to accept that there will be deaths now. Brexit is going the full-spectrum Vietnam.

    How many people are actually paying attention to all of this nonsense in parliament? I reckon the vast majority of people are just getting on with their own lives.
    I would guess most just see it in passing, oh look they are back and arguing among themselves again and no progress on Brexit.
    The Arse of Commons is a grotesque embarrassment. All that sound and fury to get the prorogation reversed, and then with much fanfare they return to duty, and.... they just argue and whinge and hurl insults.

    Every time I think our politics has reached a new low, and can go no further, it manages to surprise on the downside. What a shedload of root vegetables they are.
    And here we seem to need another lesson in civics.

    Let's start with an easy one - who do you suppose caused all those "root vegetables" to be there?
    The public wants an election. To replace them. The prime minister wants an election.

    It's a rancid cabal of Remainers and lefties that refuse to leave the Commons, they are the problem.
    You do realise that the vast majority of MPs will be reelected, certainly way over half. An election won't "replace them" it will just change the numbers in each party a bit.
    370MPs at the last election had a majority over their opponents of 20% or more
    427 had a majority of over 15%
  • MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 47,251
    How the hell did this USA team get 30 points past Scotland?
  • Props ain't like they used to be!
  • spudgfsh said:


    Someone else will be. I suspect that either the Jo Swinson or Jeremy Corbyn will have blinked and allowed someone to be caretaker PM (HH or JC depending). they then get their extension and an election.

    I doubt it will be Swinson, it's possible but unlikely.

    Corbyn will be the man to do the dirty on the 17 million just prior to an election; Labour will want it to be him and the Tories will definitely want it to be him.
  • malcolmgmalcolmg Posts: 37,946

    kinabalu said:

    Dreadful HoC yesterday and the vibe at the moment IS very angry. Even I'm affected. I don't feel calm let alone sunny. I bought a pair of polyester slacks for just £12 this morning in the sales - and they fit perfectly - but the usual afterglow of quiet satisfaction from such a transaction is wholly absent. This thing is impacting everyday life and mental health.

    Is there a Polyester Slacks Helpline?
    Where can one purchase these polyester slacks
  • ByronicByronic Posts: 3,578
    148grss said:

    Byronic said:

    Mr. grss, the EU does deserve some blame too.

    The sequencing is demented, and the demand for regulatory annexation was ridiculous.

    Even when the deal was clearly doomed in the Commons they refused to countenance any change (beyond the UK submitting to the customs union, contrary to what both sides in the referendum campaign said would happen).

    Going further back, we should've had a referendum, as promised by all major parties at the time, on Lisbon. EU and pro-EU types certainly don't want us to leave but this crop that's being harvested was, to a large extent, planted by them.

    The EU’s modus O in these things is to bully and harangue until the weaker party crumbles. They did it with Greece. They did it with Italy and Ireland.

    Their expressed intention was to force us into a deal so bad we would reverse the referendum. As has happened to so many EU referendums before. With Brexit trashed and the British humbled the Project could march on proudly.

    The trouble is, this time, the irresistible economic force of the EU met the immovable political object of a British referendum vote. The result was a horrible crash that has shaken Britain and now menaces the EU.

    Idiots.

    I think there are problems with the EU, but if the 27 countries disagreed on the tactics the "divide and conquer" strategy we've attempted may have worked.

    The issue for the EU is they have a small member state that is very close to us in Ireland. They need to prove being in the EU gives more clout than being out of the EU, otherwise what is the point. Therefore Ireland basically is the most important issue. Sans Ireland I think much of this would have been fudged earlier.

    I do not think the EU negotiated with the intent of keeping the UK in the EU. Firstly, we are a pain in their arse. If they truly do want ever closer union, we will always stop that happening. If they want uniformity we will always demand opt outs. We have always been a part of this project for the economic benefits and have ignored the rest. Much of the reporting from the continent just seems to be about how little the politicians of the UK understand the EU or how it works.

    As for bullying, the UK's history of bullying outweighs anything the EU has done, even if I disagree with what happened in Greece.
    This is naive. There is ample evidence, from multiple sources, that the EU's original intention was to get Brexit reversed.

    Unfortunately, in their attempts to do this, they - and their Remainer fellow travellers in the UK, with whom they secretly worked - have made Brexit a whole lot nastier and more difficult, for everyone, than it might have been.

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/sep/14/clegg-leads-pro-remain-grandees-on-diplomatic-mission-to-stop-brexit

    https://euobserver.com/brexit/144724
  • MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 47,251
    malcolmg said:

    kinabalu said:

    Dreadful HoC yesterday and the vibe at the moment IS very angry. Even I'm affected. I don't feel calm let alone sunny. I bought a pair of polyester slacks for just £12 this morning in the sales - and they fit perfectly - but the usual afterglow of quiet satisfaction from such a transaction is wholly absent. This thing is impacting everyday life and mental health.

    Is there a Polyester Slacks Helpline?
    Where can one purchase these polyester slacks
    Step. Away. From. The Internet.........
  • viewcodeviewcode Posts: 11,965
    malcolmg said:

    viewcode said:

    Byronic said:

    OK, we're either waffling about the war, or repeating ourselves endlessly about Brexit. We're no better than the Arse of Commons.

    Time to do some real work. Lates.

    Enjoy the photo shoot.
    I'm sure Byronic is not the only PBer who sits around in his pants while posting.
    Pause

    LOOK, I FREQUENTLY WORK FROM HOME, OKAY???!!!

    oh, dammit (slinks away shamefaced...)
    I work at home but do not sit in my pants for sure
    What, you mean...pants-off???

    Daring. :)
  • malcolmgmalcolmg Posts: 37,946
    viewcode said:

    kinabalu said:

    Dreadful HoC yesterday and the vibe at the moment IS very angry. Even I'm affected. I don't feel calm let alone sunny. I bought a pair of polyester slacks for just £12 this morning in the sales - and they fit perfectly - but the usual afterglow of quiet satisfaction from such a transaction is wholly absent. This thing is impacting everyday life and mental health.

    I was going to mock this post. Then I remembered I spent a hour online upset yesterday that Waterstones sell three of Gibson's Sprawl novels in editions with the same cover design, height and width, but the fourth has the same cover design, height BUT A DIFFERENT WIDTH, and so will not line up on the shelves... :(

    Bastards.

    :(
    Could you not trim it if too wide or add a false panel if narrower. Bit if crafting to go with your reading.
  • rpjsrpjs Posts: 3,787
    Gabs2 said:

    Flanner said:

    geoffw said:

    Was Ireland allied with the axis powers? No, it was nominally neutral. But the condolences reveal something else.

    But what's that something? That de Valera was a Nazi sympathiser? That he was a boring, detail-obsessed, petty bureaucrat at heart, who simply thought diplomatic protocol should never be ignored? Or that over the previous x years, he'd actually struck up something of a friendship with the German ambassador (who went to the same church as Dev, unlike his British oppo never patronised Dev and was decidedly not a committed Nazi), realised the poor sod must be terrified about what was going to happen to him next, and went to see what help the poor chap and his family might need.
    That isn't really a reason to send condolences about Hitler. Nobody else in the world did it. De Valera wasn't a Nazi, but his ideological Anglophobia caused him to sympathize with evil regimes.

    A bit like some modern politicians.
    But in practice, de Valera’s government did a lot to support the British war effort. It allowed its citizens to join the British armed forces (more men from Ireland the state served in the British forces during the war than were in the Irish forces), tacitly allowed nominally interned Allied pilots to slip across the border to NI and return to their units, shared intelligence on German intelligence activity in Ireland and naval movements around Ireland with the UK, and made plans with the British staff on joint action in the event of the Germans attempting to invade Ireland. Oh and not to mention the mutual aid from the Dublin Fire Brigade to Belfast during the Blitz.

    Now, I don’t know enough Irish history to say whether any of that happened at Dev’s behest or covertly without his knowledge and consent, but it was certainly the case that Ireland’s neutrality favoured the Allies far more than it favoured the Axis.
  • ByronicByronic Posts: 3,578
    Ugh. This injury looks a bit grisly.
  • tlg86tlg86 Posts: 23,979
    This thread has surrendered.
  • malcolmgmalcolmg Posts: 37,946

    spudgfsh said:


    Someone else will be. I suspect that either the Jo Swinson or Jeremy Corbyn will have blinked and allowed someone to be caretaker PM (HH or JC depending). they then get their extension and an election.

    I doubt it will be Swinson, it's possible but unlikely.

    Corbyn will be the man to do the dirty on the 17 million just prior to an election; Labour will want it to be him and the Tories will definitely want it to be him.
    If she thought there was a ministerial car for her she would be on it like a ferret up a drainpipe
  • spudgfshspudgfsh Posts: 1,135

    spudgfsh said:


    Someone else will be. I suspect that either the Jo Swinson or Jeremy Corbyn will have blinked and allowed someone to be caretaker PM (HH or JC depending). they then get their extension and an election.

    I doubt it will be Swinson, it's possible but unlikely.

    Corbyn will be the man to do the dirty on the 17 million just prior to an election; Labour will want it to be him and the Tories will definitely want it to be him.
    It will either be Jeremy Corbyn if Jo Swinson blinks or it will be Ken Clarke or Harriet Harman if Jeremy Corbyn is forced to blink.
  • Jess Phillips is really rather impressive. See the quote at 13:34:

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/live/2019/sep/26/boris-johnsons-brexit-rhetoric-condemned-as-mps-tell-of-death-threats-politics-live

    Also David Gauke is proving to be a star. I met him briefly in 2010 when he was a junior in the Treasury, and I thought then he might go far. What a tragedy that the modern Conservative Party is no longer interested in sensible people like him.
  • malcolmgmalcolmg Posts: 37,946
    viewcode said:

    malcolmg said:

    viewcode said:

    Byronic said:

    OK, we're either waffling about the war, or repeating ourselves endlessly about Brexit. We're no better than the Arse of Commons.

    Time to do some real work. Lates.

    Enjoy the photo shoot.
    I'm sure Byronic is not the only PBer who sits around in his pants while posting.
    Pause

    LOOK, I FREQUENTLY WORK FROM HOME, OKAY???!!!

    oh, dammit (slinks away shamefaced...)
    I work at home but do not sit in my pants for sure
    What, you mean...pants-off???

    Daring. :)
    Tutu or micro skirt and high heels
  • Mr Byronic, pleeeze! Oh dear, and I thought you were one of the more thoughtful (if there is such a thing) of Leavers. "Fellow travellers" FFS. have you been on the juice again? Have a few glasses of water and a lie down. The only possible "fellow travellers" in this debate are Vladimir Putin's. Is he more your type?
  • kinabalukinabalu Posts: 32,897

    Labours conference policy on immigration will take care of the millions of working class voters...don't you worry about that.

    We will see.

    For me, that was one of the very best things to come out of the Labour conference - even if it was more mood music than hard policy which will make it into the manifesto.

    But, yes, there is a choice in how to appeal to neglected WWC voters in neglected WWC places.

    (i) Say that you will invest heavily in those places and at the same time enact policies which target the inequality that they themselves are on the wrong side of.

    (ii) Say that we will Make Britain Great Again and in particular stop so many foreigners coming over here.

    It is very possible - likely even - that (ii) will prove the more effective method but I am happy to support a party which has chosen (i).

  • Also David Gauke is proving to be a star. I met him briefly in 2010 when he was a junior in the Treasury, and I thought then he might go far. What a tragedy that the modern Conservative Party is no longer interested in sensible people like him.

    Once the UK has left then the whole dynamics of debate will change and focus will move back to domestic policy.

    At that point I would welcome all the rebels back in to the party...all except Grieve.
  • nichomarnichomar Posts: 7,483
    tlg86 said:

    Byronic said:

    EVERYONE CALM DOWN

    In other news, I think we have to accept that there will be deaths now. Brexit is going the full-spectrum Vietnam.

    How many people are actually paying attention to all of this nonsense in parliament? I reckon the vast majority of people are just getting on with their own lives.
    Have asked my three daughters are people really angry about this and one said ‘all what.’ The other two said nobody talks about it one way or the other anymore.
  • malcolmg said:


    If she thought there was a ministerial car for her she would be on it like a ferret up a drainpipe

    I don't doubt that for a moment but there would not be the support for her in parliament I don't think.

  • nichomarnichomar Posts: 7,483
    TOPPING said:

    .

    Byronic said:

    tlg86 said:

    Byronic said:

    EVERYONE CALM DOWN

    In other news, I think we have to accept that there will be deaths now. Brexit is going the full-spectrum Vietnam.

    How many people are actually paying attention to all of this nonsense in parliament? I reckon the vast majority of people are just getting on with their own lives.
    I would guess most just see it in passing, oh look they are back and arguing among themselves again and no progress on Brexit.
    The Arse of Commons is a grotesque embarrassment. All that sound and fury to get the prorogation reversed, and then with much fanfare they return to duty, and.... they just argue and whinge and hurl insults.

    Every time I think our politics has reached a new low, and can go no further, it manages to surprise on the downside. What a shedload of root vegetables they are.
    And here we seem to need another lesson in civics.

    Let's start with an easy one - who do you suppose caused all those "root vegetables" to be there?
    Malc?
  • kinabalukinabalu Posts: 32,897
    malcolmg said:

    Did they have expandable elastic at the sides, if so just plunk them and you will feel better

    None of that. In fact they look quite classy.

    Can't wait to hit the Farmers' Market in them later.
  • PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 72,850
    @ Whoever it was who said it to @Byronic making light of mental health issues is a low blow


    I struggle to believe shes 16, she looks like a twelve year old which makes her order the adults around routine even weirder.

    & No need to dismiss someones views just because they look younger than they are.
  • malcolmg said:

    Byronic said:

    OllyT said:

    Byronic said:

    OllyT said:

    Foxy said:

    DavidL said:

    eristdoof said:

    While the politicians in the UK and the US were knocking seven bells out of each other, I got some good news yesterday evening. I will gain German citizenship on 9th October!

    I only became eligible for citizenship on 1st August after being a resident here for 6 years. The default minimum residency is 8 years, so with 6 years I needed to make a good case. I am happily surprised that the immigration office has been so quick at processing and approving my case.

    I am delighted that my citizenship comes through before brexit, which means that I will remain both a UK citizen and a citizen of a EU country REGARDLESS of when and what type of Brexit occurs. I was at one stage quite worried that I would lose my British passport due to a No Deal Crash Out.

    Have you felt a sudden urge to invade Poland?
    British obsession with the war is why we are in such a mess as a country.

    @eristdoof congratulations, I would if I could too.
    You beat me to it. When I read Eristdoof's comment I thought how long will it be before a Brexiteer brings up the war. I didn't have long to wait.

    If you ever look at any Brexit discussion on CH you won't go along without WW2 coming into it. It ended three quarters of a century ago yet they bring it up like it was last year. It is pathetic. Everyone else seems to have moved on but us.
    To nuclear bombs. It is arguably the most pivotal moment in the human story.
    I disagree, nobody bangs on about WW2 in the way many Brits do.
    Simple error. They don't go on about it so much, because they either feel the guilt of atrocity (e.g. Germany) or the shame of defeat (e.g. France).

    It's still a huge brooding presence in national psyches across the Channel. Notice how the EU rolls up the continental sleeve to show the scars of war, whenever Brits ask why we need the EU in the first place.

    Brits bang on about WW2 openly, whereas others whisper and mutter, because we won it, and we are very proud that we won it.
    I think more accurate is that we were on the winning side, to say we won it kind of misses the fact that we had lots and lots and lots of help.
    The best summary I read was Britain provided time, the USA money and the USSR blood.
  • PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 72,850
    Anna Soubry leader of the GoaR maybe ?

    A day in the sun for Change UK since they're a threat to precisely noone in the forthcoming GE.
  • bigjohnowlsbigjohnowls Posts: 19,695
    Jesters 100% record of Commons defeats is intact

    DIVISION RESULT
    Adjournment Motion (Conference Recess)

    AYES 289
    NOES 306

    The NOES have it.
    NOES Majority of 17.

    Govt. loses another vote.
  • Fantastic. Trump must be doing his nut!

    “I don’t think he’s happy in his own skin,” Schwarzenegger said in today’s interview. “I think he wants to be me. He wants to be a great, studly guy, that looks good and is muscular, doesn’t have a gut sticking out—all of those things.”
  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 43,596

    IanB2 said:


    Bipolar and balanced are so close.

    Accusing another poster of being bipolar is sailing pretty close to the wind.

    Or are you a remainer? In which case you can crack on lol.
    He’s raised it and made light of it himself on several occasions; otherwise you might have had a point. I was simply struck by the contrast between the two statements in his post, which was remarkable. By the standards even of today on PB you can find dozens of more objectionable posts if you want to go looking.
This discussion has been closed.