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How Murdoch’s New York Post is covering the MidTerms – politicalbetting.com

SystemSystem Posts: 8,489
edited November 27 in General
imageHow Murdoch’s New York Post is covering the MidTerms – politicalbetting.com

This is how the New York Times is describing it:

Read the full story here

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Comments

  • Much as I dislike this sort of play-the-person political journalism, it is a pretty effective example of its type!
  • edmundintokyoedmundintokyo Posts: 16,481
    GOP are going to have to pay Musk not to restore Trump's Twitter account.
  • bigjohnowlsbigjohnowls Posts: 19,583
    Clark officials say their count will likely not be completed till Thursday 17th November.

    Shockingly shit.
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 41,913
    edited November 10

    Clark officials say their count will likely not be completed till Thursday 17th November.

    Shockingly shit.

    Given that American politicians have taken to calling election results that go against them, fraudulent, stolen, rigged, or otherwise illegitimate; how does taking 10 days to count the ballots help give a good impression of the electoral process?
  • bigjohnowlsbigjohnowls Posts: 19,583
    Sandpit said:

    Clark officials say their count will likely not be completed till Thursday 17th November.

    Shockingly shit.

    Given that American politicians have taken to calling election results that go against them, fraudulent, stolen, rigged, or otherwise illegitimate; how does taking 10 days to count the ballots help give a good impression of the electoral process?
    It's going to be amazingly close too. Dems slight favourites on betting markets but have to close the 19300 GOP lead will likely be seen as stolen.
  • swing_voterswing_voter Posts: 1,313
    Sorry, but I am more interested in 3 UK byelections in the offing, all in the NW... 18 months ago the Tories would have fancied their chances in at least one, and Labour would have perhaps sweated in another.... it'll be interesting to see what the `other' parties do. I reckon quite a few Tory MPs will be closely watching, Graham Brady will no doubt watch how the Blue vote holds in next door Urmston & Stretford (which he lost a chunk of blue voters to in the last boundary change).
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 45,359

    Clark officials say their count will likely not be completed till Thursday 17th November.

    Shockingly shit.

    Not shocking at all.

    That’s what happens when you have a poorly funded system, very complicated ballot papers (there’s no comparison with the UK), no trust between the two parties, and each vote potentially contested.
    Close contests will take time.

    The impatience of outside observers is more understandable than the self-serving whining of the current Republican party, but not all that much more.
  • MikeLMikeL Posts: 6,932
    edited November 10
    NV Senate Rep lead UP to 21k - votes just came in in Lyon
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 45,359
    Democrat re-elected by a landslide in Pennsylvania – even though he’s dead
    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2022/nov/09/pennsylvania-dead-democrat-tony-deluca-victory
  • bigjohnowlsbigjohnowls Posts: 19,583
    MikeL said:

    NV Senate Rep lead UP to 21k - votes just came in in Lyon

    CNN has it down to 15k
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 45,359
    Genuine RIP

    Bao Tong, former top aide of Chinese leader Zhao Ziyang, dies at 90
    Senior Communist party official jailed over Tiananmen democracy movement became one of party’s most vociferous critics
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/nov/09/bao-tong-former-top-aide-of-chinese-leader-zhao-ziyang-dies-at-90
  • bigjohnowlsbigjohnowls Posts: 19,583

    MikeL said:

    NV Senate Rep lead UP to 21k - votes just came in in Lyon

    CNN has it down to 15k
    15.8k actually.

    Dems 1.5
    GOP 2.8
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 41,913
    There’s a few interesting plebiscites in the US alongside the election:

    California Prop 27 - to legalise online sports betting - is going down 83/17. Why were Californians so against it?
    Prop 26 - to legalise sports betting in casinos and racetracks on tribal lands - is going down 70/30.

    Legalisation of recreational marijuana passing in Maryland and Missouri, failing in Arkansas and the Dakotas. .

    https://edition.cnn.com/election/2022/results/ballot-measures
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 48,485
    Sandpit said:

    There’s a few interesting plebiscites in the US alongside the election:

    California Prop 27 - to legalise online sports betting - is going down 83/17. Why were Californians so against it?
    Prop 26 - to legalise sports betting in casinos and racetracks on tribal lands - is going down 70/30.

    Legalisation of recreational marijuana passing in Maryland and Missouri, failing in Arkansas and the Dakotas. .

    https://edition.cnn.com/election/2022/results/ballot-measures

    Phew: I know a lot of people who spent a lot of money on those propositions
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 41,913
    FTX rumoured to have an $8bn hole in its balance sheet, Binance takeover is off. Bitcoin down 10% more yesterday.

    Good luck to anyone trying to get cash out of an FTX account.

    Meanwhile, Amazon becomes the first company to ever lose $1trn of stock value. It was worth $1.8trn in June, now worth only $800bn.
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 41,913
    rcs1000 said:

    Sandpit said:

    There’s a few interesting plebiscites in the US alongside the election:

    California Prop 27 - to legalise online sports betting - is going down 83/17. Why were Californians so against it?
    Prop 26 - to legalise sports betting in casinos and racetracks on tribal lands - is going down 70/30.

    Legalisation of recreational marijuana passing in Maryland and Missouri, failing in Arkansas and the Dakotas. .

    https://edition.cnn.com/election/2022/results/ballot-measures

    Phew: I know a lot of people who spent a lot of money on those propositions
    So how do Californians bet on sports? VPN to Nevada, or these not-really-betting-we-promise ‘daily fantasy’ games?
  • bigjohnowlsbigjohnowls Posts: 19,583
    NV Senate circa 180k votes to count.

    Almost 100k in Clark, 20k Washoe, nearly 60k in smaller districts
  • HeathenerHeathener Posts: 3,885
    edited November 10
    Good morning all.

    Not sure those of you piling money on Laxalt yesterday were being particularly wise. There's a reason the networks say this is too close to call.

    The Dems could afford to lose NV though as Warnock will win the GA run-off.
  • pingping Posts: 3,210
    edited November 10
    Sandpit said:

    FTX rumoured to have an $8bn hole in its balance sheet, Binance takeover is off. Bitcoin down 10% more yesterday.

    Good luck to anyone trying to get cash out of an FTX account.

    Meanwhile, Amazon becomes the first company to ever lose $1trn of stock value. It was worth $1.8trn in June, now worth only $800bn.

    I understand Amazon make most of their money from the AWS side of things, these days, but they’ve really neglected the consumer storefront stuff. Prices are usually cheaper in retail shops. Audible and Kindle are expensive for what they are. Their entertainment offer ain’t great, either.

    It does feel a bit like they’ve lost their advantage from my perspective, as a humble end customer.

    I use amazon a lot less than I used to.
  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 42,824
    I assume the lead is right on attributing the quote to the Times with the picture from the Post?

    Perhaps there is hope, after all, with the passing of both Johnson and Trump, that democracies - provided they can stay as such - do come to their senses in the end?
  • Sandpit said:

    FTX rumoured to have an $8bn hole in its balance sheet, Binance takeover is off. Bitcoin down 10% more yesterday.

    Good luck to anyone trying to get cash out of an FTX account.

    Meanwhile, Amazon becomes the first company to ever lose $1trn of stock value. It was worth $1.8trn in June, now worth only $800bn.

    Was Amazon over-valued before? And now?
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 45,359
    rcs1000 said:

    Sandpit said:

    There’s a few interesting plebiscites in the US alongside the election:

    California Prop 27 - to legalise online sports betting - is going down 83/17. Why were Californians so against it?
    Prop 26 - to legalise sports betting in casinos and racetracks on tribal lands - is going down 70/30.

    Legalisation of recreational marijuana passing in Maryland and Missouri, failing in Arkansas and the Dakotas. .

    https://edition.cnn.com/election/2022/results/ballot-measures

    Phew: I know a lot of people who spent a lot of money on those propositions
    A gamble which didn’t pay off ?
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 45,359
    . It’s official, Colorado voters passed Prop FF to give ALL public school students the option to eat two free school meals daily, regardless of their family’s income. No more shame, worry, or stigma, because a child doesn’t have money to eat…
    https://twitter.com/SenRhondaFields/status/1590376566579949568
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 45,359
    Senior MoD figures thought Gavin Williamson caused national security leak
    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2022/nov/10/senior-mod-figures-thought-gavin-williamson-caused-national-security-leak

    From 2019.
  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 42,824
    Freedland: As things turned out, the ex-president’s trademark narcissism was not so wide of the mark. In a way, the 2022 midterms were indeed all about him – just not in the way he had hoped.

    Trump was poised to claim credit for a famous victory and to enjoy the fruits of it. He looked forward to a decisive Republican takeover of the House, one that would see the Democrat-led investigation into the attempted insurrection of 6 January 2021 abandoned, its place taken instead by multiple probes into the affairs of the Biden family. As one seasoned Democrat put it to me this week, “He’ll expect the House to operate as his law firm.”

    As Wednesday morning came, a pattern seemed to be emerging. Even Fox News reporters were quoting Republican sources telling them: “If it wasn’t clear before, it should be now. We have a Trump problem.”

    Along with reproductive rights, imperilled by the supreme court’s summer ruling ending constitutional protection for abortion, the threat to democracy galvanised blue turnout, seemingly turning a red wave into a red ripple. Blame, or credit, for that comes entirely down to Trump, who made election denial a Republican article of faith.

    Cold, hard logic suggests Republicans should step away from Trump, a man who has now presided over three consecutive defeats in 2018, 2020 and 2022 (four if you include the two Georgia senate runoffs in January 2021). But it won’t be simple…. the Republicans’ problem is not simply Trump the man. It is that they have become Trump’s party.


  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 41,913
    ping said:

    Sandpit said:

    FTX rumoured to have an $8bn hole in its balance sheet, Binance takeover is off. Bitcoin down 10% more yesterday.

    Good luck to anyone trying to get cash out of an FTX account.

    Meanwhile, Amazon becomes the first company to ever lose $1trn of stock value. It was worth $1.8trn in June, now worth only $800bn.

    I understand Amazon make most of their money from the AWS side of things, these days, but they’ve really neglected the consumer storefront stuff. Prices are usually cheaper in retail shops. Audible and Kindle are expensive for what they are. Their entertainment offer ain’t great, either.

    It does feel a bit like they’ve lost their advantage from my perspective, as a humble end customer.

    I use amazon a lot less than I used to.
    Yes, looking at their Q2 figures, their profit was $3.3bn on revenue of $121bn, with AWS accounting for $5.7bn profit from sales of $19.7bn. So yes, all their profit and more came from AWS.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2022/07/28/amazon-amzn-q2-2022-earnings.html

    They now employ 1.5m people (I think only Walmart is bigger than that).

    I think they’re possibly still over-valued. Annual profits of $20bn still gives them a P/E above 40/1 - more in line with tech stock than retail stalwart. Walmart is valued at $400bn or so, with a P/E of 30.
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 48,197
    Nevada odds on Betfair now 1.08/1.19 for Dems and no-one wanting to back the Reps.

    I presume this is off the back of all the outstanding Clark County ballots, but even then it seems an overreaction.
  • MikeLMikeL Posts: 6,932

    MikeL said:

    NV Senate Rep lead UP to 21k - votes just came in in Lyon

    CNN has it down to 15k
    Yes - a big chunk of votes came in in Washoe which cut the statewide lead from 21k to the current 15,812.

    Before this chunk, Laxalt had been leading in Washoe by about 4% - which looked surprising as Biden won Washoe. But with this chunk, Cortez now leads Washoe 48.8 - 48.6.
  • RogerRoger Posts: 17,467
    edited November 10
    Mr Murdoch's rags and media enterprises are probably more responsible than any other single factor in the UKs's fall into the cultural gutter.

    Above is a small example of how he's done the same to the US though thanks to their lax media laws he's taken them further and faster.

    When the history books are written 'The Fall of Western Civilisation' Murdoch will be top of the list. Villain in chief. Way above Trump. The baddest of the bad
  • MikeLMikeL Posts: 6,932
    edited November 10
    Important to note that it's not all one way traffic.

    The NV Rep lead overnight has gone from 24k to 16k as follows:

    24k
    19k (D gain 5k in Clark)
    21k (R gain 2k in Lyon)
    16k (D gain 5k in Washoe)

    Still to count per 5.55am post above:

    Almost 100k in Clark, 20k Washoe, nearly 60k in smaller districts

    Now it looks like we've probably had most of the Washoe - so can Dem gain 16k more in Clark than Rep gains in rural Counties?
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 41,913
    Nevada. They have 870k votes counted, which CNN reckons is 84% - so another 160k or so still to come and a lead of 16k for Laxalt. My hunch is that Cortez Masto takes it, but I’m definitely not backing that outcome at 1.08.

    She needs the remaining votes to be 55/45 in her favour, the votes from Clark so far are only 51/46. Laxalt is definitely the value.
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 41,913
    Roger said:

    Mr Murdoch's rags and media enterprises are probably more responsible than any other single factor in the UKs's fall into the cultural gutter.

    Above is a small example of how he's done the same to the US though thanks to their lax media laws he's taken them further and faster.

    When the history books are written 'The Fall of Western Civilisation' Murdoch will be top of the list. Villain in chief. Way above Trump. The baddest of the bad

    Murdoch is high on the list, but Mark Zuckerberg is at the top.
  • eristdooferistdoof Posts: 4,426

    Much as I dislike this sort of play-the-person political journalism, it is a pretty effective example of its type!

    It is the same kind of attack politics that trump is quick to employ, such as "Crooked Hilary" and "Sleepy Joe".
  • Nigelb said:

    Democrat re-elected by a landslide in Pennsylvania – even though he’s dead
    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2022/nov/09/pennsylvania-dead-democrat-tony-deluca-victory

    That was a plot in the West Wing that led to the departure of Sam Seaborn.
  • edmundintokyoedmundintokyo Posts: 16,481
    Taz said:

    Sandpit said:

    FTX rumoured to have an $8bn hole in its balance sheet, Binance takeover is off. Bitcoin down 10% more yesterday.

    Good luck to anyone trying to get cash out of an FTX account.

    Meanwhile, Amazon becomes the first company to ever lose $1trn of stock value. It was worth $1.8trn in June, now worth only $800bn.

    The same FTX who were recently tweeting (now deleted) about their rather plush new offices in Miami no less.

    I don’t invest in Crypto. I don’t really know a great deal about it. But what I do see really makes glad I have never touched it.
    That's probably a good policy. But in the event that you do, your money should never spend more than 24 hours on a centralized (ie trust-me-type) exchange. Usually it should be there less than an hour. Send funds in, buy or sell, cash out.
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 41,913
    edited November 10
    Taz said:

    Sandpit said:

    FTX rumoured to have an $8bn hole in its balance sheet, Binance takeover is off. Bitcoin down 10% more yesterday.

    Good luck to anyone trying to get cash out of an FTX account.

    Meanwhile, Amazon becomes the first company to ever lose $1trn of stock value. It was worth $1.8trn in June, now worth only $800bn.

    The same FTX who were recently tweeting (now deleted) about their rather plush new offices in Miami no less.

    I don’t invest in Crypto. I don’t really know a great deal about it. But what I do see really makes glad I have never touched it.
    I work in IT, and understand the technology. And wouldn’t touch the investment side of it with a barge pole.

    Someone on another forum, described the crypto industry as speed-running through the last 150 years of financial regulation, having learned none of the lessons the rest of us did.

    For me personally, it became obvious to avoid when everyone trying to sell crypto had been selling timeshares in Majorca previously.
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 48,197
    MikeL said:

    Important to note that it's not all one way traffic.

    The NV Rep lead overnight has gone from 24k to 16k as follows:

    24k
    19k (D gain 5k in Clark)
    21k (R gain 2k in Lyon)
    16k (D gain 5k in Washoe)

    Still to count per 5.55am post above:

    Almost 100k in Clark, 20k Washoe, nearly 60k in smaller districts

    Now it looks like we've probably had most of the Washoe - so can Dem gain 16k more in Clark than Rep gains in rural Counties?

    If the remaining Clark is 60:40 in the Dems favour and the rurals 55:45 to the GOP then the rough net effect is a gap closer of 14k.

    However, if Clark is 67:33 then it's more like a 28k net effect and the Dems get it.

    My hunch is that Cortez Masto wins by about 8,000 but certainly not worth backing at 1.08
  • TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 104,595
    edited November 10
    Sandpit said:

    Taz said:

    Sandpit said:

    FTX rumoured to have an $8bn hole in its balance sheet, Binance takeover is off. Bitcoin down 10% more yesterday.

    Good luck to anyone trying to get cash out of an FTX account.

    Meanwhile, Amazon becomes the first company to ever lose $1trn of stock value. It was worth $1.8trn in June, now worth only $800bn.

    The same FTX who were recently tweeting (now deleted) about their rather plush new offices in Miami no less.

    I don’t invest in Crypto. I don’t really know a great deal about it. But what I do see really makes glad I have never touched it.
    I work in IT, and understand the technology. And wouldn’t touch the investment side of it with a barge pole.

    Someone on another forum, described the crypto industry as speed-running through the last 150 years of financial regulation, having learned none of the lessons the rest of us did.

    For me personally, it became obvious to avoid when everyone trying to sell crypto had been selling timeshares in Majorca previously.
    Crypto smells like Dutch Tulips.

    As somebody who works in financial services multi-jurisdictional law and regulatory affairs, if you wanted to design the perfect ponzi scheme-cum-money laundering scam it would look a lot like crypto.

    It's nearly as scandalous as Football Index.
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 45,359
    Sandpit said:

    ping said:

    Sandpit said:

    FTX rumoured to have an $8bn hole in its balance sheet, Binance takeover is off. Bitcoin down 10% more yesterday.

    Good luck to anyone trying to get cash out of an FTX account.

    Meanwhile, Amazon becomes the first company to ever lose $1trn of stock value. It was worth $1.8trn in June, now worth only $800bn.

    I understand Amazon make most of their money from the AWS side of things, these days, but they’ve really neglected the consumer storefront stuff. Prices are usually cheaper in retail shops. Audible and Kindle are expensive for what they are. Their entertainment offer ain’t great, either.

    It does feel a bit like they’ve lost their advantage from my perspective, as a humble end customer.

    I use amazon a lot less than I used to.
    Yes, looking at their Q2 figures, their profit was $3.3bn on revenue of $121bn, with AWS accounting for $5.7bn profit from sales of $19.7bn. So yes, all their profit and more came from AWS.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2022/07/28/amazon-amzn-q2-2022-earnings.html

    They now employ 1.5m people (I think only Walmart is bigger than that).

    I think they’re possibly still over-valued. Annual profits of $20bn still gives them a P/E above 40/1 - more in line with tech stock than retail stalwart. Walmart is valued at $400bn or so, with a P/E of 30.
    A demerger of AWS might start to look very attractive.
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 45,359
    Nigelb said:

    Senior MoD figures thought Gavin Williamson caused national security leak
    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2022/nov/10/senior-mod-figures-thought-gavin-williamson-caused-national-security-leak

    From 2019.

    ...A former government insider said it was believed by senior figures in the Ministry of Defence at the time that the leak “could only have come from Gavin” and that “our people’s lives were put at risk by it”...

    And a month or so later, Johnson reappointed him to cabinet.
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 41,913

    Sandpit said:

    Taz said:

    Sandpit said:

    FTX rumoured to have an $8bn hole in its balance sheet, Binance takeover is off. Bitcoin down 10% more yesterday.

    Good luck to anyone trying to get cash out of an FTX account.

    Meanwhile, Amazon becomes the first company to ever lose $1trn of stock value. It was worth $1.8trn in June, now worth only $800bn.

    The same FTX who were recently tweeting (now deleted) about their rather plush new offices in Miami no less.

    I don’t invest in Crypto. I don’t really know a great deal about it. But what I do see really makes glad I have never touched it.
    I work in IT, and understand the technology. And wouldn’t touch the investment side of it with a barge pole.

    Someone on another forum, described the crypto industry as speed-running through the last 150 years of financial regulation, having learned none of the lessons the rest of us did.

    For me personally, it became obvious to avoid when everyone trying to sell crypto had been selling timeshares in Majorca previously.
    Crypto smells like Dutch Tulips.

    As somebody who works in financial services multi-jurisdictional law and regulatory affairs, if you wanted to design the perfect ponzi scheme-cum-money laundering scam it would look a lot like crypto.

    It's nearly as scandalous as Football Index.
    At least the Dutch tulips would smell nice. ;) Deregulated finance, not so much.

    Football Index was hillarious, as was MoviePass.
  • Nigelb said:

    Nigelb said:

    Senior MoD figures thought Gavin Williamson caused national security leak
    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2022/nov/10/senior-mod-figures-thought-gavin-williamson-caused-national-security-leak

    From 2019.

    ...A former government insider said it was believed by senior figures in the Ministry of Defence at the time that the leak “could only have come from Gavin” and that “our people’s lives were put at risk by it”...

    And a month or so later, Johnson reappointed him to cabinet.
    Boris Johnson liked appointing disgraced national security risks to his cabinet, lest we forget the appointment of Priti Patel.
  • AlistairAlistair Posts: 23,660
    rcs1000 said:

    Russia's retreat in Kherson is a disaster for the Ukrainians:


    It's addictive reading these accounts isn't it? Another wave of self locking their accounts at this news.
  • paulyork64paulyork64 Posts: 2,451
    Sandpit said:

    Nevada. They have 870k votes counted, which CNN reckons is 84% - so another 160k or so still to come and a lead of 16k for Laxalt. My hunch is that Cortez Masto takes it, but I’m definitely not backing that outcome at 1.08.

    She needs the remaining votes to be 55/45 in her favour, the votes from Clark so far are only 51/46. Laxalt is definitely the value.

    Agree on not backing at 1.08.

    The market is so thin you can only get 3.0ish on Laxalt. No thanks.

    I think it took 18k Clark votes counted for Cortez to gain 5k. 100k more from Clark gets her maybe 5-10k ahead. Then I think she loses a bit across the rest of the state.

    I think she edges it but no value odds anywhere on either side.
  • Sandpit said:

    Sandpit said:

    Taz said:

    Sandpit said:

    FTX rumoured to have an $8bn hole in its balance sheet, Binance takeover is off. Bitcoin down 10% more yesterday.

    Good luck to anyone trying to get cash out of an FTX account.

    Meanwhile, Amazon becomes the first company to ever lose $1trn of stock value. It was worth $1.8trn in June, now worth only $800bn.

    The same FTX who were recently tweeting (now deleted) about their rather plush new offices in Miami no less.

    I don’t invest in Crypto. I don’t really know a great deal about it. But what I do see really makes glad I have never touched it.
    I work in IT, and understand the technology. And wouldn’t touch the investment side of it with a barge pole.

    Someone on another forum, described the crypto industry as speed-running through the last 150 years of financial regulation, having learned none of the lessons the rest of us did.

    For me personally, it became obvious to avoid when everyone trying to sell crypto had been selling timeshares in Majorca previously.
    Crypto smells like Dutch Tulips.

    As somebody who works in financial services multi-jurisdictional law and regulatory affairs, if you wanted to design the perfect ponzi scheme-cum-money laundering scam it would look a lot like crypto.

    It's nearly as scandalous as Football Index.
    At least the Dutch tulips would smell nice. ;) Deregulated finance, not so much.

    Football Index was hillarious, as was MoviePass.
    Football Index really wasn't, The Athletic did a lot of pieces of it, the victims of it were some of the most vulnerable in society, the regulators let them down.

    There was one chap who invested his entire life savings and pension into it, poor chap is now 70 and will have to work until he dies.
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 41,913

    Sandpit said:

    Sandpit said:

    Taz said:

    Sandpit said:

    FTX rumoured to have an $8bn hole in its balance sheet, Binance takeover is off. Bitcoin down 10% more yesterday.

    Good luck to anyone trying to get cash out of an FTX account.

    Meanwhile, Amazon becomes the first company to ever lose $1trn of stock value. It was worth $1.8trn in June, now worth only $800bn.

    The same FTX who were recently tweeting (now deleted) about their rather plush new offices in Miami no less.

    I don’t invest in Crypto. I don’t really know a great deal about it. But what I do see really makes glad I have never touched it.
    I work in IT, and understand the technology. And wouldn’t touch the investment side of it with a barge pole.

    Someone on another forum, described the crypto industry as speed-running through the last 150 years of financial regulation, having learned none of the lessons the rest of us did.

    For me personally, it became obvious to avoid when everyone trying to sell crypto had been selling timeshares in Majorca previously.
    Crypto smells like Dutch Tulips.

    As somebody who works in financial services multi-jurisdictional law and regulatory affairs, if you wanted to design the perfect ponzi scheme-cum-money laundering scam it would look a lot like crypto.

    It's nearly as scandalous as Football Index.
    At least the Dutch tulips would smell nice. ;) Deregulated finance, not so much.

    Football Index was hillarious, as was MoviePass.
    Football Index really wasn't, The Athletic did a lot of pieces of it, the victims of it were some of the most vulnerable in society, the regulators let them down.

    There was one chap who invested his entire life savings and pension into it, poor chap is now 70 and will have to work until he dies.
    Yeah, that’s pretty sh!t. I read this morning that some Canadian teachers’ pension fund is massively exposed to FTX, there’s a bunch of fund managers going to get their arses sued for stuff like that.
  • MikeLMikeL Posts: 6,932
    edited November 10
    Worth noting that Laxalt has won many rural Counties (so far) by huge amounts (several with leads in the 40% to 60% range).
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 35,663

    Sandpit said:

    Sandpit said:

    Taz said:

    Sandpit said:

    FTX rumoured to have an $8bn hole in its balance sheet, Binance takeover is off. Bitcoin down 10% more yesterday.

    Good luck to anyone trying to get cash out of an FTX account.

    Meanwhile, Amazon becomes the first company to ever lose $1trn of stock value. It was worth $1.8trn in June, now worth only $800bn.

    The same FTX who were recently tweeting (now deleted) about their rather plush new offices in Miami no less.

    I don’t invest in Crypto. I don’t really know a great deal about it. But what I do see really makes glad I have never touched it.
    I work in IT, and understand the technology. And wouldn’t touch the investment side of it with a barge pole.

    Someone on another forum, described the crypto industry as speed-running through the last 150 years of financial regulation, having learned none of the lessons the rest of us did.

    For me personally, it became obvious to avoid when everyone trying to sell crypto had been selling timeshares in Majorca previously.
    Crypto smells like Dutch Tulips.

    As somebody who works in financial services multi-jurisdictional law and regulatory affairs, if you wanted to design the perfect ponzi scheme-cum-money laundering scam it would look a lot like crypto.

    It's nearly as scandalous as Football Index.
    At least the Dutch tulips would smell nice. ;) Deregulated finance, not so much.

    Football Index was hillarious, as was MoviePass.
    Football Index really wasn't, The Athletic did a lot of pieces of it, the victims of it were some of the most vulnerable in society, the regulators let them down.

    There was one chap who invested his entire life savings and pension into it, poor chap is now 70 and will have to work until he dies.
    A fair number of our Filipino nurses seem to have bought in, "investing" for their retirement. Crypto has been heavily promoted to the naive.

    Hopefully they are not too exposed.
  • England win the toss and bowl.
  • Malan & Wood out with Salt & Jordan in.
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 45,359
    Net Zero Needs Fusion. What Should Investors Be Asking The Frontrunners?
    https://www.forbes.com/sites/walvanlierop/2022/11/08/net-zero-needs-fusion-what-should-investors-be-asking-the-frontrunners/

    Good questions, but maybe "0. Does the plasma physics work?" Given some companies are working on ideas for which there is actively theoretical disproof, seems important
    https://mobile.twitter.com/FLF_Nick/status/1590593796906962944
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 30,267

    Sandpit said:

    Taz said:

    Sandpit said:

    FTX rumoured to have an $8bn hole in its balance sheet, Binance takeover is off. Bitcoin down 10% more yesterday.

    Good luck to anyone trying to get cash out of an FTX account.

    Meanwhile, Amazon becomes the first company to ever lose $1trn of stock value. It was worth $1.8trn in June, now worth only $800bn.

    The same FTX who were recently tweeting (now deleted) about their rather plush new offices in Miami no less.

    I don’t invest in Crypto. I don’t really know a great deal about it. But what I do see really makes glad I have never touched it.
    I work in IT, and understand the technology. And wouldn’t touch the investment side of it with a barge pole.

    Someone on another forum, described the crypto industry as speed-running through the last 150 years of financial regulation, having learned none of the lessons the rest of us did.

    For me personally, it became obvious to avoid when everyone trying to sell crypto had been selling timeshares in Majorca previously.
    Crypto smells like Dutch Tulips.

    As somebody who works in financial services multi-jurisdictional law and regulatory affairs, if you wanted to design the perfect ponzi scheme-cum-money laundering scam it would look a lot like crypto.

    It's nearly as scandalous as Football Index.
    The fun bit was looking at the structure of the “markets” - often instant buying and “we’ll get back to you” for selling - and seeing the clear evidence of pump and dump cycles in the prices.

    But while it’s all going up, no one will listen.
  • edmundintokyoedmundintokyo Posts: 16,481
    Sandpit said:

    Sandpit said:

    Sandpit said:

    Taz said:

    Sandpit said:

    FTX rumoured to have an $8bn hole in its balance sheet, Binance takeover is off. Bitcoin down 10% more yesterday.

    Good luck to anyone trying to get cash out of an FTX account.

    Meanwhile, Amazon becomes the first company to ever lose $1trn of stock value. It was worth $1.8trn in June, now worth only $800bn.

    The same FTX who were recently tweeting (now deleted) about their rather plush new offices in Miami no less.

    I don’t invest in Crypto. I don’t really know a great deal about it. But what I do see really makes glad I have never touched it.
    I work in IT, and understand the technology. And wouldn’t touch the investment side of it with a barge pole.

    Someone on another forum, described the crypto industry as speed-running through the last 150 years of financial regulation, having learned none of the lessons the rest of us did.

    For me personally, it became obvious to avoid when everyone trying to sell crypto had been selling timeshares in Majorca previously.
    Crypto smells like Dutch Tulips.

    As somebody who works in financial services multi-jurisdictional law and regulatory affairs, if you wanted to design the perfect ponzi scheme-cum-money laundering scam it would look a lot like crypto.

    It's nearly as scandalous as Football Index.
    At least the Dutch tulips would smell nice. ;) Deregulated finance, not so much.

    Football Index was hillarious, as was MoviePass.
    Football Index really wasn't, The Athletic did a lot of pieces of it, the victims of it were some of the most vulnerable in society, the regulators let them down.

    There was one chap who invested his entire life savings and pension into it, poor chap is now 70 and will have to work until he dies.
    Yeah, that’s pretty sh!t. I read this morning that some Canadian teachers’ pension fund is massively exposed to FTX, there’s a bunch of fund managers going to get their arses sued for stuff like that.
    Also it seems likely that the President of El Salvador invested his country's money there.
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 41,913
    Alistair said:

    rcs1000 said:

    Russia's retreat in Kherson is a disaster for the Ukrainians:


    It's addictive reading these accounts isn't it? Another wave of self locking their accounts at this news.
    I still think there’s something not quite right about Kherson.

    Fingers crossed I’m wrong, and it was a simple case of the enemy being starved out by cutting the supply lines over the Deniper bridges.
  • not_on_firenot_on_fire Posts: 4,321
    Nigelb said:

    rcs1000 said:

    Sandpit said:

    There’s a few interesting plebiscites in the US alongside the election:

    California Prop 27 - to legalise online sports betting - is going down 83/17. Why were Californians so against it?
    Prop 26 - to legalise sports betting in casinos and racetracks on tribal lands - is going down 70/30.

    Legalisation of recreational marijuana passing in Maryland and Missouri, failing in Arkansas and the Dakotas. .

    https://edition.cnn.com/election/2022/results/ballot-measures

    Phew: I know a lot of people who spent a lot of money on those propositions
    A gamble which didn’t pay off ?
    Americans are just very puritanical about betting outside of Nevada, even in the blue states.

    See alcohol also - even in relatively blue Colorado, a measure allowing supermarkets to sell wine has failed. imagine the outcry here if Tesco had to stop selling cheap Merlot and Pinot Grigio.
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 30,267
    ping said:

    Sandpit said:

    FTX rumoured to have an $8bn hole in its balance sheet, Binance takeover is off. Bitcoin down 10% more yesterday.

    Good luck to anyone trying to get cash out of an FTX account.

    Meanwhile, Amazon becomes the first company to ever lose $1trn of stock value. It was worth $1.8trn in June, now worth only $800bn.

    I understand Amazon make most of their money from the AWS side of things, these days, but they’ve really neglected the consumer storefront stuff. Prices are usually cheaper in retail shops. Audible and Kindle are expensive for what they are. Their entertainment offer ain’t great, either.

    It does feel a bit like they’ve lost their advantage from my perspective, as a humble end customer.

    I use amazon a lot less than I used to.
    In a number of areas, retailers have pulled back from Amazon. Their pricing and predatory practices have made it cheaper and better to run your own online store, for a growing number.
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 41,913
    Foxy said:

    Sandpit said:

    Sandpit said:

    Taz said:

    Sandpit said:

    FTX rumoured to have an $8bn hole in its balance sheet, Binance takeover is off. Bitcoin down 10% more yesterday.

    Good luck to anyone trying to get cash out of an FTX account.

    Meanwhile, Amazon becomes the first company to ever lose $1trn of stock value. It was worth $1.8trn in June, now worth only $800bn.

    The same FTX who were recently tweeting (now deleted) about their rather plush new offices in Miami no less.

    I don’t invest in Crypto. I don’t really know a great deal about it. But what I do see really makes glad I have never touched it.
    I work in IT, and understand the technology. And wouldn’t touch the investment side of it with a barge pole.

    Someone on another forum, described the crypto industry as speed-running through the last 150 years of financial regulation, having learned none of the lessons the rest of us did.

    For me personally, it became obvious to avoid when everyone trying to sell crypto had been selling timeshares in Majorca previously.
    Crypto smells like Dutch Tulips.

    As somebody who works in financial services multi-jurisdictional law and regulatory affairs, if you wanted to design the perfect ponzi scheme-cum-money laundering scam it would look a lot like crypto.

    It's nearly as scandalous as Football Index.
    At least the Dutch tulips would smell nice. ;) Deregulated finance, not so much.

    Football Index was hillarious, as was MoviePass.
    Football Index really wasn't, The Athletic did a lot of pieces of it, the victims of it were some of the most vulnerable in society, the regulators let them down.

    There was one chap who invested his entire life savings and pension into it, poor chap is now 70 and will have to work until he dies.
    A fair number of our Filipino nurses seem to have bought in, "investing" for their retirement. Crypto has been heavily promoted to the naive.

    Hopefully they are not too exposed.
    Yes, I’ve spent a lot of time talking low-income people out of various get-rich-quick schemes, crypto being the biggest in the past few years.

    So many people think that 20% interest rates for savings are great, when the bank pays 0.2%, without realising that your money is always safe and available if it’s in the bank.
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 41,913

    Sandpit said:

    Sandpit said:

    Sandpit said:

    Taz said:

    Sandpit said:

    FTX rumoured to have an $8bn hole in its balance sheet, Binance takeover is off. Bitcoin down 10% more yesterday.

    Good luck to anyone trying to get cash out of an FTX account.

    Meanwhile, Amazon becomes the first company to ever lose $1trn of stock value. It was worth $1.8trn in June, now worth only $800bn.

    The same FTX who were recently tweeting (now deleted) about their rather plush new offices in Miami no less.

    I don’t invest in Crypto. I don’t really know a great deal about it. But what I do see really makes glad I have never touched it.
    I work in IT, and understand the technology. And wouldn’t touch the investment side of it with a barge pole.

    Someone on another forum, described the crypto industry as speed-running through the last 150 years of financial regulation, having learned none of the lessons the rest of us did.

    For me personally, it became obvious to avoid when everyone trying to sell crypto had been selling timeshares in Majorca previously.
    Crypto smells like Dutch Tulips.

    As somebody who works in financial services multi-jurisdictional law and regulatory affairs, if you wanted to design the perfect ponzi scheme-cum-money laundering scam it would look a lot like crypto.

    It's nearly as scandalous as Football Index.
    At least the Dutch tulips would smell nice. ;) Deregulated finance, not so much.

    Football Index was hillarious, as was MoviePass.
    Football Index really wasn't, The Athletic did a lot of pieces of it, the victims of it were some of the most vulnerable in society, the regulators let them down.

    There was one chap who invested his entire life savings and pension into it, poor chap is now 70 and will have to work until he dies.
    Yeah, that’s pretty sh!t. I read this morning that some Canadian teachers’ pension fund is massively exposed to FTX, there’s a bunch of fund managers going to get their arses sued for stuff like that.
    Also it seems likely that the President of El Salvador invested his country's money there.
    Whoops!
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 45,359
    Sandpit said:

    Alistair said:

    rcs1000 said:

    Russia's retreat in Kherson is a disaster for the Ukrainians:


    It's addictive reading these accounts isn't it? Another wave of self locking their accounts at this news.
    I still think there’s something not quite right about Kherson.

    Fingers crossed I’m wrong, and it was a simple case of the enemy being starved out by cutting the supply lines over the Deniper bridges.
    Another data point.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/COUPSURE/status/1590405107169914881
    I think this thread will surprise you...

    Russia is digging new trenches in... Northern Crimea!

  • OnlyLivingBoyOnlyLivingBoy Posts: 10,434

    Sandpit said:

    Taz said:

    Sandpit said:

    FTX rumoured to have an $8bn hole in its balance sheet, Binance takeover is off. Bitcoin down 10% more yesterday.

    Good luck to anyone trying to get cash out of an FTX account.

    Meanwhile, Amazon becomes the first company to ever lose $1trn of stock value. It was worth $1.8trn in June, now worth only $800bn.

    The same FTX who were recently tweeting (now deleted) about their rather plush new offices in Miami no less.

    I don’t invest in Crypto. I don’t really know a great deal about it. But what I do see really makes glad I have never touched it.
    I work in IT, and understand the technology. And wouldn’t touch the investment side of it with a barge pole.

    Someone on another forum, described the crypto industry as speed-running through the last 150 years of financial regulation, having learned none of the lessons the rest of us did.

    For me personally, it became obvious to avoid when everyone trying to sell crypto had been selling timeshares in Majorca previously.
    Crypto smells like Dutch Tulips.

    As somebody who works in financial services multi-jurisdictional law and regulatory affairs, if you wanted to design the perfect ponzi scheme-cum-money laundering scam it would look a lot like crypto.

    It's nearly as scandalous as Football Index.
    I wouldn't touch crypto "assets" with a shitty stick for the reasons you mention. Of course a lot of people will have made money off it - that's the whole point of a Ponzi scheme. But the whole sphere is dodgy AF.
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 30,267
    Sandpit said:

    Sandpit said:

    Sandpit said:

    Sandpit said:

    Taz said:

    Sandpit said:

    FTX rumoured to have an $8bn hole in its balance sheet, Binance takeover is off. Bitcoin down 10% more yesterday.

    Good luck to anyone trying to get cash out of an FTX account.

    Meanwhile, Amazon becomes the first company to ever lose $1trn of stock value. It was worth $1.8trn in June, now worth only $800bn.

    The same FTX who were recently tweeting (now deleted) about their rather plush new offices in Miami no less.

    I don’t invest in Crypto. I don’t really know a great deal about it. But what I do see really makes glad I have never touched it.
    I work in IT, and understand the technology. And wouldn’t touch the investment side of it with a barge pole.

    Someone on another forum, described the crypto industry as speed-running through the last 150 years of financial regulation, having learned none of the lessons the rest of us did.

    For me personally, it became obvious to avoid when everyone trying to sell crypto had been selling timeshares in Majorca previously.
    Crypto smells like Dutch Tulips.

    As somebody who works in financial services multi-jurisdictional law and regulatory affairs, if you wanted to design the perfect ponzi scheme-cum-money laundering scam it would look a lot like crypto.

    It's nearly as scandalous as Football Index.
    At least the Dutch tulips would smell nice. ;) Deregulated finance, not so much.

    Football Index was hillarious, as was MoviePass.
    Football Index really wasn't, The Athletic did a lot of pieces of it, the victims of it were some of the most vulnerable in society, the regulators let them down.

    There was one chap who invested his entire life savings and pension into it, poor chap is now 70 and will have to work until he dies.
    Yeah, that’s pretty sh!t. I read this morning that some Canadian teachers’ pension fund is massively exposed to FTX, there’s a bunch of fund managers going to get their arses sued for stuff like that.
    Also it seems likely that the President of El Salvador invested his country's money there.
    Whoops!
    There does seem to be a tradition in Central and South America of making some really, really magnificent financial decisions, by countries leaders.

    Magnificent as in “Wow, they’ll see the explosion on the moon”.
  • numbertwelvenumbertwelve Posts: 4,123
    Unfortunately Boebert has closed the gap and I suspect hangs on.
  • edmundintokyoedmundintokyo Posts: 16,481
    edited November 10

    Sandpit said:

    Taz said:

    Sandpit said:

    FTX rumoured to have an $8bn hole in its balance sheet, Binance takeover is off. Bitcoin down 10% more yesterday.

    Good luck to anyone trying to get cash out of an FTX account.

    Meanwhile, Amazon becomes the first company to ever lose $1trn of stock value. It was worth $1.8trn in June, now worth only $800bn.

    The same FTX who were recently tweeting (now deleted) about their rather plush new offices in Miami no less.

    I don’t invest in Crypto. I don’t really know a great deal about it. But what I do see really makes glad I have never touched it.
    I work in IT, and understand the technology. And wouldn’t touch the investment side of it with a barge pole.

    Someone on another forum, described the crypto industry as speed-running through the last 150 years of financial regulation, having learned none of the lessons the rest of us did.

    For me personally, it became obvious to avoid when everyone trying to sell crypto had been selling timeshares in Majorca previously.
    Crypto smells like Dutch Tulips.

    As somebody who works in financial services multi-jurisdictional law and regulatory affairs, if you wanted to design the perfect ponzi scheme-cum-money laundering scam it would look a lot like crypto.

    It's nearly as scandalous as Football Index.
    I wouldn't touch crypto "assets" with a shitty stick for the reasons you mention. Of course a lot of people will have made money off it - that's the whole point of a Ponzi scheme. But the whole sphere is dodgy AF.
    "Crypto" doesn't describe the type of asset, it describes a way of managing the asset. There are lots of ponzi schemes, but not everything is a ponzi scheme.

    * Edited to add that final "not", the lack of which changed the meaning somewhat.
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 45,359
    Nigelb said:

    Net Zero Needs Fusion. What Should Investors Be Asking The Frontrunners?
    https://www.forbes.com/sites/walvanlierop/2022/11/08/net-zero-needs-fusion-what-should-investors-be-asking-the-frontrunners/

    Good questions, but maybe "0. Does the plasma physics work?" Given some companies are working on ideas for which there is actively theoretical disproof, seems important
    https://mobile.twitter.com/FLF_Nick/status/1590593796906962944

    First Light Fusion has a real prospect of being one of those that succeed.
    The UK should be providing sufficient funding to prevent their decamping to the US. Which is the only place they will be able to raise sufficient funds privately to build actual power plants.

    The money involved is not huge, but the potential payoff is. A worthwhile gamble, IMO.
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 30,267
    edited November 10
    Sandpit said:

    Alistair said:

    rcs1000 said:

    Russia's retreat in Kherson is a disaster for the Ukrainians:


    It's addictive reading these accounts isn't it? Another wave of self locking their accounts at this news.
    I still think there’s something not quite right about Kherson.

    Fingers crossed I’m wrong, and it was a simple case of the enemy being starved out by cutting the supply lines over the Deniper bridges.
    It seems that the Ukrainians share your view and are being very cautious about entry into the pocket.

    I’m still betting on the Russians blowing the dam. It was what they tried in 1941. Didn’t help then, but just killed a lot of people. But the Russians seem to like stupid, so…

    EDIT: I think the Russians have genuinely run out military capability. It’s more about what kind of trap, if any, they are trying to leave behind.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 35,663
    Sandpit said:

    Alistair said:

    rcs1000 said:

    Russia's retreat in Kherson is a disaster for the Ukrainians:


    It's addictive reading these accounts isn't it? Another wave of self locking their accounts at this news.
    I still think there’s something not quite right about Kherson.

    Fingers crossed I’m wrong, and it was a simple case of the enemy being starved out by cutting the supply lines over the Deniper bridges.
    No, I think it is a straightforward withdrawal, though not currently a rout. More like the retreat from Kyiv than Lyman. They may get some men out, but will have to abandon much heavy equipment.
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 45,359
    "On it..."

    How the Republican Party views women.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/cynicalzoomer/status/1590502986190839808
    Jesse claims "Democrat policies are designed to keep women single."

    "We need these ladies to get married. And it's time to fall in love and just settle down. Guys, go put a ring on it."
  • AlistairAlistair Posts: 23,660
    MikeL said:

    Worth noting that Laxalt has won many rural Counties (so far) by huge amounts (several with leads in the 40% to 60% range).

    Just like Trump did.

    5-of-17 by over 60%
    3 by over 50%
    3 by over 40%
    2 by over 30% ( this is a lie 1 of those was won by 29.47)

    The key thing is how many votes are left in every place. If there are lots of rural votes left it is great for Laxalt - hew "won" yesterdays count in Nye 76/19 (Nye incidentally is the country that wanted to hand count every ballot because of election conpsiracies)
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 30,267
    Nigelb said:

    Nigelb said:

    Net Zero Needs Fusion. What Should Investors Be Asking The Frontrunners?
    https://www.forbes.com/sites/walvanlierop/2022/11/08/net-zero-needs-fusion-what-should-investors-be-asking-the-frontrunners/

    Good questions, but maybe "0. Does the plasma physics work?" Given some companies are working on ideas for which there is actively theoretical disproof, seems important
    https://mobile.twitter.com/FLF_Nick/status/1590593796906962944

    First Light Fusion has a real prospect of being one of those that succeed.
    The UK should be providing sufficient funding to prevent their decamping to the US. Which is the only place they will be able to raise sufficient funds privately to build actual power plants.

    The money involved is not huge, but the potential payoff is. A worthwhile gamble, IMO.
    There seems to be a lot snake oil being sold. Small space launch, crypto and fusion. There was even one attempt at selling small launch and crypto in the same project….

    As ever, there are some real concepts hidden behind the scams.

    Some concepts, though, might theoretically make as much power as goes in - but are clearly not going to reach break even in terms of generating actual surplus power
  • MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 47,047
    Nigelb said:

    Nigelb said:

    Senior MoD figures thought Gavin Williamson caused national security leak
    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2022/nov/10/senior-mod-figures-thought-gavin-williamson-caused-national-security-leak

    From 2019.

    ...A former government insider said it was believed by senior figures in the Ministry of Defence at the time that the leak “could only have come from Gavin” and that “our people’s lives were put at risk by it”...

    And a month or so later, Johnson reappointed him to cabinet.
    Hard to believe that Sunak was not privy to this matter. And still Williamson got appointed by him.

    His Little Black Book must be a very dark thing indeed.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 35,663
    Nigelb said:

    "On it..."

    How the Republican Party views women.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/cynicalzoomer/status/1590502986190839808
    Jesse claims "Democrat policies are designed to keep women single."

    "We need these ladies to get married. And it's time to fall in love and just settle down. Guys, go put a ring on it."

    A reference to the popular singer Beyonce , M'lud.

    https://youtu.be/4m1EFMoRFvY
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 41,913

    Sandpit said:

    Alistair said:

    rcs1000 said:

    Russia's retreat in Kherson is a disaster for the Ukrainians:


    It's addictive reading these accounts isn't it? Another wave of self locking their accounts at this news.
    I still think there’s something not quite right about Kherson.

    Fingers crossed I’m wrong, and it was a simple case of the enemy being starved out by cutting the supply lines over the Deniper bridges.
    It seems that the Ukrainians share your view and are being very cautious about entry into the pocket.

    I’m still betting on the Russians blowing the dam. It was what they tried in 1941. Didn’t help then, but just killed a lot of people. But the Russians seem to like stupid, so…

    EDIT: I think the Russians have genuinely run out military capability. It’s more about what kind of trap, if any, they are trying to leave behind.
    Yeah, the dam is a worry, as is what looks on the surface like a withdrawal, but is actually leaving thousands of well-armed soldiers holed up in civilian buildings.

    Or maybe it is just like the withdrawal from Kiev, they are exhausted and can’t get supplies, so have to move back.

    One can see why the Ukranians are nervous though, to see such a strategic location given up with apparently little fuss.
  • MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 47,047

    Sandpit said:

    Alistair said:

    rcs1000 said:

    Russia's retreat in Kherson is a disaster for the Ukrainians:


    It's addictive reading these accounts isn't it? Another wave of self locking their accounts at this news.
    I still think there’s something not quite right about Kherson.

    Fingers crossed I’m wrong, and it was a simple case of the enemy being starved out by cutting the supply lines over the Deniper bridges.
    It seems that the Ukrainians share your view and are being very cautious about entry into the pocket.

    I’m still betting on the Russians blowing the dam. It was what they tried in 1941. Didn’t help then, but just killed a lot of people. But the Russians seem to like stupid, so…

    EDIT: I think the Russians have genuinely run out military capability. It’s more about what kind of trap, if any, they are trying to leave behind.
    If Kherson is returned to Ukraine (remember, Putin claimed it was now part of "Russia, forever") without it being levelled, then it will be another example of how to fight that will be studied for decades. Admittedly, the Russians had painted themselves into a corner, so it was strategically stupid. But the denial of resources to maintain the fighting ability of an army of 25,000 men and machines has been brilliantly planned and executed.
  • TazTaz Posts: 6,235
    Russia now open to negotiations with Ukraine.

    But who would trust them given the bad faith with which they have approached negotiations previously.

    https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/world/russia-open-to-negotiations-with-ukraine-factoring-in-new-realities/ar-AA13VRu4?ocid=entnewsntp&cvid=3b5b26698ae14b7f8cc796ecb0a879da
  • Blow for England as India succeed in bringing Kohli on strike in only the second over.
  • Scott_xPScott_xP Posts: 28,250

    Nigelb said:

    Nigelb said:

    Senior MoD figures thought Gavin Williamson caused national security leak
    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2022/nov/10/senior-mod-figures-thought-gavin-williamson-caused-national-security-leak

    From 2019.

    ...A former government insider said it was believed by senior figures in the Ministry of Defence at the time that the leak “could only have come from Gavin” and that “our people’s lives were put at risk by it”...

    And a month or so later, Johnson reappointed him to cabinet.
    Hard to believe that Sunak was not privy to this matter. And still Williamson got appointed by him.

    His Little Black Book must be a very dark thing indeed.
    I am starting to view the current iteration of the Tory Party a bit like crypto bros.

    They fell for the hype.

    BoZo was supposed to be the man who could get things done, and while the list of things he wanted to build with his name on them is long, the list of those he delivered is very, very short.

    Gav is the same. His reputation for fearsome shenanigans wildly exceeds his reported ability.

    And here we are...
  • nico679nico679 Posts: 2,553
    Not sure where this 60,000 left to count in the rurals is coming from .

    That would be akin to one third of the total vote in the 2020 election in the non Clark and Washoe counties . Not sure where the 60,000 figure is coming from but it’s simply not happening.



  • Scott_xPScott_xP Posts: 28,250
    I'm going to suggest that this isn't aging well: https://twitter.com/Rhodri_H_Davies/status/1590415295348604929/photo/1
  • Sandpit said:

    Sandpit said:

    Sandpit said:

    Sandpit said:

    Taz said:

    Sandpit said:

    FTX rumoured to have an $8bn hole in its balance sheet, Binance takeover is off. Bitcoin down 10% more yesterday.

    Good luck to anyone trying to get cash out of an FTX account.

    Meanwhile, Amazon becomes the first company to ever lose $1trn of stock value. It was worth $1.8trn in June, now worth only $800bn.

    The same FTX who were recently tweeting (now deleted) about their rather plush new offices in Miami no less.

    I don’t invest in Crypto. I don’t really know a great deal about it. But what I do see really makes glad I have never touched it.
    I work in IT, and understand the technology. And wouldn’t touch the investment side of it with a barge pole.

    Someone on another forum, described the crypto industry as speed-running through the last 150 years of financial regulation, having learned none of the lessons the rest of us did.

    For me personally, it became obvious to avoid when everyone trying to sell crypto had been selling timeshares in Majorca previously.
    Crypto smells like Dutch Tulips.

    As somebody who works in financial services multi-jurisdictional law and regulatory affairs, if you wanted to design the perfect ponzi scheme-cum-money laundering scam it would look a lot like crypto.

    It's nearly as scandalous as Football Index.
    At least the Dutch tulips would smell nice. ;) Deregulated finance, not so much.

    Football Index was hillarious, as was MoviePass.
    Football Index really wasn't, The Athletic did a lot of pieces of it, the victims of it were some of the most vulnerable in society, the regulators let them down.

    There was one chap who invested his entire life savings and pension into it, poor chap is now 70 and will have to work until he dies.
    Yeah, that’s pretty sh!t. I read this morning that some Canadian teachers’ pension fund is massively exposed to FTX, there’s a bunch of fund managers going to get their arses sued for stuff like that.
    Also it seems likely that the President of El Salvador invested his country's money there.
    Whoops!
    There does seem to be a tradition in Central and South America of making some really, really magnificent financial decisions, by countries leaders.

    Magnificent as in “Wow, they’ll see the explosion on the moon”.
    Whilst I agree, it is worth remembering how many UK local councils found themselves dangerously exposed to loses during the GFA because of their decision to invest funds in Icelandic banks. No one seems to be immune to the lure of high returns even when we all know there is a price to pay.
  • MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 47,047
    Sandpit said:

    Sandpit said:

    Alistair said:

    rcs1000 said:

    Russia's retreat in Kherson is a disaster for the Ukrainians:


    It's addictive reading these accounts isn't it? Another wave of self locking their accounts at this news.
    I still think there’s something not quite right about Kherson.

    Fingers crossed I’m wrong, and it was a simple case of the enemy being starved out by cutting the supply lines over the Deniper bridges.
    It seems that the Ukrainians share your view and are being very cautious about entry into the pocket.

    I’m still betting on the Russians blowing the dam. It was what they tried in 1941. Didn’t help then, but just killed a lot of people. But the Russians seem to like stupid, so…

    EDIT: I think the Russians have genuinely run out military capability. It’s more about what kind of trap, if any, they are trying to leave behind.
    Yeah, the dam is a worry, as is what looks on the surface like a withdrawal, but is actually leaving thousands of well-armed soldiers holed up in civilian buildings.

    Or maybe it is just like the withdrawal from Kiev, they are exhausted and can’t get supplies, so have to move back.

    One can see why the Ukranians are nervous though, to see such a strategic location given up with apparently little fuss.
    I won't be entirely surprised if it turns out that here has been a deal brokered here; leave Kherson and Ukraine will let your soldiers depart; stay and HIMARS etc. WILL destroy them. Perhaps Turkey or Saudi in the background. That meeting of the Russian top brass (absent Putin) did look to me remarkably stage managed - pieces being moved on the board to a pre-determined sequence

    If so, do other parts of that sequence include Ukraine giving up on any ambitions to return Crimea? Getting Russian troops back over to the left bank of the river is only a partial success if Russian artillery can still flatten the place. Putting the defences in on the Crimea side suggests maybe that is some agreed position for an armistice - on this front at least.
  • Scott_xPScott_xP Posts: 28,250
    On NI Brexit arrangements, Chris Heaton-Harris says those who created it didn't foresee what it would mean.

    "When [the Protocol] was written I don't think the people behind writing it knew the ramifications it would have...when the rubber hit the road", he tells @SkyNews

    https://twitter.com/tamcohen/status/1590603830118715392
  • eristdooferistdoof Posts: 4,426

    Nigelb said:

    rcs1000 said:

    Sandpit said:

    There’s a few interesting plebiscites in the US alongside the election:

    California Prop 27 - to legalise online sports betting - is going down 83/17. Why were Californians so against it?
    Prop 26 - to legalise sports betting in casinos and racetracks on tribal lands - is going down 70/30.

    Legalisation of recreational marijuana passing in Maryland and Missouri, failing in Arkansas and the Dakotas. .

    https://edition.cnn.com/election/2022/results/ballot-measures

    Phew: I know a lot of people who spent a lot of money on those propositions
    A gamble which didn’t pay off ?
    Americans are just very puritanical about betting outside of Nevada, even in the blue states.

    See alcohol also - even in relatively blue Colorado, a measure allowing supermarkets to sell wine has failed. imagine the outcry here if Tesco had to stop selling cheap Merlot and Pinot Grigio.
    Even in Australia, just as alcohol friendly as the UK, the supermarkets do not sell alcohol. But most of the large ones do have a "bottle-o" right next door.

    Caveat: I haven't been there for 20 years now, so this might have changed, but I haven't heard of any change, and most aussies just accepted the status quo.
  • TazTaz Posts: 6,235

    Sandpit said:

    Sandpit said:

    Sandpit said:

    Sandpit said:

    Taz said:

    Sandpit said:

    FTX rumoured to have an $8bn hole in its balance sheet, Binance takeover is off. Bitcoin down 10% more yesterday.

    Good luck to anyone trying to get cash out of an FTX account.

    Meanwhile, Amazon becomes the first company to ever lose $1trn of stock value. It was worth $1.8trn in June, now worth only $800bn.

    The same FTX who were recently tweeting (now deleted) about their rather plush new offices in Miami no less.

    I don’t invest in Crypto. I don’t really know a great deal about it. But what I do see really makes glad I have never touched it.
    I work in IT, and understand the technology. And wouldn’t touch the investment side of it with a barge pole.

    Someone on another forum, described the crypto industry as speed-running through the last 150 years of financial regulation, having learned none of the lessons the rest of us did.

    For me personally, it became obvious to avoid when everyone trying to sell crypto had been selling timeshares in Majorca previously.
    Crypto smells like Dutch Tulips.

    As somebody who works in financial services multi-jurisdictional law and regulatory affairs, if you wanted to design the perfect ponzi scheme-cum-money laundering scam it would look a lot like crypto.

    It's nearly as scandalous as Football Index.
    At least the Dutch tulips would smell nice. ;) Deregulated finance, not so much.

    Football Index was hillarious, as was MoviePass.
    Football Index really wasn't, The Athletic did a lot of pieces of it, the victims of it were some of the most vulnerable in society, the regulators let them down.

    There was one chap who invested his entire life savings and pension into it, poor chap is now 70 and will have to work until he dies.
    Yeah, that’s pretty sh!t. I read this morning that some Canadian teachers’ pension fund is massively exposed to FTX, there’s a bunch of fund managers going to get their arses sued for stuff like that.
    Also it seems likely that the President of El Salvador invested his country's money there.
    Whoops!
    There does seem to be a tradition in Central and South America of making some really, really magnificent financial decisions, by countries leaders.

    Magnificent as in “Wow, they’ll see the explosion on the moon”.
    Whilst I agree, it is worth remembering how many UK local councils found themselves dangerously exposed to loses during the GFA because of their decision to invest funds in Icelandic banks. No one seems to be immune to the lure of high returns even when we all know there is a price to pay.
    True, but New Labour used anti terror legislation to seize assets of the icelandic banks.

    It helped retail depositors but not councils.

    I doubt there is any such way to protect those in crypto.
  • MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 47,047
    Scott_xP said:

    Nigelb said:

    Nigelb said:

    Senior MoD figures thought Gavin Williamson caused national security leak
    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2022/nov/10/senior-mod-figures-thought-gavin-williamson-caused-national-security-leak

    From 2019.

    ...A former government insider said it was believed by senior figures in the Ministry of Defence at the time that the leak “could only have come from Gavin” and that “our people’s lives were put at risk by it”...

    And a month or so later, Johnson reappointed him to cabinet.
    Hard to believe that Sunak was not privy to this matter. And still Williamson got appointed by him.

    His Little Black Book must be a very dark thing indeed.
    I am starting to view the current iteration of the Tory Party a bit like crypto bros.

    They fell for the hype.

    BoZo was supposed to be the man who could get things done, and while the list of things he wanted to build with his name on them is long, the list of those he delivered is very, very short.

    Gav is the same. His reputation for fearsome shenanigans wildly exceeds his reported ability.

    And here we are...
    The list of things Boris wanted to build may indeed have been long; but the money to build them got spent on Covid before he could start.

    Gavin's USP as a Nasty Piece of Work has been taken by Braverman. There's only room for one of those in Sunak's government. And even that role will be gone well before the election.

  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 41,913
    Scott_xP said:

    On NI Brexit arrangements, Chris Heaton-Harris says those who created it didn't foresee what it would mean.

    "When [the Protocol] was written I don't think the people behind writing it knew the ramifications it would have...when the rubber hit the road", he tells @SkyNews

    https://twitter.com/tamcohen/status/1590603830118715392

    If everyone continually moaning about this, instead expended their energies on finding a workable solution…
  • Scott_xP said:

    On NI Brexit arrangements, Chris Heaton-Harris says those who created it didn't foresee what it would mean.

    "When [the Protocol] was written I don't think the people behind writing it knew the ramifications it would have...when the rubber hit the road", he tells @SkyNews

    https://twitter.com/tamcohen/status/1590603830118715392

    Alternatively they knew exactly what the ramifications would be which is why they were so vehemently opposed to the backstop, and managed to get it watered down to the Protocol that the UK could amend easier.

    You still don't get it, do you? You never will. 🤦‍♂️
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 30,267

    Sandpit said:

    Sandpit said:

    Alistair said:

    rcs1000 said:

    Russia's retreat in Kherson is a disaster for the Ukrainians:


    It's addictive reading these accounts isn't it? Another wave of self locking their accounts at this news.
    I still think there’s something not quite right about Kherson.

    Fingers crossed I’m wrong, and it was a simple case of the enemy being starved out by cutting the supply lines over the Deniper bridges.
    It seems that the Ukrainians share your view and are being very cautious about entry into the pocket.

    I’m still betting on the Russians blowing the dam. It was what they tried in 1941. Didn’t help then, but just killed a lot of people. But the Russians seem to like stupid, so…

    EDIT: I think the Russians have genuinely run out military capability. It’s more about what kind of trap, if any, they are trying to leave behind.
    Yeah, the dam is a worry, as is what looks on the surface like a withdrawal, but is actually leaving thousands of well-armed soldiers holed up in civilian buildings.

    Or maybe it is just like the withdrawal from Kiev, they are exhausted and can’t get supplies, so have to move back.

    One can see why the Ukranians are nervous though, to see such a strategic location given up with apparently little fuss.
    I won't be entirely surprised if it turns out that here has been a deal brokered here; leave Kherson and Ukraine will let your soldiers depart; stay and HIMARS etc. WILL destroy them. Perhaps Turkey or Saudi in the background. That meeting of the Russian top brass (absent Putin) did look to me remarkably stage managed - pieces being moved on the board to a pre-determined sequence

    If so, do other parts of that sequence include Ukraine giving up on any ambitions to return Crimea? Getting Russian troops back over to the left bank of the river is only a partial success if Russian artillery can still flatten the place. Putting the defences in on the Crimea side suggests maybe that is some agreed position for an armistice - on this front at least.
    The problem with the artillery trap thesis is that the Ukrainians are now the ones with the modern, really long range and accurate systems. Such as HIMARS.

    The Ukrainians didn't want to destroy Kherson, but take it, so they systematically reduced the supply capability to the Russian forces. What is happening now is the result of this.

    I don't think there was any deal - just making it increasingly clear to the Russians that they couldn't hold the far bank.
  • AnabobazinaAnabobazina Posts: 15,309
    Republican majority in the Senate now as long as 9 on BX

  • Scott_xPScott_xP Posts: 28,250
    NI Secretary Chris Heaton-Harris tells @KayBurley that the authors of the NI Protocol didn't understand the ramifications. "Politicians are legislators. Legislators are very good at creating law but when the rubber hits the road sometimes you get unforeseen consequences."
    https://twitter.com/DJBond6873/status/1590610461979860992
  • bondegezoubondegezou Posts: 2,644

    Scott_xP said:

    Nigelb said:

    Nigelb said:

    Senior MoD figures thought Gavin Williamson caused national security leak
    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2022/nov/10/senior-mod-figures-thought-gavin-williamson-caused-national-security-leak

    From 2019.

    ...A former government insider said it was believed by senior figures in the Ministry of Defence at the time that the leak “could only have come from Gavin” and that “our people’s lives were put at risk by it”...

    And a month or so later, Johnson reappointed him to cabinet.
    Hard to believe that Sunak was not privy to this matter. And still Williamson got appointed by him.

    His Little Black Book must be a very dark thing indeed.
    I am starting to view the current iteration of the Tory Party a bit like crypto bros.

    They fell for the hype.

    BoZo was supposed to be the man who could get things done, and while the list of things he wanted to build with his name on them is long, the list of those he delivered is very, very short.

    Gav is the same. His reputation for fearsome shenanigans wildly exceeds his reported ability.

    And here we are...
    The list of things Boris wanted to build may indeed have been long; but the money to build them got spent on Covid before he could start.

    Gavin's USP as a Nasty Piece of Work has been taken by Braverman. There's only room for one of those in Sunak's government. And even that role will be gone well before the election.

    The list of things Boris wanted to build was a long list long before COVID! The Garden Bridge, the Boris Island airport, the bridge to Northern Ireland…
  • MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 47,047

    Unfortunately Boebert has closed the gap and I suspect hangs on.

    Probably not a bad thing for the Democrats if Boebert survives. You need some swivel-eyed loons remaining to scare the horses ahead of 2024....
  • Big_G_NorthWalesBig_G_NorthWales Posts: 55,079
    edited November 10

    Nigelb said:

    Nigelb said:

    Senior MoD figures thought Gavin Williamson caused national security leak
    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2022/nov/10/senior-mod-figures-thought-gavin-williamson-caused-national-security-leak

    From 2019.

    ...A former government insider said it was believed by senior figures in the Ministry of Defence at the time that the leak “could only have come from Gavin” and that “our people’s lives were put at risk by it”...

    And a month or so later, Johnson reappointed him to cabinet.
    Hard to believe that Sunak was not privy to this matter. And still Williamson got appointed by him.

    His Little Black Book must be a very dark thing indeed.
    Good morning

    Rishi is either naive or maybe just inexperienced in high office to see the danger signs flashing with Williamson

    There is no doubt he has a lot of state craft to learn, and quickly but as I have maintained from the beginning next spring will be critical for him especially if he has not reduced labour's lead

    I am very impressed with this forums knowledge of US politics which I simply do not fully understand but it seems the good news is that Trump seems to have failed but the bad news is Biden saying he will run again in 2024.
  • MaxPBMaxPB Posts: 36,228
    Sandpit said:

    There’s a few interesting plebiscites in the US alongside the election:

    California Prop 27 - to legalise online sports betting - is going down 83/17. Why were Californians so against it?
    Prop 26 - to legalise sports betting in casinos and racetracks on tribal lands - is going down 70/30.

    Legalisation of recreational marijuana passing in Maryland and Missouri, failing in Arkansas and the Dakotas. .

    https://edition.cnn.com/election/2022/results/ballot-measures

    I think Californians have seen first hand the ills that come with addiction and are slowly becoming more socially conservative. The fentanyl crisis is horrific in parts of the state. Saying yes to another potentially addictive past time may not sit well with them.
  • BenpointerBenpointer Posts: 23,758
    edited November 10

    Scott_xP said:

    On NI Brexit arrangements, Chris Heaton-Harris says those who created it didn't foresee what it would mean.

    "When [the Protocol] was written I don't think the people behind writing it knew the ramifications it would have...when the rubber hit the road", he tells @SkyNews

    https://twitter.com/tamcohen/status/1590603830118715392

    Alternatively they knew exactly what the ramifications would be which is why they were so vehemently opposed to the backstop, and managed to get it watered down to the Protocol that the UK could amend easier.

    You still don't get it, do you? You never will. 🤦‍♂️
    It's Chris Heaton-Harris, the Conservative NI Secretary, a self-described "fierce Eurosceptic", who 'doesn't get it', surely?

    Brexit is a total f*ck-up from start to finish. You still don't get it, do you? You never will.
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 30,267
    MaxPB said:

    Sandpit said:

    There’s a few interesting plebiscites in the US alongside the election:

    California Prop 27 - to legalise online sports betting - is going down 83/17. Why were Californians so against it?
    Prop 26 - to legalise sports betting in casinos and racetracks on tribal lands - is going down 70/30.

    Legalisation of recreational marijuana passing in Maryland and Missouri, failing in Arkansas and the Dakotas. .

    https://edition.cnn.com/election/2022/results/ballot-measures

    I think Californians have seen first hand the ills that come with addiction and are slowly becoming more socially conservative. The fentanyl crisis is horrific in parts of the state. Saying yes to another potentially addictive past time may not sit well with them.
    Time was when being opposed to addictive substances/gambling was the progressive position. Lots of old style Socialists etc.
  • AnabobazinaAnabobazina Posts: 15,309
    Jordan strikes!
This discussion has been closed.