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politicalbetting.com » Blog Archive » These, I’m told, are part of Labour’s new message

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  • GeoffMGeoffM Posts: 6,071

    GeoffM said:

    Scott_P said:
    Wow! Bamber Gascoigne is still alive!

    [checks the Dead Pool on a site I host]

    Yeah, someone has already bagged him. 81, apparently.
    A good pick by that reader-player as Bamber's obviously gone gaga. Sad.
    I don't know Geoff, he appears to have plenty of critical faculty on a reading of that letter.
    You think so? Looks like bullet point speaking points that he's regurgitated from a list.

    There's no argument or point or direction to it. Nobody will be educated or enlightened as a result of reading it, which would be an indication of "critical faculty".

    I guess we will have to disagree on this one.
  • MonksfieldMonksfield Posts: 1,941
    GeoffM said:

    GeoffM said:

    Scott_P said:
    Wow! Bamber Gascoigne is still alive!

    [checks the Dead Pool on a site I host]

    Yeah, someone has already bagged him. 81, apparently.
    A good pick by that reader-player as Bamber's obviously gone gaga. Sad.
    I don't know Geoff, he appears to have plenty of critical faculty on a reading of that letter.
    You think so? Looks like bullet point speaking points that he's regurgitated from a list.

    There's no argument or point or direction to it. Nobody will be educated or enlightened as a result of reading it, which would be an indication of "critical faculty".

    I guess we will have to disagree on this one.
    Plenty of people who are less engaged with politics than the readership of pb.com will be interested in his views. He exposes the vanity of Goldsmith's actions and the contradictions in his stances quite nicely.

    I don't expect you to like it, but he certainly doesn't come across as gaga.
  • Is the second statement from Mr Corbyn taken from a mission statement from one of those boring computer type firms
  • JonathanJonathan Posts: 17,042

    GeoffM said:

    GeoffM said:

    Scott_P said:
    Wow! Bamber Gascoigne is still alive!

    [checks the Dead Pool on a site I host]

    Yeah, someone has already bagged him. 81, apparently.
    A good pick by that reader-player as Bamber's obviously gone gaga. Sad.
    I don't know Geoff, he appears to have plenty of critical faculty on a reading of that letter.
    You think so? Looks like bullet point speaking points that he's regurgitated from a list.

    There's no argument or point or direction to it. Nobody will be educated or enlightened as a result of reading it, which would be an indication of "critical faculty".

    I guess we will have to disagree on this one.
    Plenty of people who are less engaged with politics than the readership of pb.com will be interested in his views. He exposes the vanity of Goldsmith's actions and the contradictions in his stances quite nicely.

    I don't expect you to like it, but he certainly doesn't come across as gaga.
    It's great. Clearly not everyone can work on the intellectual plane occupied by GeoffM.
  • DadgeDadge Posts: 2,030

    Someone else has identified WTW Leavers:

    https://twitter.com/clougholive/status/801074776357928960

    If the EU thinks it will damage the UK, it may discover that two can play at that game. As many others have discovered to their cost when threatening these islands in the past.

    I have no doubt in my mind which one will come out the victor in the long term.
    I want the UK to prosper, whether we're in the EU or out of it, but the level of delusion among Brexiters is quite sad. Britain couldn't get a good deal out of the EU while we were members, so how and why should we get a good deal when we leave? Plus the fact that we'll be a nation of 60 million bargaining with a bloc of 450 million. Faites-vous les maths.

    The EU is not seeking to damage the UK, or engage in some kind of playgound battle, and now that we're leaving, creating even more animosity and jingoism on the part of Daily Mail readers is pointless. Let's try a bit of realism: leaving the EU is not going to be easy, and most people will notice very little if any benefit from the change in any way.
  • DadgeDadge Posts: 2,030
    edited November 2016
    null
  • GeoffMGeoffM Posts: 6,071

    GeoffM said:

    GeoffM said:

    Scott_P said:
    Wow! Bamber Gascoigne is still alive!

    [checks the Dead Pool on a site I host]

    Yeah, someone has already bagged him. 81, apparently.
    A good pick by that reader-player as Bamber's obviously gone gaga. Sad.
    I don't know Geoff, he appears to have plenty of critical faculty on a reading of that letter.
    You think so? Looks like bullet point speaking points that he's regurgitated from a list.

    There's no argument or point or direction to it. Nobody will be educated or enlightened as a result of reading it, which would be an indication of "critical faculty".

    I guess we will have to disagree on this one.
    Plenty of people who are less engaged with politics than the readership of pb.com will be interested in his views. He exposes the vanity of Goldsmith's actions and the contradictions in his stances quite nicely.

    I don't expect you to like it, but he certainly doesn't come across as gaga.
    I know what you mean, and yes it does come across like a condensed Focus leaflet for the more attention span-challenged of the non-PB huddled masses.

    I hope someone didn't stick it under his nose in the old folks home and say "sign this, grandpa, it's about the weekly bingo night".
  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 38,091
    Dadge said:

    Someone else has identified WTW Leavers:

    https://twitter.com/clougholive/status/801074776357928960

    If the EU thinks it will damage the UK, it may discover that two can play at that game. As many others have discovered to their cost when threatening these islands in the past.

    I have no doubt in my mind which one will come out the victor in the long term.
    I want the UK to prosper, whether we're in the EU or out of it, but the level of delusion among Brexiters is quite sad. Britain couldn't get a good deal out of the EU while we were members, so how and why should we get a good deal when we leave? Plus the fact that we'll be a nation of 60 million bargaining with a bloc of 450 million. Faites-vous les maths.

    The EU is not seeking to damage the UK, or engage in some kind of playgound battle, and now that we're leaving, creating even more animosity and jingoism on the part of Daily Mail readers is pointless. Let's try a bit of realism: leaving the EU is not going to be easy, and most people will notice very little if any benefit from the change in any way.
    Good post
  • glw said:

    DavidL said:

    pbr2013 said:

    I am reminded of Brown in one of the 2010 town halls when in between berating an obviouly Labour leaning anesthesiologist about how she was "quite wrong" he started to rant about "digital manufacturing". I remember hoping that someone would ask him "what is digital manufacturing"?

    Obvious. Making things with digits.
    More precisely, using your fingers to make shit.
    That's an unusual physiology you've got there.
  • viewcode said:

    viewcode said:

    AnneJGP said:

    viewcode said:

    Am I the only one who thinks The Internet of Things sounds like a term created for the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy?

    It's a real thing. If you attach the right chips to everything (toasters, cows, your mother) and allow those chips to talk to each other, then you have a great deal of control (or more realistically you have enormous data). Real-life applications include:

    * You can now switch your heating/boiler on/off remotely with your phone
    * Your car can send out a large amount of data, enabling you to reduce your insurance
    * The inventor of Candy Crush receives an enormous amount of data per second from all the people worldwide



    So the style of cyber warfare in the next severe winter will be everyone's heating systems being turned off, leaving the population to freeze?

    Anything you can do like that, someone else can hack & destroy.

    (edited to add: good evening, everyone)
    Unsarcastically: yes. Which is why I posted a link to the Dyn article: it's already here, it's already a problem, and I don't know what the solution is.
    On a serious note - the way to deal with internet-of-things hacking is to mandate security - on the basis that providing zillions of hosts for DDoS is affecting society as a whole.

    It is pretty trivial to create such systems with built in 1024bit crypto to secure and sign all the communications between the "things", and have any external web interface properly hardened. And turned off by default.
    Good point, but who is going to bell the cat? The best the UK government can do is control the things in the UK, but who controls the ones outside the UK? Is there/will there be a Great Firewall of Britain?
    The UK is still in the EU for the time being, this makes much more sense as an EU standard. It'll generally make more sense to make your stuff properly rather than maintain two versions, one for the EU and one for the rest of the world.

    If it leaves the UK can just adopt the EU standard, as it will over pretty much everything else.
  • PAWPAW Posts: 1,074
    If the EU damage the UK it will be their own nationals that will take the strain.
  • JonathanJonathan Posts: 17,042
    PAW said:

    If the EU damage the UK it will be their own nationals that will take the strain.

    What does that mean?
  • PAWPAW Posts: 1,074
    If there are 2 million job losses in the UK, send 2 million EU workers home. It is what Germany did to Turkish workers.
  • JonathanJonathan Posts: 17,042
    PAW said:

    If there are 2 million job losses in the UK, send 2 million EU workers home. It is what Germany did to Turkish workers.

    How are you going to do that?
  • GeoffMGeoffM Posts: 6,071
    Dadge said:

    Someone else has identified WTW Leavers:

    https://twitter.com/clougholive/status/801074776357928960

    If the EU thinks it will damage the UK, it may discover that two can play at that game. As many others have discovered to their cost when threatening these islands in the past.

    I have no doubt in my mind which one will come out the victor in the long term.
    I want the UK to prosper, whether we're in the EU or out of it, but the level of delusion among Brexiters is quite sad. Britain couldn't get a good deal out of the EU while we were members, so how and why should we get a good deal when we leave? Plus the fact that we'll be a nation of 60 million bargaining with a bloc of 450 million. Faites-vous les maths.

    The EU is not seeking to damage the UK, or engage in some kind of playgound battle, and now that we're leaving, creating even more animosity and jingoism on the part of Daily Mail readers is pointless. Let's try a bit of realism: leaving the EU is not going to be easy, and most people will notice very little if any benefit from the change in any way.
    So they gave us a good kicking when we were inside and will give us a good kicking for leaving so we should stick to the internal kicking because Daily Mail.

    Escaping *is* the good deal.
  • PAWPAW Posts: 1,074
    By stopping access to all benefits would be enough.
  • JonathanJonathan Posts: 17,042
    PAW said:

    By stopping access to all benefits would be enough.

    Really? You mentioned you would send 2 million EU workers home. How are you going to that? You must have thought this through.
  • PAW said:

    If there are 2 million job losses in the UK, send 2 million EU workers home. It is what Germany did to Turkish workers.

    Good one. Let's teach those two million workers a lesson about working that they'll never forget.
  • williamglennwilliamglenn Posts: 38,789
    PAW said:

    If there are 2 million job losses in the UK, send 2 million EU workers home. It is what Germany did to Turkish workers.

    That would be 2/3 of all EU citizens in the UK, not all of whom could be considered by any stretch of the imagination to be Gastarbeiter. Your position is just a nationalistic fantasy.
  • Richard_NabaviRichard_Nabavi Posts: 29,467
    edited November 2016
    The Internet of Things is like the canal mania of the 1790s, or the Victorian steam-powered absurdities, or the dot-com lunacies like pets.com. In each case there was a new technology which was genuinely useful, but people got so enthusiastic about it that they started applying it to things for which it was completely useless or economically unsound.

    So, there certainly are some useful Internet of Things applications: security alarms, home heating controls that you can switch on from anywhere (but you really don't need the excessive complexity being built in to some of the offerings), remotely-readable electricity meters, and no doubt some we haven't thought of.

    And there are a whole lot more which are bonkers and which will go down into the same dustbin of history as the absurdities of the Victorian steam gadgets. You really, really don't need an internet-connected toaster, or an internet-connected fridge, or an internet-connected music system that you can switch on from Hawaii.
  • FF43FF43 Posts: 13,107
    GeoffM said:

    GeoffM said:

    Scott_P said:
    Wow! Bamber Gascoigne is still alive!

    [checks the Dead Pool on a site I host]

    Yeah, someone has already bagged him. 81, apparently.
    A good pick by that reader-player as Bamber's obviously gone gaga. Sad.
    I don't know Geoff, he appears to have plenty of critical faculty on a reading of that letter.
    You think so? Looks like bullet point speaking points that he's regurgitated from a list.

    There's no argument or point or direction to it. Nobody will be educated or enlightened as a result of reading it, which would be an indication of "critical faculty".

    I guess we will have to disagree on this one.
    Mr Gascoigne implies Zac Goldsmith is disingenuous and not at all the principled politician he claims to be. I don't think I agree with that implication, but Mr Gascoigne makes a reasonable argument.
  • PAWPAW Posts: 1,074
    Labour missed a trick, they should have given EU migrants the vote as they did to commonwealth migrants in 1948. But they didn't - I believe 2 million job losses is the accepted figure if the EU do as much damage as they can, that will 4 million voters affected, so do you think there will be a party that will care about EU migrants?
  • williamglennwilliamglenn Posts: 38,789
    PAW said:

    Labour missed a trick, they should have given EU migrants the vote as they did to commonwealth migrants in 1948. But they didn't - I believe 2 million job losses is the accepted figure if the EU do as much damage as they can, that will 4 million voters affected, so do you think there will be a party that will care about EU migrants?

    Why do you assume the job losses will fall on EU citizens? They are likely to be disproportionately safe.
  • JonathanJonathan Posts: 17,042
    PAW said:

    Labour missed a trick, they should have given EU migrants the vote as they did to commonwealth migrants in 1948. But they didn't - I believe 2 million job losses is the accepted figure if the EU do as much damage as they can, that will 4 million voters affected, so do you think there will be a party that will care about EU migrants?

    Two million deportations is quite a logistical undertaking. 10 trains a day each carrying 1000 people back to Europe for 200 days. Is that your preferred solution? Who would run the deportation centres?
  • PAWPAW Posts: 1,074
    It is only a couple of years of gross immigration figures.
  • williamglennwilliamglenn Posts: 38,789
    edited November 2016
    Jonathan said:

    10 trains a day each carrying 1000 people back to Europe for 200 days. Is that your preferred solution? Who would run the deportation centres?

    Presumably Michael O'Leary could do it for a song...
  • eekeek Posts: 17,293

    The Internet of Things is like the canal mania of the 1790s, or the Victorian steam-powered absurdities, or the dot-com lunacies like pets.com. In each case there was a new technology which was genuinely useful, but people got so enthusiastic about it that they started applying it to things for which it was completely useless or economically unsound.

    So, there certainly are some useful Internet of Things applications: security alarms, home heating controls that you can switch on from anywhere (but you really don't need the excessive complexity being built in to some of the offerings), remotely-readable electricity meters, and no doubt some we haven't thought of.

    And there are a whole lot more which are bonkers and which will go down into the same dustbin of history as the absurdities of the Victorian steam gadgets. You really, really don't need an internet-connected toaster, or an internet-connected fridge, or an internet-connected music system that you can switch on from Hawaii.

    I've had connected music systems for over 10 years at home. It's endless fun adding a couple of total unconnected tracks to someone else play list.
  • shiney2shiney2 Posts: 672
    First they laugh etc

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/11/22/theresa-may-would-missing-trick-not-make-donald-trump-next-man/

    Clearly starting to move from 'Fight' to 'Win'.

    Looking forward to 'outraged of pb' funding the Farage Statue.
  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 38,091
    Food prices to rise by 5% over the next six months #newsnight
  • JonathanJonathan Posts: 17,042

    Jonathan said:

    10 trains a day each carrying 1000 people back to Europe for 200 days. Is that your preferred solution? Who would run the deportation centres?

    Presumably Michael O'Leary could do it for a song...
    Seriously? after a gross violation to basic human dignity, you will force them on Ryanair? What sort of sadist are you?
  • eek said:

    I've had connected music systems for over 10 years at home. It's endless fun adding a couple of total unconnected tracks to someone else play list.

    The amusing thing is that, far from saving time, many of the population have become full-time sysadmin slaves, forever upgrading their phones, downloading security updates, and battling with call-centres in India to find out why their service has suddenly stopped (usually it's because the service provider has 'upgraded to a new platform').
  • JonathanJonathan Posts: 17,042

    eek said:

    I've had connected music systems for over 10 years at home. It's endless fun adding a couple of total unconnected tracks to someone else play list.

    The amusing thing is that, far from saving time, many of the population have become full-time sysadmin slaves, forever upgrading their phones, downloading security updates, and battling with call-centres in India to find out why their service has suddenly stopped (usually it's because the service provider has 'upgraded to a new platform').
    Don't know anyone who does that, maybe is just you Richard?
  • Richard_NabaviRichard_Nabavi Posts: 29,467
    edited November 2016
    Jonathan said:

    Don't know anyone who does that, maybe is just you Richard?

    Certainly not me! I've got too much experience in IT to ever want to update software which is working. But we had a great example of the problem Chez Nabavi today: my wife's business email suddenly stopped working, entirely because some idiots at a company called Gradwell had 'upgraded' their systems.
  • MaxPBMaxPB Posts: 33,285

    eek said:

    I've had connected music systems for over 10 years at home. It's endless fun adding a couple of total unconnected tracks to someone else play list.

    The amusing thing is that, far from saving time, many of the population have become full-time sysadmin slaves, forever upgrading their phones, downloading security updates, and battling with call-centres in India to find out why their service has suddenly stopped (usually it's because the service provider has 'upgraded to a new platform').
    WiFi music is pretty great though. Connects my Spotify playlist to the Sonos. It's really useful and intuitive.
  • Richard_NabaviRichard_Nabavi Posts: 29,467
    edited November 2016
    MaxPB said:

    eek said:

    I've had connected music systems for over 10 years at home. It's endless fun adding a couple of total unconnected tracks to someone else play list.

    The amusing thing is that, far from saving time, many of the population have become full-time sysadmin slaves, forever upgrading their phones, downloading security updates, and battling with call-centres in India to find out why their service has suddenly stopped (usually it's because the service provider has 'upgraded to a new platform').
    WiFi music is pretty great though. Connects my Spotify playlist to the Sonos. It's really useful and intuitive.
    Sure, but you don't need to control it remotely. Big difference.

    Also, CDs are actually rather good - and likely to have a 50-year lifetime at least. I bet your Spotify playlist will vanish into the ether in that timescale.
  • JonathanJonathan Posts: 17,042

    Jonathan said:

    Don't know anyone who does that, maybe is just you Richard?

    Certainly not me! I've got too much experience in IT to ever want to update software which is working. But we had a great example of the problem Chez Nabavi today: my wife's business email suddenly stopped working, entirely because some idiots at a company called Gradwell had 'upgraded' their systems.
    The Sinclair QL really was ahead of its time, but you should move on now.
  • JonathanJonathan Posts: 17,042

    MaxPB said:

    eek said:

    I've had connected music systems for over 10 years at home. It's endless fun adding a couple of total unconnected tracks to someone else play list.

    The amusing thing is that, far from saving time, many of the population have become full-time sysadmin slaves, forever upgrading their phones, downloading security updates, and battling with call-centres in India to find out why their service has suddenly stopped (usually it's because the service provider has 'upgraded to a new platform').
    WiFi music is pretty great though. Connects my Spotify playlist to the Sonos. It's really useful and intuitive.
    Sure, but you don't need to control it remotely. Big difference.

    Also, CDs are actually rather good - and likely to have a 50-year lifetime at least. I bet your Spotify playlist will vanish into the ether in that timescale.
    So will we, so who cares?
  • MaxPBMaxPB Posts: 33,285

    MaxPB said:

    eek said:

    I've had connected music systems for over 10 years at home. It's endless fun adding a couple of total unconnected tracks to someone else play list.

    The amusing thing is that, far from saving time, many of the population have become full-time sysadmin slaves, forever upgrading their phones, downloading security updates, and battling with call-centres in India to find out why their service has suddenly stopped (usually it's because the service provider has 'upgraded to a new platform').
    WiFi music is pretty great though. Connects my Spotify playlist to the Sonos. It's really useful and intuitive.
    Sure, but you don't need to control it remotely. Big difference.
    No of course, but in my flat it used to know when I connected to the home WiFi and transfer the audio from my phone to the Sonos.
  • williamglennwilliamglenn Posts: 38,789

    Also, CDs are actually rather good - and likely to have a 50-year lifetime at least. I bet your Spotify playlist will vanish into the ether in that timescale.

    In a world of overvalued real estate, setting aside space in your home to store digital media which is available over the air is either perverse or a decadent luxury.
  • Jonathan said:

    Jonathan said:

    Don't know anyone who does that, maybe is just you Richard?

    Certainly not me! I've got too much experience in IT to ever want to update software which is working. But we had a great example of the problem Chez Nabavi today: my wife's business email suddenly stopped working, entirely because some idiots at a company called Gradwell had 'upgraded' their systems.
    The Sinclair QL really was ahead of its time, but you should move on now.
    You should move when it's sensible to do so.

    There's a very good reason why banks and telecoms systems are still based on old technology.

    Seriously, the internet is worryingly unreliable. I don't mean the infrastructure, although even that is nothing like as reliable as the telephone system. I mean the whole thing we are beginning to rely on absolutely: DNS servers, email, cloud-based applications, etc. It's not so much the technology itself, but the fact that some idiot at an ISP can screw up your DNS records at the click of a mouse, or the cloud-based company can vanish with all your data, and so on.
  • JonathanJonathan Posts: 17,042

    Jonathan said:

    Jonathan said:

    Don't know anyone who does that, maybe is just you Richard?

    Certainly not me! I've got too much experience in IT to ever want to update software which is working. But we had a great example of the problem Chez Nabavi today: my wife's business email suddenly stopped working, entirely because some idiots at a company called Gradwell had 'upgraded' their systems.
    The Sinclair QL really was ahead of its time, but you should move on now.
    You should move when it's sensible to do so.

    There's a very good reason why banks and telecoms systems are still based on old technology.

    Seriously, the internet is worryingly unreliable. I don't mean the infrastructure, although even that is nothing like as reliable as the telephone system. I mean the whole thing we are beginning to rely on absolutely: DNS servers, email, cloud-based applications, etc. It's not so much the technology itself, but the fact that some idiot at an ISP can screw up your DNS records at the click of a mouse, or the cloud-based company can vanish with all your data, and so on.
    It will never catch on.
  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 29,395
    edited November 2016
    Just wasted two hours due to trains between Sheffield and the East Midlands being cancelled because of flooding. No information on whether tickets would be valid on other services, so had to spend more money on extra tickets to avoid being fined.
  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 38,091
    Good news if indeed the government is tomorrow to ban lettings agents from levying renewal and other spurious paperwork fees from tenants. As Scotland did a few years back, I believe.
  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 29,395
    Jonathan said:

    Jonathan said:

    Don't know anyone who does that, maybe is just you Richard?

    Certainly not me! I've got too much experience in IT to ever want to update software which is working. But we had a great example of the problem Chez Nabavi today: my wife's business email suddenly stopped working, entirely because some idiots at a company called Gradwell had 'upgraded' their systems.
    The Sinclair QL really was ahead of its time, but you should move on now.
    I still use the Sinclair QL. I won't hear a word spoken against it. It's a brilliant computer.
  • AndyJS said:

    I still use the Sinclair QL. I won't hear a word spoken against it. It's a brilliant computer.

    The microdrives weren't brilliant, though. In fact they were a total disaster.
  • JonathanJonathan Posts: 17,042
    AndyJS said:

    Jonathan said:

    Jonathan said:

    Don't know anyone who does that, maybe is just you Richard?

    Certainly not me! I've got too much experience in IT to ever want to update software which is working. But we had a great example of the problem Chez Nabavi today: my wife's business email suddenly stopped working, entirely because some idiots at a company called Gradwell had 'upgraded' their systems.
    The Sinclair QL really was ahead of its time, but you should move on now.
    I still use the Sinclair QL. I won't hear a word spoken against it. It's a brilliant computer.
    What do you use it for?
  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 29,395
    Jonathan said:

    AndyJS said:

    Jonathan said:

    Jonathan said:

    Don't know anyone who does that, maybe is just you Richard?

    Certainly not me! I've got too much experience in IT to ever want to update software which is working. But we had a great example of the problem Chez Nabavi today: my wife's business email suddenly stopped working, entirely because some idiots at a company called Gradwell had 'upgraded' their systems.
    The Sinclair QL really was ahead of its time, but you should move on now.
    I still use the Sinclair QL. I won't hear a word spoken against it. It's a brilliant computer.
    What do you use it for?
    Word processing, databasing, games. All very retro of course.
  • JonathanJonathan Posts: 17,042
    AndyJS said:

    Jonathan said:

    AndyJS said:

    Jonathan said:

    Jonathan said:

    Don't know anyone who does that, maybe is just you Richard?

    Certainly not me! I've got too much experience in IT to ever want to update software which is working. But we had a great example of the problem Chez Nabavi today: my wife's business email suddenly stopped working, entirely because some idiots at a company called Gradwell had 'upgraded' their systems.
    The Sinclair QL really was ahead of its time, but you should move on now.
    I still use the Sinclair QL. I won't hear a word spoken against it. It's a brilliant computer.
    What do you use it for?
    Word processing, databasing, games. All very retro of course.
    That's awesome. :-)
  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 29,395
    One of the best sites for the QL is run by an Italian guy called Daniele Terdina:

    http://terdina.net/ql/q-emulator.html
  • MTimTMTimT Posts: 7,034
    Jonathan said:

    Jonathan said:

    Jonathan said:

    Don't know anyone who does that, maybe is just you Richard?

    Certainly not me! I've got too much experience in IT to ever want to update software which is working. But we had a great example of the problem Chez Nabavi today: my wife's business email suddenly stopped working, entirely because some idiots at a company called Gradwell had 'upgraded' their systems.
    The Sinclair QL really was ahead of its time, but you should move on now.
    You should move when it's sensible to do so.

    There's a very good reason why banks and telecoms systems are still based on old technology.

    Seriously, the internet is worryingly unreliable. I don't mean the infrastructure, although even that is nothing like as reliable as the telephone system. I mean the whole thing we are beginning to rely on absolutely: DNS servers, email, cloud-based applications, etc. It's not so much the technology itself, but the fact that some idiot at an ISP can screw up your DNS records at the click of a mouse, or the cloud-based company can vanish with all your data, and so on.
    It will never catch on.
    I keep nothing on the Cloud. I also like the programs to be on my computer.
  • PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 69,287
    edited November 2016
  • RobDRobD Posts: 56,572
    Pulpstar said:
    :o why were they spending money in CA??
  • PongPong Posts: 4,693
    RobD said:

    Pulpstar said:
    :o why were they spending money in CA??
    Because that's where the donors are?
  • PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 69,287
    Pong said:

    RobD said:

    Pulpstar said:
    :o why were they spending money in CA??
    Because that's where the donors are?
    & Nebraska :D ?
  • RobDRobD Posts: 56,572
    Pong said:

    RobD said:

    Pulpstar said:
    :o why were they spending money in CA??
    Because that's where the donors are?
    Do campaign ads typically solicit donations?
  • brokenwheelbrokenwheel Posts: 3,352
    edited November 2016
    Pulpstar said:

    Pong said:

    RobD said:

    Pulpstar said:
    :o why were they spending money in CA??
    Because that's where the donors are?
    & Nebraska :D ?
    Nebraska CD2; along with Maine (partially) Nebraska apportions ECVs by congressional district.
  • PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 69,287

    Pulpstar said:

    Pong said:

    RobD said:

    Pulpstar said:
    :o why were they spending money in CA??
    Because that's where the donors are?
    & Nebraska :D ?
    Nebraska CD2; along with Maine (partially) Nebraska apportions ECVs by congressional district.
    Good point !
  • williamglennwilliamglenn Posts: 38,789
    The fact that Clinton was the only one campaigning in California slightly undermines the moral victory in the popular vote.
  • nunununu Posts: 6,024
    Pulpstar said:
    clinton not spending in Michigan in wisconsin? Even after Bernie's shock win in Michigan which had him 20% behind in the polls? ffs, she deserved to lose.
  • FloaterFloater Posts: 14,195
    PAW said:

    If the EU damage the UK it will be their own nationals that will take the strain.

    Where did you get the opinion that pain of real people matters to the EU elite?

    My first exhibit is Greece - I have others
  • RobDRobD Posts: 56,572
    It sure is quiet tonight..
  • weejonnieweejonnie Posts: 3,820
    GIN1138 said:

    Someone else has identified WTW Leavers:

    https://twitter.com/clougholive/status/801074776357928960

    Well he's worrying about his business and the financial implications of Brexit for him and his company.

    Remember EVERYONE has a agenda.

    Oh and he's also a climate change "denier" it seems...
    Send him to Washington as Ambassador - should fit in well with Trump.
  • swing_voterswing_voter Posts: 1,077
    An apology for a pixxpoor performance during the referendum campaign would be a good start
  • Ozzy sat next to Ken. Former chancellors together.
This discussion has been closed.