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Not the performance of a government that is going to be re-elected – politicalbetting.com

SystemSystem Posts: 11,002
edited March 12 in General
Not the performance of a government that is going to be re-elected – politicalbetting.com

At least 2/3 of Britons say the government is doing badly at each of Rishi Sunak's pledgesCutting NHS waiting lists: 88% doing badlyRemoving small boats migrants: 79%Reducing national debt: 71%Encouraging economic growth: 69%Reducing inflation: 67%https://t.co/PMVJRFCWiv pic.twitter.com/x2b1gbIv5W

Read the full story here

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Comments

  • First like Starmer.
  • viewcodeviewcode Posts: 18,531
    edited February 21
    Second like somebody famous who came second. Trump probably. Or Dec. Yes, Dec is a good example. Second like Dec. That'll work.
  • FPT
    ydoethur said:

    ydoethur said:

    So we can now go back to thinking Starmer's not a misunderstood tactical genius again.

    Thank goodness for that.

    @OwenJones84
    If this was Boris Johnson behaving like this, quite rightly, “centrist” commentators would be howling in outrage.

    They’d call it thuggery, blackmail and an assault on the democratic system.

    Let’s see how they respond to this, shall we!


    https://twitter.com/OwenJones84/status/1760317560942203153
    Oh good god, I…. I…. agree with Owen Jones.

    I think I need a lie down.
    Whether he's right or wrong, his grammar is so bad and the result so incoherent even Warren G. Harding would blink.

    How did an idiot like that ever get into uni?
    He was accepted to Oxford University, that tells you everything.
  • Luckyguy1983Luckyguy1983 Posts: 25,213
    Rishi to go now please. Enjoy Silicon Valley. Don't stay in touch.
  • LostPasswordLostPassword Posts: 14,956
    Wait a minute. The public rate Sunak's performance in encouraging economic growth as his second best out of five, when the latest estimates have Britain in recession?

    That's really bad.
  • SelebianSelebian Posts: 7,310
    viewcode said:

    Second like somebody famous who came second. Trump probably. Or Dec. Yes, Dec is a good example. Second like Dec. That'll work.

    December is 12th, Shirley?
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 62,041
    Selebian said:

    viewcode said:

    Second like somebody famous who came second. Trump probably. Or Dec. Yes, Dec is a good example. Second like Dec. That'll work.

    December is 12th, Shirley?
    Say it Ant so.
  • FairlieredFairliered Posts: 3,934

    First like Starmer.

    Did you bully OGH into letting you always post first?
  • AlsoLeiAlsoLei Posts: 609
    FPT

    ydoethur said:

    @kateferguson4
    🚨🚨🚨

    Hearing the SNP are seeking urgent discussions with Tories about getting rid of Speaker Sir Lindsay Hoyle after todays Gaza amendment row


    https://twitter.com/kateferguson4/status/1760304767434150198

    SNP teaming up with Tories will play *really well* north of the border...
    1979 all over again!
    The Tories could vote for the SNP motion in a game of bluff and counter bluff. Ideally sufficient Tories would abstain to ensure it was passed on the votes of Labour rebels.
    I believe the unamended motion only gets voted on if no amendments are accepted. So that would need the Tories to vote down their own amendment...
  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 58,094
    edited February 21
    Bet accordingly for London Mayor:


    John Rentoul
    @JohnRentoul
    ·
    1h
    My phone just rang on the Tube on 5G in between stations. What has Sadiq Khan done?
  • viewcodeviewcode Posts: 18,531
    Selebian said:

    viewcode said:

    Second like somebody famous who came second. Trump probably. Or Dec. Yes, Dec is a good example. Second like Dec. That'll work.

    December is 12th, Shirley?
    Dec. Not Dec. The other Dec. The one who isn't Ant. That Dec. :)
  • LostPasswordLostPassword Posts: 14,956
    The other thing that strikes me about this is that these are tests Sunak set himself. You'd expect he wouldn't have done so without a plan of how to meet his tests. And somehow he's flunked them all - except inflation, which is officially the remit of the Bank of England anyway.
  • First like Starmer.

    Did you bully OGH into letting you always post first?
    No, it is often a test to see if the comments are open.

    Sometimes if the headline is too big it will not let people comment on the thread.
  • LostPasswordLostPassword Posts: 14,956
    Selebian said:

    viewcode said:

    Second like somebody famous who came second. Trump probably. Or Dec. Yes, Dec is a good example. Second like Dec. That'll work.

    December is 12th, Shirley?
    10th. Clue is in the name.

    Implies we should start a new year at the beginning of March. Which would also mean that we could use leap day, every four years, to have an even bigger New Year's Eve party than normal.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 91,510
    edited February 21
    I do love procedural wrangling. This one is especially tasty because

    a) a (good) procedure Hoyle put in place has come back to bite him, and

    b) the quotes from Labour figures to BBC Newsnight totally throw Hoyle under the bus by acknowledging he was essentially instructed to do it or he would lose his job as Speaker after the election.

    Totally undermines whatever rationale he might have, however reasonable that is, with the party going 'yeah, we strongarmed him'.
  • AlsoLeiAlsoLei Posts: 609
    On topic, it's fascinating to see that people believe by 67% to 22% that Sunak is failing even on the pledge to reduce inflation

    I mean, I'm about as far from being a Sunakian as it's possible to get, and even I'll admit that inflation has fallen from where it was a year ago!

    So 67% of the population are prepared to kick Sunak for any reason, whether valid or not....
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 91,510
    edited February 21
    AlsoLei said:

    FPT

    ydoethur said:

    @kateferguson4
    🚨🚨🚨

    Hearing the SNP are seeking urgent discussions with Tories about getting rid of Speaker Sir Lindsay Hoyle after todays Gaza amendment row


    https://twitter.com/kateferguson4/status/1760304767434150198

    SNP teaming up with Tories will play *really well* north of the border...
    1979 all over again!
    The Tories could vote for the SNP motion in a game of bluff and counter bluff. Ideally sufficient Tories would abstain to ensure it was passed on the votes of Labour rebels.
    I believe the unamended motion only gets voted on if no amendments are accepted. So that would need the Tories to vote down their own amendment...
    Sillier things have happened.

    Actually I think they might have done that exact thing in the last year or so, unless my memory is playing tricks on me.
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 39,468
    AlsoLei said:

    On topic, it's fascinating to see that people believe by 67% to 22% that Sunak is failing even on the pledge to reduce inflation

    I mean, I'm about as far from being a Sunakian as it's possible to get, and even I'll admit that inflation has fallen from where it was a year ago!

    So 67% of the population are prepared to kick Sunak for any reason, whether valid or not....

    Depends. It's not the differential but the integral that kicks people in the nads.
  • numbertwelvenumbertwelve Posts: 5,416
    kle4 said:

    I do love procedural wrangling. This one is especially tasty because

    a) a (good) procedure Hoyle put in place has come back to bite him, and

    b) the quotes from Labour figures to BBC Newsnight totally throw Hoyle under the bus by acknowledging he was essentially instructed to do it or he would lose his job as Speaker after the election.

    Totally undermines whatever rationale he might have, however reasonable that is, with the party going 'yeah, we strongarmed him'.

    Makes you wonder if some figures in Labour want Hoyle out regardless (not sure why that would be, though). It feels like they are throwing him under the bus like you say, and it’s entirely possible he will lose his job as a result.
  • FairlieredFairliered Posts: 3,934
    viewcode said:

    Selebian said:

    viewcode said:

    Second like somebody famous who came second. Trump probably. Or Dec. Yes, Dec is a good example. Second like Dec. That'll work.

    December is 12th, Shirley?
    Dec. Not Dec. The other Dec. The one who isn't Ant. That Dec. :)
    Is he the one who was Decandant or is that the other one?
  • AlsoLei said:

    On topic, it's fascinating to see that people believe by 67% to 22% that Sunak is failing even on the pledge to reduce inflation

    I mean, I'm about as far from being a Sunakian as it's possible to get, and even I'll admit that inflation has fallen from where it was a year ago!

    So 67% of the population are prepared to kick Sunak for any reason, whether valid or not....

    It's not that, most voters think falling inflation means prices are falling.

    When Rishi Sunak says he aims to halve inflation, British voters think he aims to get...

    Prices to decrease 47%
    Prices to increase more slowly 42%
    Don't know 11%

    https://www1.politicalbetting.com/index.php/archives/2023/06/11/deflating-rishi-sunak/

    Basically the voters are thick.
  • Andy_JSAndy_JS Posts: 26,334
    AlsoLei said:

    On topic, it's fascinating to see that people believe by 67% to 22% that Sunak is failing even on the pledge to reduce inflation

    I mean, I'm about as far from being a Sunakian as it's possible to get, and even I'll admit that inflation has fallen from where it was a year ago!

    So 67% of the population are prepared to kick Sunak for any reason, whether valid or not....

    If you care about objective truth, it isn't good. The same is true in the United States. People just deciding to believe whatever they want.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 91,510
    AlsoLei said:

    On topic, it's fascinating to see that people believe by 67% to 22% that Sunak is failing even on the pledge to reduce inflation

    I mean, I'm about as far from being a Sunakian as it's possible to get, and even I'll admit that inflation has fallen from where it was a year ago!

    So 67% of the population are prepared to kick Sunak for any reason, whether valid or not....

    Two things I think are true.

    Sunak has got a difficult situation and the general anti tory position is such he won't get credit even where deserved.

    He's also proven to be so inept that he's contributed to that atmosphere getting so bad.

    So sympathy is limited. I think the scale of the GE loss will be a bit harsh on him personally, but not outrageously so.
  • SelebianSelebian Posts: 7,310

    Why are our elected politicians twatting around about a ceasefire in a conflict between two combatants who couldn't really give a toss about what we want them to do? What's the point? Any sane person (difficult to find in this parliament, admittedly) would say a ceasefire in any conflict would be a damn fine thing. What's to discuss? Haven't they got stuff to debate around things they actually do have control of, like the PO scandal, the state of the economy, why the armed forces are on their arse...
    Or is that too hard for them?

    I'll vote for whichever party puts forward and amendment based on the above.
  • RobDRobD Posts: 58,953

    AlsoLei said:

    On topic, it's fascinating to see that people believe by 67% to 22% that Sunak is failing even on the pledge to reduce inflation

    I mean, I'm about as far from being a Sunakian as it's possible to get, and even I'll admit that inflation has fallen from where it was a year ago!

    So 67% of the population are prepared to kick Sunak for any reason, whether valid or not....

    It's not that, most voters think falling inflation means prices are falling.

    When Rishi Sunak says he aims to halve inflation, British voters think he aims to get...

    Prices to decrease 47%
    Prices to increase more slowly 42%
    Don't know 11%

    https://www1.politicalbetting.com/index.php/archives/2023/06/11/deflating-rishi-sunak/

    Basically the voters are thick.
    I spoke to someone a few months ago who were saying that the government set the inflation rate. I extricated myself from the conversation as quickly as possible.
  • TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 114,147
    edited February 21

    Seems like the Iranians have supplied Russia with hundreds of ballistic missiles. At the moment Russia seems to be receiving more supplies from its allies (Iran and North Korea) them Ukraine is receiving from its allies.

    That's embarrassing.

    And some [moderated] have the cheek to blame Biden and not the GOP and Trump.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 91,510

    kle4 said:

    I do love procedural wrangling. This one is especially tasty because

    a) a (good) procedure Hoyle put in place has come back to bite him, and

    b) the quotes from Labour figures to BBC Newsnight totally throw Hoyle under the bus by acknowledging he was essentially instructed to do it or he would lose his job as Speaker after the election.

    Totally undermines whatever rationale he might have, however reasonable that is, with the party going 'yeah, we strongarmed him'.

    Makes you wonder if some figures in Labour want Hoyle out regardless (not sure why that would be, though). It feels like they are throwing him under the bus like you say, and it’s entirely possible he will lose his job as a result.
    We know the Starmerites are ruthless.

    Why have 'senior Labour figures' admit that if not to make him look cowardly?

    He's been played if the report is correct.
  • SelebianSelebian Posts: 7,310

    AlsoLei said:

    On topic, it's fascinating to see that people believe by 67% to 22% that Sunak is failing even on the pledge to reduce inflation

    I mean, I'm about as far from being a Sunakian as it's possible to get, and even I'll admit that inflation has fallen from where it was a year ago!

    So 67% of the population are prepared to kick Sunak for any reason, whether valid or not....

    It's not that, most voters think falling inflation means prices are falling.

    When Rishi Sunak says he aims to halve inflation, British voters think he aims to get...

    Prices to decrease 47%
    Prices to increase more slowly 42%
    Don't know 11%

    https://www1.politicalbetting.com/index.php/archives/2023/06/11/deflating-rishi-sunak/

    Basically the voters are thick.
    I read that first response as 'prices to decrease [by] 47%' and thought that was a weirdly precise (and off, even on the internal logic that falling inflation means falling prices) misinterpretation of halving inflation.
  • Sky saying there will be 3 votes at 7.00pm

    Labour amendment first

    SNP on motion

    Final vote on government amendment
  • Sky saying there will be 3 votes at 7.00pm

    Labour amendment first

    SNP on motion

    Final vote on government amendment

    A completely wasted day.
  • StereodogStereodog Posts: 399
    Selebian said:

    Why are our elected politicians twatting around about a ceasefire in a conflict between two combatants who couldn't really give a toss about what we want them to do? What's the point? Any sane person (difficult to find in this parliament, admittedly) would say a ceasefire in any conflict would be a damn fine thing. What's to discuss? Haven't they got stuff to debate around things they actually do have control of, like the PO scandal, the state of the economy, why the armed forces are on their arse...
    Or is that too hard for them?

    I'll vote for whichever party puts forward and amendment based on the above.
    This whole thing has a whiff of GK Chesterton’s poetic response to F.E. Smith saying that the Welsh Disestablishment Bill was “A Bill which has shocked the conscience of every Christian community in Europe.”

    ARE they clinging to their crosses,
    F.E. Smith,
    Where the Breton boat-fleet tosses,
    Are they, Smith?
    Do they, fasting, trembling, bleeding,
    Wait the news from this our city?
    Groaning 'That's the Second Reading!'
    Hissing 'There is still Committee!'
    If the voice of Cecil falters,
    If McKenna's point has pith,
    Do they tremble for their altars?
    Do they, Smith?
  • Luckyguy1983Luckyguy1983 Posts: 25,213
    AlsoLei said:

    On topic, it's fascinating to see that people believe by 67% to 22% that Sunak is failing even on the pledge to reduce inflation

    I mean, I'm about as far from being a Sunakian as it's possible to get, and even I'll admit that inflation has fallen from where it was a year ago!

    So 67% of the population are prepared to kick Sunak for any reason, whether valid or not....

    Restores ones faith in the British electorate doesn't it?

    *Poor Sunak I am feeling a trifle sorry for the man now. I dare say it will pass.
  • kle4 said:

    I do love procedural wrangling. This one is especially tasty because

    a) a (good) procedure Hoyle put in place has come back to bite him, and

    b) the quotes from Labour figures to BBC Newsnight totally throw Hoyle under the bus by acknowledging he was essentially instructed to do it or he would lose his job as Speaker after the election.

    Totally undermines whatever rationale he might have, however reasonable that is, with the party going 'yeah, we strongarmed him'.

    Same, I love a good constitutional crisis.

    With Sir Peter Bottomley standing down at the election, who is likely to be the Father/Mother of the House after the general election?

    Their first act will be to preside over the election/re-election of a Speaker.

    Anyhoo, pop quiz PBers, what was so special about Henry Campbell-Bannerman's stint as Father of the House?
  • williamglennwilliamglenn Posts: 47,940

    Seems like the Iranians have supplied Russia with hundreds of ballistic missiles. At the moment Russia seems to be receiving more supplies from its allies (Iran and North Korea) them Ukraine is receiving from its allies.

    That's embarrassing.

    And some [moderated] have the cheek to blame Biden and not the GOP and Trump.
    Biden bypassed Congress to redirect arms from Ukraine to Israel.

    https://www.axios.com/2023/10/19/us-israel-artillery-shells-ukraine-weapons-gaza

    The Pentagon plans to send Israel tens of thousands of 155mm artillery shells that had been destined for Ukraine from U.S. emergency stocks several months ago, three Israeli officials with knowledge of the situation tell Axios.
  • TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 114,147
    edited February 21

    Seems like the Iranians have supplied Russia with hundreds of ballistic missiles. At the moment Russia seems to be receiving more supplies from its allies (Iran and North Korea) them Ukraine is receiving from its allies.

    That's embarrassing.

    And some [moderated] have the cheek to blame Biden and not the GOP and Trump.
    Biden bypassed Congress to redirect arms from Ukraine to Israel.

    https://www.axios.com/2023/10/19/us-israel-artillery-shells-ukraine-weapons-gaza

    The Pentagon plans to send Israel tens of thousands of 155mm artillery shells that had been destined for Ukraine from U.S. emergency stocks several months ago, three Israeli officials with knowledge of the situation tell Axios.
    Non sequitur.

    It is entirely possible to support both Israel and Ukraine at the same time.

    Apologies to the Corbynites and hard left who were triggered by that observation.
  • LeonLeon Posts: 46,464

    Seems like the Iranians have supplied Russia with hundreds of ballistic missiles. At the moment Russia seems to be receiving more supplies from its allies (Iran and North Korea) them Ukraine is receiving from its allies.

    That's embarrassing.

    And some [moderated] have the cheek to blame Biden and not the GOP and Trump.
    Biden bypassed Congress to redirect arms from Ukraine to Israel.

    https://www.axios.com/2023/10/19/us-israel-artillery-shells-ukraine-weapons-gaza

    The Pentagon plans to send Israel tens of thousands of 155mm artillery shells that had been destined for Ukraine from U.S. emergency stocks several months ago, three Israeli officials with knowledge of the situation tell Axios.
    That’s a really bad look for Biden

    He is pissing off his young/minority voters, and he can’t afford to do that
  • RobD said:

    AlsoLei said:

    On topic, it's fascinating to see that people believe by 67% to 22% that Sunak is failing even on the pledge to reduce inflation

    I mean, I'm about as far from being a Sunakian as it's possible to get, and even I'll admit that inflation has fallen from where it was a year ago!

    So 67% of the population are prepared to kick Sunak for any reason, whether valid or not....

    It's not that, most voters think falling inflation means prices are falling.

    When Rishi Sunak says he aims to halve inflation, British voters think he aims to get...

    Prices to decrease 47%
    Prices to increase more slowly 42%
    Don't know 11%

    https://www1.politicalbetting.com/index.php/archives/2023/06/11/deflating-rishi-sunak/

    Basically the voters are thick.
    I spoke to someone a few months ago who were saying that the government set the inflation rate. I extricated myself from the conversation as quickly as possible.
    Being generous I hope they meant the government sets the inflation target.
  • bondegezoubondegezou Posts: 7,443
    AlsoLei said:

    On topic, it's fascinating to see that people believe by 67% to 22% that Sunak is failing even on the pledge to reduce inflation

    I mean, I'm about as far from being a Sunakian as it's possible to get, and even I'll admit that inflation has fallen from where it was a year ago!

    So 67% of the population are prepared to kick Sunak for any reason, whether valid or not....

    The poll ask how is the Government doing at decreasing inflation. One can observe that inflation has fallen, but not give the Government any credit for this event. Which is fair enough given that it's the Bank of England and/or the world economy adjusting after shocks that are mainly responsible.

    Or maybe it's just that people don't really bother with the wording of these questions and are just expressing their generic unhappiness.
  • Tory MP Sir Charles Walker against Will Wragg move against @CommonsSpeaker: “This furore will blow over. When the House of Commons comes to its senses it will realise very quickly that the removal of the speaker will only lead to metaphorical champagne corks popping in Tehran.”

    Sir Charles Walker added: “This debate has already placed enough strain on the institution of Parliament.”


    https://twitter.com/nicholaswatt/status/1760321784857919677
  • ChrisChris Posts: 11,054

    AlsoLei said:

    On topic, it's fascinating to see that people believe by 67% to 22% that Sunak is failing even on the pledge to reduce inflation

    I mean, I'm about as far from being a Sunakian as it's possible to get, and even I'll admit that inflation has fallen from where it was a year ago!

    So 67% of the population are prepared to kick Sunak for any reason, whether valid or not....

    It's not that, most voters think falling inflation means prices are falling.

    When Rishi Sunak says he aims to halve inflation, British voters think he aims to get...

    Prices to decrease 47%
    Prices to increase more slowly 42%
    Don't know 11%

    https://www1.politicalbetting.com/index.php/archives/2023/06/11/deflating-rishi-sunak/

    Basically the voters are thick.
    We'd hardly have had 14 years of Conservative government, if the voters hadn't been thick.
  • AlsoLei said:

    On topic, it's fascinating to see that people believe by 67% to 22% that Sunak is failing even on the pledge to reduce inflation

    I mean, I'm about as far from being a Sunakian as it's possible to get, and even I'll admit that inflation has fallen from where it was a year ago!

    So 67% of the population are prepared to kick Sunak for any reason, whether valid or not....

    The poll ask how is the Government doing at decreasing inflation. One can observe that inflation has fallen, but not give the Government any credit for this event. Which is fair enough given that it's the Bank of England and/or the world economy adjusting after shocks that are mainly responsible.

    Or maybe it's just that people don't really bother with the wording of these questions and are just expressing their generic unhappiness.
    There's also another aspect at work which has been picked up on by many focus groups.

    When inflation went up, Sunak said it was the fault of Russia etc but when it came down it was all thanks to Rishi.

    That really grates with voters.
  • Scott_xPScott_xP Posts: 32,793
    ...
  • nico679nico679 Posts: 4,640
    So some Tory MPs lecturing others about this being a bad day for democracy and Parliament when they said fxck all about Bozo illegally shutting down parliament and were happy to break international law .

    They really need to stfu and stop the faux outrage !
  • Leon said:

    Who is making our Trident missiles? Is it Boeing?

    "Boeing 757-200 Diverted From Route After Suffering Damage To One Of Its Wings"

    https://x.com/zerohedge/status/1760302382905237815?s=20


    Jeez. It sounds like the wing simply.... fell apart

    ????

    757s aren't exactly new - first one flew in 1982, newest one built in 2004.
  • Leon said:

    Seems like the Iranians have supplied Russia with hundreds of ballistic missiles. At the moment Russia seems to be receiving more supplies from its allies (Iran and North Korea) them Ukraine is receiving from its allies.

    That's embarrassing.

    And some [moderated] have the cheek to blame Biden and not the GOP and Trump.
    Biden bypassed Congress to redirect arms from Ukraine to Israel.

    https://www.axios.com/2023/10/19/us-israel-artillery-shells-ukraine-weapons-gaza

    The Pentagon plans to send Israel tens of thousands of 155mm artillery shells that had been destined for Ukraine from U.S. emergency stocks several months ago, three Israeli officials with knowledge of the situation tell Axios.
    That’s a really bad look for Biden

    He is pissing off his young/minority voters, and he can’t afford to do that
    And he's helping Poo-tin...
  • noneoftheabovenoneoftheabove Posts: 20,544
    RobD said:

    AlsoLei said:

    On topic, it's fascinating to see that people believe by 67% to 22% that Sunak is failing even on the pledge to reduce inflation

    I mean, I'm about as far from being a Sunakian as it's possible to get, and even I'll admit that inflation has fallen from where it was a year ago!

    So 67% of the population are prepared to kick Sunak for any reason, whether valid or not....

    It's not that, most voters think falling inflation means prices are falling.

    When Rishi Sunak says he aims to halve inflation, British voters think he aims to get...

    Prices to decrease 47%
    Prices to increase more slowly 42%
    Don't know 11%

    https://www1.politicalbetting.com/index.php/archives/2023/06/11/deflating-rishi-sunak/

    Basically the voters are thick.
    I spoke to someone a few months ago who were saying that the government set the inflation rate. I extricated myself from the conversation as quickly as possible.
    So how was Gavin Williamson doing back then?
  • NickPalmerNickPalmer Posts: 21,302

    Tory MP Sir Charles Walker against Will Wragg move against @CommonsSpeaker: “This furore will blow over. When the House of Commons comes to its senses it will realise very quickly that the removal of the speaker will only lead to metaphorical champagne corks popping in Tehran.”

    Sir Charles Walker added: “This debate has already placed enough strain on the institution of Parliament.”


    https://twitter.com/nicholaswatt/status/1760321784857919677

    I don't think he'll be removed (or should be) - a bad precedent to change the Speaker because you don't like one decision. But the idea that anyone in Teheran cares either way is preposterous.
  • LeonLeon Posts: 46,464
    Sora video of a dog typing at a computer

    At the 3rd or 4th glance you see the flaws. But damn, it is convincing

    https://x.com/picopaco17/status/1760011075485921519?s=46&t=bulOICNH15U6kB0MwE6Lfw

    It must be terrifying to be in video/Hollywood right now. How can they ever compete with this?
  • Seems like the Iranians have supplied Russia with hundreds of ballistic missiles. At the moment Russia seems to be receiving more supplies from its allies (Iran and North Korea) them Ukraine is receiving from its allies.

    That's embarrassing.

    And some [moderated] have the cheek to blame Biden and not the GOP and Trump.
    Biden bypassed Congress to redirect arms from Ukraine to Israel.

    https://www.axios.com/2023/10/19/us-israel-artillery-shells-ukraine-weapons-gaza

    The Pentagon plans to send Israel tens of thousands of 155mm artillery shells that had been destined for Ukraine from U.S. emergency stocks several months ago, three Israeli officials with knowledge of the situation tell Axios.
    Non sequitur.

    It is entirely possible to support both Israel and Ukraine at the same time.

    Apologies to the Corbynites and hard left who were triggered by that observation.
    Nah, I support both Palestine and Ukraine.
  • NickPalmerNickPalmer Posts: 21,302

    Sky saying there will be 3 votes at 7.00pm

    Labour amendment first

    SNP on motion

    Final vote on government amendment

    So presumably Lab+SNP vote yes on 1 but get voted down by the Tories, then Lab abstains (with some revels) on 2 and the Tories vote it down, then the Tory amendment passes. But what then? They have an amended motion - don't they have to vote on the motion as amended?
  • Tory MP Sir Charles Walker against Will Wragg move against @CommonsSpeaker: “This furore will blow over. When the House of Commons comes to its senses it will realise very quickly that the removal of the speaker will only lead to metaphorical champagne corks popping in Tehran.”

    Sir Charles Walker added: “This debate has already placed enough strain on the institution of Parliament.”


    https://twitter.com/nicholaswatt/status/1760321784857919677

    I don't think he'll be removed (or should be) - a bad precedent to change the Speaker because you don't like one decision. But the idea that anyone in Teheran cares either way is preposterous.
    Yes, it's a Shi'ite comment by Sir Charles Walker.
  • AverageNinjaAverageNinja Posts: 1,169

    Bet accordingly for London Mayor:


    John Rentoul
    @JohnRentoul
    ·
    1h
    My phone just rang on the Tube on 5G in between stations. What has Sadiq Khan done?

    By far the most transformative policy in years.
  • Anyone else shocked?

    Met Police officer found guilty of multiple rapes and kidnap

    Cliff Mitchell joined the force in 2021 having been accused of child rape in 2017


    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2024/02/21/met-police-officer-found-guilty-of-multiple-rapes-kidnap/
  • Andy_JSAndy_JS Posts: 26,334

    Bet accordingly for London Mayor:


    John Rentoul
    @JohnRentoul
    ·
    1h
    My phone just rang on the Tube on 5G in between stations. What has Sadiq Khan done?

    By far the most transformative policy in years.
    When did this come into operation?
  • LeonLeon Posts: 46,464
    edited February 21
    Jeepers. This guy is good on AI. He’s not mad and he has access to major models


    He thinks AGI will happen… this year. Unless he is trolling or joking in this tweet


    “It is my assertion that the test for “AGI” is not a clear one nor is the definition.

    Yet it is also my assertion that AGI (as they define it) will be “discovered” in a garage with 128 AI models running locally.

    It will have full agency and intent.

    It will happen this year.”

    https://x.com/brianroemmele/status/1760003818279055724?s=46&t=bulOICNH15U6kB0MwE6Lfw
  • AverageNinjaAverageNinja Posts: 1,169
    Andy_JS said:

    Bet accordingly for London Mayor:


    John Rentoul
    @JohnRentoul
    ·
    1h
    My phone just rang on the Tube on 5G in between stations. What has Sadiq Khan done?

    By far the most transformative policy in years.
    When did this come into operation?
    It's still rolling out but has been in progress since last year.

    Most of the Central Line is covered, with Elizabeth Line platforms and other stations going live soon. Also parts of the Northern line too.

    (Jubilee Line has been live since 2020 on an earlier pilot.)
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 44,042

    Anyone else shocked?

    Met Police officer found guilty of multiple rapes and kidnap

    Cliff Mitchell joined the force in 2021 having been accused of child rape in 2017


    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2024/02/21/met-police-officer-found-guilty-of-multiple-rapes-kidnap/

    Shocked - no.

    Think of it a successfully implementing diversity in the Police Force. A diverse range of criminals.
  • Leon said:

    Sora video of a dog typing at a computer

    At the 3rd or 4th glance you see the flaws. But damn, it is convincing

    https://x.com/picopaco17/status/1760011075485921519?s=46&t=bulOICNH15U6kB0MwE6Lfw

    It must be terrifying to be in video/Hollywood right now. How can they ever compete with this?

    Hollywood yes. Some independent television production company in Somewherestan making homegrown kids' programmes, no.
  • eekeek Posts: 24,866

    The Speaker should have told them all to get on with something more important. We all want the war to end even if we disagree about precisely how that should happen. And the combatants on both sides couldn't care in the slightest what our parliaments view on it happens to be. It is just grandstanding. Spend the time fixing something that actually can be fixed by parliament instead.

    This parliament is doing sod all
  • LostPasswordLostPassword Posts: 14,956

    The Speaker should have told them all to get on with something more important. We all want the war to end even if we disagree about precisely how that should happen. And the combatants on both sides couldn't care in the slightest what our parliaments view on it happens to be. It is just grandstanding. Spend the time fixing something that actually can be fixed by parliament instead.

    In Ireland the Opposition have called on the government to take specific steps that would have some impact on Israel - to the extent that the Irish government has felt compelled to write to the EU Commission requesting that the EU trade deal with Israel is suspended.

    Is there anything in the debate on Britain about taking any concrete steps to put pressure on Israel in any way, or is it purely grandstanding?
  • Daveyboy1961Daveyboy1961 Posts: 3,371

    Selebian said:

    viewcode said:

    Second like somebody famous who came second. Trump probably. Or Dec. Yes, Dec is a good example. Second like Dec. That'll work.

    December is 12th, Shirley?
    10th. Clue is in the name.

    Implies we should start a new year at the beginning of March. Which would also mean that we could use leap day, every four years, to have an even bigger New Year's Eve party than normal.
    New years day used to be on March 25th in the pre 1700s
  • malcolmgmalcolmg Posts: 41,800
    FPT
    Mexicanpete said:

    » show previous quotes
    The problem is the SNP in Westminster have for the second time used the tragedy of Gaza as a weapon with which to attack Labour division. I suppose weaponising Gaza simply to damage your opponent is fair game, if morally bankrupt. I do find it somewhat ironic nonetheless that the SNP bellyache that their silly game has been scuppered by a Labour silly game

    Two cheeks of the same arse, at least the SNP losers forced the labour Hypocrites to do something even if both are just virtue signalling. Fit SNP better if they did some work on Scotland rather than whining constantly about affairs well outside their remit.
  • LostPasswordLostPassword Posts: 14,956

    Selebian said:

    viewcode said:

    Second like somebody famous who came second. Trump probably. Or Dec. Yes, Dec is a good example. Second like Dec. That'll work.

    December is 12th, Shirley?
    10th. Clue is in the name.

    Implies we should start a new year at the beginning of March. Which would also mean that we could use leap day, every four years, to have an even bigger New Year's Eve party than normal.
    New years day used to be on March 25th in the pre 1700s
    Indeed it did. Which is why the tax year starts on April 6th.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 91,510

    kle4 said:

    I do love procedural wrangling. This one is especially tasty because

    a) a (good) procedure Hoyle put in place has come back to bite him, and

    b) the quotes from Labour figures to BBC Newsnight totally throw Hoyle under the bus by acknowledging he was essentially instructed to do it or he would lose his job as Speaker after the election.

    Totally undermines whatever rationale he might have, however reasonable that is, with the party going 'yeah, we strongarmed him'.

    Same, I love a good constitutional crisis.

    With Sir Peter Bottomley standing down at the election, who is likely to be the Father/Mother of the House after the general election?

    Their first act will be to preside over the election/re-election of a Speaker.

    Anyhoo, pop quiz PBers, what was so special about Henry Campbell-Bannerman's stint as Father of the House?
    If Corbyn stands as an Indy (he wont) it could be him as Father.
  • noneoftheabovenoneoftheabove Posts: 20,544

    The Speaker should have told them all to get on with something more important. We all want the war to end even if we disagree about precisely how that should happen. And the combatants on both sides couldn't care in the slightest what our parliaments view on it happens to be. It is just grandstanding. Spend the time fixing something that actually can be fixed by parliament instead.

    In Ireland the Opposition have called on the government to take specific steps that would have some impact on Israel - to the extent that the Irish government has felt compelled to write to the EU Commission requesting that the EU trade deal with Israel is suspended.

    Is there anything in the debate on Britain about taking any concrete steps to put pressure on Israel in any way, or is it purely grandstanding?
    That is not a concrete measure. People fighting for their existence, as both sides rightly or wrongly think they are doing, do not change course because 1% of the world, or in Irelands case 0.1% of the world want to suspend a trade deal.
  • turbotubbsturbotubbs Posts: 15,057
    AlsoLei said:

    On topic, it's fascinating to see that people believe by 67% to 22% that Sunak is failing even on the pledge to reduce inflation

    I mean, I'm about as far from being a Sunakian as it's possible to get, and even I'll admit that inflation has fallen from where it was a year ago!

    So 67% of the population are prepared to kick Sunak for any reason, whether valid or not....

    Or they just don't understand what inflation is a measure of. How many of them think inflation falling = prices falling? Lots, I'd guess. Including most politicians.
  • LeonLeon Posts: 46,464

    Leon said:

    Sora video of a dog typing at a computer

    At the 3rd or 4th glance you see the flaws. But damn, it is convincing

    https://x.com/picopaco17/status/1760011075485921519?s=46&t=bulOICNH15U6kB0MwE6Lfw

    It must be terrifying to be in video/Hollywood right now. How can they ever compete with this?

    Hollywood yes. Some independent television production company in Somewherestan making homegrown kids' programmes, no.
    Sora is not a threat to Hollywood yet, but in 3-7 years, absolutely. That’s not long

    If you are studying film at UCLA right now, you are looking at this tech with fear and loathing
  • CleitophonCleitophon Posts: 194
    That is what he said 1 year ago: let's wait till it gets better. And it got worse. I bet you he wished he had done a ge last year.... if he has any wise council they will tell him there is nothing good to wait for. It is a head fake. Boats will kick off in spring. Energy prices just went up 3% hinting at higher inflation again. NHS... no chance of improvement. Economic growth? We are going to see the effect of border controls and more red tape first.... what is there to wait for? Israel? Even sunak is calling for a ceasefire. People are getting angrier and angrier that the tories won't call the GE. The sooner he goes to the people, the more of the Parliamentary group he saves.
  • kyf_100kyf_100 Posts: 3,917

    AlsoLei said:

    On topic, it's fascinating to see that people believe by 67% to 22% that Sunak is failing even on the pledge to reduce inflation

    I mean, I'm about as far from being a Sunakian as it's possible to get, and even I'll admit that inflation has fallen from where it was a year ago!

    So 67% of the population are prepared to kick Sunak for any reason, whether valid or not....

    The poll ask how is the Government doing at decreasing inflation. One can observe that inflation has fallen, but not give the Government any credit for this event. Which is fair enough given that it's the Bank of England and/or the world economy adjusting after shocks that are mainly responsible.

    Or maybe it's just that people don't really bother with the wording of these questions and are just expressing their generic unhappiness.
    Prices in the shops are visibly falling. But. As you say, Sunak isn't responsible for this. Even interest rates, nominally independent, we more or less have to match what the Fed does.

    But the bigger factor at play here is, the longer interest rates stay high, the more people end up with massive increases in their mortgage or rent bills. So even if prices in the shops are falling, people feel poorer. Great, I can buy a wedge of cheese for £2.50 instead of £2.80 now. Not going to make me vote for Sunak if my rent/mortgage has gone up £300 a month...
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 12,415
    “ When Sunak sees this polling he will rule out a May election because he thinks he will need more time to turn the polling around.”

    On topic. Will you stop your nonsense! This is a betting site. 😠

    The only way the May 2nd can be cancelled now, is if the modelling and war gaming shows it’s a better result held in Autumn. Timing these things is scientific, not whimsical. Objective, not subjective.

    Interest rates And high new mortgages arn’t going away by Christmas, nor will figures published this side of an election show much if any economic growth. In fact energy prices tipped to send inflation back upwards by end of the year. That’s the science behind picking the date. And the politics to waiting after May is the growth in boat crossings - showing as very much up on last year then all manner of hell could break out in Tory circles, as not just voters go to reform, but, members, councillors, MPs.

    Do you actually want the Conservative Party to get the worst result possible? Is that your game? I think you do. For some reason you can judge as astutely as the rest of us, that May 2nd is the safest moment to fight before the narrative starts to go properly bad - and you are using headers not to guide betting but coax Sunak to Chuck the future existence of the party into a roulette wheel.

    But that worse result of 50-100 MPs less from backdrop of a summer and autumn of proper melting down, will not bring a fiscally conservative, working class aspirational, pro business, liberal minded Conservative Party back any quicker, for us can both vote for - it will just make it worse. It will just end up with an even less conservative, even more mindlessly populist main right wing party for ever. ☹️

    you pushing the Tories out into all that dangerous narrative the other side of a summer where the boats keep coming, is very dangerous.

    I am so flipping cross.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 91,510

    Tory MP Sir Charles Walker against Will Wragg move against @CommonsSpeaker: “This furore will blow over. When the House of Commons comes to its senses it will realise very quickly that the removal of the speaker will only lead to metaphorical champagne corks popping in Tehran.”

    Sir Charles Walker added: “This debate has already placed enough strain on the institution of Parliament.”


    https://twitter.com/nicholaswatt/status/1760321784857919677

    I don't think he'll be removed (or should be) - a bad precedent to change the Speaker because you don't like one decision. But the idea that anyone in Teheran cares either way is preposterous.
    Agreed he shouldn't and won't be removed. But you can bet money the government will have a retort ready next time he criticises them about something.

    "I take that on board Mr speaker, we all know your rulings are made with sincere integrity"

    Someone in Starmers camp has severely undermined Hoyle, though why who knows.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 91,510

    Anyone else shocked?

    Met Police officer found guilty of multiple rapes and kidnap

    Cliff Mitchell joined the force in 2021 having been accused of child rape in 2017


    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2024/02/21/met-police-officer-found-guilty-of-multiple-rapes-kidnap/

    Yes, that he's been caught.
  • viewcodeviewcode Posts: 18,531

    viewcode said:

    Selebian said:

    viewcode said:

    Second like somebody famous who came second. Trump probably. Or Dec. Yes, Dec is a good example. Second like Dec. That'll work.

    December is 12th, Shirley?
    Dec. Not Dec. The other Dec. The one who isn't Ant. That Dec. :)
    Is he the one who was Decandant or is that the other one?
    Yes :)
  • kjhkjh Posts: 10,543
    eek said:

    The Speaker should have told them all to get on with something more important. We all want the war to end even if we disagree about precisely how that should happen. And the combatants on both sides couldn't care in the slightest what our parliaments view on it happens to be. It is just grandstanding. Spend the time fixing something that actually can be fixed by parliament instead.

    This parliament is doing sod all
    I spoke to an MP last Saturday. I was told they are all standing around twiddling their fingers waiting for the election. Fixed term parliament is another thing this Government has undone unwisely.
  • CookieCookie Posts: 11,300

    AlsoLei said:

    On topic, it's fascinating to see that people believe by 67% to 22% that Sunak is failing even on the pledge to reduce inflation

    I mean, I'm about as far from being a Sunakian as it's possible to get, and even I'll admit that inflation has fallen from where it was a year ago!

    So 67% of the population are prepared to kick Sunak for any reason, whether valid or not....

    Or they just don't understand what inflation is a measure of. How many of them think inflation falling = prices falling? Lots, I'd guess. Including most politicians.
    Thing is, prices don't all go up at once. And every time you notice an eye watering price hike - your £2.50 coffee-and-croissant habit at Pret suddenly costing over £5, the shysters at Centerparcs charging their captive market £47 per person for an hour-long treetop trek, to cite two recent kicks to the teeth - you think, "fuck me, inflation, eh?" - and it doesn't feel much like inflation is being tackled.
  • viewcodeviewcode Posts: 18,531

    kle4 said:

    I do love procedural wrangling. This one is especially tasty because

    a) a (good) procedure Hoyle put in place has come back to bite him, and

    b) the quotes from Labour figures to BBC Newsnight totally throw Hoyle under the bus by acknowledging he was essentially instructed to do it or he would lose his job as Speaker after the election.

    Totally undermines whatever rationale he might have, however reasonable that is, with the party going 'yeah, we strongarmed him'.

    Same, I love a good constitutional crisis.

    With Sir Peter Bottomley standing down at the election, who is likely to be the Father/Mother of the House after the general election?

    Their first act will be to preside over the election/re-election of a Speaker.

    Anyhoo, pop quiz PBers, what was so special about Henry Campbell-Bannerman's stint as Father of the House?
    "He remains the only person to date to hold the positions of Prime Minister and Father of the House at the same time", https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Campbell-Bannerman
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 44,042
    kle4 said:

    Anyone else shocked?

    Met Police officer found guilty of multiple rapes and kidnap

    Cliff Mitchell joined the force in 2021 having been accused of child rape in 2017


    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2024/02/21/met-police-officer-found-guilty-of-multiple-rapes-kidnap/

    Yes, that he's been caught.
    Police officers are always getting caught for something - why is that shocking?
  • JohnOJohnO Posts: 4,213


    Anyhoo, pop quiz PBers, what was so special about Henry Campbell-Bannerman's stint as Father of the House?

    Guessing...he was also PM?
  • CookieCookie Posts: 11,300

    The Speaker should have told them all to get on with something more important. We all want the war to end even if we disagree about precisely how that should happen. And the combatants on both sides couldn't care in the slightest what our parliaments view on it happens to be. It is just grandstanding. Spend the time fixing something that actually can be fixed by parliament instead.

    In Ireland the Opposition have called on the government to take specific steps that would have some impact on Israel - to the extent that the Irish government has felt compelled to write to the EU Commission requesting that the EU trade deal with Israel is suspended.

    Is there anything in the debate on Britain about taking any concrete steps to put pressure on Israel in any way, or is it purely grandstanding?
    Or alternatively taking any concrete steps to put pressure on Hamas?
  • OnlyLivingBoyOnlyLivingBoy Posts: 14,983
    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Sora video of a dog typing at a computer

    At the 3rd or 4th glance you see the flaws. But damn, it is convincing

    https://x.com/picopaco17/status/1760011075485921519?s=46&t=bulOICNH15U6kB0MwE6Lfw

    It must be terrifying to be in video/Hollywood right now. How can they ever compete with this?

    Hollywood yes. Some independent television production company in Somewherestan making homegrown kids' programmes, no.
    Sora is not a threat to Hollywood yet, but in 3-7 years, absolutely. That’s not long

    If you are studying film at UCLA right now, you are looking at this tech with fear and loathing
    I don't think do, although it will have a profound impact on the medium. I think it will be more like what cinema did to the theatre and what photography did to painting.
  • AnabobazinaAnabobazina Posts: 19,774
    Scott_xP said:

    ...

    Truss you say? T...

    (Something wrong with my keyboard again, must get that looked at)
  • viewcodeviewcode Posts: 18,531
    edited February 21

    Selebian said:

    viewcode said:

    Second like somebody famous who came second. Trump probably. Or Dec. Yes, Dec is a good example. Second like Dec. That'll work.

    December is 12th, Shirley?
    10th. Clue is in the name.

    Implies we should start a new year at the beginning of March. Which would also mean that we could use leap day, every four years, to have an even bigger New Year's Eve party than normal.
    New years day used to be on March 25th in the pre 1700s
    And if memory serves Scotland and England changed that convention at different years: 1600 for Scotland, 1752 for England. So for several years January 1st was January 1st 16XX in England but January 1st 16XX+1 in Scotland.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,045
    edited February 21

    kle4 said:

    I do love procedural wrangling. This one is especially tasty because

    a) a (good) procedure Hoyle put in place has come back to bite him, and

    b) the quotes from Labour figures to BBC Newsnight totally throw Hoyle under the bus by acknowledging he was essentially instructed to do it or he would lose his job as Speaker after the election.

    Totally undermines whatever rationale he might have, however reasonable that is, with the party going 'yeah, we strongarmed him'.

    Same, I love a good constitutional crisis.

    With Sir Peter Bottomley standing down at the election, who is likely to be the Father/Mother of the House after the general election?

    Their first act will be to preside over the election/re-election of a Speaker.

    Anyhoo, pop quiz PBers, what was so special about Henry Campbell-Bannerman's stint as Father of the House?
    He was the only Father of the House to be the incumbent Prime Minister.
  • CookieCookie Posts: 11,300

    Anyone else shocked?

    Met Police officer found guilty of multiple rapes and kidnap

    Cliff Mitchell joined the force in 2021 having been accused of child rape in 2017


    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2024/02/21/met-police-officer-found-guilty-of-multiple-rapes-kidnap/

    Shocked - no.

    Think of it a successfully implementing diversity in the Police Force. A diverse range of criminals.
    I was shocked - but only because my brain initially made sense of this as "Cliff Michelmore".
  • noneoftheabovenoneoftheabove Posts: 20,544
    Cookie said:

    AlsoLei said:

    On topic, it's fascinating to see that people believe by 67% to 22% that Sunak is failing even on the pledge to reduce inflation

    I mean, I'm about as far from being a Sunakian as it's possible to get, and even I'll admit that inflation has fallen from where it was a year ago!

    So 67% of the population are prepared to kick Sunak for any reason, whether valid or not....

    Or they just don't understand what inflation is a measure of. How many of them think inflation falling = prices falling? Lots, I'd guess. Including most politicians.
    Thing is, prices don't all go up at once. And every time you notice an eye watering price hike - your £2.50 coffee-and-croissant habit at Pret suddenly costing over £5, the shysters at Centerparcs charging their captive market £47 per person for an hour-long treetop trek, to cite two recent kicks to the teeth - you think, "fuck me, inflation, eh?" - and it doesn't feel much like inflation is being tackled.
    People are also more concerned by their own personal inflation rate rather than the government statistics type. Anyone poorer than average, renting or switching to a new mortgage rate in the last year will still be seeing very high inflation and higher than the government figures.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 91,510

    RobD said:

    AlsoLei said:

    On topic, it's fascinating to see that people believe by 67% to 22% that Sunak is failing even on the pledge to reduce inflation

    I mean, I'm about as far from being a Sunakian as it's possible to get, and even I'll admit that inflation has fallen from where it was a year ago!

    So 67% of the population are prepared to kick Sunak for any reason, whether valid or not....

    It's not that, most voters think falling inflation means prices are falling.

    When Rishi Sunak says he aims to halve inflation, British voters think he aims to get...

    Prices to decrease 47%
    Prices to increase more slowly 42%
    Don't know 11%

    https://www1.politicalbetting.com/index.php/archives/2023/06/11/deflating-rishi-sunak/

    Basically the voters are thick.
    I spoke to someone a few months ago who were saying that the government set the inflation rate. I extricated myself from the conversation as quickly as possible.
    So how was Gavin Williamson doing back then?
    Sir Gavin, please.
  • kjhkjh Posts: 10,543
    Leon said:

    Sora video of a dog typing at a computer

    At the 3rd or 4th glance you see the flaws. But damn, it is convincing

    https://x.com/picopaco17/status/1760011075485921519?s=46&t=bulOICNH15U6kB0MwE6Lfw

    It must be terrifying to be in video/Hollywood right now. How can they ever compete with this?

    That is good. What flaws did you see? The only thing for me was the paws typing seemed unreal, but that is probably not a flaw but the fact that, well dogs don't have paws that can type like humans, so that might be what they would look like if they did type.
  • CleitophonCleitophon Posts: 194

    “ When Sunak sees this polling he will rule out a May election because he thinks he will need more time to turn the polling around.”

    On topic. Will you stop your nonsense! This is a betting site. 😠

    The only way the May 2nd can be cancelled now, is if the modelling and war gaming shows it’s a better result held in Autumn. Timing these things is scientific, not whimsical. Objective, not subjective.

    Interest rates And high new mortgages arn’t going away by Christmas, nor will figures published this side of an election show much if any economic growth. In fact energy prices tipped to send inflation back upwards by end of the year. That’s the science behind picking the date. And the politics to waiting after May is the growth in boat crossings - showing as very much up on last year then all manner of hell could break out in Tory circles, as not just voters go to reform, but, members, councillors, MPs.

    Do you actually want the Conservative Party to get the worst result possible? Is that your game? I think you do. For some reason you can judge as astutely as the rest of us, that May 2nd is the safest moment to fight before the narrative starts to go properly bad - and you are using headers not to guide betting but coax Sunak to Chuck the future existence of the party into a roulette wheel.

    But that worse result of 50-100 MPs less from backdrop of a summer and autumn of proper melting down, will not bring a fiscally conservative, working class aspirational, pro business, liberal minded Conservative Party back any quicker, for us can both vote for - it will just make it worse. It will just end up with an even less conservative, even more mindlessly populist main right wing party for ever. ☹️

    you pushing the Tories out into all that dangerous narrative the other side of a summer where the boats keep coming, is very dangerous.

    I am so flipping cross.

    Agree 100%

    It is mad to wait. There is no outlook for anything but more difficult electioneering. All the political issues are total moo and in decline. And yet smarkets have very low % for a April-June GE. I just don't get it 🤷 frustration is going to build in the electorate too and Starmer is going to call them yellow. They need to go to the people right now... look at the defense stories adding to tory misery today. Two failed trident launches and we are left without a credible deterrent... all under the tories. More rot will show I guarantee it.
  • Stark_DawningStark_Dawning Posts: 9,266
    kjh said:

    eek said:

    The Speaker should have told them all to get on with something more important. We all want the war to end even if we disagree about precisely how that should happen. And the combatants on both sides couldn't care in the slightest what our parliaments view on it happens to be. It is just grandstanding. Spend the time fixing something that actually can be fixed by parliament instead.

    This parliament is doing sod all
    I spoke to an MP last Saturday. I was told they are all standing around twiddling their fingers waiting for the election. Fixed term parliament is another thing this Government has undone unwisely.
    Yes, why anyone thought a return to this nonsense was a great idea is quite beyond me.
  • malcolmgmalcolmg Posts: 41,800

    Seems like the Iranians have supplied Russia with hundreds of ballistic missiles. At the moment Russia seems to be receiving more supplies from its allies (Iran and North Korea) them Ukraine is receiving from its allies.

    That's embarrassing.

    And some [moderated] have the cheek to blame Biden and not the GOP and Trump.
    Biden bypassed Congress to redirect arms from Ukraine to Israel.

    https://www.axios.com/2023/10/19/us-israel-artillery-shells-ukraine-weapons-gaza

    The Pentagon plans to send Israel tens of thousands of 155mm artillery shells that had been destined for Ukraine from U.S. emergency stocks several months ago, three Israeli officials with knowledge of the situation tell Axios.
    Non sequitur.

    It is entirely possible to support both Israel and Ukraine at the same time.

    Apologies to the Corbynites and hard left who were triggered by that observation.
    They are not supporting Ukraine as well though, they are sending diddly squat.
  • kjhkjh Posts: 10,543

    RobD said:

    AlsoLei said:

    On topic, it's fascinating to see that people believe by 67% to 22% that Sunak is failing even on the pledge to reduce inflation

    I mean, I'm about as far from being a Sunakian as it's possible to get, and even I'll admit that inflation has fallen from where it was a year ago!

    So 67% of the population are prepared to kick Sunak for any reason, whether valid or not....

    It's not that, most voters think falling inflation means prices are falling.

    When Rishi Sunak says he aims to halve inflation, British voters think he aims to get...

    Prices to decrease 47%
    Prices to increase more slowly 42%
    Don't know 11%

    https://www1.politicalbetting.com/index.php/archives/2023/06/11/deflating-rishi-sunak/

    Basically the voters are thick.
    I spoke to someone a few months ago who were saying that the government set the inflation rate. I extricated myself from the conversation as quickly as possible.
    Being generous I hope they meant the government sets the inflation target.
    I suspect @RobD was wise to remove himself in case your assumption is wrong. I would have struggled to restrain myself. Maybe ask how exactly they do that then?
  • LeonLeon Posts: 46,464
    kjh said:

    Leon said:

    Sora video of a dog typing at a computer

    At the 3rd or 4th glance you see the flaws. But damn, it is convincing

    https://x.com/picopaco17/status/1760011075485921519?s=46&t=bulOICNH15U6kB0MwE6Lfw

    It must be terrifying to be in video/Hollywood right now. How can they ever compete with this?

    That is good. What flaws did you see? The only thing for me was the paws typing seemed unreal, but that is probably not a flaw but the fact that, well dogs don't have paws that can type like humans, so that might be what they would look like if they did type.
    The flashing blue light makes no sense. Where is it coming from?

    The lower half of the dog’s body is weird

    Some elements in the background don’t quite add up

    But it took me 3 goes to start seeing that. So in a movie length feature you’d get away with it fine, plus this technology will only improve - and perhaps at exponential speed

    We will see real life impacts pretty soon
  • OmniumOmnium Posts: 9,729

    Scott_xP said:

    ...

    Truss you say? T...

    (Something wrong with my keyboard again, must get that looked at)
    How can anyone think that Truss isn't the worst PM ever, let alone the worst recent PM?
  • AnabobazinaAnabobazina Posts: 19,774

    Bet accordingly for London Mayor:


    John Rentoul
    @JohnRentoul
    ·
    1h
    My phone just rang on the Tube on 5G in between stations. What has Sadiq Khan done?

    By far the most transformative policy in years.
    Another major project delivery on Khan's cv. He might not be the most inspiring mayor ever, but he gets shit done.

    • Night Tube
    • Crossrail
    • Ulez
    • Ulez-X
    • Underground mobile
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 12,415
    edited February 21

    “ When Sunak sees this polling he will rule out a May election because he thinks he will need more time to turn the polling around.”

    On topic. Will you stop your nonsense! This is a betting site. 😠

    The only way the May 2nd can be cancelled now, is if the modelling and war gaming shows it’s a better result held in Autumn. Timing these things is scientific, not whimsical. Objective, not subjective.

    Interest rates And high new mortgages arn’t going away by Christmas, nor will figures published this side of an election show much if any economic growth. In fact energy prices tipped to send inflation back upwards by end of the year. That’s the science behind picking the date. And the politics to waiting after May is the growth in boat crossings - showing as very much up on last year then all manner of hell could break out in Tory circles, as not just voters go to reform, but, members, councillors, MPs.

    Do you actually want the Conservative Party to get the worst result possible? Is that your game? I think you do. For some reason you can judge as astutely as the rest of us, that May 2nd is the safest moment to fight before the narrative starts to go properly bad - and you are using headers not to guide betting but coax Sunak to Chuck the future existence of the party into a roulette wheel.

    But that worse result of 50-100 MPs less from backdrop of a summer and autumn of proper melting down, will not bring a fiscally conservative, working class aspirational, pro business, liberal minded Conservative Party back any quicker, for us can both vote for - it will just make it worse. It will just end up with an even less conservative, even more mindlessly populist main right wing party for ever. ☹️

    you pushing the Tories out into all that dangerous narrative the other side of a summer where the boats keep coming, is very dangerous.

    I am so flipping cross.

    Agree 100%

    It is mad to wait. There is no outlook for anything but more difficult electioneering. All the political issues are total moo and in decline. And yet smarkets have very low % for a April-June GE. I just don't get it 🤷 frustration is going to build in the electorate too and Starmer is going to call them yellow. They need to go to the people right now... look at the defense stories adding to tory misery today. Two failed trident launches and we are left without a credible deterrent... all under the tories. More rot will show I guarantee it.
    Most of all it’s the boats. Boat crossings will be up this year, then Badenoch and Jenrick will say we told you this surge was coming, then all hell will break loose before and during the actual campaign. 😞
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 91,510

    kjh said:

    eek said:

    The Speaker should have told them all to get on with something more important. We all want the war to end even if we disagree about precisely how that should happen. And the combatants on both sides couldn't care in the slightest what our parliaments view on it happens to be. It is just grandstanding. Spend the time fixing something that actually can be fixed by parliament instead.

    This parliament is doing sod all
    I spoke to an MP last Saturday. I was told they are all standing around twiddling their fingers waiting for the election. Fixed term parliament is another thing this Government has undone unwisely.
    Yes, why anyone thought a return to this nonsense was a great idea is quite beyond me.
    It was in the manifesto of Labour and the Tories, so most of the parliament wanted this.

    I liked the principle but in the end it just got bloody silly.
This discussion has been closed.