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Biden’s heads towards getting negative ratings from the majority of Americans – politicalbetting.com

SystemSystem Posts: 8,489
edited September 22 in General
imageBiden’s heads towards getting negative ratings from the majority of Americans – politicalbetting.com

Johnson’s meeting with Biden in Washington comes at a moment when the polls suggest that he is not approved of by the majority of Americans. Above is the latest rolling average from Nate Silver’s site.

Read the full story here

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Comments

  • tlg86tlg86 Posts: 20,127
    First.
  • LeonLeon Posts: 11,427
    FPT for RCS


    Replace your bogus "bad mother monkey" story with this (which I learned only yesterday)


    "Fearful memories haunt mouse descendants"


    "Mouse pups — and even the offspring's offspring — can inherit a fearful association of a certain smell with pain, even if they have not experienced the pain themselves, and without the need for genetic mutations. "


    YOU CAN INHERIT, FROM YOUR PARENTS, EVEN GRANDPARENTS, A SHUDDERING FEAR OF SOMETHING STRANGE THAT HAPPENED TO THEM, NOT YOU

    Extraordinary. The ramifications are endless, and creepy as hell. Good for someone trying to write spooky stories, tho


    https://www.nature.com/articles/nature.2013.14272
  • pingping Posts: 1,287
    edited September 22
    Bloody brilliant.

    As feared, my supplier, Green, has just gone bust. Not convinced I’ll get my credit balance back off them. Loads of customers have large balances after they offered an almost unlimited 10% extra credit-if-you-top-up, earlier in the year.

    Silly me. That was a warning sign of a badly run company borrowing money from their customers. Expensive lesson learned.
  • Leon said:

    FPT for RCS


    Replace your bogus "bad mother monkey" story with this (which I learned only yesterday)


    "Fearful memories haunt mouse descendants"


    "Mouse pups — and even the offspring's offspring — can inherit a fearful association of a certain smell with pain, even if they have not experienced the pain themselves, and without the need for genetic mutations. "


    YOU CAN INHERIT, FROM YOUR PARENTS, EVEN GRANDPARENTS, A SHUDDERING FEAR OF SOMETHING STRANGE THAT HAPPENED TO THEM, NOT YOU

    Extraordinary. The ramifications are endless, and creepy as hell. Good for someone trying to write spooky stories, tho


    https://www.nature.com/articles/nature.2013.14272

    Very interesting, thank you for posting!
  • CarlottaVanceCarlottaVance Posts: 51,489
    That's one way to deal with the drugs problem:

    People caught [in Scotland] with class A drugs will be able to receive police warnings instead of being referred to prosecutors.

    Lord Advocate Lesley Bain announced the dramatic move in response to Scotland’s shocking drugs death figures.

    1,339 deaths were registered in Scotland in 2020 - the largest number since records began in 1996.


    https://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/politics/breaking-class-drug-users-receive-25045369?utm_source=twitter.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=sharebar
  • Biden has more than one head?

    Zaphod Beeblebrox has taken over the Whitehouse?
  • CarlottaVanceCarlottaVance Posts: 51,489
    edited September 22
    It turns out that while claiming to be focused on the pandemic and crises in our NHS, the SNP-Green Scottish Government has actually been steadily increasing its spending on overseas offices. It now has 52 members of overseas staff at a cost of over £8m, and expansion is planned.

    The claimed purpose of this massive public spending is to support trade, yet the Scottish Government now has more staff in Brussels than in London, despite the vast majority of Scotland's trade being with the rest of the UK. Nationalist political posturing with taxpayers' money.


    https://twitter.com/dhothersall/status/1440677171991703555?s=20
  • QuincelQuincel Posts: 3,760
    ping said:

    Bloody brilliant.

    As feared, my supplier, Green, has just gone bust. Not convinced I’ll get my credit balance back off them. Loads of customers have large balances after they offered an almost unlimited 10% extra credit-if-you-top-up, earlier in the year.

    Silly me. That was a warning sign of a badly run company borrowing money from their customers. Expensive lesson learned.

    Ouch. Hope you aren't being stung too badly.
  • LostPasswordLostPassword Posts: 4,614
    edited September 22
    ping said:

    Bloody brilliant.

    As feared, my supplier, Green, has just gone bust. Not convinced I’ll get my credit balance back off them. Loads of customers have large balances after they offered an almost unlimited 10% extra credit-if-you-top-up, earlier in the year.

    Silly me. That was a warning sign of a badly run company borrowing money from their customers. Expensive lesson learned.

    Most direct debit customers will have their largest credit balance at around this time of year, shortly before turning the heating on for the first time.

    All these energy companies collapsing will act as a bit like a reverse-PPI, sucking money out of the economy.

    Edit: seems like the regulation is stronger than that. See PT next post.
  • kjhkjh Posts: 4,041
    Just back from France now waiting for my flight to Portugal. Sean eat your heart out.
  • isamisam Posts: 38,082
    Leon said:

    FPT for RCS


    Replace your bogus "bad mother monkey" story with this (which I learned only yesterday)


    "Fearful memories haunt mouse descendants"


    "Mouse pups — and even the offspring's offspring — can inherit a fearful association of a certain smell with pain, even if they have not experienced the pain themselves, and without the need for genetic mutations. "


    YOU CAN INHERIT, FROM YOUR PARENTS, EVEN GRANDPARENTS, A SHUDDERING FEAR OF SOMETHING STRANGE THAT HAPPENED TO THEM, NOT YOU

    Extraordinary. The ramifications are endless, and creepy as hell. Good for someone trying to write spooky stories, tho


    https://www.nature.com/articles/nature.2013.14272

    I seem to remember Peter Hitchens thinks this happens
  • Biden has more than one head?

    Zaphod Beeblebrox has taken over the Whitehouse?
    I wonder which of Biden's heads has the lowest rating though, or if they are both equally despised?
  • turbotubbsturbotubbs Posts: 3,833
    Leon said:

    FPT for RCS


    Replace your bogus "bad mother monkey" story with this (which I learned only yesterday)


    "Fearful memories haunt mouse descendants"


    "Mouse pups — and even the offspring's offspring — can inherit a fearful association of a certain smell with pain, even if they have not experienced the pain themselves, and without the need for genetic mutations. "


    YOU CAN INHERIT, FROM YOUR PARENTS, EVEN GRANDPARENTS, A SHUDDERING FEAR OF SOMETHING STRANGE THAT HAPPENED TO THEM, NOT YOU

    Extraordinary. The ramifications are endless, and creepy as hell. Good for someone trying to write spooky stories, tho


    https://www.nature.com/articles/nature.2013.14272

    Turns out that the much mocked Lamarck (who posited inheritance of acquired characteristics, such a blacksmiths muscles) was not so wrong as thought. Epigenetics is huge in biology right now. The idea of a fixed genetic inheritance is dead in the water.
  • MaxPBMaxPB Posts: 30,984
    Can someone explain why the government should be bailing out energy resellers? It's not as though they set fire to the pylons when they go under. They're nothing more than a call centre and dodgy branding. We're with Bulb, almost certain they'll go under too as they refused to hedge against rising prices.
  • Scott_xPScott_xP Posts: 15,832
    Here in US, the row between US/France is dominating this PM trip. Biden/Macron STILL haven’t spoken. Jen Psaki told reporters on Tues still finalising details of call

    Boris Johnson says France needs to 'get a grip' amid anger over AUKUS pact
    https://news.sky.com/story/boris-johnson-says-france-needs-to-get-a-grip-amid-anger-over-aukus-pact-12414414
  • Leon said:

    FPT for RCS


    Replace your bogus "bad mother monkey" story with this (which I learned only yesterday)


    "Fearful memories haunt mouse descendants"


    "Mouse pups — and even the offspring's offspring — can inherit a fearful association of a certain smell with pain, even if they have not experienced the pain themselves, and without the need for genetic mutations. "


    YOU CAN INHERIT, FROM YOUR PARENTS, EVEN GRANDPARENTS, A SHUDDERING FEAR OF SOMETHING STRANGE THAT HAPPENED TO THEM, NOT YOU

    Extraordinary. The ramifications are endless, and creepy as hell. Good for someone trying to write spooky stories, tho


    https://www.nature.com/articles/nature.2013.14272

    Turns out that the much mocked Lamarck (who posited inheritance of acquired characteristics, such a blacksmiths muscles) was not so wrong as thought. Epigenetics is huge in biology right now. The idea of a fixed genetic inheritance is dead in the water.
    Kind of makes sense. It might help explain relatively rapid evolution without need for millions of mutations preceding a useful one.
  • boulayboulay Posts: 92
    Leon said:

    FPT for RCS


    Replace your bogus "bad mother monkey" story with this (which I learned only yesterday)


    "Fearful memories haunt mouse descendants"


    "Mouse pups — and even the offspring's offspring — can inherit a fearful association of a certain smell with pain, even if they have not experienced the pain themselves, and without the need for genetic mutations. "


    YOU CAN INHERIT, FROM YOUR PARENTS, EVEN GRANDPARENTS, A SHUDDERING FEAR OF SOMETHING STRANGE THAT HAPPENED TO THEM, NOT YOU

    Extraordinary. The ramifications are endless, and creepy as hell. Good for someone trying to write spooky stories, tho


    https://www.nature.com/articles/nature.2013.14272

    it's like that theory re ghosts, which i was trying to explain whilst suitably drunk to a couple of friends a few weeks ago, that ghosts are a sort of imprint on the DNA.

    Effectively in the past something has been seen/experienced by an ancestor that has stayed in the memory. when the DNA has been passed down for some reason this memory is stored and then crops up down the line in someone's mind. i suppose like a faulty VHS tape where something that was supposed to be taped over is still there.

    the person who experiences this glitch due to a DNA "memory" thinks they have seen a ghost but they are just experiencing a replay of something that imprinted on the mind and DNA of an ancestor - for example sightings of Roman Soldiers walking down a road made a huge impression on someone 2000 years ago and burnt into the memory bank.

    I think it's effectively like instinct, memories and lessons learnt that get stored in an animal brain and passed down generations to help survival. Most experiences are wiped but some stay for whatever reason.

    It could of course just be a load of bollocks but i like it as an explanation for ghosts....
  • SelebianSelebian Posts: 2,453
    edited September 22

    ping said:

    Bloody brilliant.

    As feared, my supplier, Green, has just gone bust. Not convinced I’ll get my credit balance back off them. Loads of customers have large balances after they offered an almost unlimited 10% extra credit-if-you-top-up, earlier in the year.

    Silly me. That was a warning sign of a badly run company borrowing money from their customers. Expensive lesson learned.

    Apparently the 'supplier of last resort' who takes over your account is legally obliged to honour your credit balance. So its not like a retail company going bust and you have eg gift cards for them which are as good as lost when that happens. So just make sure you have records of what your balance is and whoever takes your account over respects your balance as they're obliged to do so.

    Very dodgy behaviour though as you said.
    Just logged in to download our latest statement (been meaning to do so...) and discovered that ours has gone/is going under too (Avro). No email to that effect so far, might be quite recent news.

    So, some hassle and expense to come, no doubt, after we're allocated to another supplier and then switching from whoever that is to whatever passes for a decent deal at present (and a bit annoying as we had a fairly decent deal running through to March).

    Edit: Does indeed seem hot off the press as it were, if you trust Pesto
    https://www.itv.com/news/2021-09-22/avro-energy-provider-with-12-m-customers-latest-hit-by-financial-difficulties
  • LostPasswordLostPassword Posts: 4,614

    Leon said:

    FPT for RCS


    Replace your bogus "bad mother monkey" story with this (which I learned only yesterday)


    "Fearful memories haunt mouse descendants"


    "Mouse pups — and even the offspring's offspring — can inherit a fearful association of a certain smell with pain, even if they have not experienced the pain themselves, and without the need for genetic mutations. "


    YOU CAN INHERIT, FROM YOUR PARENTS, EVEN GRANDPARENTS, A SHUDDERING FEAR OF SOMETHING STRANGE THAT HAPPENED TO THEM, NOT YOU

    Extraordinary. The ramifications are endless, and creepy as hell. Good for someone trying to write spooky stories, tho


    https://www.nature.com/articles/nature.2013.14272

    Turns out that the much mocked Lamarck (who posited inheritance of acquired characteristics, such a blacksmiths muscles) was not so wrong as thought. Epigenetics is huge in biology right now. The idea of a fixed genetic inheritance is dead in the water.
    Complicates that staple argument of nature vs nurture somewhat.

    How can we be righteously indignant with each other with our absolutist takes when reality is so stubbornly complicated?
  • Scott_xPScott_xP Posts: 15,832
    Official: Avro Energy, with 1.2m customers, has ceased trading. https://twitter.com/ofgem/status/1440679307861315602
  • MaxPB said:

    Can someone explain why the government should be bailing out energy resellers? It's not as though they set fire to the pylons when they go under. They're nothing more than a call centre and dodgy branding. We're with Bulb, almost certain they'll go under too as they refused to hedge against rising prices.

    I agree. Also what happened to the principle of caveat emptor. If an energy price is low, and therefore too good to be true, it probably is. Not sure why the taxpayer should bail out those who have been shopping around to get cheap energy, when they should have asked the obvious question: why is it so cheap?
  • MaxPB said:

    Can someone explain why the government should be bailing out energy resellers? It's not as though they set fire to the pylons when they go under. They're nothing more than a call centre and dodgy branding. We're with Bulb, almost certain they'll go under too as they refused to hedge against rising prices.

    Any company that sells long and buys short that fails to hedge absolutely deserves to go bust and there shouldn't be any bail out whatsoever.

    There's procedures to protect customers being moved over to suppliers of last resort and its reasonable for that to be underwritten - but no bailout for failed business models.
  • isam said:

    Leon said:

    FPT for RCS


    Replace your bogus "bad mother monkey" story with this (which I learned only yesterday)


    "Fearful memories haunt mouse descendants"


    "Mouse pups — and even the offspring's offspring — can inherit a fearful association of a certain smell with pain, even if they have not experienced the pain themselves, and without the need for genetic mutations. "


    YOU CAN INHERIT, FROM YOUR PARENTS, EVEN GRANDPARENTS, A SHUDDERING FEAR OF SOMETHING STRANGE THAT HAPPENED TO THEM, NOT YOU

    Extraordinary. The ramifications are endless, and creepy as hell. Good for someone trying to write spooky stories, tho


    https://www.nature.com/articles/nature.2013.14272

    I seem to remember Peter Hitchens thinks this happens
    Hitchens is a creationist, so anything to undermine Darwinism would be endorsed by him.
  • SelebianSelebian Posts: 2,453
    Scott_xP said:

    Official: Avro Energy, with 1.2m customers, has ceased trading. https://twitter.com/ofgem/status/1440679307861315602

    Yep, see also my posts below.

    Must be one of the bigger 'small ones'?
  • MaxPB said:

    Can someone explain why the government should be bailing out energy resellers? It's not as though they set fire to the pylons when they go under. They're nothing more than a call centre and dodgy branding. We're with Bulb, almost certain they'll go under too as they refused to hedge against rising prices.

    If they do it, it will be because it's excellent retail politics and they're terrified of bad headlines.

    It's the downside of banging on about "taking back control". The government (certainly a modern Conservative one) doesn't want to be in control of lots of stuff; it's difficult and dangerous. But a lot of the public don't see it that way.
  • LostPasswordLostPassword Posts: 4,614
    edited September 22
    MaxPB said:

    Can someone explain why the government should be bailing out energy resellers? It's not as though they set fire to the pylons when they go under. They're nothing more than a call centre and dodgy branding. We're with Bulb, almost certain they'll go under too as they refused to hedge against rising prices.

    All behaviours become habitual if repeated sufficiently often.

    Bailing out the banks was a big one. And we recently bailed out pretty much the whole economy during lockdown. There might have been some others in between.

    Easy for it to seem like a normal function of government.
  • boulay said:

    Leon said:

    FPT for RCS


    Replace your bogus "bad mother monkey" story with this (which I learned only yesterday)


    "Fearful memories haunt mouse descendants"


    "Mouse pups — and even the offspring's offspring — can inherit a fearful association of a certain smell with pain, even if they have not experienced the pain themselves, and without the need for genetic mutations. "


    YOU CAN INHERIT, FROM YOUR PARENTS, EVEN GRANDPARENTS, A SHUDDERING FEAR OF SOMETHING STRANGE THAT HAPPENED TO THEM, NOT YOU

    Extraordinary. The ramifications are endless, and creepy as hell. Good for someone trying to write spooky stories, tho


    https://www.nature.com/articles/nature.2013.14272

    it's like that theory re ghosts, which i was trying to explain whilst suitably drunk to a couple of friends a few weeks ago, that ghosts are a sort of imprint on the DNA.

    Effectively in the past something has been seen/experienced by an ancestor that has stayed in the memory. when the DNA has been passed down for some reason this memory is stored and then crops up down the line in someone's mind. i suppose like a faulty VHS tape where something that was supposed to be taped over is still there.

    the person who experiences this glitch due to a DNA "memory" thinks they have seen a ghost but they are just experiencing a replay of something that imprinted on the mind and DNA of an ancestor - for example sightings of Roman Soldiers walking down a road made a huge impression on someone 2000 years ago and burnt into the memory bank.

    I think it's effectively like instinct, memories and lessons learnt that get stored in an animal brain and passed down generations to help survival. Most experiences are wiped but some stay for whatever reason.

    It could of course just be a load of bollocks but i like it as an explanation for ghosts....
    The best explanation for ghosts that I have ever seen is that GHOSTS ARE NOT F**KING REAL.
    You appear to be a little transparent in your thinking
  • MaxPB said:

    Can someone explain why the government should be bailing out energy resellers? It's not as though they set fire to the pylons when they go under. They're nothing more than a call centre and dodgy branding. We're with Bulb, almost certain they'll go under too as they refused to hedge against rising prices.

    If they do it, it will be because it's excellent retail politics and they're terrified of bad headlines.

    It's the downside of banging on about "taking back control". The government (certainly a modern Conservative one) doesn't want to be in control of lots of stuff; it's difficult and dangerous. But a lot of the public don't see it that way.
    It seems they're not interested in doing it and quite right too.

    It'd be too much of a can of worms to step in now. Given failed businesses have already collapsed if the government stepped in to bail out the next one before it collapsed there'd be uproar about why all the others weren't saved too.

    Moral hazard is a real issue and its not a bad thing that all these dodgy companies who failed to hedge have gone bust. Hopefully shareholders of other companies that sell long and buy short will stress test their business model and get hedges in place where required.
  • isam said:

    Leon said:

    FPT for RCS


    Replace your bogus "bad mother monkey" story with this (which I learned only yesterday)


    "Fearful memories haunt mouse descendants"


    "Mouse pups — and even the offspring's offspring — can inherit a fearful association of a certain smell with pain, even if they have not experienced the pain themselves, and without the need for genetic mutations. "


    YOU CAN INHERIT, FROM YOUR PARENTS, EVEN GRANDPARENTS, A SHUDDERING FEAR OF SOMETHING STRANGE THAT HAPPENED TO THEM, NOT YOU

    Extraordinary. The ramifications are endless, and creepy as hell. Good for someone trying to write spooky stories, tho


    https://www.nature.com/articles/nature.2013.14272

    I seem to remember Peter Hitchens thinks this happens
    Hitchens is a creationist, so anything to undermine Darwinism would be endorsed by him.
    Is he an antivaxxer as well?
  • felixfelix Posts: 13,692
    Oh dear - Biden cozies up to the UK - no more good headers on PB for him. :smiley: I'm sure it was unintentional but the way the header is worded suggests a causal link between the bad polling and the meeting with Boris.
  • CarlottaVanceCarlottaVance Posts: 51,489
    Avro Energy, with 580,000 household customers, has become by far the biggest energy supplier to go bust

    Green, with 250,000 customers, has also collapsed


    https://twitter.com/emilygosden/status/1440679495183130632?s=20
  • turbotubbsturbotubbs Posts: 3,833

    boulay said:

    Leon said:

    FPT for RCS


    Replace your bogus "bad mother monkey" story with this (which I learned only yesterday)


    "Fearful memories haunt mouse descendants"


    "Mouse pups — and even the offspring's offspring — can inherit a fearful association of a certain smell with pain, even if they have not experienced the pain themselves, and without the need for genetic mutations. "


    YOU CAN INHERIT, FROM YOUR PARENTS, EVEN GRANDPARENTS, A SHUDDERING FEAR OF SOMETHING STRANGE THAT HAPPENED TO THEM, NOT YOU

    Extraordinary. The ramifications are endless, and creepy as hell. Good for someone trying to write spooky stories, tho


    https://www.nature.com/articles/nature.2013.14272

    it's like that theory re ghosts, which i was trying to explain whilst suitably drunk to a couple of friends a few weeks ago, that ghosts are a sort of imprint on the DNA.

    Effectively in the past something has been seen/experienced by an ancestor that has stayed in the memory. when the DNA has been passed down for some reason this memory is stored and then crops up down the line in someone's mind. i suppose like a faulty VHS tape where something that was supposed to be taped over is still there.

    the person who experiences this glitch due to a DNA "memory" thinks they have seen a ghost but they are just experiencing a replay of something that imprinted on the mind and DNA of an ancestor - for example sightings of Roman Soldiers walking down a road made a huge impression on someone 2000 years ago and burnt into the memory bank.

    I think it's effectively like instinct, memories and lessons learnt that get stored in an animal brain and passed down generations to help survival. Most experiences are wiped but some stay for whatever reason.

    It could of course just be a load of bollocks but i like it as an explanation for ghosts....
    The best explanation for ghosts that I have ever seen is that GHOSTS ARE NOT F**KING REAL.
    Almost certainly, but that doesn't explain why people think they have seen them.

    My belief is misidentification, and misperception. Years ago, my slightly batty aunt, saw the ghost of a little old lady in white crossing the road near Warminster, ironically enough at a place called Dead Maids. I was following in a second car and saw a barn owl flitting across. Preconceptions matter. She was convinced of the reality of ghosts and took the flitting white thing to be that. I, brought up in the Wiltshire countryside, expect to see 'ghost' owls on a regular basis.
  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 31,244
    edited September 22
    MaxPB said:

    Can someone explain why the government should be bailing out energy resellers? It's not as though they set fire to the pylons when they go under. They're nothing more than a call centre and dodgy branding. We're with Bulb, almost certain they'll go under too as they refused to hedge against rising prices.

    Are they? I thought they were wiping out the equity in those shonky providers and ensuring they (the customers) go to the bigger ones. Are they subsidising the bigger providers for the now more expensive gas they will have to buy in the spot market? I presume so.

    Quite a fiscal transfer to the private energy companies if so and I would imagine there will be some shenanigans by those smart treasury depts to ensure the revenues are maximised.
  • felix said:

    Oh dear - Biden cozies up to the UK - no more good headers on PB for him. :smiley: I'm sure it was unintentional but the way the header is worded suggests a causal link between the bad polling and the meeting with Boris.

    I think it less complicated than that. Many of us had high hopes of Biden, after all he is not Trump. Turns out he is almost as shit, just in a different way. Americans seem to be heading to the same conclusion.
  • SelebianSelebian Posts: 2,453

    MaxPB said:

    Can someone explain why the government should be bailing out energy resellers? It's not as though they set fire to the pylons when they go under. They're nothing more than a call centre and dodgy branding. We're with Bulb, almost certain they'll go under too as they refused to hedge against rising prices.

    I agree. Also what happened to the principle of caveat emptor. If an energy price is low, and therefore too good to be true, it probably is. Not sure why the taxpayer should bail out those who have been shopping around to get cheap energy, when they should have asked the obvious question: why is it so cheap?
    It's one (perhaps the only) way of transferring wealth from all those pensioners with British Gas to the young with Acme energy co :wink:
  • LeonLeon Posts: 11,427
    boulay said:

    Leon said:

    FPT for RCS


    Replace your bogus "bad mother monkey" story with this (which I learned only yesterday)


    "Fearful memories haunt mouse descendants"


    "Mouse pups — and even the offspring's offspring — can inherit a fearful association of a certain smell with pain, even if they have not experienced the pain themselves, and without the need for genetic mutations. "


    YOU CAN INHERIT, FROM YOUR PARENTS, EVEN GRANDPARENTS, A SHUDDERING FEAR OF SOMETHING STRANGE THAT HAPPENED TO THEM, NOT YOU

    Extraordinary. The ramifications are endless, and creepy as hell. Good for someone trying to write spooky stories, tho


    https://www.nature.com/articles/nature.2013.14272

    it's like that theory re ghosts, which i was trying to explain whilst suitably drunk to a couple of friends a few weeks ago, that ghosts are a sort of imprint on the DNA.

    Effectively in the past something has been seen/experienced by an ancestor that has stayed in the memory. when the DNA has been passed down for some reason this memory is stored and then crops up down the line in someone's mind. i suppose like a faulty VHS tape where something that was supposed to be taped over is still there.

    the person who experiences this glitch due to a DNA "memory" thinks they have seen a ghost but they are just experiencing a replay of something that imprinted on the mind and DNA of an ancestor - for example sightings of Roman Soldiers walking down a road made a huge impression on someone 2000 years ago and burnt into the memory bank.

    I think it's effectively like instinct, memories and lessons learnt that get stored in an animal brain and passed down generations to help survival. Most experiences are wiped but some stay for whatever reason.

    It could of course just be a load of bollocks but i like it as an explanation for ghosts....
    It could also explain UAPS. I don't know how, but I just wanted to put them in, as well
  • kinabalukinabalu Posts: 24,393
    MaxPB said:

    Can someone explain why the government should be bailing out energy resellers? It's not as though they set fire to the pylons when they go under. They're nothing more than a call centre and dodgy branding. We're with Bulb, almost certain they'll go under too as they refused to hedge against rising prices.

    They aren't, are they? It'd be outrageous.
  • isamisam Posts: 38,082

    isam said:

    Leon said:

    FPT for RCS


    Replace your bogus "bad mother monkey" story with this (which I learned only yesterday)


    "Fearful memories haunt mouse descendants"


    "Mouse pups — and even the offspring's offspring — can inherit a fearful association of a certain smell with pain, even if they have not experienced the pain themselves, and without the need for genetic mutations. "


    YOU CAN INHERIT, FROM YOUR PARENTS, EVEN GRANDPARENTS, A SHUDDERING FEAR OF SOMETHING STRANGE THAT HAPPENED TO THEM, NOT YOU

    Extraordinary. The ramifications are endless, and creepy as hell. Good for someone trying to write spooky stories, tho


    https://www.nature.com/articles/nature.2013.14272

    I seem to remember Peter Hitchens thinks this happens
    Hitchens is a creationist, so anything to undermine Darwinism would be endorsed by him.
    Is he? I have never heard or read him say that
  • isamisam Posts: 38,082

    isam said:

    Leon said:

    FPT for RCS


    Replace your bogus "bad mother monkey" story with this (which I learned only yesterday)


    "Fearful memories haunt mouse descendants"


    "Mouse pups — and even the offspring's offspring — can inherit a fearful association of a certain smell with pain, even if they have not experienced the pain themselves, and without the need for genetic mutations. "


    YOU CAN INHERIT, FROM YOUR PARENTS, EVEN GRANDPARENTS, A SHUDDERING FEAR OF SOMETHING STRANGE THAT HAPPENED TO THEM, NOT YOU

    Extraordinary. The ramifications are endless, and creepy as hell. Good for someone trying to write spooky stories, tho


    https://www.nature.com/articles/nature.2013.14272

    I seem to remember Peter Hitchens thinks this happens
    Hitchens is a creationist, so anything to undermine Darwinism would be endorsed by him.
    Is he an antivaxxer as well?
    He isn't an anti vaxxer, he had the jab a long while ago
  • kinabalukinabalu Posts: 24,393
    Leon said:

    FPT for RCS

    Replace your bogus "bad mother monkey" story with this (which I learned only yesterday)

    "Fearful memories haunt mouse descendants"

    "Mouse pups — and even the offspring's offspring — can inherit a fearful association of a certain smell with pain, even if they have not experienced the pain themselves, and without the need for genetic mutations. "

    YOU CAN INHERIT, FROM YOUR PARENTS, EVEN GRANDPARENTS, A SHUDDERING FEAR OF SOMETHING STRANGE THAT HAPPENED TO THEM, NOT YOU

    Extraordinary. The ramifications are endless, and creepy as hell. Good for someone trying to write spooky stories, tho

    https://www.nature.com/articles/nature.2013.14272

    Not a solid study. Unlikely to be true.
  • SelebianSelebian Posts: 2,453

    boulay said:

    Leon said:

    FPT for RCS


    Replace your bogus "bad mother monkey" story with this (which I learned only yesterday)


    "Fearful memories haunt mouse descendants"


    "Mouse pups — and even the offspring's offspring — can inherit a fearful association of a certain smell with pain, even if they have not experienced the pain themselves, and without the need for genetic mutations. "


    YOU CAN INHERIT, FROM YOUR PARENTS, EVEN GRANDPARENTS, A SHUDDERING FEAR OF SOMETHING STRANGE THAT HAPPENED TO THEM, NOT YOU

    Extraordinary. The ramifications are endless, and creepy as hell. Good for someone trying to write spooky stories, tho


    https://www.nature.com/articles/nature.2013.14272

    it's like that theory re ghosts, which i was trying to explain whilst suitably drunk to a couple of friends a few weeks ago, that ghosts are a sort of imprint on the DNA.

    Effectively in the past something has been seen/experienced by an ancestor that has stayed in the memory. when the DNA has been passed down for some reason this memory is stored and then crops up down the line in someone's mind. i suppose like a faulty VHS tape where something that was supposed to be taped over is still there.

    the person who experiences this glitch due to a DNA "memory" thinks they have seen a ghost but they are just experiencing a replay of something that imprinted on the mind and DNA of an ancestor - for example sightings of Roman Soldiers walking down a road made a huge impression on someone 2000 years ago and burnt into the memory bank.

    I think it's effectively like instinct, memories and lessons learnt that get stored in an animal brain and passed down generations to help survival. Most experiences are wiped but some stay for whatever reason.

    It could of course just be a load of bollocks but i like it as an explanation for ghosts....
    The best explanation for ghosts that I have ever seen is that GHOSTS ARE NOT F**KING REAL.
    A slightly more nuanced one is some of the interesting findings around particular frequencies of sound inducing feelings of dread and - possibly - visions, as the brain tries to make shadows and the like into a rational cause for that dread.
  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 31,244

    MaxPB said:

    Can someone explain why the government should be bailing out energy resellers? It's not as though they set fire to the pylons when they go under. They're nothing more than a call centre and dodgy branding. We're with Bulb, almost certain they'll go under too as they refused to hedge against rising prices.

    If they do it, it will be because it's excellent retail politics and they're terrified of bad headlines.

    It's the downside of banging on about "taking back control". The government (certainly a modern Conservative one) doesn't want to be in control of lots of stuff; it's difficult and dangerous. But a lot of the public don't see it that way.
    It seems they're not interested in doing it and quite right too.

    It'd be too much of a can of worms to step in now. Given failed businesses have already collapsed if the government stepped in to bail out the next one before it collapsed there'd be uproar about why all the others weren't saved too.

    Moral hazard is a real issue and its not a bad thing that all these dodgy companies who failed to hedge have gone bust. Hopefully shareholders of other companies that sell long and buy short will stress test their business model and get hedges in place where required.
    There is going to be a huge grant to existing/surviving energy companies and who's to say the ones in receipt of the grants are going to survive.

    The govt was talking about 6-10 providers in the end game. How many do we have now?

    Plus if I was sitting in the treasury dept of, say, EDF, I would be looking at rinsing the govt for every penny possible.

    I don't see how the govt does this without huge grants to the remaining GasCos.
  • TOPPING said:

    MaxPB said:

    Can someone explain why the government should be bailing out energy resellers? It's not as though they set fire to the pylons when they go under. They're nothing more than a call centre and dodgy branding. We're with Bulb, almost certain they'll go under too as they refused to hedge against rising prices.

    Are they? I thought they were wiping out the equity in those shonky providers and ensuring they (the customers) go to the bigger ones. Are they subsidising the bigger providers for the now more expensive gas they will have to buy in the spot market? I presume so.

    Quite a fiscal transfer to the private energy companies if so and I would imagine there will be some shenanigans by those smart treasury depts to ensure the revenues are maximised.
    If 'suppliers of last resort' are taking on unprofitable accounts as a service to ensure continuity of service, it seems reasonable for that service to be underwritten.

    That's different to bailing out failed companies. The underwriting is going to a successful company offering a service not a failed one that screwed up.
  • kinabalukinabalu Posts: 24,393
    boulay said:

    Leon said:

    FPT for RCS


    Replace your bogus "bad mother monkey" story with this (which I learned only yesterday)


    "Fearful memories haunt mouse descendants"


    "Mouse pups — and even the offspring's offspring — can inherit a fearful association of a certain smell with pain, even if they have not experienced the pain themselves, and without the need for genetic mutations. "


    YOU CAN INHERIT, FROM YOUR PARENTS, EVEN GRANDPARENTS, A SHUDDERING FEAR OF SOMETHING STRANGE THAT HAPPENED TO THEM, NOT YOU

    Extraordinary. The ramifications are endless, and creepy as hell. Good for someone trying to write spooky stories, tho


    https://www.nature.com/articles/nature.2013.14272

    it's like that theory re ghosts, which i was trying to explain whilst suitably drunk to a couple of friends a few weeks ago, that ghosts are a sort of imprint on the DNA.

    Effectively in the past something has been seen/experienced by an ancestor that has stayed in the memory. when the DNA has been passed down for some reason this memory is stored and then crops up down the line in someone's mind. i suppose like a faulty VHS tape where something that was supposed to be taped over is still there.

    the person who experiences this glitch due to a DNA "memory" thinks they have seen a ghost but they are just experiencing a replay of something that imprinted on the mind and DNA of an ancestor - for example sightings of Roman Soldiers walking down a road made a huge impression on someone 2000 years ago and burnt into the memory bank.

    I think it's effectively like instinct, memories and lessons learnt that get stored in an animal brain and passed down generations to help survival. Most experiences are wiped but some stay for whatever reason.

    It could of course just be a load of bollocks but i like it as an explanation for ghosts....
    No such thing as ghosts. All sightings are either a trick or illusion/delusion.
  • felixfelix Posts: 13,692

    felix said:

    Oh dear - Biden cozies up to the UK - no more good headers on PB for him. :smiley: I'm sure it was unintentional but the way the header is worded suggests a causal link between the bad polling and the meeting with Boris.

    I think it less complicated than that. Many of us had high hopes of Biden, after all he is not Trump. Turns out he is almost as shit, just in a different way. Americans seem to be heading to the same conclusion.
    I did not expect much and therefore am less disappointed but the AUKUS deal and his movement on climate change are surely to be welcomed. Clearly there were some who hoped he'd be anti-British as well, always a naive hope imho. Afghanistan was a clear disaster for him but not really a surprise.
  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 31,244
    re ghosts. The human mind is a wondrous thing. It can, under the right/wrong circumstances, create all manner of extraordinary phenomena. From headless Elizabethan courtiers to bland Spectator articles to fantastic little out of the way pubs in North London.

    Ghosts are products of the human mind. Sadly in many ways.
  • https://www.gov.uk/government/news/government-publishes-independent-report-into-regulation-of-football-index

    https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1017268/Report_of_the_Independent_Review_of_the_Regulation_of_BetIndex_Limited._Final_version_130921_.pdf

    Summary of their findings:

    Could have done better
    Lessons must be learned
    Updated frameworks and memorandums.

    ---------

    In reality, regulators were naive and incompetent (not simply could have done better), no accountability (so why will the lessons be learnt), its being whitewashed and forgotten.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 64,643
    edited September 22
    I still haven't seen anybody explain how we went for a big what was it 6 or 8 energy companies and a handful of niche ones to over 70. This seems to just happened really quickly. Did something change in the law that encouraged it, or did a load of peoppe think they could be gas traders and chance their arm?

    I don't know anything really about the sector, but it just doesn't seem like a good business to be in for a small company. You don't control the production, you are totally at the mercy of a market you can't control in anyway plus government caps prices, you have to deal with pain in the ass public. Doesn't seem like an easy buck opportunity.
  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 31,244

    TOPPING said:

    MaxPB said:

    Can someone explain why the government should be bailing out energy resellers? It's not as though they set fire to the pylons when they go under. They're nothing more than a call centre and dodgy branding. We're with Bulb, almost certain they'll go under too as they refused to hedge against rising prices.

    Are they? I thought they were wiping out the equity in those shonky providers and ensuring they (the customers) go to the bigger ones. Are they subsidising the bigger providers for the now more expensive gas they will have to buy in the spot market? I presume so.

    Quite a fiscal transfer to the private energy companies if so and I would imagine there will be some shenanigans by those smart treasury depts to ensure the revenues are maximised.
    If 'suppliers of last resort' are taking on unprofitable accounts as a service to ensure continuity of service, it seems reasonable for that service to be underwritten.

    That's different to bailing out failed companies. The underwriting is going to a successful company offering a service not a failed one that screwed up.
    Part of peoples' choice of energy company includes a risk assessment of that company's viability and quality of business model. Or it should (I appreciate that most people just choose the one at the top of the USwitch list).

    You talk, rightly, about moral hazard but what incentive is there for consumers to make more informed choices if they are themselves bailed out of poor decisions.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 64,643
    edited September 22

    https://www.gov.uk/government/news/government-publishes-independent-report-into-regulation-of-football-index

    https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1017268/Report_of_the_Independent_Review_of_the_Regulation_of_BetIndex_Limited._Final_version_130921_.pdf

    Summary of their findings:

    Could have done better
    Lessons must be learned
    Updated frameworks and memorandums.

    ---------

    In reality, regulators were naive and incompetent (not simply could have done better), no accountability (so why will the lessons be learnt), its being whitewashed and forgotten.

    Those regulators aren't fit to do their job. Every serious punter with half a brain I know immediately clocked the problem with it.
  • LostPasswordLostPassword Posts: 4,614
    TOPPING said:

    MaxPB said:

    Can someone explain why the government should be bailing out energy resellers? It's not as though they set fire to the pylons when they go under. They're nothing more than a call centre and dodgy branding. We're with Bulb, almost certain they'll go under too as they refused to hedge against rising prices.

    If they do it, it will be because it's excellent retail politics and they're terrified of bad headlines.

    It's the downside of banging on about "taking back control". The government (certainly a modern Conservative one) doesn't want to be in control of lots of stuff; it's difficult and dangerous. But a lot of the public don't see it that way.
    It seems they're not interested in doing it and quite right too.

    It'd be too much of a can of worms to step in now. Given failed businesses have already collapsed if the government stepped in to bail out the next one before it collapsed there'd be uproar about why all the others weren't saved too.

    Moral hazard is a real issue and its not a bad thing that all these dodgy companies who failed to hedge have gone bust. Hopefully shareholders of other companies that sell long and buy short will stress test their business model and get hedges in place where required.
    There is going to be a huge grant to existing/surviving energy companies and who's to say the ones in receipt of the grants are going to survive.

    The govt was talking about 6-10 providers in the end game. How many do we have now?

    Plus if I was sitting in the treasury dept of, say, EDF, I would be looking at rinsing the govt for every penny possible.

    I don't see how the govt does this without huge grants to the remaining GasCos.
    I think we had about 80, but I don't have a count of the number that have been lost so far.

    The big six will survive due to their generation profits. The two green suppliers - Ecotricity and Good Energy - say that they're hedged and safe.

    I don't know anything about the others.
  • felix said:

    felix said:

    Oh dear - Biden cozies up to the UK - no more good headers on PB for him. :smiley: I'm sure it was unintentional but the way the header is worded suggests a causal link between the bad polling and the meeting with Boris.

    I think it less complicated than that. Many of us had high hopes of Biden, after all he is not Trump. Turns out he is almost as shit, just in a different way. Americans seem to be heading to the same conclusion.
    I did not expect much and therefore am less disappointed but the AUKUS deal and his movement on climate change are surely to be welcomed. Clearly there were some who hoped he'd be anti-British as well, always a naive hope imho. Afghanistan was a clear disaster for him but not really a surprise.
    His cock up in Afghan overshadows anything else so far as I am concerned. AUKUS is a generally good thing, but it is possibly a just a way of legitimising a shafting of the French in favour of US manufacturers, though it is difficult to feel too much sympathy there. He never was anti-British, though who might hope for that (maybe Corbynites) is unfathomable. (note submariner pun at end)
  • Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 56,948
    Mr. Urquhart, I remember Davey being criticised for, while Energy Chap, being a customer of a smaller new energy firm that wasn't subject to the green levy or suchlike.
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 88,963
    The 46.9% approval rating for Biden is certainly a concern for him, it is the lowest approval rating for a President at this stage of his Presidency in the last 50 years after Ford and Trump and we know neither of them were re elected.

    The fact his approval rating has dipped below 50% also means the GOP are likely to retake at least the House next year in the classic midterms protest vote
  • kinabalukinabalu Posts: 24,393
    edited September 22

    MaxPB said:

    Can someone explain why the government should be bailing out energy resellers? It's not as though they set fire to the pylons when they go under. They're nothing more than a call centre and dodgy branding. We're with Bulb, almost certain they'll go under too as they refused to hedge against rising prices.

    Any company that sells long and buys short that fails to hedge absolutely deserves to go bust and there shouldn't be any bail out whatsoever.

    There's procedures to protect customers being moved over to suppliers of last resort and its reasonable for that to be underwritten - but no bailout for failed business models.
    I wouldn't say they necessarily deserve to go bust but if they mismatch maturities without the reserves to cover a move against them, that's reckless and they shouldn't get a state bailout.

    Public ownership looks the way to go for retail energy supply. One entity, simple tariff, uniform stable pricing, strip out all the needless complexity.
  • isam said:

    isam said:

    Leon said:

    FPT for RCS


    Replace your bogus "bad mother monkey" story with this (which I learned only yesterday)


    "Fearful memories haunt mouse descendants"


    "Mouse pups — and even the offspring's offspring — can inherit a fearful association of a certain smell with pain, even if they have not experienced the pain themselves, and without the need for genetic mutations. "


    YOU CAN INHERIT, FROM YOUR PARENTS, EVEN GRANDPARENTS, A SHUDDERING FEAR OF SOMETHING STRANGE THAT HAPPENED TO THEM, NOT YOU

    Extraordinary. The ramifications are endless, and creepy as hell. Good for someone trying to write spooky stories, tho


    https://www.nature.com/articles/nature.2013.14272

    I seem to remember Peter Hitchens thinks this happens
    Hitchens is a creationist, so anything to undermine Darwinism would be endorsed by him.
    Is he? I have never heard or read him say that
    See here. He also endorses Andrew Wakefield while he's at it.

    https://hitchensblog.mailonsunday.co.uk/2006/11/fanatics_in_the.html
  • williamglennwilliamglenn Posts: 38,416
    Emmanual Macron expects "concrete measures" from Joe Biden to restore confidence in the USA.

    https://twitter.com/Malbrunot/status/1440680486691430407
  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 31,244
    kinabalu said:

    MaxPB said:

    Can someone explain why the government should be bailing out energy resellers? It's not as though they set fire to the pylons when they go under. They're nothing more than a call centre and dodgy branding. We're with Bulb, almost certain they'll go under too as they refused to hedge against rising prices.

    Any company that sells long and buys short that fails to hedge absolutely deserves to go bust and there shouldn't be any bail out whatsoever.

    There's procedures to protect customers being moved over to suppliers of last resort and its reasonable for that to be underwritten - but no bailout for failed business models.
    I wouldn't say they necessarily deserve to go bust but if they mismatch maturities without the reserves to cover a move against them, that's reckless and they shouldn't get a state bailout.

    Public ownership looks the way to go for retail energy supply. One entity, simple tariff, uniform stable pricing, strip out all the needless complexity.
    Not sure it's a great idea. Don't whatever you do tell Sid.
  • Emmanual Macron expects "concrete measures" from Joe Biden to restore confidence in the USA.

    https://twitter.com/Malbrunot/status/1440680486691430407

    Concrete measures is maybe not a good think to ask of someone with Irish or Sicilian DNA!
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 43,931
    FPT - I will happily say something "Remainy" for a change: given the European continent shares many advanced Western economies that have similar-ish values and do a lot of trade with each other it makes sense to have an ambitious level of common market across them for agricultural produce, manufactured goods and some associated services, with a limited level of worker movement across it, but also with the freedom and flex to do trade deals with other non-European nations as well, subject to a commensurate level of internal customs/ROO checks depending on what each nation picks.

    Were that on the table (without any of the extra gubbins) and we had votes on it I think the UK would (today) go for it by a clear margin. We'd see it purely as an economic and trading arrangement, and about free collaboration between independent nation states.

    However, that wasn't what was on the table: we were told we had to take or leave full membership with full free movement, European citizenship and ever-closer political, legal and economic union, and ever greater EU-level legislative scope creep over national legislation, or become a satellite with no votes, or take a cold hard full exit.

    We all know its federalist ideology, so it ultimately became about making a decisive break for national self-governance and we took the cold hard full exit. If the middle option was available *with* votes/ unanimity, limitations and caveats then we'd have gone for that.

    I think the most likely long-term outcome of Brexit is that we end up back there in a loose outer tier of associate members after 20-30 years, once the EU and the UK have both come to their senses, and the current generation of politicians are long gone.
  • I still haven't seen anybody explain how we went for a big what was it 6 or 8 energy companies and a handful of niche ones to over 70. This seems to just happened really quickly. Did something change in the law that encouraged it, or did a load of peoppe think they could be gas traders and chance their arm?

    I don't know anything really about the sector, but it just doesn't seem like a good business to be in for a small company. You don't control the production, you are totally at the mercy of a market you can't control in anyway plus government caps prices, you have to deal with pain in the ass public. Doesn't seem like an easy buck opportunity.

    Profits = Capitalism = Goes to shareholders
    Losses = Socialism = Goes to the state/Redistributed across the industry

    Like much of our mixed economy its a rigged game favouring capital, sometimes more than just capitalism would.
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 33,222

    isam said:

    Leon said:

    FPT for RCS

    Replace your bogus "bad mother monkey" story with this (which I learned only yesterday)

    "Fearful memories haunt mouse descendants"

    "Mouse pups — and even the offspring's offspring — can inherit a fearful association of a certain smell with pain, even if they have not experienced the pain themselves, and without the need for genetic mutations. "

    YOU CAN INHERIT, FROM YOUR PARENTS, EVEN GRANDPARENTS, A SHUDDERING FEAR OF SOMETHING STRANGE THAT HAPPENED TO THEM, NOT YOU

    Extraordinary. The ramifications are endless, and creepy as hell. Good for someone trying to write spooky stories, tho

    https://www.nature.com/articles/nature.2013.14272

    I seem to remember Peter Hitchens thinks this happens
    Hitchens is a creationist, so anything to undermine Darwinism would be endorsed by him.
    He's also a bit thick then, as it doesn't.
  • kinabalu said:

    MaxPB said:

    Can someone explain why the government should be bailing out energy resellers? It's not as though they set fire to the pylons when they go under. They're nothing more than a call centre and dodgy branding. We're with Bulb, almost certain they'll go under too as they refused to hedge against rising prices.

    Any company that sells long and buys short that fails to hedge absolutely deserves to go bust and there shouldn't be any bail out whatsoever.

    There's procedures to protect customers being moved over to suppliers of last resort and its reasonable for that to be underwritten - but no bailout for failed business models.
    I wouldn't say they necessarily deserve to go bust but if they mismatch maturities without the reserves to cover a move against them, that's reckless and they shouldn't get a state bailout.

    Public ownership looks the way to go for retail energy supply. One entity, simple tariff, uniform stable pricing, strip out all the needless complexity.
    How about telecom too? I mean, I can remember how great BT was before it was privatised! British rail was really good as well, and as for British Leyland, what quality! Oh, yes, the man in Whitehall. He definitely knows how to deliver great service!
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 43,931

    boulay said:

    Leon said:

    FPT for RCS


    Replace your bogus "bad mother monkey" story with this (which I learned only yesterday)


    "Fearful memories haunt mouse descendants"


    "Mouse pups — and even the offspring's offspring — can inherit a fearful association of a certain smell with pain, even if they have not experienced the pain themselves, and without the need for genetic mutations. "


    YOU CAN INHERIT, FROM YOUR PARENTS, EVEN GRANDPARENTS, A SHUDDERING FEAR OF SOMETHING STRANGE THAT HAPPENED TO THEM, NOT YOU

    Extraordinary. The ramifications are endless, and creepy as hell. Good for someone trying to write spooky stories, tho


    https://www.nature.com/articles/nature.2013.14272

    it's like that theory re ghosts, which i was trying to explain whilst suitably drunk to a couple of friends a few weeks ago, that ghosts are a sort of imprint on the DNA.

    Effectively in the past something has been seen/experienced by an ancestor that has stayed in the memory. when the DNA has been passed down for some reason this memory is stored and then crops up down the line in someone's mind. i suppose like a faulty VHS tape where something that was supposed to be taped over is still there.

    the person who experiences this glitch due to a DNA "memory" thinks they have seen a ghost but they are just experiencing a replay of something that imprinted on the mind and DNA of an ancestor - for example sightings of Roman Soldiers walking down a road made a huge impression on someone 2000 years ago and burnt into the memory bank.

    I think it's effectively like instinct, memories and lessons learnt that get stored in an animal brain and passed down generations to help survival. Most experiences are wiped but some stay for whatever reason.

    It could of course just be a load of bollocks but i like it as an explanation for ghosts....
    The best explanation for ghosts that I have ever seen is that GHOSTS ARE NOT F**KING REAL.
    Almost certainly, but that doesn't explain why people think they have seen them.

    My belief is misidentification, and misperception. Years ago, my slightly batty aunt, saw the ghost of a little old lady in white crossing the road near Warminster, ironically enough at a place called Dead Maids. I was following in a second car and saw a barn owl flitting across. Preconceptions matter. She was convinced of the reality of ghosts and took the flitting white thing to be that. I, brought up in the Wiltshire countryside, expect to see 'ghost' owls on a regular basis.
    The spread of camera enabled smartphones has been great for demonstrating that some things that people are reluctant to believe in, such as US police brutality against minorities, are actually real, while other things that people want to believe are true, like ghosts or the Loch Ness Monster, are a load of old bollocks.
    Every new technology has upsides and downsides.

    The downsides are (a) we are always "on", (b) we obsess over curating ourselves online as opposed to real-life relationships, which is bad for our mental health and leaves a lot of breadcrumbs that can come back to haunt you later and (c) we are able to be watched, filmed and tracked wherever we go.

    I don't feel "free" most of the time now. I really don't.
  • MangoMango Posts: 953

    boulay said:

    Leon said:

    FPT for RCS


    Replace your bogus "bad mother monkey" story with this (which I learned only yesterday)


    "Fearful memories haunt mouse descendants"


    "Mouse pups — and even the offspring's offspring — can inherit a fearful association of a certain smell with pain, even if they have not experienced the pain themselves, and without the need for genetic mutations. "


    YOU CAN INHERIT, FROM YOUR PARENTS, EVEN GRANDPARENTS, A SHUDDERING FEAR OF SOMETHING STRANGE THAT HAPPENED TO THEM, NOT YOU

    Extraordinary. The ramifications are endless, and creepy as hell. Good for someone trying to write spooky stories, tho


    https://www.nature.com/articles/nature.2013.14272

    it's like that theory re ghosts, which i was trying to explain whilst suitably drunk to a couple of friends a few weeks ago, that ghosts are a sort of imprint on the DNA.

    Effectively in the past something has been seen/experienced by an ancestor that has stayed in the memory. when the DNA has been passed down for some reason this memory is stored and then crops up down the line in someone's mind. i suppose like a faulty VHS tape where something that was supposed to be taped over is still there.

    the person who experiences this glitch due to a DNA "memory" thinks they have seen a ghost but they are just experiencing a replay of something that imprinted on the mind and DNA of an ancestor - for example sightings of Roman Soldiers walking down a road made a huge impression on someone 2000 years ago and burnt into the memory bank.

    I think it's effectively like instinct, memories and lessons learnt that get stored in an animal brain and passed down generations to help survival. Most experiences are wiped but some stay for whatever reason.

    It could of course just be a load of bollocks but i like it as an explanation for ghosts....
    The best explanation for ghosts that I have ever seen is that GHOSTS ARE NOT F**KING REAL.
    You appear to be a little transparent in your thinking
    I admire his spirit though.
  • Mango said:

    boulay said:

    Leon said:

    FPT for RCS


    Replace your bogus "bad mother monkey" story with this (which I learned only yesterday)


    "Fearful memories haunt mouse descendants"


    "Mouse pups — and even the offspring's offspring — can inherit a fearful association of a certain smell with pain, even if they have not experienced the pain themselves, and without the need for genetic mutations. "


    YOU CAN INHERIT, FROM YOUR PARENTS, EVEN GRANDPARENTS, A SHUDDERING FEAR OF SOMETHING STRANGE THAT HAPPENED TO THEM, NOT YOU

    Extraordinary. The ramifications are endless, and creepy as hell. Good for someone trying to write spooky stories, tho


    https://www.nature.com/articles/nature.2013.14272

    it's like that theory re ghosts, which i was trying to explain whilst suitably drunk to a couple of friends a few weeks ago, that ghosts are a sort of imprint on the DNA.

    Effectively in the past something has been seen/experienced by an ancestor that has stayed in the memory. when the DNA has been passed down for some reason this memory is stored and then crops up down the line in someone's mind. i suppose like a faulty VHS tape where something that was supposed to be taped over is still there.

    the person who experiences this glitch due to a DNA "memory" thinks they have seen a ghost but they are just experiencing a replay of something that imprinted on the mind and DNA of an ancestor - for example sightings of Roman Soldiers walking down a road made a huge impression on someone 2000 years ago and burnt into the memory bank.

    I think it's effectively like instinct, memories and lessons learnt that get stored in an animal brain and passed down generations to help survival. Most experiences are wiped but some stay for whatever reason.

    It could of course just be a load of bollocks but i like it as an explanation for ghosts....
    The best explanation for ghosts that I have ever seen is that GHOSTS ARE NOT F**KING REAL.
    You appear to be a little transparent in your thinking
    I admire his spirit though.
    I quite ex-spectre-d some sort of comment like that
  • CarlottaVanceCarlottaVance Posts: 51,489
    Good grief the Education Committee is thick - one dumb nit-picking question after another!

    https://www.parliamentlive.tv/Event/Index/0e3adc0d-69f8-4a59-aaaf-2257a78f6b1f
  • felixfelix Posts: 13,692

    kinabalu said:

    MaxPB said:

    Can someone explain why the government should be bailing out energy resellers? It's not as though they set fire to the pylons when they go under. They're nothing more than a call centre and dodgy branding. We're with Bulb, almost certain they'll go under too as they refused to hedge against rising prices.

    Any company that sells long and buys short that fails to hedge absolutely deserves to go bust and there shouldn't be any bail out whatsoever.

    There's procedures to protect customers being moved over to suppliers of last resort and its reasonable for that to be underwritten - but no bailout for failed business models.
    I wouldn't say they necessarily deserve to go bust but if they mismatch maturities without the reserves to cover a move against them, that's reckless and they shouldn't get a state bailout.

    Public ownership looks the way to go for retail energy supply. One entity, simple tariff, uniform stable pricing, strip out all the needless complexity.
    How about telecom too? I mean, I can remember how great BT was before it was privatised! British rail was really good as well, and as for British Leyland, what quality! Oh, yes, the man in Whitehall. He definitely knows how to deliver great service!
    How dare you malign the great British Leyland - how can you forget the Allegro?


  • SelebianSelebian Posts: 2,453
    TOPPING said:

    MaxPB said:

    Can someone explain why the government should be bailing out energy resellers? It's not as though they set fire to the pylons when they go under. They're nothing more than a call centre and dodgy branding. We're with Bulb, almost certain they'll go under too as they refused to hedge against rising prices.

    If they do it, it will be because it's excellent retail politics and they're terrified of bad headlines.

    It's the downside of banging on about "taking back control". The government (certainly a modern Conservative one) doesn't want to be in control of lots of stuff; it's difficult and dangerous. But a lot of the public don't see it that way.
    It seems they're not interested in doing it and quite right too.

    It'd be too much of a can of worms to step in now. Given failed businesses have already collapsed if the government stepped in to bail out the next one before it collapsed there'd be uproar about why all the others weren't saved too.

    Moral hazard is a real issue and its not a bad thing that all these dodgy companies who failed to hedge have gone bust. Hopefully shareholders of other companies that sell long and buy short will stress test their business model and get hedges in place where required.
    There is going to be a huge grant to existing/surviving energy companies and who's to say the ones in receipt of the grants are going to survive.

    The govt was talking about 6-10 providers in the end game. How many do we have now?

    Plus if I was sitting in the treasury dept of, say, EDF, I would be looking at rinsing the govt for every penny possible.

    I don't see how the govt does this without huge grants to the remaining GasCos.
    The other issue is a lack of, well, competition in the absence of many competing companies, which will lead to opportunities for a bit of an oligopoly. It must take a bit of time to set up a new small supplier and investors will be, rightly, wary (as might customers).
  • PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 67,956
    On energy, I had an idea that we should vastly overbuild wind - but encourage large commercial (And some larger homes as we get more potential 'excess' electricity) to have an electric combi-boiler as well as a gas combi so when it's windy we switch over to use less overall gas in the mix (And when it's quiet use gas).
  • gealbhangealbhan Posts: 2,362
    edited September 22

    Useless Nonentity falls further behind on best PM

    https://twitter.com/Survation/status/1440658975356162049

    Oh - you back to swinging that way and pushing that agenda this week?

    Seriously, is there anything he can start doing and signalling that changes your mind?
  • felix said:

    kinabalu said:

    MaxPB said:

    Can someone explain why the government should be bailing out energy resellers? It's not as though they set fire to the pylons when they go under. They're nothing more than a call centre and dodgy branding. We're with Bulb, almost certain they'll go under too as they refused to hedge against rising prices.

    Any company that sells long and buys short that fails to hedge absolutely deserves to go bust and there shouldn't be any bail out whatsoever.

    There's procedures to protect customers being moved over to suppliers of last resort and its reasonable for that to be underwritten - but no bailout for failed business models.
    I wouldn't say they necessarily deserve to go bust but if they mismatch maturities without the reserves to cover a move against them, that's reckless and they shouldn't get a state bailout.

    Public ownership looks the way to go for retail energy supply. One entity, simple tariff, uniform stable pricing, strip out all the needless complexity.
    How about telecom too? I mean, I can remember how great BT was before it was privatised! British rail was really good as well, and as for British Leyland, what quality! Oh, yes, the man in Whitehall. He definitely knows how to deliver great service!
    How dare you malign the great British Leyland - how can you forget the Allegro?


    What a beauty!
  • felixfelix Posts: 13,692
    gealbhan said:

    Useless Nonentity falls further behind on best PM

    https://twitter.com/Survation/status/1440658975356162049

    Oh - you back to swinging that way and pushing that agenda this week?

    Seriously, is there anything he can start doing and signalling that changes your mind?
    Resign?
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 34,184
    ping said:

    Bloody brilliant.

    As feared, my supplier, Green, has just gone bust. Not convinced I’ll get my credit balance back off them. Loads of customers have large balances after they offered an almost unlimited 10% extra credit-if-you-top-up, earlier in the year.

    Silly me. That was a warning sign of a badly run company borrowing money from their customers. Expensive lesson learned.

    They needed the cash at the time, and consumer credit balances are protected under OFCOM to nothing to lose.

    It’s always fun to se a bust company blaming regulatory failings, for their own failure to hedge the material price at under the retail price, especially when they were selling future prices into the retail market.
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 34,184

    kinabalu said:

    MaxPB said:

    Can someone explain why the government should be bailing out energy resellers? It's not as though they set fire to the pylons when they go under. They're nothing more than a call centre and dodgy branding. We're with Bulb, almost certain they'll go under too as they refused to hedge against rising prices.

    Any company that sells long and buys short that fails to hedge absolutely deserves to go bust and there shouldn't be any bail out whatsoever.

    There's procedures to protect customers being moved over to suppliers of last resort and its reasonable for that to be underwritten - but no bailout for failed business models.
    I wouldn't say they necessarily deserve to go bust but if they mismatch maturities without the reserves to cover a move against them, that's reckless and they shouldn't get a state bailout.

    Public ownership looks the way to go for retail energy supply. One entity, simple tariff, uniform stable pricing, strip out all the needless complexity.
    How about telecom too? I mean, I can remember how great BT was before it was privatised! British rail was really good as well, and as for British Leyland, what quality! Oh, yes, the man in Whitehall. He definitely knows how to deliver great service!
    Ahh, British Telecom. Where you’d wait three months for them to connect a line, and you’d better be damn grateful that they deigned to serve you.
  • kinabalukinabalu Posts: 24,393
    TOPPING said:

    kinabalu said:

    MaxPB said:

    Can someone explain why the government should be bailing out energy resellers? It's not as though they set fire to the pylons when they go under. They're nothing more than a call centre and dodgy branding. We're with Bulb, almost certain they'll go under too as they refused to hedge against rising prices.

    Any company that sells long and buys short that fails to hedge absolutely deserves to go bust and there shouldn't be any bail out whatsoever.

    There's procedures to protect customers being moved over to suppliers of last resort and its reasonable for that to be underwritten - but no bailout for failed business models.
    I wouldn't say they necessarily deserve to go bust but if they mismatch maturities without the reserves to cover a move against them, that's reckless and they shouldn't get a state bailout.

    Public ownership looks the way to go for retail energy supply. One entity, simple tariff, uniform stable pricing, strip out all the needless complexity.
    Not sure it's a great idea. Don't whatever you do tell Sid.
    Oh god, yes, "Sid", I remember that. End of public utility, start of director share options and the bowler hat brigade all "bed and breakfasting".
  • maaarshmaaarsh Posts: 2,356

    TOPPING said:

    MaxPB said:

    Can someone explain why the government should be bailing out energy resellers? It's not as though they set fire to the pylons when they go under. They're nothing more than a call centre and dodgy branding. We're with Bulb, almost certain they'll go under too as they refused to hedge against rising prices.

    Are they? I thought they were wiping out the equity in those shonky providers and ensuring they (the customers) go to the bigger ones. Are they subsidising the bigger providers for the now more expensive gas they will have to buy in the spot market? I presume so.

    Quite a fiscal transfer to the private energy companies if so and I would imagine there will be some shenanigans by those smart treasury depts to ensure the revenues are maximised.
    If 'suppliers of last resort' are taking on unprofitable accounts as a service to ensure continuity of service, it seems reasonable for that service to be underwritten.

    That's different to bailing out failed companies. The underwriting is going to a successful company offering a service not a failed one that screwed up.
    It'd be even more reasonable to just tell customers that they bet on a low fixed price, lost and will now be transferred to the standard variable price of an alternate supplier (still covered by the government price cap).

    Hard to see why taxpayers should be effectively subsidising the energy prices of people who signed up to below market prices with companies that couldn't deliver.
  • Scott_xPScott_xP Posts: 15,832
    BoZo is a liar who tells lies...

    Boris Johnson, when asked about Joe Biden's concerns over the Northern Ireland protocol, told reporters: "The president actually in our meeting yesterday, I don't think it came up at all. We had a meeting of over 90 minutes & it wasn't raised."
    cf. the White House readout:
    https://twitter.com/BBCJLandale/status/1440690141459222544/photo/1
  • gealbhangealbhan Posts: 2,362
    Pulpstar said:

    On energy, I had an idea that we should vastly overbuild wind - but encourage large commercial (And some larger homes as we get more potential 'excess' electricity) to have an electric combi-boiler as well as a gas combi so when it's windy we switch over to use less overall gas in the mix (And when it's quiet use gas).

    How much do we import? How much control do we then have? CO2 for example, how dependent are we on supplies from EU? So how nice do we have to be to them to stop them playing hard ball?
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 68,915

    Sorry Big G, I know you’d set your hopes on this one.

    PM's spokesman, asked about UK wanting to join US/Mex/Can free trade area: "That's not an approach we are currently taking."
    Kite downed.


    https://twitter.com/paulwaugh/status/1440647305372131332?s=21

    Sorry Big G, I know you’d set your hopes on this one.

    PM's spokesman, asked about UK wanting to join US/Mex/Can free trade area: "That's not an approach we are currently taking."
    Kite downed.


    https://twitter.com/paulwaugh/status/1440647305372131332?s=21

    And has Trudeau applied to join AUUKUS yet? We were categorically assured that the only reason Canada wasn't involved was because an election was underway.
    A few people speculating which several disagreed about is 'categorical assurance'?
  • Sandpit said:

    kinabalu said:

    MaxPB said:

    Can someone explain why the government should be bailing out energy resellers? It's not as though they set fire to the pylons when they go under. They're nothing more than a call centre and dodgy branding. We're with Bulb, almost certain they'll go under too as they refused to hedge against rising prices.

    Any company that sells long and buys short that fails to hedge absolutely deserves to go bust and there shouldn't be any bail out whatsoever.

    There's procedures to protect customers being moved over to suppliers of last resort and its reasonable for that to be underwritten - but no bailout for failed business models.
    I wouldn't say they necessarily deserve to go bust but if they mismatch maturities without the reserves to cover a move against them, that's reckless and they shouldn't get a state bailout.

    Public ownership looks the way to go for retail energy supply. One entity, simple tariff, uniform stable pricing, strip out all the needless complexity.
    How about telecom too? I mean, I can remember how great BT was before it was privatised! British rail was really good as well, and as for British Leyland, what quality! Oh, yes, the man in Whitehall. He definitely knows how to deliver great service!
    Ahh, British Telecom. Where you’d wait three months for them to connect a line, and you’d better be damn grateful that they deigned to serve you.
    It was so much better in those days. You got what you were told you were allowed. None of this choice nonsense. When you were eventually allowed a phone line (sometimes a "party" line -remember those?), you would then have a choice of a bakerlite dial phone in cream or black. Those were the days eh?
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 88,963
    edited September 22

    Fixed it for you.
    Prepare for the new Franco Kiwi alliance and love in with Beijing, NZ can barely be considered part of the Anglosphere now under Ardern, no wonder it is out of AUSUSUK.

    Note New Zealand also the only nation in the Anglosphere Commonwealth realms still not to have agreed a FTA with post Brexit UK
  • MattWMattW Posts: 9,983
    edited September 22

    I still haven't seen anybody explain how we went for a big what was it 6 or 8 energy companies and a handful of niche ones to over 70. This seems to just happened really quickly. Did something change in the law that encouraged it, or did a load of peoppe think they could be gas traders and chance their arm?

    I don't know anything really about the sector, but it just doesn't seem like a good business to be in for a small company. You don't control the production, you are totally at the mercy of a market you can't control in anyway plus government caps prices, you have to deal with pain in the ass public. Doesn't seem like an easy buck opportunity.

    Profits = Capitalism = Goes to shareholders
    Losses = Socialism = Goes to the state/Redistributed across the industry

    Like much of our mixed economy its a rigged game favouring capital, sometimes more than just capitalism would.
    Except that's not what's happening.

    Get-rich-quickers are going bust, and the more solid ones seem to be being supported.

    And we have robust customer protection measures in place.

    Markets doing their job.
  • gealbhangealbhan Posts: 2,362
    nico679 said:

    It’s amazing how little has been mentioned of the UK leaving the EU Internal Energy Market and the impact that has had on gas
    prices .

    Prices are rising across Europe but the UK is now paying more for gas than its neighbours . Do we log this as yet another Brexit benefit !

    Is that actually true? Does it technically have to be true?
  • pingping Posts: 1,287
    edited September 22
    Govt should ditch the energy cap.

    Forcing energy companies to sell below cost creates more problems than it solves.

    Let the free market sort itself out.

    The action the govt should be taking is keeping the £20/wk UC uplift. Perhaps even raise it a bit more.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 68,915

    Emmanual Macron expects "concrete measures" from Joe Biden to restore confidence in the USA.

    https://twitter.com/Malbrunot/status/1440680486691430407

    Saying you want concrete measures may be counter productive to getting them as it puts Biden's back up, in the same way nothing is likely to make a grateful person ungrateful faster, than telling them they should be grateful.
  • isamisam Posts: 38,082

    isam said:

    isam said:

    Leon said:

    FPT for RCS


    Replace your bogus "bad mother monkey" story with this (which I learned only yesterday)


    "Fearful memories haunt mouse descendants"


    "Mouse pups — and even the offspring's offspring — can inherit a fearful association of a certain smell with pain, even if they have not experienced the pain themselves, and without the need for genetic mutations. "


    YOU CAN INHERIT, FROM YOUR PARENTS, EVEN GRANDPARENTS, A SHUDDERING FEAR OF SOMETHING STRANGE THAT HAPPENED TO THEM, NOT YOU

    Extraordinary. The ramifications are endless, and creepy as hell. Good for someone trying to write spooky stories, tho


    https://www.nature.com/articles/nature.2013.14272

    I seem to remember Peter Hitchens thinks this happens
    Hitchens is a creationist, so anything to undermine Darwinism would be endorsed by him.
    Is he? I have never heard or read him say that
    See here. He also endorses Andrew Wakefield while he's at it.

    https://hitchensblog.mailonsunday.co.uk/2006/11/fanatics_in_the.html
    I have seen here - does he say he is a creationist? He says

    "people on one side of this dispute tend to misrepresent the other side. Rational scientists who are doubtful about Darwinism are abused. And expressions such as 'Creationism' are used to suggest that a complex, nuanced position is in fact a crude Hillbilly superstition."

    and

    "I am sure some supporters of ID do so for tactical reasons, and actually believe (but keep quiet about their belief) that the Genesis account of the creation of the world is literally true, and is an accurate and factual description of events - that the Earth was made in six days and is only a few thousand years old. This I, and many other Christians, do not agree with. I think the scientific evidence on the age of the planet simply contradicts this view."
  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 31,244
    edited September 22
    kinabalu said:

    TOPPING said:

    kinabalu said:

    MaxPB said:

    Can someone explain why the government should be bailing out energy resellers? It's not as though they set fire to the pylons when they go under. They're nothing more than a call centre and dodgy branding. We're with Bulb, almost certain they'll go under too as they refused to hedge against rising prices.

    Any company that sells long and buys short that fails to hedge absolutely deserves to go bust and there shouldn't be any bail out whatsoever.

    There's procedures to protect customers being moved over to suppliers of last resort and its reasonable for that to be underwritten - but no bailout for failed business models.
    I wouldn't say they necessarily deserve to go bust but if they mismatch maturities without the reserves to cover a move against them, that's reckless and they shouldn't get a state bailout.

    Public ownership looks the way to go for retail energy supply. One entity, simple tariff, uniform stable pricing, strip out all the needless complexity.
    Not sure it's a great idea. Don't whatever you do tell Sid.
    Oh god, yes, "Sid", I remember that. End of public utility, start of director share options and the bowler hat brigade all "bed and breakfasting".
    Wasn't it about the time you entered the City so something about it must have appealed.
  • rkrkrkrkrkrk Posts: 7,042

    kinabalu said:

    MaxPB said:

    Can someone explain why the government should be bailing out energy resellers? It's not as though they set fire to the pylons when they go under. They're nothing more than a call centre and dodgy branding. We're with Bulb, almost certain they'll go under too as they refused to hedge against rising prices.

    Any company that sells long and buys short that fails to hedge absolutely deserves to go bust and there shouldn't be any bail out whatsoever.

    There's procedures to protect customers being moved over to suppliers of last resort and its reasonable for that to be underwritten - but no bailout for failed business models.
    I wouldn't say they necessarily deserve to go bust but if they mismatch maturities without the reserves to cover a move against them, that's reckless and they shouldn't get a state bailout.

    Public ownership looks the way to go for retail energy supply. One entity, simple tariff, uniform stable pricing, strip out all the needless complexity.
    How about telecom too? I mean, I can remember how great BT was before it was privatised! British rail was really good as well, and as for British Leyland, what quality! Oh, yes, the man in Whitehall. He definitely knows how to deliver great service!
    Public ownership for things where you can't have proper competition. Like water, trains, energy.
  • YouGov have just asked me the greatest polling question ever.


  • PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 67,956
    gealbhan said:

    Pulpstar said:

    On energy, I had an idea that we should vastly overbuild wind - but encourage large commercial (And some larger homes as we get more potential 'excess' electricity) to have an electric combi-boiler as well as a gas combi so when it's windy we switch over to use less overall gas in the mix (And when it's quiet use gas).

    How much do we import? How much control do we then have? CO2 for example, how dependent are we on supplies from EU? So how nice do we have to be to them to stop them playing hard ball?
    ???? My proposal vastly would decrease our reliance on others.
  • Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 56,948
    Mr. Ping, the energy cap does seem... unwise.
  • felix said:

    Oh dear - Biden cozies up to the UK - no more good headers on PB for him. :smiley: I'm sure it was unintentional but the way the header is worded suggests a causal link between the bad polling and the meeting with Boris.

    We've been flagging up Biden's unpopularity for a bit.

    https://www2.politicalbetting.com/index.php/archives/2021/08/25/for-78-year-old-biden-not-being-trump-is-no-longer-enough/
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 34,184

    https://www.gov.uk/government/news/government-publishes-independent-report-into-regulation-of-football-index

    https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1017268/Report_of_the_Independent_Review_of_the_Regulation_of_BetIndex_Limited._Final_version_130921_.pdf

    Summary of their findings:

    Could have done better
    Lessons must be learned
    Updated frameworks and memorandums.

    ---------

    In reality, regulators were naive and incompetent (not simply could have done better), no accountability (so why will the lessons be learnt), its being whitewashed and forgotten.

    Wait until the regulators start arguing among themselves, over who’s going to be responsible for shutting down the NFT ‘sticker book’ company who’s sending several hundred million the way of the Premier League, for ‘image rights’ to their scam.
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