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The numbers do add up for Sunak – politicalbetting.com

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  • Options
    LeonLeon Posts: 50,693

    Leon said:

    Hah. Just showed the Poe Poems to a professional writer friend. A one word reaction

    “Fuck”

    That can be interpreted in (at least) two ways.
    I rightly interpreted it as meaning "Fuck, soon my art form - novel writing - will be taken over and ruined by the machines"

    This really is the end for most creative writers. If Claude can master advanced poetry and it can write amusing Seinfeld scripts, then it can do anything. And it will do anything, because better and better AIs are coming down the line

    The only human writing that will survive will be memoir, travel, human interest journalism. The direct human experience an AI cannot have
  • Options
    EPGEPG Posts: 6,572

    I support it in principle. Maths is very important. However, there are two problems I can see:
    1. Where will the teachers come from?
    2. If kids have not engaged with maths by 16, another two years will make no difference.
    The really key years are primary school and 7-9 in secondary school. Those should be the focus.

    Yes, this is the sensible criticism to give.

    But most OECD countries do mandate maths until 18 years old as well, so I do think that needs to be part of it.
    Southam's point is the one I agree with. Being forced to study something you're crap at and have mentally disengaged from for two more years is clearly not the solution. Being taught well early on is. The trouble is that the latter concept can't be distilled into a simple and deliverable-sounding solution. It will be quietly dropped in due course - perhaps a change to the 'General Studies' (do they still do that?) course curriculum to include a bit of 'maths' to save Sunak's blushes should he ever be in a position to implement this policy.
    I don't think that's the proposal. It's just about recognising you can't bail out of what will be a core skill as a 21stC adult at age 16, when there's a further two years of education to go. There are all sorts of curricula being explored, including Core Maths qualifications, T-levels and more innovative options as well as the A-level.

    And the recommendation came from the Times Education Commission is much broader than that, and more fundamental too:

    "The Times Education Commission took evidence from more than 600 experts across fields including business, the arts and education.

    The main recommendation of the year-long commission includes the introduction of a British Baccalaureate, an equally rigorous but broader qualification than A-levels including both academic and vocational routes or a combination of the two.

    Pupils would take six subjects and the qualification would be based on the International Baccalaureate, an A-level alternative offered mainly in private schools, but customised for the UK. It could be adopted to replace the Highers qualification in Scotland as well as A-levels in England, Wales and Northern Ireland."


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/times-education-commission-report-welcomed-by-tony-blair-john-major-qwc3b7ktx

    It has been welcomed by Sir Tony Blair and Sir John Major, along with ten former education secretaries. It recommends replacing GCSEs with slimmed-down exams at 16, digital skills being an integral part of the curriculum, 50 new university campuses, laptops for every child, an army of undergraduate tutors and a substantial investment in early years.

    In other words, it has broad cross-party support in this country and the approach is uncontentious in most other countries, where they already do it, like Australia, Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Norway and the United States.

    Do we need to fund it properly? Absolutely we do.

    So let's stop pointless distractions of trying to desecrate small independent schools, or compete about how much we hated or loved maths at school, and discuss how we make this happen.
    Desecrate? They're not religious sites, they're places affluent people send their kids to segregate them from the bottom 90%.
  • Options
    LeonLeon Posts: 50,693

    Leon said:

    ohnotnow said:

    Phil said:

    Leon said:

    Sandpit said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Claude writes quite excellent poetry (if it has an editor to pluck the nicest answers)

    i mean, FUCK. A highly skilled professional poet would find this very hard to do, and would take several days. Weeks? Claude coughs it up in seconds

    https://twitter.com/andy_l_jones/status/1611063295850729472?s=20&t=kSKGo25ff2ZyuPy0F31h-w


    Sample genius lines:

    Mortal," said the sprite, "be wary; shallow learning is unwary;
    Heed the perils of reliance on machin'ry's mere compliance

    Machinry???? Fuck

    This is a machine marching through Uncanny Valley and storming up the other side, our side, and now it advances towards us in plain sight. Bayonets fixed




    It's a bit GM Hopkins-heavy by the look of it.
    it correctly elides the e in machinery so as to keep to the metre. This is professional level poetry. Wow

    Remember this is Claude writing after it was prompted to compose stuff "in the style of Poe's Raven"

    We have no idea what it might do with different poetic prompts
    It sounds like it’s creative writers who should be the ones getting worried about AI, rather than those of us who use maths, write code, and troubleshoot computers for a living.
    Nah, we are all fucked. Coders and artists alike. At least we can all go down together
    AI is just a tool. Photography didn’t elimate the visual arts & I doubt ChatGPT will eliminate human authors of the written word either. But the landscape will change - change is good, change is normal, embrace the change!
    It's been argued (and I have some sympathy with it) that photography had a large impact on painting. At the very base work-a-day level even - imagine being a run-of-the-mill portrait artist then seeing your first photography exhibition. "It's all over lads" might well have been the mood at the Salon of Run Of The Mill Painters that night.

    More currently, I was watching a youtube video over the holidays with someone who'd written a basic Excel 'ChatGPT' plugin. Like 'Clippy, but good'. The business opportunity for Microsoft must be huge. Even a 5 minute run through of the video - writing macro's based on natural language input that an average office worker could handle, but then saving 100s or 1000s of hours work.

    I think their investment in OpenAI is going to pay back handsomely.
    And at 1/44 of the cost of buying twitter....investment of the decade.
    Unless Google or Baidu or Apple or a totally unknown company launch an even better AI with more sass and daring (and fewer guardrails) and everyone migrates to the new, funnier, cleverer machine overnight
    Its not quite that simple. Microsoft already have business bought into the eco-system, they all subscribe to Office 365, so they can easily incorporate this into the existing tools from Word to Teams.

    Its like the Abode business model, it is very difficult to disrupt, as companies already have their pipeline of work based around this. There are better products out there than Adobe, with the latest whizzy AI, but they don't provide the end-to-end pipeline and as of yet not really being picked up (and if the odd company pops up too much, they just buy them out).

    Apple don't do business software, neither do Google. There is room in the various ecosystems for different products aimed at different use cases.
    They are supposedly incorporating ChatGPT into Bing in March. Expect Google to respond in kind
  • Options
    Luckyguy1983Luckyguy1983 Posts: 26,556
    edited January 2023

    I support it in principle. Maths is very important. However, there are two problems I can see:
    1. Where will the teachers come from?
    2. If kids have not engaged with maths by 16, another two years will make no difference.
    The really key years are primary school and 7-9 in secondary school. Those should be the focus.

    Yes, this is the sensible criticism to give.

    But most OECD countries do mandate maths until 18 years old as well, so I do think that needs to be part of it.
    Southam's point is the one I agree with. Being forced to study something you're crap at and have mentally disengaged from for two more years is clearly not the solution. Being taught well early on is. The trouble is that the latter concept can't be distilled into a simple and deliverable-sounding solution. It will be quietly dropped in due course - perhaps a change to the 'General Studies' (do they still do that?) course curriculum to include a bit of 'maths' to save Sunak's blushes should he ever be in a position to implement this policy.
    I don't think that's the proposal. It's just about recognising you can't bail out of what will be a core skill as a 21stC adult at age 16, when there's a further two years of education to go. There are all sorts of curricula being explored, including Core Maths qualifications, T-levels and more innovative options as well as the A-level.

    And the recommendation came from the Times Education Commission is much broader than that, and more fundamental too:

    "The Times Education Commission took evidence from more than 600 experts across fields including business, the arts and education.

    The main recommendation of the year-long commission includes the introduction of a British Baccalaureate, an equally rigorous but broader qualification than A-levels including both academic and vocational routes or a combination of the two.

    Pupils would take six subjects and the qualification would be based on the International Baccalaureate, an A-level alternative offered mainly in private schools, but customised for the UK. It could be adopted to replace the Highers qualification in Scotland as well as A-levels in England, Wales and Northern Ireland."


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/times-education-commission-report-welcomed-by-tony-blair-john-major-qwc3b7ktx

    It has been welcomed by Sir Tony Blair and Sir John Major, along with ten former education secretaries. It recommends replacing GCSEs with slimmed-down exams at 16, digital skills being an integral part of the curriculum, 50 new university campuses, laptops for every child, an army of undergraduate tutors and a substantial investment in early years.

    In other words, it has broad cross-party support in this country and the approach is uncontentious in most other countries, where they already do it, like Australia, Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Norway and the United States.

    Do we need to fund it properly? Absolutely we do.

    So let's stop pointless distractions of trying to desecrate small independent schools, or compete about how much we hated or loved maths at school, and discuss how we make this happen.
    Sorry to see continuity-remoanerism under every bed, but if the above is true it sounds strongly like a fairly clear cut case of EU-harmonisation (again) even though we're not in the EU. There was me thinking that Sunak had actually had an original thought about maths, albeit flawed. My mistake.
  • Options
    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    ohnotnow said:

    Phil said:

    Leon said:

    Sandpit said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Claude writes quite excellent poetry (if it has an editor to pluck the nicest answers)

    i mean, FUCK. A highly skilled professional poet would find this very hard to do, and would take several days. Weeks? Claude coughs it up in seconds

    https://twitter.com/andy_l_jones/status/1611063295850729472?s=20&t=kSKGo25ff2ZyuPy0F31h-w


    Sample genius lines:

    Mortal," said the sprite, "be wary; shallow learning is unwary;
    Heed the perils of reliance on machin'ry's mere compliance

    Machinry???? Fuck

    This is a machine marching through Uncanny Valley and storming up the other side, our side, and now it advances towards us in plain sight. Bayonets fixed




    It's a bit GM Hopkins-heavy by the look of it.
    it correctly elides the e in machinery so as to keep to the metre. This is professional level poetry. Wow

    Remember this is Claude writing after it was prompted to compose stuff "in the style of Poe's Raven"

    We have no idea what it might do with different poetic prompts
    It sounds like it’s creative writers who should be the ones getting worried about AI, rather than those of us who use maths, write code, and troubleshoot computers for a living.
    Nah, we are all fucked. Coders and artists alike. At least we can all go down together
    AI is just a tool. Photography didn’t elimate the visual arts & I doubt ChatGPT will eliminate human authors of the written word either. But the landscape will change - change is good, change is normal, embrace the change!
    It's been argued (and I have some sympathy with it) that photography had a large impact on painting. At the very base work-a-day level even - imagine being a run-of-the-mill portrait artist then seeing your first photography exhibition. "It's all over lads" might well have been the mood at the Salon of Run Of The Mill Painters that night.

    More currently, I was watching a youtube video over the holidays with someone who'd written a basic Excel 'ChatGPT' plugin. Like 'Clippy, but good'. The business opportunity for Microsoft must be huge. Even a 5 minute run through of the video - writing macro's based on natural language input that an average office worker could handle, but then saving 100s or 1000s of hours work.

    I think their investment in OpenAI is going to pay back handsomely.
    And at 1/44 of the cost of buying twitter....investment of the decade.
    Unless Google or Baidu or Apple or a totally unknown company launch an even better AI with more sass and daring (and fewer guardrails) and everyone migrates to the new, funnier, cleverer machine overnight
    Its not quite that simple. Microsoft already have business bought into the eco-system, they all subscribe to Office 365, so they can easily incorporate this into the existing tools from Word to Teams.

    Its like the Abode business model, it is very difficult to disrupt, as companies already have their pipeline of work based around this. There are better products out there than Adobe, with the latest whizzy AI, but they don't provide the end-to-end pipeline and as of yet not really being picked up (and if the odd company pops up too much, they just buy them out).

    Apple don't do business software, neither do Google. There is room in the various ecosystems for different products aimed at different use cases.
    They are supposedly incorporating ChatGPT into Bing in March. Expect Google to respond in kind
    Bing is rubbish compared to Google.
  • Options
    ChrisChris Posts: 11,577

    I support it in principle. Maths is very important. However, there are two problems I can see:
    1. Where will the teachers come from?
    2. If kids have not engaged with maths by 16, another two years will make no difference.
    The really key years are primary school and 7-9 in secondary school. Those should be the focus.

    Yes, this is the sensible criticism to give.

    But most OECD countries do mandate maths until 18 years old as well, so I do think that needs to be part of it.
    Southam's point is the one I agree with. Being forced to study something you're crap at and have mentally disengaged from for two more years is clearly not the solution. Being taught well early on is. The trouble is that the latter concept can't be distilled into a simple and deliverable-sounding solution. It will be quietly dropped in due course - perhaps a change to the 'General Studies' (do they still do that?) course curriculum to include a bit of 'maths' to save Sunak's blushes should he ever be in a position to implement this policy.
    I don't think that's the proposal. It's just about recognising you can't bail out of what will be a core skill as a 21stC adult at age 16, when there's a further two years of education to go. There are all sorts of curricula being explored, including Core Maths qualifications, T-levels and more innovative options as well as the A-level.

    And the recommendation came from the Times Education Commission is much broader than that, and more fundamental too:

    "The Times Education Commission took evidence from more than 600 experts across fields including business, the arts and education.

    The main recommendation of the year-long commission includes the introduction of a British Baccalaureate, an equally rigorous but broader qualification than A-levels including both academic and vocational routes or a combination of the two.

    Pupils would take six subjects and the qualification would be based on the International Baccalaureate, an A-level alternative offered mainly in private schools, but customised for the UK. It could be adopted to replace the Highers qualification in Scotland as well as A-levels in England, Wales and Northern Ireland."


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/times-education-commission-report-welcomed-by-tony-blair-john-major-qwc3b7ktx

    It has been welcomed by Sir Tony Blair and Sir John Major, along with ten former education secretaries. It recommends replacing GCSEs with slimmed-down exams at 16, digital skills being an integral part of the curriculum, 50 new university campuses, laptops for every child, an army of undergraduate tutors and a substantial investment in early years.

    In other words, it has broad cross-party support in this country and the approach is uncontentious in most other countries, where they already do it, like Australia, Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Norway and the United States.

    Do we need to fund it properly? Absolutely we do.

    So let's stop pointless distractions of trying to desecrate small independent schools, or compete about how much we hated or loved maths at school, and discuss how we make this happen.
    "Shut up and calculate."
  • Options
    FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 79,035
    edited January 2023
    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    ohnotnow said:

    Phil said:

    Leon said:

    Sandpit said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Claude writes quite excellent poetry (if it has an editor to pluck the nicest answers)

    i mean, FUCK. A highly skilled professional poet would find this very hard to do, and would take several days. Weeks? Claude coughs it up in seconds

    https://twitter.com/andy_l_jones/status/1611063295850729472?s=20&t=kSKGo25ff2ZyuPy0F31h-w


    Sample genius lines:

    Mortal," said the sprite, "be wary; shallow learning is unwary;
    Heed the perils of reliance on machin'ry's mere compliance

    Machinry???? Fuck

    This is a machine marching through Uncanny Valley and storming up the other side, our side, and now it advances towards us in plain sight. Bayonets fixed




    It's a bit GM Hopkins-heavy by the look of it.
    it correctly elides the e in machinery so as to keep to the metre. This is professional level poetry. Wow

    Remember this is Claude writing after it was prompted to compose stuff "in the style of Poe's Raven"

    We have no idea what it might do with different poetic prompts
    It sounds like it’s creative writers who should be the ones getting worried about AI, rather than those of us who use maths, write code, and troubleshoot computers for a living.
    Nah, we are all fucked. Coders and artists alike. At least we can all go down together
    AI is just a tool. Photography didn’t elimate the visual arts & I doubt ChatGPT will eliminate human authors of the written word either. But the landscape will change - change is good, change is normal, embrace the change!
    It's been argued (and I have some sympathy with it) that photography had a large impact on painting. At the very base work-a-day level even - imagine being a run-of-the-mill portrait artist then seeing your first photography exhibition. "It's all over lads" might well have been the mood at the Salon of Run Of The Mill Painters that night.

    More currently, I was watching a youtube video over the holidays with someone who'd written a basic Excel 'ChatGPT' plugin. Like 'Clippy, but good'. The business opportunity for Microsoft must be huge. Even a 5 minute run through of the video - writing macro's based on natural language input that an average office worker could handle, but then saving 100s or 1000s of hours work.

    I think their investment in OpenAI is going to pay back handsomely.
    And at 1/44 of the cost of buying twitter....investment of the decade.
    Unless Google or Baidu or Apple or a totally unknown company launch an even better AI with more sass and daring (and fewer guardrails) and everyone migrates to the new, funnier, cleverer machine overnight
    Its not quite that simple. Microsoft already have business bought into the eco-system, they all subscribe to Office 365, so they can easily incorporate this into the existing tools from Word to Teams.

    Its like the Abode business model, it is very difficult to disrupt, as companies already have their pipeline of work based around this. There are better products out there than Adobe, with the latest whizzy AI, but they don't provide the end-to-end pipeline and as of yet not really being picked up (and if the odd company pops up too much, they just buy them out).

    Apple don't do business software, neither do Google. There is room in the various ecosystems for different products aimed at different use cases.
    They are supposedly incorporating ChatGPT into Bing in March. Expect Google to respond in kind
    Oh yes I can certainly see Google wanting to keep their search crown and we know they have their own LLM, but there is an eco-system of services that Google provide around that search that Bing doesn't.

    As I say, just like we have seen the various last-gen crappy assistants within the different eco-systems of Apple, Google, Amazon and Microsoft, all with slightly different bents to what they are trying to achieve e.g. Alexa was about interacting with their speakers and allowing you to add things to your shopping cart, where as Apple is about interacting with an iPhone.
  • Options
    geoffwgeoffw Posts: 8,367
    Leon said:

    rcs1000 said:

    I think Leon is just having a nervous breakdown because Flint Knappers Weekly won't be requiring their services anymore.....

    Tbh I've read a couple of articles in the mainstream media recently that made me wonder if they'd been written by ChatGPT from a premise supplied by the columnist. No names, no pack drill, and no libel writs for OGH, but there was a certain repetitive and blandly monotonous style.
    LLM have shown to be excellent at this kind of task. Rapid prototyping is absolutely a key area we will see these LLM and text-to-image/3d deployed.
    Exactly: want bland copy for your website? LLMs are perfect
    That Poe poem is not bland

    It’s genius

    It is surprisingly good. I'm sold.

  • Options
    dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 28,910

    I support it in principle. Maths is very important. However, there are two problems I can see:
    1. Where will the teachers come from?
    2. If kids have not engaged with maths by 16, another two years will make no difference.
    The really key years are primary school and 7-9 in secondary school. Those should be the focus.

    Yes, this is the sensible criticism to give.

    But most OECD countries do mandate maths until 18 years old as well, so I do think that needs to be part of it.
    Southam's point is the one I agree with. Being forced to study something you're crap at and have mentally disengaged from for two more years is clearly not the solution. Being taught well early on is. The trouble is that the latter concept can't be distilled into a simple and deliverable-sounding solution. It will be quietly dropped in due course - perhaps a change to the 'General Studies' (do they still do that?) course curriculum to include a bit of 'maths' to save Sunak's blushes should he ever be in a position to implement this policy.
    I don't think that's the proposal. It's just about recognising you can't bail out of what will be a core skill as a 21stC adult at age 16, when there's a further two years of education to go. There are all sorts of curricula being explored, including Core Maths qualifications, T-levels and more innovative options as well as the A-level.

    And the recommendation came from the Times Education Commission is much broader than that, and more fundamental too:

    "The Times Education Commission took evidence from more than 600 experts across fields including business, the arts and education.

    The main recommendation of the year-long commission includes the introduction of a British Baccalaureate, an equally rigorous but broader qualification than A-levels including both academic and vocational routes or a combination of the two.

    Pupils would take six subjects and the qualification would be based on the International Baccalaureate, an A-level alternative offered mainly in private schools, but customised for the UK. It could be adopted to replace the Highers qualification in Scotland as well as A-levels in England, Wales and Northern Ireland."


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/times-education-commission-report-welcomed-by-tony-blair-john-major-qwc3b7ktx

    It has been welcomed by Sir Tony Blair and Sir John Major, along with ten former education secretaries. It recommends replacing GCSEs with slimmed-down exams at 16, digital skills being an integral part of the curriculum, 50 new university campuses, laptops for every child, an army of undergraduate tutors and a substantial investment in early years.

    In other words, it has broad cross-party support in this country and the approach is uncontentious in most other countries, where they already do it, like Australia, Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Norway and the United States.

    Do we need to fund it properly? Absolutely we do.

    So let's stop pointless distractions of trying to desecrate small independent schools, or compete about how much we hated or loved maths at school, and discuss how we make this happen.
    It's the funding though.
    There's all kinds of things can be achieved with proper funding.
    This year's teacher's pay rise is to come out of existing (inadequate) budgets.
    I see no evidence whatsoever that that attitude will change.
  • Options
    For all of the interest in & coverage of the amazing GOP Flying Flea Circus last week to (finally) elect Kevin McCarthy as Speaker, it was NOT the top national story in the USA.

    That honor goes to the saga of Damar Hamlin.

    CNN.com - NFL honors Damar Hamlin in final week of regular season

    Buffalo Bills to honor Hamlin and medical workers in customized home tribute, sources say

    The Buffalo Bills are set to honor Damar Hamlin and the medical workers involved in saving his life with a customized home tribute Sunday, a source told CNN's Coy Wire.

    The pre-game tribute at Highmark Stadium in Orchard Park, New York, will especially highlight the members of the Bills training staff who immediately jumped into action after Hamlin collapsed on the field Monday.

    According to an update from the Bills Saturday, Hamlin remains in critical condition at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center.

    https://www.cnn.com/us/live-news/damar-hamlin-update-nfl-news-01-08-23/index.html
  • Options
    Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 57,924
    12-point plan from the TEC is below:

    1 A British Baccalaureate
    It would offer broader academic and vocational qualifications at 18, with parity in funding per pupil in both routes, and a slimmed-down set of exams at 16 to bring out the best in every child.

    2 ‘Electives premium’
    To be spent on activities including drama, music, dance and sport and a National Citizen Service experience for every pupil, with volunteering and outdoor pursuits to ensure that activities enjoyed by the most advantaged become available to all.

    3 New cadre of Career Academies
    Elite technical and vocational sixth forms with close links to industry, mirroring the academic sixth forms and a new focus on creativity and entrepreneurialism in education to unleash the economic potential of Britain.

    4 Significant boost to early years funding
    The extra funding should be targeted at the most vulnerable. A unique pupil number would be given to every child from birth, to level the playing field before they get to school. Every primary school should have a library.

    5 Army of undergraduate tutors
    The students would earn credit towards their degrees by helping pupils who fall behind to catch up.

    6 Making the most of tech
    A laptop or tablet for every child, greater use of artificial intelligence in schools, colleges and universities to personalise learning, reduce teacher workload and prepare young people better for future employment.

    7 Wellbeing at the heart of education
    A counsellor should be placed in every school and an annual wellbeing survey of pupils carried out to encourage schools to actively build resilience rather than just support students once problems have arisen.

    8 Bring out the best in teaching
    Profession’s status and appeal would be increased with better career development, revalidation every 5 yrs & a new category of consultant teachers, promoted within the classroom, as well as a new teaching apprenticeship.

    9 A reformed Ofsted
    Ofsted should work collaboratively with schools to secure sustained improvement, and a new “report card” with a wider range of metrics including wellbeing, school culture, inclusion & attendance to unleash the potential of schools.

    10 Better training
    Teachers should be trained to identify children who have special educational needs, a greater focus should be placed on inclusion and a duty put on schools to remain accountable for the pupils they exclude to draw out the talent in every child.

    11 New university campuses
    New campuses should be created in 50 HE “cold spots”, including satellite wings in FE colleges. In addition, pay and conditions in FE sector should be improved and a transferrable credit system between universities and colleges created to boost stalled British productivity.

    12 A 15-year strategy
    Drawn up in consultation with business leaders, scientists, local mayors, civic leaders & cultural figures, putting education above short-term party politics and bringing out the best in our schools, colleges and universities.
  • Options
    dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 28,910
    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Hah. Just showed the Poe Poems to a professional writer friend. A one word reaction

    “Fuck”

    That can be interpreted in (at least) two ways.
    I rightly interpreted it as meaning "Fuck, soon my art form - novel writing - will be taken over and ruined by the machines"

    This really is the end for most creative writers. If Claude can master advanced poetry and it can write amusing Seinfeld scripts, then it can do anything. And it will do anything, because better and better AIs are coming down the line

    The only human writing that will survive will be memoir, travel, human interest journalism. The direct human experience an AI cannot have
    Why will travel survive?
    Why can't AI just figure out what it would be like?
  • Options
    Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 57,924
    dixiedean said:

    I support it in principle. Maths is very important. However, there are two problems I can see:
    1. Where will the teachers come from?
    2. If kids have not engaged with maths by 16, another two years will make no difference.
    The really key years are primary school and 7-9 in secondary school. Those should be the focus.

    Yes, this is the sensible criticism to give.

    But most OECD countries do mandate maths until 18 years old as well, so I do think that needs to be part of it.
    Southam's point is the one I agree with. Being forced to study something you're crap at and have mentally disengaged from for two more years is clearly not the solution. Being taught well early on is. The trouble is that the latter concept can't be distilled into a simple and deliverable-sounding solution. It will be quietly dropped in due course - perhaps a change to the 'General Studies' (do they still do that?) course curriculum to include a bit of 'maths' to save Sunak's blushes should he ever be in a position to implement this policy.
    I don't think that's the proposal. It's just about recognising you can't bail out of what will be a core skill as a 21stC adult at age 16, when there's a further two years of education to go. There are all sorts of curricula being explored, including Core Maths qualifications, T-levels and more innovative options as well as the A-level.

    And the recommendation came from the Times Education Commission is much broader than that, and more fundamental too:

    "The Times Education Commission took evidence from more than 600 experts across fields including business, the arts and education.

    The main recommendation of the year-long commission includes the introduction of a British Baccalaureate, an equally rigorous but broader qualification than A-levels including both academic and vocational routes or a combination of the two.

    Pupils would take six subjects and the qualification would be based on the International Baccalaureate, an A-level alternative offered mainly in private schools, but customised for the UK. It could be adopted to replace the Highers qualification in Scotland as well as A-levels in England, Wales and Northern Ireland."


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/times-education-commission-report-welcomed-by-tony-blair-john-major-qwc3b7ktx

    It has been welcomed by Sir Tony Blair and Sir John Major, along with ten former education secretaries. It recommends replacing GCSEs with slimmed-down exams at 16, digital skills being an integral part of the curriculum, 50 new university campuses, laptops for every child, an army of undergraduate tutors and a substantial investment in early years.

    In other words, it has broad cross-party support in this country and the approach is uncontentious in most other countries, where they already do it, like Australia, Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Norway and the United States.

    Do we need to fund it properly? Absolutely we do.

    So let's stop pointless distractions of trying to desecrate small independent schools, or compete about how much we hated or loved maths at school, and discuss how we make this happen.
    It's the funding though.
    There's all kinds of things can be achieved with proper funding.
    This year's teacher's pay rise is to come out of existing (inadequate) budgets.
    I see no evidence whatsoever that that attitude will change.
    Funding needs to be targeted and focussed at the right strategy.
  • Options
    Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 57,924

    I support it in principle. Maths is very important. However, there are two problems I can see:
    1. Where will the teachers come from?
    2. If kids have not engaged with maths by 16, another two years will make no difference.
    The really key years are primary school and 7-9 in secondary school. Those should be the focus.

    Yes, this is the sensible criticism to give.

    But most OECD countries do mandate maths until 18 years old as well, so I do think that needs to be part of it.
    Southam's point is the one I agree with. Being forced to study something you're crap at and have mentally disengaged from for two more years is clearly not the solution. Being taught well early on is. The trouble is that the latter concept can't be distilled into a simple and deliverable-sounding solution. It will be quietly dropped in due course - perhaps a change to the 'General Studies' (do they still do that?) course curriculum to include a bit of 'maths' to save Sunak's blushes should he ever be in a position to implement this policy.
    I don't think that's the proposal. It's just about recognising you can't bail out of what will be a core skill as a 21stC adult at age 16, when there's a further two years of education to go. There are all sorts of curricula being explored, including Core Maths qualifications, T-levels and more innovative options as well as the A-level.

    And the recommendation came from the Times Education Commission is much broader than that, and more fundamental too:

    "The Times Education Commission took evidence from more than 600 experts across fields including business, the arts and education.

    The main recommendation of the year-long commission includes the introduction of a British Baccalaureate, an equally rigorous but broader qualification than A-levels including both academic and vocational routes or a combination of the two.

    Pupils would take six subjects and the qualification would be based on the International Baccalaureate, an A-level alternative offered mainly in private schools, but customised for the UK. It could be adopted to replace the Highers qualification in Scotland as well as A-levels in England, Wales and Northern Ireland."


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/times-education-commission-report-welcomed-by-tony-blair-john-major-qwc3b7ktx

    It has been welcomed by Sir Tony Blair and Sir John Major, along with ten former education secretaries. It recommends replacing GCSEs with slimmed-down exams at 16, digital skills being an integral part of the curriculum, 50 new university campuses, laptops for every child, an army of undergraduate tutors and a substantial investment in early years.

    In other words, it has broad cross-party support in this country and the approach is uncontentious in most other countries, where they already do it, like Australia, Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Norway and the United States.

    Do we need to fund it properly? Absolutely we do.

    So let's stop pointless distractions of trying to desecrate small independent schools, or compete about how much we hated or loved maths at school, and discuss how we make this happen.
    Sorry to see continuity-remoanerism under every bed, but if the above is true it sounds strongly like a fairly clear cut case of EU-harmonisation (again) even though we're not in the EU. There was me thinking that Sunak had actually had an original thought about maths, albeit flawed. My mistake.
    Eh?
  • Options
    MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 46,031

    I support it in principle. Maths is very important. However, there are two problems I can see:
    1. Where will the teachers come from?
    2. If kids have not engaged with maths by 16, another two years will make no difference.
    The really key years are primary school and 7-9 in secondary school. Those should be the focus.

    Yes, this is the sensible criticism to give.

    But most OECD countries do mandate maths until 18 years old as well, so I do think that needs to be part of it.
    Southam's point is the one I agree with. Being forced to study something you're crap at and have mentally disengaged from for two more years is clearly not the solution. Being taught well early on is. The trouble is that the latter concept can't be distilled into a simple and deliverable-sounding solution. It will be quietly dropped in due course - perhaps a change to the 'General Studies' (do they still do that?) course curriculum to include a bit of 'maths' to save Sunak's blushes should he ever be in a position to implement this policy.
    I don't think that's the proposal. It's just about recognising you can't bail out of what will be a core skill as a 21stC adult at age 16, when there's a further two years of education to go. There are all sorts of curricula being explored, including Core Maths qualifications, T-levels and more innovative options as well as the A-level.

    And the recommendation came from the Times Education Commission is much broader than that, and more fundamental too:

    "The Times Education Commission took evidence from more than 600 experts across fields including business, the arts and education.

    The main recommendation of the year-long commission includes the introduction of a British Baccalaureate, an equally rigorous but broader qualification than A-levels including both academic and vocational routes or a combination of the two.

    Pupils would take six subjects and the qualification would be based on the International Baccalaureate, an A-level alternative offered mainly in private schools, but customised for the UK. It could be adopted to replace the Highers qualification in Scotland as well as A-levels in England, Wales and Northern Ireland."


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/times-education-commission-report-welcomed-by-tony-blair-john-major-qwc3b7ktx

    It has been welcomed by Sir Tony Blair and Sir John Major, along with ten former education secretaries. It recommends replacing GCSEs with slimmed-down exams at 16, digital skills being an integral part of the curriculum, 50 new university campuses, laptops for every child, an army of undergraduate tutors and a substantial investment in early years.

    In other words, it has broad cross-party support in this country and the approach is uncontentious in most other countries, where they already do it, like Australia, Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Norway and the United States.

    Do we need to fund it properly? Absolutely we do.

    So let's stop pointless distractions of trying to desecrate small independent schools, or compete about how much we hated or loved maths at school, and discuss how we make this happen.
    You can’t study 6 subjects between 16-18

    They might do that in Furin countries but there are unique absolutely unfixable, absolutely stupid reasons for not doing it here.

    Bit like applying to university after you get your exam results. Or staggering school holidays regionally across the country.
  • Options
    dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 28,910

    dixiedean said:

    I support it in principle. Maths is very important. However, there are two problems I can see:
    1. Where will the teachers come from?
    2. If kids have not engaged with maths by 16, another two years will make no difference.
    The really key years are primary school and 7-9 in secondary school. Those should be the focus.

    Yes, this is the sensible criticism to give.

    But most OECD countries do mandate maths until 18 years old as well, so I do think that needs to be part of it.
    Southam's point is the one I agree with. Being forced to study something you're crap at and have mentally disengaged from for two more years is clearly not the solution. Being taught well early on is. The trouble is that the latter concept can't be distilled into a simple and deliverable-sounding solution. It will be quietly dropped in due course - perhaps a change to the 'General Studies' (do they still do that?) course curriculum to include a bit of 'maths' to save Sunak's blushes should he ever be in a position to implement this policy.
    I don't think that's the proposal. It's just about recognising you can't bail out of what will be a core skill as a 21stC adult at age 16, when there's a further two years of education to go. There are all sorts of curricula being explored, including Core Maths qualifications, T-levels and more innovative options as well as the A-level.

    And the recommendation came from the Times Education Commission is much broader than that, and more fundamental too:

    "The Times Education Commission took evidence from more than 600 experts across fields including business, the arts and education.

    The main recommendation of the year-long commission includes the introduction of a British Baccalaureate, an equally rigorous but broader qualification than A-levels including both academic and vocational routes or a combination of the two.

    Pupils would take six subjects and the qualification would be based on the International Baccalaureate, an A-level alternative offered mainly in private schools, but customised for the UK. It could be adopted to replace the Highers qualification in Scotland as well as A-levels in England, Wales and Northern Ireland."


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/times-education-commission-report-welcomed-by-tony-blair-john-major-qwc3b7ktx

    It has been welcomed by Sir Tony Blair and Sir John Major, along with ten former education secretaries. It recommends replacing GCSEs with slimmed-down exams at 16, digital skills being an integral part of the curriculum, 50 new university campuses, laptops for every child, an army of undergraduate tutors and a substantial investment in early years.

    In other words, it has broad cross-party support in this country and the approach is uncontentious in most other countries, where they already do it, like Australia, Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Norway and the United States.

    Do we need to fund it properly? Absolutely we do.

    So let's stop pointless distractions of trying to desecrate small independent schools, or compete about how much we hated or loved maths at school, and discuss how we make this happen.
    It's the funding though.
    There's all kinds of things can be achieved with proper funding.
    This year's teacher's pay rise is to come out of existing (inadequate) budgets.
    I see no evidence whatsoever that that attitude will change.
    Funding needs to be targeted and focussed at the right strategy.
    Well of course.
    But it won't be. We've 40 years of doing everything on the cheap.
  • Options
    kjhkjh Posts: 11,062

    I'm interested to hear what AI can do for me and Scarlett Johansson.

    Can I hear a bit more about this please?

    Arrange for a restraining order.
  • Options
    dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 28,910
    kjh said:

    I'm interested to hear what AI can do for me and Scarlett Johansson.

    Can I hear a bit more about this please?

    Arrange for a restraining order.
    She's that pushy?
  • Options
    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Hah. Just showed the Poe Poems to a professional writer friend. A one word reaction

    “Fuck”

    That can be interpreted in (at least) two ways.
    I rightly interpreted it as meaning "Fuck, soon my art form - novel writing - will be taken over and ruined by the machines"

    This really is the end for most creative writers. If Claude can master advanced poetry and it can write amusing Seinfeld scripts, then it can do anything. And it will do anything, because better and better AIs are coming down the line

    The only human writing that will survive will be memoir, travel, human interest journalism. The direct human experience an AI cannot have
    Doubt it the end for high-end writers & writing. Or even most of the middle.

    However, for the lower echelons could well prove problematic.

    FYI (also BTW) there are computer programs available, that are capable of coming up with a plethora of potential political election slogans AND campaign logos.

    Friend of mine who is graphic artist in this field says this is stiff competition for the likes of her. Though personally would rather have a human with some experience, aptitude and (at least a little) horse sense on this job, than a discount version of The Great Brain.
  • Options
    LeonLeon Posts: 50,693
    dixiedean said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Hah. Just showed the Poe Poems to a professional writer friend. A one word reaction

    “Fuck”

    That can be interpreted in (at least) two ways.
    I rightly interpreted it as meaning "Fuck, soon my art form - novel writing - will be taken over and ruined by the machines"

    This really is the end for most creative writers. If Claude can master advanced poetry and it can write amusing Seinfeld scripts, then it can do anything. And it will do anything, because better and better AIs are coming down the line

    The only human writing that will survive will be memoir, travel, human interest journalism. The direct human experience an AI cannot have
    Why will travel survive?
    Why can't AI just figure out what it would be like?
    Because - I suspect - readers will demand an authentic human experience reported by a traveling human

    And on that note, I have to do some traveling. Later
  • Options
    MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 46,031

    I support it in principle. Maths is very important. However, there are two problems I can see:
    1. Where will the teachers come from?
    2. If kids have not engaged with maths by 16, another two years will make no difference.
    The really key years are primary school and 7-9 in secondary school. Those should be the focus.

    Yes, this is the sensible criticism to give.

    But most OECD countries do mandate maths until 18 years old as well, so I do think that needs to be part of it.
    Southam's point is the one I agree with. Being forced to study something you're crap at and have mentally disengaged from for two more years is clearly not the solution. Being taught well early on is. The trouble is that the latter concept can't be distilled into a simple and deliverable-sounding solution. It will be quietly dropped in due course - perhaps a change to the 'General Studies' (do they still do that?) course curriculum to include a bit of 'maths' to save Sunak's blushes should he ever be in a position to implement this policy.
    I don't think that's the proposal. It's just about recognising you can't bail out of what will be a core skill as a 21stC adult at age 16, when there's a further two years of education to go. There are all sorts of curricula being explored, including Core Maths qualifications, T-levels and more innovative options as well as the A-level.

    And the recommendation came from the Times Education Commission is much broader than that, and more fundamental too:

    "The Times Education Commission took evidence from more than 600 experts across fields including business, the arts and education.

    The main recommendation of the year-long commission includes the introduction of a British Baccalaureate, an equally rigorous but broader qualification than A-levels including both academic and vocational routes or a combination of the two.

    Pupils would take six subjects and the qualification would be based on the International Baccalaureate, an A-level alternative offered mainly in private schools, but customised for the UK. It could be adopted to replace the Highers qualification in Scotland as well as A-levels in England, Wales and Northern Ireland."


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/times-education-commission-report-welcomed-by-tony-blair-john-major-qwc3b7ktx

    It has been welcomed by Sir Tony Blair and Sir John Major, along with ten former education secretaries. It recommends replacing GCSEs with slimmed-down exams at 16, digital skills being an integral part of the curriculum, 50 new university campuses, laptops for every child, an army of undergraduate tutors and a substantial investment in early years.

    In other words, it has broad cross-party support in this country and the approach is uncontentious in most other countries, where they already do it, like Australia, Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Norway and the United States.

    Do we need to fund it properly? Absolutely we do.

    So let's stop pointless distractions of trying to desecrate small independent schools, or compete about how much we hated or loved maths at school, and discuss how we make this happen.
    Sorry to see continuity-remoanerism under every bed, but if the above is true it sounds strongly like a fairly clear cut case of EU-harmonisation (again) even though we're not in the EU. There was me thinking that Sunak had actually had an original thought about maths, albeit flawed. My mistake.
    Eh?
    TIL that Australia, Canada, Japan and the USA are in the EU.

    Interesting.
  • Options
    Luckyguy1983Luckyguy1983 Posts: 26,556
    Nigelb said:

    Enjoyed skimming the previous Brexit/ rejoin thread.

    The holdout Brexiteers are beginning to remind me of 1980s communists - "it just hasn't been properly delivered yet".

    If Russia was still being run for the benefit of the deposed Tsar, the Bolsheviks had joined the triple entente, and serfdom was still in fashion, they might have had a point.

    If you had a better track record in honest self-analysis, I might ask whether when you opposed Brexit, in your wildest dreams you imagined that 6 years on from the cataclysmic event, no noticeable divergence whatever from the EU would have developed.
  • Options
    dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 28,910
    Leon said:

    dixiedean said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Hah. Just showed the Poe Poems to a professional writer friend. A one word reaction

    “Fuck”

    That can be interpreted in (at least) two ways.
    I rightly interpreted it as meaning "Fuck, soon my art form - novel writing - will be taken over and ruined by the machines"

    This really is the end for most creative writers. If Claude can master advanced poetry and it can write amusing Seinfeld scripts, then it can do anything. And it will do anything, because better and better AIs are coming down the line

    The only human writing that will survive will be memoir, travel, human interest journalism. The direct human experience an AI cannot have
    Why will travel survive?
    Why can't AI just figure out what it would be like?
    Because - I suspect - readers will demand an authentic human experience reported by a traveling human

    And on that note, I have to do some traveling. Later
    And how will readers know?
  • Options
    solarflaresolarflare Posts: 3,688
    I find it comforting to know that before Skynet launches Judgement Day at least it'll be able to write a nice article explaining why it had to do it.
  • Options
    PhilPhil Posts: 2,104

    ChatGPT or Leon....

    The day is coming when artificial intelligence will put professional writers out of work forever. With the ability to generate content that is indistinguishable from that produced by humans, AI will render the skills of even the most talented scribes obsolete. No longer will people need to spend years honing their craft and developing their voice, as a machine will be able to do it all for them.

    The writing profession, as we know it, will cease to exist. No more struggling to find the right words or worrying about writer's block. No more late nights at the keyboard, pouring your heart and soul into every sentence. Instead, all that will be needed is a simple command to a machine, and presto! A perfectly crafted piece of writing will appear, ready to be published or broadcast to the world.

    But the implications of this go far beyond just the writing profession. With AI able to produce any type of content, from news articles and social media posts to marketing copy and even screenplays, the creative industries as a whole will be upended. No longer will we need creative directors or copywriters or even filmmakers. AI will be able to do it all, and do it better than any human could.

    So if you're a professional writer, start thinking about a new career now. Because the future is coming, and it's going to be all about the machines.

    If you work as a wordsmith then you definitely need to be thinking about how ChatGPT & friends are going to change the market for the written word. Basic copywriting is dead in the water, that seems inevitable. So either move up the value chain or switch to a different market where AI can’t operate. It’s pretty much certain to ruin the market for college essays.

    I know I’ve written a lot of skeptical commentary here about ChatGPT & its friends, but I do think they’re going to be revolutionary too. Yesterday I helped the eldest write some internship appications which demanded 3 2000 word personal essays, something that he finds absolutely excruciating. “To the ChatGPT-mobile!” I said & suitably prompted ChatGPT spat out a few thousand words of text for us that we could massage into something submittable. Was it great prose? No. Was it a whole lot better than starting with a blank page? Absolutely.
  • Options

    12-point plan from the TEC is below:

    1 A British Baccalaureate
    It would offer broader academic and vocational qualifications at 18, with parity in funding per pupil in both routes, and a slimmed-down set of exams at 16 to bring out the best in every child.

    2 ‘Electives premium’
    To be spent on activities including drama, music, dance and sport and a National Citizen Service experience for every pupil, with volunteering and outdoor pursuits to ensure that activities enjoyed by the most advantaged become available to all.

    3 New cadre of Career Academies
    Elite technical and vocational sixth forms with close links to industry, mirroring the academic sixth forms and a new focus on creativity and entrepreneurialism in education to unleash the economic potential of Britain.

    4 Significant boost to early years funding
    The extra funding should be targeted at the most vulnerable. A unique pupil number would be given to every child from birth, to level the playing field before they get to school. Every primary school should have a library.

    5 Army of undergraduate tutors
    The students would earn credit towards their degrees by helping pupils who fall behind to catch up.

    6 Making the most of tech
    A laptop or tablet for every child, greater use of artificial intelligence in schools, colleges and universities to personalise learning, reduce teacher workload and prepare young people better for future employment.

    7 Wellbeing at the heart of education
    A counsellor should be placed in every school and an annual wellbeing survey of pupils carried out to encourage schools to actively build resilience rather than just support students once problems have arisen.

    8 Bring out the best in teaching
    Profession’s status and appeal would be increased with better career development, revalidation every 5 yrs & a new category of consultant teachers, promoted within the classroom, as well as a new teaching apprenticeship.

    9 A reformed Ofsted
    Ofsted should work collaboratively with schools to secure sustained improvement, and a new “report card” with a wider range of metrics including wellbeing, school culture, inclusion & attendance to unleash the potential of schools.

    10 Better training
    Teachers should be trained to identify children who have special educational needs, a greater focus should be placed on inclusion and a duty put on schools to remain accountable for the pupils they exclude to draw out the talent in every child.

    11 New university campuses
    New campuses should be created in 50 HE “cold spots”, including satellite wings in FE colleges. In addition, pay and conditions in FE sector should be improved and a transferrable credit system between universities and colleges created to boost stalled British productivity.

    12 A 15-year strategy
    Drawn up in consultation with business leaders, scientists, local mayors, civic leaders & cultural figures, putting education above short-term party politics and bringing out the best in our schools, colleges and universities.

    There is a lot of motherhood and apple pie there, as well as wishful thinking. But look at item 1: parity of funding for academic and vocational education is what killed off technical schools in the grammar/secondary modern/technical schools system. It is simply absurd to give the same funding to equip workshops and kitchens for vocational training as to buying a few books for the academic side.
  • Options
    FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 79,035
    edited January 2023
    Phil said:

    ChatGPT or Leon....

    The day is coming when artificial intelligence will put professional writers out of work forever. With the ability to generate content that is indistinguishable from that produced by humans, AI will render the skills of even the most talented scribes obsolete. No longer will people need to spend years honing their craft and developing their voice, as a machine will be able to do it all for them.

    The writing profession, as we know it, will cease to exist. No more struggling to find the right words or worrying about writer's block. No more late nights at the keyboard, pouring your heart and soul into every sentence. Instead, all that will be needed is a simple command to a machine, and presto! A perfectly crafted piece of writing will appear, ready to be published or broadcast to the world.

    But the implications of this go far beyond just the writing profession. With AI able to produce any type of content, from news articles and social media posts to marketing copy and even screenplays, the creative industries as a whole will be upended. No longer will we need creative directors or copywriters or even filmmakers. AI will be able to do it all, and do it better than any human could.

    So if you're a professional writer, start thinking about a new career now. Because the future is coming, and it's going to be all about the machines.

    If you work as a wordsmith then you definitely need to be thinking about how ChatGPT & friends are going to change the market for the written word. Basic copywriting is dead in the water, that seems inevitable. So either move up the value chain or switch to a different market where AI can’t operate. It’s pretty much certain to ruin the market for college essays.

    I know I’ve written a lot of skeptical commentary here about ChatGPT & its friends, but I do think they’re going to be revolutionary too. Yesterday I helped the eldest write some internship appications which demanded 3 2000 word personal essays, something that he finds absolutely excruciating. “To the ChatGPT-mobile!” I said & suitably prompted ChatGPT spat out a few thousand words of text for us that we could massage into something submittable. Was it great prose? No. Was it a whole lot better than starting with a blank page? Absolutely.
    I don't think anybody is arguing against the fact these tools will be a step change across a wide range of industries. I would be rather concerned if I was early in my career and worked in a low / mid level white collar job, particularly involving writing lots of repetitive text (or rather basic coding), and not qualified with any specialism that aren't easily replaced by a LLM.
  • Options
    FFS....BBC commentators talking bollocks about xG.....quick get ChatGPT to replace them.
  • Options
    MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 46,031

    Nigelb said:

    Enjoyed skimming the previous Brexit/ rejoin thread.

    The holdout Brexiteers are beginning to remind me of 1980s communists - "it just hasn't been properly delivered yet".

    If Russia was still being run for the benefit of the deposed Tsar, the Bolsheviks had joined the triple entente, and serfdom was still in fashion, they might have had a point.

    If you had a better track record in honest self-analysis, I might ask whether when you opposed Brexit, in your wildest dreams you imagined that 6 years on from the cataclysmic event, no noticeable divergence whatever from the EU would have developed.

    “Is Russia still the danger?”

    “We are all very worried about her.”

    “We always were in my day, and in Dizzy’s before me. Is there still a Tsar?”

    “Yes, but he is not a Romanoff. It’s another family. He is much more powerful, and much more despotic.”
  • Options
    Phil said:

    ChatGPT or Leon....

    The day is coming when artificial intelligence will put professional writers out of work forever. With the ability to generate content that is indistinguishable from that produced by humans, AI will render the skills of even the most talented scribes obsolete. No longer will people need to spend years honing their craft and developing their voice, as a machine will be able to do it all for them.

    The writing profession, as we know it, will cease to exist. No more struggling to find the right words or worrying about writer's block. No more late nights at the keyboard, pouring your heart and soul into every sentence. Instead, all that will be needed is a simple command to a machine, and presto! A perfectly crafted piece of writing will appear, ready to be published or broadcast to the world.

    But the implications of this go far beyond just the writing profession. With AI able to produce any type of content, from news articles and social media posts to marketing copy and even screenplays, the creative industries as a whole will be upended. No longer will we need creative directors or copywriters or even filmmakers. AI will be able to do it all, and do it better than any human could.

    So if you're a professional writer, start thinking about a new career now. Because the future is coming, and it's going to be all about the machines.

    If you work as a wordsmith then you definitely need to be thinking about how ChatGPT & friends are going to change the market for the written word. Basic copywriting is dead in the water, that seems inevitable. So either move up the value chain or switch to a different market where AI can’t operate. It’s pretty much certain to ruin the market for college essays.

    I know I’ve written a lot of skeptical commentary here about ChatGPT & its friends, but I do think they’re going to be revolutionary too. Yesterday I helped the eldest write some internship appications which demanded 3 2000 word personal essays, something that he finds absolutely excruciating. “To the ChatGPT-mobile!” I said & suitably prompted ChatGPT spat out a few thousand words of text for us that we could massage into something submittable. Was it great prose? No. Was it a whole lot better than starting with a blank page? Absolutely.
    Yes, I think it is writing the first draft that will be AI's sweet spot.
  • Options

    Phil said:

    ChatGPT or Leon....

    The day is coming when artificial intelligence will put professional writers out of work forever. With the ability to generate content that is indistinguishable from that produced by humans, AI will render the skills of even the most talented scribes obsolete. No longer will people need to spend years honing their craft and developing their voice, as a machine will be able to do it all for them.

    The writing profession, as we know it, will cease to exist. No more struggling to find the right words or worrying about writer's block. No more late nights at the keyboard, pouring your heart and soul into every sentence. Instead, all that will be needed is a simple command to a machine, and presto! A perfectly crafted piece of writing will appear, ready to be published or broadcast to the world.

    But the implications of this go far beyond just the writing profession. With AI able to produce any type of content, from news articles and social media posts to marketing copy and even screenplays, the creative industries as a whole will be upended. No longer will we need creative directors or copywriters or even filmmakers. AI will be able to do it all, and do it better than any human could.

    So if you're a professional writer, start thinking about a new career now. Because the future is coming, and it's going to be all about the machines.

    If you work as a wordsmith then you definitely need to be thinking about how ChatGPT & friends are going to change the market for the written word. Basic copywriting is dead in the water, that seems inevitable. So either move up the value chain or switch to a different market where AI can’t operate. It’s pretty much certain to ruin the market for college essays.

    I know I’ve written a lot of skeptical commentary here about ChatGPT & its friends, but I do think they’re going to be revolutionary too. Yesterday I helped the eldest write some internship appications which demanded 3 2000 word personal essays, something that he finds absolutely excruciating. “To the ChatGPT-mobile!” I said & suitably prompted ChatGPT spat out a few thousand words of text for us that we could massage into something submittable. Was it great prose? No. Was it a whole lot better than starting with a blank page? Absolutely.
    Yes, I think it is writing the first draft that will be AI's sweet spot.
    I already use these models for the first draft of a function I am writing in code, or asking is there a trick to make some common task more efficient.
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    Chinese police clash with Covid test factory workers after sudden sackings

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/world-news/2023/01/08/watch-chinese-police-clash-covid-test-factory-workers-sudden/
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    Just asking ChatGPT about it replacing travel writers and no amount of prompting could I get it to admit that it will put them out of a job....again are we sure Leon isn't ChatGPT?
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    Sunil_PrasannanSunil_Prasannan Posts: 50,456
    edited January 2023

    Nigelb said:

    Enjoyed skimming the previous Brexit/ rejoin thread.

    The holdout Brexiteers are beginning to remind me of 1980s communists - "it just hasn't been properly delivered yet".

    If Russia was still being run for the benefit of the deposed Tsar, the Bolsheviks had joined the triple entente, and serfdom was still in fashion, they might have had a point.

    If you had a better track record in honest self-analysis, I might ask whether when you opposed Brexit, in your wildest dreams you imagined that 6 years on from the cataclysmic event, no noticeable divergence whatever from the EU would have developed.

    “Is Russia still the danger?”

    “We are all very worried about her.”

    “We always were in my day, and in Dizzy’s before me. Is there still a Tsar?”

    “Yes, but he is not a Romanoff. It’s another family. He is much more powerful, and much more despotic.”
    " I've been such a fool, Vassili. Man will always be a man. There is no new man. We tried so hard to create a society that was equal, where there'd be nothing to envy your neighbour. But there's always something to envy. A smile, a friendship, something you don't have and want to appropriate. In this world, even a Soviet one, there will always be rich and poor. Rich in gifts, poor in gifts. Rich in love, poor in love."
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    Aston Villa.

    LOL.
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    MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 46,031
    edited January 2023

    FFS....BBC commentators talking bollocks about xG.....quick get ChatGPT to replace them.

    Yes. It is definitely scores 3.6 Pestos on the Pesto Scale
  • Options

    Nigelb said:

    Enjoyed skimming the previous Brexit/ rejoin thread.

    The holdout Brexiteers are beginning to remind me of 1980s communists - "it just hasn't been properly delivered yet".

    If Russia was still being run for the benefit of the deposed Tsar, the Bolsheviks had joined the triple entente, and serfdom was still in fashion, they might have had a point.

    If you had a better track record in honest self-analysis, I might ask whether when you opposed Brexit, in your wildest dreams you imagined that 6 years on from the cataclysmic event, no noticeable divergence whatever from the EU would have developed.
    It was always possible.

    After all, diverging standards means you have to have a boundary between the two sets of rules, and that's a faff and cost to manage.

    So the gains of changing things have to be pretty substantial for it to be worth it. And they're not thick in the ground, hence JRM padding out the list of Brexit benefits with that thing about signs in the Dartford tunnel.

    I think Blair made the prediction that Brexit would turn out either harmful or pointless. It took Johnson's genius to make it both.
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    Phil said:

    ChatGPT or Leon....

    The day is coming when artificial intelligence will put professional writers out of work forever. With the ability to generate content that is indistinguishable from that produced by humans, AI will render the skills of even the most talented scribes obsolete. No longer will people need to spend years honing their craft and developing their voice, as a machine will be able to do it all for them.

    The writing profession, as we know it, will cease to exist. No more struggling to find the right words or worrying about writer's block. No more late nights at the keyboard, pouring your heart and soul into every sentence. Instead, all that will be needed is a simple command to a machine, and presto! A perfectly crafted piece of writing will appear, ready to be published or broadcast to the world.

    But the implications of this go far beyond just the writing profession. With AI able to produce any type of content, from news articles and social media posts to marketing copy and even screenplays, the creative industries as a whole will be upended. No longer will we need creative directors or copywriters or even filmmakers. AI will be able to do it all, and do it better than any human could.

    So if you're a professional writer, start thinking about a new career now. Because the future is coming, and it's going to be all about the machines.

    If you work as a wordsmith then you definitely need to be thinking about how ChatGPT & friends are going to change the market for the written word. Basic copywriting is dead in the water, that seems inevitable. So either move up the value chain or switch to a different market where AI can’t operate. It’s pretty much certain to ruin the market for college essays.

    I know I’ve written a lot of skeptical commentary here about ChatGPT & its friends, but I do think they’re going to be revolutionary too. Yesterday I helped the eldest write some internship appications which demanded 3 2000 word personal essays, something that he finds absolutely excruciating. “To the ChatGPT-mobile!” I said & suitably prompted ChatGPT spat out a few thousand words of text for us that we could massage into something submittable. Was it great prose? No. Was it a whole lot better than starting with a blank page? Absolutely.
    I don't think anybody is arguing against the fact these tools will be a step change across a wide range of industries. I would be rather concerned if I was early in my career and worked in a low / mid level white collar job, particularly involving writing lots of repetitive text (or rather basic coding), and not qualified with any specialism that aren't easily replaced by a LLM.
    Change and automation, and self-service, have killed off lots of jobs. Petrol pump attendants and lift operators are no more. I am just about old enough to remember the tea trolley coming round.

    Low-level coding? Well, in the early days of computing, programmers feared the introduction of assembly language, let alone compiled then interpreted languages, libraries and frameworks and APIs and yet we probably have more programmers now than ever. (As the film Hidden Figures reminded us, electronic computers displaced human computers, some of whom became computer programmers.)

    Low-level white collar jobs are more in danger from self-service than AI. What happened to ticket sellers on the underground, or conductors on buses, and is happening now to supermarket till operators?

    Yes, there will be changes, but there'd have been changes anyway, just different changes.
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    Phil said:

    ChatGPT or Leon....

    The day is coming when artificial intelligence will put professional writers out of work forever. With the ability to generate content that is indistinguishable from that produced by humans, AI will render the skills of even the most talented scribes obsolete. No longer will people need to spend years honing their craft and developing their voice, as a machine will be able to do it all for them.

    The writing profession, as we know it, will cease to exist. No more struggling to find the right words or worrying about writer's block. No more late nights at the keyboard, pouring your heart and soul into every sentence. Instead, all that will be needed is a simple command to a machine, and presto! A perfectly crafted piece of writing will appear, ready to be published or broadcast to the world.

    But the implications of this go far beyond just the writing profession. With AI able to produce any type of content, from news articles and social media posts to marketing copy and even screenplays, the creative industries as a whole will be upended. No longer will we need creative directors or copywriters or even filmmakers. AI will be able to do it all, and do it better than any human could.

    So if you're a professional writer, start thinking about a new career now. Because the future is coming, and it's going to be all about the machines.

    If you work as a wordsmith then you definitely need to be thinking about how ChatGPT & friends are going to change the market for the written word. Basic copywriting is dead in the water, that seems inevitable. So either move up the value chain or switch to a different market where AI can’t operate. It’s pretty much certain to ruin the market for college essays.

    I know I’ve written a lot of skeptical commentary here about ChatGPT & its friends, but I do think they’re going to be revolutionary too. Yesterday I helped the eldest write some internship appications which demanded 3 2000 word personal essays, something that he finds absolutely excruciating. “To the ChatGPT-mobile!” I said & suitably prompted ChatGPT spat out a few thousand words of text for us that we could massage into something submittable. Was it great prose? No. Was it a whole lot better than starting with a blank page? Absolutely.
    I don't think anybody is arguing against the fact these tools will be a step change across a wide range of industries. I would be rather concerned if I was early in my career and worked in a low / mid level white collar job, particularly involving writing lots of repetitive text (or rather basic coding), and not qualified with any specialism that aren't easily replaced by a LLM.
    Change and automation, and self-service, have killed off lots of jobs. Petrol pump attendants and lift operators are no more. I am just about old enough to remember the tea trolley coming round.

    Low-level coding? Well, in the early days of computing, programmers feared the introduction of assembly language, let alone compiled then interpreted languages, libraries and frameworks and APIs and yet we probably have more programmers now than ever. (As the film Hidden Figures reminded us, electronic computers displaced human computers, some of whom became computer programmers.)

    Low-level white collar jobs are more in danger from self-service than AI. What happened to ticket sellers on the underground, or conductors on buses, and is happening now to supermarket till operators?

    Yes, there will be changes, but there'd have been changes anyway, just different changes.
    I think this brings up full circle to the start of the debate....what training / education does the system need to place more focus / higher value on.
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    DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 25,788
    edited January 2023

    Just asking ChatGPT about it replacing travel writers and no amount of prompting could I get it to admit that it will put them out of a job....again are we sure Leon isn't ChatGPT?

    Who needs travel writers, or even travel, when Youtube provides videos of Caribbean beaches, Australian wildlife, and real-time air travel?
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    SeaShantyIrish2SeaShantyIrish2 Posts: 16,397
    edited January 2023
    latest from Orchard Park, New York - with just over 9 minutes left in 1st Quarter
    New England Patriots 0, Buffalo Bills 7

    Game with playoff implications. More importantly, the focus is on recovery of injured Bills player Damon Hamlin

    Tweet from his hospital bed watching the start of the game:

    https://twitter.com/HamlinIsland/status/1612146641527799809/photo/1?ref_src=twsrc^tfw|twcamp^tweetembed|twterm^1612146641527799809|twgr^77113af3bb592d3367942d7661af02890d24a609|twcon^s1_&ref_url=https://www.cnn.com/us/live-news/damar-hamlin-update-nfl-news-01-08-23/index.html

    then this

    CNN - Unbelievable! The Buffalo Bills returned the opening kickoff for a touchdown


    The Buffalo Bills, who spent the week worrying for the health of safety Damar Hamlin, returned the opening kickoff of their game for a 96-yard touchdown against the New England Patriots.

    Hamlin, watching from the hospital, tweeted, “OMFG!!!!!!!!!!!!!”

    https://www.cnn.com/us/live-news/damar-hamlin-update-nfl-news-01-08-23/index.html

    SSI - perhaps worth noting, that the first words that Damar Hamlin said, coming out of the coma following his on-field cardiac arrest, where to ask, "Who won?" the game where he went down.

    Though there WAS no game after that, instead frantic - and successful - effort to save his life - and quality of life. Accompanied by the shock, sympathy, empathy, prayers and best wished of millions across America.

    More than were praying for Kevin McCarthy last week, can assure you of that!

    Addendum - Patriots equalized, score now 7-7 with 5+ minutes remaining Q1.
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    DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 25,788
    edited January 2023

    Phil said:

    ChatGPT or Leon....

    The day is coming when artificial intelligence will put professional writers out of work forever. With the ability to generate content that is indistinguishable from that produced by humans, AI will render the skills of even the most talented scribes obsolete. No longer will people need to spend years honing their craft and developing their voice, as a machine will be able to do it all for them.

    The writing profession, as we know it, will cease to exist. No more struggling to find the right words or worrying about writer's block. No more late nights at the keyboard, pouring your heart and soul into every sentence. Instead, all that will be needed is a simple command to a machine, and presto! A perfectly crafted piece of writing will appear, ready to be published or broadcast to the world.

    But the implications of this go far beyond just the writing profession. With AI able to produce any type of content, from news articles and social media posts to marketing copy and even screenplays, the creative industries as a whole will be upended. No longer will we need creative directors or copywriters or even filmmakers. AI will be able to do it all, and do it better than any human could.

    So if you're a professional writer, start thinking about a new career now. Because the future is coming, and it's going to be all about the machines.

    If you work as a wordsmith then you definitely need to be thinking about how ChatGPT & friends are going to change the market for the written word. Basic copywriting is dead in the water, that seems inevitable. So either move up the value chain or switch to a different market where AI can’t operate. It’s pretty much certain to ruin the market for college essays.

    I know I’ve written a lot of skeptical commentary here about ChatGPT & its friends, but I do think they’re going to be revolutionary too. Yesterday I helped the eldest write some internship appications which demanded 3 2000 word personal essays, something that he finds absolutely excruciating. “To the ChatGPT-mobile!” I said & suitably prompted ChatGPT spat out a few thousand words of text for us that we could massage into something submittable. Was it great prose? No. Was it a whole lot better than starting with a blank page? Absolutely.
    I don't think anybody is arguing against the fact these tools will be a step change across a wide range of industries. I would be rather concerned if I was early in my career and worked in a low / mid level white collar job, particularly involving writing lots of repetitive text (or rather basic coding), and not qualified with any specialism that aren't easily replaced by a LLM.
    Change and automation, and self-service, have killed off lots of jobs. Petrol pump attendants and lift operators are no more. I am just about old enough to remember the tea trolley coming round.

    Low-level coding? Well, in the early days of computing, programmers feared the introduction of assembly language, let alone compiled then interpreted languages, libraries and frameworks and APIs and yet we probably have more programmers now than ever. (As the film Hidden Figures reminded us, electronic computers displaced human computers, some of whom became computer programmers.)

    Low-level white collar jobs are more in danger from self-service than AI. What happened to ticket sellers on the underground, or conductors on buses, and is happening now to supermarket till operators?

    Yes, there will be changes, but there'd have been changes anyway, just different changes.
    I think this brings up full circle to the start of the debate....what training / education does the system need to place more focus / higher value on.
    That, pace Casino_Royale and the TEC commission, is a good question. What do we need to teach for the modern world? IT skills, obviously, but we could ditch history and geography from the curriculum. Who cares about oxbow lakes? Classical languages too, and because English is the lingua franca, we do not need our young'uns learning French, Spanish or German either. Maths till 18 is pointless but everyone should be competent in mental arithmetic (which is what I suspect many opinion poll respondents thought they were being asked about) in case Apple removes calculator apps from phones.

    The only reason for not lowering the school leaving age to 11 is to allow time for physical and emotional development.

    OK, that's hyperbole, but a lot of sacred cows will need to be dropped from schools to make time for things that really matter.
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    Luckyguy1983Luckyguy1983 Posts: 26,556

    Nigelb said:

    Enjoyed skimming the previous Brexit/ rejoin thread.

    The holdout Brexiteers are beginning to remind me of 1980s communists - "it just hasn't been properly delivered yet".

    If Russia was still being run for the benefit of the deposed Tsar, the Bolsheviks had joined the triple entente, and serfdom was still in fashion, they might have had a point.

    If you had a better track record in honest self-analysis, I might ask whether when you opposed Brexit, in your wildest dreams you imagined that 6 years on from the cataclysmic event, no noticeable divergence whatever from the EU would have developed.
    It was always possible.

    After all, diverging standards means you have to have a boundary between the two sets of rules, and that's a faff and cost to manage.

    So the gains of changing things have to be pretty substantial for it to be worth it. And they're not thick in the ground, hence JRM padding out the list of Brexit benefits with that thing about signs in the Dartford tunnel.

    I think Blair made the prediction that Brexit would turn out either harmful or pointless. It took Johnson's genius to make it both.
    Opening your front door in the morning is pointless - not to mention drafty. It also happens to be the best way to go to work to earn money, go and meet friends, feel the sun on your face, go down the pub and get pissed, and fall in love (not necessarily in that order). If you're not planning on stepping over the threshold, though, there is indeed very little point.
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    dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 28,910
    edited January 2023

    Chinese police clash with Covid test factory workers after sudden sackings

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/world-news/2023/01/08/watch-chinese-police-clash-covid-test-factory-workers-sudden/

    Chinese New Year holiday is the 21st to 27th. It will be the first proper one in three years.
    I imagine there will be a Covid outbreak like never before seen.
    There will 100's of millions on the move.
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    A headline that only makes sense in Washington State

    Seattle Times ($) - The road to Paradise is closed on weekdays.

    Mount Rainier National Park’s most popular winter destination has beckoned skiers, snowshoers, sledders and snow lovers for more than a century. But despite blue skies Monday, the observed New Year’s Day holiday, all was quiet at Paradise, even as Cascades ski hills and cross-country trails were packed.

    Park officials announced Nov. 29 that the road beyond Longmire would remain closed Mondays through Fridays this winter due to inadequate staffing, drastically reducing accessibility to Paradise and hampering nearby businesses that rely on winter recreation. Winter camping is permitted Saturday nights only, while the snow play area and sledding hill will not open this season.

    The closure severely curtails access to the beloved winter recreation destination, incensing Washington’s outdoors community and spurring it to action. Park leadership hopes recruiting efforts may yield additional open days but sees no path to a full reopening this winter.

    “The staffing and capacity challenges facing Mount Rainier are being seen across the federal public land system and affecting access and management in a myriad of ways,” said Winter Wildlands Alliance policy director Hilary Eisen. “This weekday closure at Paradise, however, is certainly the most high-profile loss of winter access that I’m aware of.” . . . .
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    A headline that only makes sense in Washington State

    Seattle Times ($) - The road to Paradise is closed on weekdays.

    Mount Rainier National Park’s most popular winter destination has beckoned skiers, snowshoers, sledders and snow lovers for more than a century. But despite blue skies Monday, the observed New Year’s Day holiday, all was quiet at Paradise, even as Cascades ski hills and cross-country trails were packed.

    Park officials announced Nov. 29 that the road beyond Longmire would remain closed Mondays through Fridays this winter due to inadequate staffing, drastically reducing accessibility to Paradise and hampering nearby businesses that rely on winter recreation. Winter camping is permitted Saturday nights only, while the snow play area and sledding hill will not open this season.

    The closure severely curtails access to the beloved winter recreation destination, incensing Washington’s outdoors community and spurring it to action. Park leadership hopes recruiting efforts may yield additional open days but sees no path to a full reopening this winter.

    “The staffing and capacity challenges facing Mount Rainier are being seen across the federal public land system and affecting access and management in a myriad of ways,” said Winter Wildlands Alliance policy director Hilary Eisen. “This weekday closure at Paradise, however, is certainly the most high-profile loss of winter access that I’m aware of.” . . . .

    The road to Paradise is closed on weekdays,
    A sign that says "detour" points the way.
    But who can tell where the detour leads,
    When all our hopes and dreams are delayed?

    The sky is grey and the air is cold,
    As I trudge down the lonely path.
    I see the gates of Paradise up ahead,
    But they are locked and sealed with wrath.

    I try the handle and I rattle the chain,
    But the gates won't budge, no matter how I plead.
    I'm left outside in the pouring rain,
    Wondering what I did to deserve this deed.

    The road to Paradise is closed on weekdays,
    Leaving me stranded in this hell.
    But I'll keep walking, I'll keep trying,
    For one day, the gates will open, and all will be well.
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    Angela Levin
    @angelalevin1
    When Meghan was giving birth to Archie, Harry downed so much 'laughing gas' that when the midwife popped back there was none left for Meghan. And he puts this in his memoir?

    More evidence of a put-any-old-shit-in authorial strategy. This was a known issue by the late 1990s, and they now distribute gas cylinders ahead of time, but not the mouthpiece until it's needed. I refuse to believe he nicked the lot after she went into labour. Sort of line which sounds good in a really bad hollywood comedy.
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    pm215pm215 Posts: 1,023

    Change and automation, and self-service, have killed off lots of jobs. Petrol pump attendants and lift operators are no more. I am just about old enough to remember the tea trolley coming round.

    My employer's office doesn't have any tea trolley pushers, true, but on the other hand it does have baristas...
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    Alastair Meeks
    @AlastairMeeks
    "Boris Johnson last matched at 5 (4/1 in conventional odds) on Betfair for next Conservative leader. This is an absurdly short price. The real probability must be closer to 20/1.

    Yes, I am a layer."

    Agree screaming lay.
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    pm215 said:

    Change and automation, and self-service, have killed off lots of jobs. Petrol pump attendants and lift operators are no more. I am just about old enough to remember the tea trolley coming round.

    My employer's office doesn't have any tea trolley pushers, true, but on the other hand it does have baristas...
    They usually work in chambaz
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    Sean_FSean_F Posts: 36,638
    If I think of the works of art, literature, music that have moved, impressed, engaged, even infuriated me, do I think AI would have done it better?

    No, because there is more to these things than being technically proficient. And, it can often be the flaws in great works that make them interesting.
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    Alastair Meeks
    @AlastairMeeks
    "Boris Johnson last matched at 5 (4/1 in conventional odds) on Betfair for next Conservative leader. This is an absurdly short price. The real probability must be closer to 20/1.

    Yes, I am a layer."

    Agree screaming lay.

    6.2 now £53 available
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    https://twitter.com/48_Crash/status/1612067312806547457

    How strange, we didn't seem to be against Harry killing then.
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    dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 28,910
    A maximum of 11 Premier League sides in the fourth round. (Leeds to replay, Arsenal yet to play)
    That's got to be a record low, hasn't it?
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    Sean_F said:

    If I think of the works of art, literature, music that have moved, impressed, engaged, even infuriated me, do I think AI would have done it better?

    No, because there is more to these things than being technically proficient. And, it can often be the flaws in great works that make them interesting.

    The Poe poem goes beyond technically proficient.

    I would absolutely bet that Joyce specialists would not distinguish on a better than chance basis real from CG excerpts from Finnegans Wake.
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    https://twitter.com/48_Crash/status/1612067312806547457

    How strange, we didn't seem to be against Harry killing then.

    Talk to any serviceman who has actually been in action. They thought he was a twat for saying it then just as they do now.
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    MexicanpeteMexicanpete Posts: 26,658
    edited January 2023

    12-point plan from the TEC is below:

    1 A British Baccalaureate
    It would offer broader academic and vocational qualifications at 18, with parity in funding per pupil in both routes, and a slimmed-down set of exams at 16 to bring out the best in every child.

    2 ‘Electives premium’
    To be spent on activities including drama, music, dance and sport and a National Citizen Service experience for every pupil, with volunteering and outdoor pursuits to ensure that activities enjoyed by the most advantaged become available to all.

    3 New cadre of Career Academies
    Elite technical and vocational sixth forms with close links to industry, mirroring the academic sixth forms and a new focus on creativity and entrepreneurialism in education to unleash the economic potential of Britain.

    4 Significant boost to early years funding
    The extra funding should be targeted at the most vulnerable. A unique pupil number would be given to every child from birth, to level the playing field before they get to school. Every primary school should have a library.

    5 Army of undergraduate tutors
    The students would earn credit towards their degrees by helping pupils who fall behind to catch up.

    6 Making the most of tech
    A laptop or tablet for every child, greater use of artificial intelligence in schools, colleges and universities to personalise learning, reduce teacher workload and prepare young people better for future employment.

    7 Wellbeing at the heart of education
    A counsellor should be placed in every school and an annual wellbeing survey of pupils carried out to encourage schools to actively build resilience rather than just support students once problems have arisen.

    8 Bring out the best in teaching
    Profession’s status and appeal would be increased with better career development, revalidation every 5 yrs & a new category of consultant teachers, promoted within the classroom, as well as a new teaching apprenticeship.

    9 A reformed Ofsted
    Ofsted should work collaboratively with schools to secure sustained improvement, and a new “report card” with a wider range of metrics including wellbeing, school culture, inclusion & attendance to unleash the potential of schools.

    10 Better training
    Teachers should be trained to identify children who have special educational needs, a greater focus should be placed on inclusion and a duty put on schools to remain accountable for the pupils they exclude to draw out the talent in every child.

    11 New university campuses
    New campuses should be created in 50 HE “cold spots”, including satellite wings in FE colleges. In addition, pay and conditions in FE sector should be improved and a transferrable credit system between universities and colleges created to boost stalled British productivity.

    12 A 15-year strategy
    Drawn up in consultation with business leaders, scientists, local mayors, civic leaders & cultural figures, putting education above short-term party politics and bringing out the best in our schools, colleges and universities.

    For 12, a 15 year strategy to work we need a moratorium on General Elections for something like, er, 15 years.

    2 sounds very woke. Have you turned left? The rest is all a bit "mom and apple pie".
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    https://twitter.com/48_Crash/status/1612067312806547457

    How strange, we didn't seem to be against Harry killing then.

    Talk to any serviceman who has actually been in action. They thought he was a twat for saying it then just as they do now.
    I know two army people who have explicitly told me their score.
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    SandyRentoolSandyRentool Posts: 21,532
    I have read down thread the claim that travel writers give an authentic account of what it would be like to take a holiday in their latest location.

    For sure.
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    TimSTimS Posts: 11,325

    Sean_F said:

    If I think of the works of art, literature, music that have moved, impressed, engaged, even infuriated me, do I think AI would have done it better?

    No, because there is more to these things than being technically proficient. And, it can often be the flaws in great works that make them interesting.

    The Poe poem goes beyond technically proficient.

    I would absolutely bet that Joyce specialists would not distinguish on a better than chance basis real from CG excerpts from Finnegans Wake.
    The point about this year’s AI developments is not that current AI is better than the best of human, but that it is improving at a sustainable rate that means it will overtake all of us soon.

    I’d draw an analogy with global warming. We’re already shocked at the weather extremes taking place now. But in a few years’ time those will become normal. I remember when 38.2C was shocking. Then a decade later it was 38.7C. Then 3 years later we were suddenly over 40. AI will be the same. It’s certainly not at its peak.

    I’m not generally catastrophist in temperament but I’m quite sure this is a big thing.
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    MexicanpeteMexicanpete Posts: 26,658

    https://twitter.com/48_Crash/status/1612067312806547457

    How strange, we didn't seem to be against Harry killing then.

    Talk to any serviceman who has actually been in action. They thought he was a twat for saying it then just as they do now.
    I know two army people who have explicitly told me their score.
    I knew a few from the Falklands War, back in day, they were quite content to blow their own trumpets down the pub. The trouble is they didn't print their story in a book which the media have (inevitably) run with, in order to tacitly encourage the Taliban to issue a fatwa on Harry, Meghan and the kids.
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    Is a coup taking place in Brazil?
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    Is a coup taking place in Brazil?

    Looks a bit more serious than jan 6.
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    https://twitter.com/48_Crash/status/1612067312806547457

    How strange, we didn't seem to be against Harry killing then.

    Talk to any serviceman who has actually been in action. They thought he was a twat for saying it then just as they do now.
    I know two army people who have explicitly told me their score.
    Yep the Russians do that.
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    MexicanpeteMexicanpete Posts: 26,658

    Is a coup taking place in Brazil?

    It looks that way. So Lula's latest term might be shorter than Liz Truss's.
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    RazedabodeRazedabode Posts: 3,015

    Is a coup taking place in Brazil?

    Looks like it - worrying times
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    LeonLeon Posts: 50,693
    TimS said:

    Sean_F said:

    If I think of the works of art, literature, music that have moved, impressed, engaged, even infuriated me, do I think AI would have done it better?

    No, because there is more to these things than being technically proficient. And, it can often be the flaws in great works that make them interesting.

    The Poe poem goes beyond technically proficient.

    I would absolutely bet that Joyce specialists would not distinguish on a better than chance basis real from CG excerpts from Finnegans Wake.
    The point about this year’s AI developments is not that current AI is better than the best of human, but that it is improving at a sustainable rate that means it will overtake all of us soon.

    I’d draw an analogy with global warming. We’re already shocked at the weather extremes taking place now. But in a few years’ time those will become normal. I remember when 38.2C was shocking. Then a decade later it was 38.7C. Then 3 years later we were suddenly over 40. AI will be the same. It’s certainly not at its peak.

    I’m not generally catastrophist in temperament but I’m quite sure this is a big thing.
    Yes, if you consider where we were with AI art two years ago then the advance is scary good. And it you consider where we were with AI poetry just two DAYS ago then fffffuck. As my writer friend put it

    That Poe poem is better than 90% of “professional” poetry
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    GallowgateGallowgate Posts: 19,278
    Brazil looks like a bunch of yobos rather than an organised coup.
  • Options
    IanB2IanB2 Posts: 49,109
    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Hah. Just showed the Poe Poems to a professional writer friend. A one word reaction

    “Fuck”

    That can be interpreted in (at least) two ways.
    I rightly interpreted it as meaning "Fuck, soon my art form - novel writing - will be taken over and ruined by the machines"

    This really is the end for most creative writers. If Claude can master advanced poetry and it can write amusing Seinfeld scripts, then it can do anything. And it will do anything, because better and better AIs are coming down the line

    The only human writing that will survive will be memoir, travel, human interest journalism. The direct human experience an AI cannot have
    Nestled in the picturesque Ticino region of Switzerland, the luxurious lakeside hotel resort is a true paradise for travelers seeking the ultimate relaxation and rejuvenation. Set amidst breathtaking alpine scenery, the resort boasts stunning views of the sparkling blue waters of Lake Lugano, framed by snow-capped mountain peaks. Whether you're seeking a romantic getaway or a family vacation, this idyllic retreat has something for everyone.

    The hotel itself is impeccably designed, with stylish, modern interiors and every amenity you could possibly desire. The rooms are spacious and beautifully appointed, with plush bedding, marble bathrooms, and private balconies or terraces overlooking the lake. The resort's on-site dining options are equally impressive, with a range of gourmet restaurants serving delicious local and international cuisine. However, the prices at the hotel can be quite steep, and some guests may find it a bit too exclusive or stuffy for their tastes. That being said, the impeccable service and attention to detail more than make up for any potential shortcomings, and the hotel's beautiful setting and world-class amenities are well worth the splurge for those seeking a truly luxurious and indulgent getaway.
  • Options
    ydoethurydoethur Posts: 68,800

    Brazil looks like a bunch of yobos rather than an organised coup.

    Silly bastards. The anniversary was two days ago.
  • Options
    NigelbNigelb Posts: 65,301

    Is a coup taking place in Brazil?

    Looks a bit more serious than jan 6.
    Evidently so; they took a couple more days to plan it...

    And the habits of democracy are slightly less well ingrained in Brazil.
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    Could AI and a probe in a glass do wine tasting?
  • Options
    FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 79,035
    edited January 2023
    Given the dross Hollywood / Disney keep putting out, would anybody be shocked if they have their own version of ChatGPT and all the blue hair weirdos that supposedly writer / direct / produce much of their output don't really exist....

    Glass Onion feels like a movie written by an AI trained on a combination of old fashioned murder mysteries, but given prompts to make it "appropriate for modern sensibilities".
  • Options
    dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 28,910
    ydoethur said:

    Brazil looks like a bunch of yobos rather than an organised coup.

    Silly bastards. The anniversary was two days ago.
    Why wait till Lula was installed?
    Bunch of dangerous Yahoos. The military would have moved sooner surely?
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    dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 28,910
    ydoethur said:

    12-point plan from the TEC is below:

    1 A British Baccalaureate
    It would offer broader academic and vocational qualifications at 18, with parity in funding per pupil in both routes, and a slimmed-down set of exams at 16 to bring out the best in every child.

    2 ‘Electives premium’
    To be spent on activities including drama, music, dance and sport and a National Citizen Service experience for every pupil, with volunteering and outdoor pursuits to ensure that activities enjoyed by the most advantaged become available to all.

    3 New cadre of Career Academies
    Elite technical and vocational sixth forms with close links to industry, mirroring the academic sixth forms and a new focus on creativity and entrepreneurialism in education to unleash the economic potential of Britain.

    4 Significant boost to early years funding
    The extra funding should be targeted at the most vulnerable. A unique pupil number would be given to every child from birth, to level the playing field before they get to school. Every primary school should have a library.

    5 Army of undergraduate tutors
    The students would earn credit towards their degrees by helping pupils who fall behind to catch up.

    6 Making the most of tech
    A laptop or tablet for every child, greater use of artificial intelligence in schools, colleges and universities to personalise learning, reduce teacher workload and prepare young people better for future employment.

    7 Wellbeing at the heart of education
    A counsellor should be placed in every school and an annual wellbeing survey of pupils carried out to encourage schools to actively build resilience rather than just support students once problems have arisen.

    8 Bring out the best in teaching
    Profession’s status and appeal would be increased with better career development, revalidation every 5 yrs & a new category of consultant teachers, promoted within the classroom, as well as a new teaching apprenticeship.

    9 A reformed Ofsted
    Ofsted should work collaboratively with schools to secure sustained improvement, and a new “report card” with a wider range of metrics including wellbeing, school culture, inclusion & attendance to unleash the potential of schools.

    10 Better training
    Teachers should be trained to identify children who have special educational needs, a greater focus should be placed on inclusion and a duty put on schools to remain accountable for the pupils they exclude to draw out the talent in every child.

    11 New university campuses
    New campuses should be created in 50 HE “cold spots”, including satellite wings in FE colleges. In addition, pay and conditions in FE sector should be improved and a transferrable credit system between universities and colleges created to boost stalled British productivity.

    12 A 15-year strategy
    Drawn up in consultation with business leaders, scientists, local mayors, civic leaders & cultural figures, putting education above short-term party politics and bringing out the best in our schools, colleges and universities.

    1) Bullshit. You can have qualifications as intense as A-level (whether they're rigorous is a different question, and I would argue the current ones are not) or you can have more of them. In Australia, for example, you do more subjects at 18 but they're much closer to GCSEs than A-levels in terms of assessment and content.

    2) What the fuck does that even mean? It's drivel.

    3) Those already exist, so why rebadge them? The key is not elitism. That's what's killed British (and I do mean British) education for centuries. We've always had good elite systems. Where we fall down is in doing a proper job for everyone else.

    4) No Shit Sherlocks. Unless you say how it's to be paid for, that's meaningless.

    5) Again, already happens on a modest scale. And it can't be expanded because there are lots of undergraduates you don't want near schoolchildren and would be as much use as Spielman in a classroom. How fucking ignorant are these people?

    6) Some university faculties have a staff student ratio of 1;46. Are they willing for a fourfold increase in uni funding? Tablets/laptops are a good idea but it's being blocked by the DfE for mostly spurious official reasons which are too long to list here but in reality because of cost.

    7) There already is. What planet are these fuckers on?

    8) These people don't have a fucking clue. Teachers already do extensive ANNUAL training due to performance related pay. Reaccrediting every five years is simply a way to keep a load of useless unemployable wankers at the DfE in work and add yet more work to teachers.

    9) OFSTED is a risk to children, because its head is ignoring safeguarding, possibly because she's stupid and possibly because she's arrogant. It was designed to bring teachers under the drink sodden retards of the DfE and is despised by teachers as a waste of time and effort. It needs abolishing not reforming.

    10) WE ALREADY FUCKING DO YOU USELESS DRUG ADDLED WANKERS. BETTER TRAINING WILL NOT CHANGE THAT BUT YOU SHUTTING YOUR USELESS STUPID PATRONISING MOUTHS MIGHT.

    11) what the fuck does this even mean? Name one county with no university. I can come up with Rutland and Northumberland. But after that I'm struggling. Even Hereford has one.

    12) sod strategies. What we need are useless wankers who think they are brilliant but are in fact thick to fuck off and stop meddling. Starting with the DfE and whatever drunken retards came up with this drivel.

    Honestly. Maybe the country's had enough of experts but I've left teaching partly because I'd had enough of ignorant stupid patronising wankers with small brains and smaller dicks telling me how to do my job despite knowing nothing about it.
    That's a no, then?
  • Options

    https://twitter.com/48_Crash/status/1612067312806547457

    How strange, we didn't seem to be against Harry killing then.

    Talk to any serviceman who has actually been in action. They thought he was a twat for saying it then just as they do now.
    I know two army people who have explicitly told me their score.
    Yep the Russians do that.
    The "Your mum smells of wee" of onllne discourse. Massively clever and amusing. Well done.
  • Options
    solarflaresolarflare Posts: 3,688

    Given the dross Hollywood / Disney keep putting out, would anybody be shocked if they have their own version of ChatGPT and all the blue hair weirdos that supposedly writer / direct / produce much of their output don't really exist....

    Glass Onion feels like a movie written by an AI trained on a combination of old fashioned murder mysteries, but given prompts to make it "appropriate for modern sensibilities".

    Any explanation for the Star Wars sequel trilogy needs serious consideration, no matter how outlandish.
  • Options
    Sean_FSean_F Posts: 36,638
    Maybe we could get Chat GPT to finish The Winds of Winter?
  • Options
    turbotubbsturbotubbs Posts: 16,261

    Brazil looks like a bunch of yobos rather than an organised coup.

    So pretty much like last year in the US?
  • Options
    FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 79,035
    edited January 2023

    Given the dross Hollywood / Disney keep putting out, would anybody be shocked if they have their own version of ChatGPT and all the blue hair weirdos that supposedly writer / direct / produce much of their output don't really exist....

    Glass Onion feels like a movie written by an AI trained on a combination of old fashioned murder mysteries, but given prompts to make it "appropriate for modern sensibilities".

    Any explanation for the Star Wars sequel trilogy needs serious consideration, no matter how outlandish.
    Not outlandish at all, Occam's razor.....so many plot holes and inconsistencies, sounds absolutely up the same street as an AI that argues that 7 isn't a whole number and thus can't be a prime, then 10 seconds later lists it as a prime number.
  • Options
    ydoethurydoethur Posts: 68,800
    dixiedean said:

    ydoethur said:

    12-point plan from the TEC is below:

    1 A British Baccalaureate
    It would offer broader academic and vocational qualifications at 18, with parity in funding per pupil in both routes, and a slimmed-down set of exams at 16 to bring out the best in every child.

    2 ‘Electives premium’
    To be spent on activities including drama, music, dance and sport and a National Citizen Service experience for every pupil, with volunteering and outdoor pursuits to ensure that activities enjoyed by the most advantaged become available to all.

    3 New cadre of Career Academies
    Elite technical and vocational sixth forms with close links to industry, mirroring the academic sixth forms and a new focus on creativity and entrepreneurialism in education to unleash the economic potential of Britain.

    4 Significant boost to early years funding
    The extra funding should be targeted at the most vulnerable. A unique pupil number would be given to every child from birth, to level the playing field before they get to school. Every primary school should have a library.

    5 Army of undergraduate tutors
    The students would earn credit towards their degrees by helping pupils who fall behind to catch up.

    6 Making the most of tech
    A laptop or tablet for every child, greater use of artificial intelligence in schools, colleges and universities to personalise learning, reduce teacher workload and prepare young people better for future employment.

    7 Wellbeing at the heart of education
    A counsellor should be placed in every school and an annual wellbeing survey of pupils carried out to encourage schools to actively build resilience rather than just support students once problems have arisen.

    8 Bring out the best in teaching
    Profession’s status and appeal would be increased with better career development, revalidation every 5 yrs & a new category of consultant teachers, promoted within the classroom, as well as a new teaching apprenticeship.

    9 A reformed Ofsted
    Ofsted should work collaboratively with schools to secure sustained improvement, and a new “report card” with a wider range of metrics including wellbeing, school culture, inclusion & attendance to unleash the potential of schools.

    10 Better training
    Teachers should be trained to identify children who have special educational needs, a greater focus should be placed on inclusion and a duty put on schools to remain accountable for the pupils they exclude to draw out the talent in every child.

    11 New university campuses
    New campuses should be created in 50 HE “cold spots”, including satellite wings in FE colleges. In addition, pay and conditions in FE sector should be improved and a transferrable credit system between universities and colleges created to boost stalled British productivity.

    12 A 15-year strategy
    Drawn up in consultation with business leaders, scientists, local mayors, civic leaders & cultural figures, putting education above short-term party politics and bringing out the best in our schools, colleges and universities.

    1) Bullshit. You can have qualifications as intense as A-level (whether they're rigorous is a different question, and I would argue the current ones are not) or you can have more of them. In Australia, for example, you do more subjects at 18 but they're much closer to GCSEs than A-levels in terms of assessment and content.

    2) What the fuck does that even mean? It's drivel.

    3) Those already exist, so why rebadge them? The key is not elitism. That's what's killed British (and I do mean British) education for centuries. We've always had good elite systems. Where we fall down is in doing a proper job for everyone else.

    4) No Shit Sherlocks. Unless you say how it's to be paid for, that's meaningless.

    5) Again, already happens on a modest scale. And it can't be expanded because there are lots of undergraduates you don't want near schoolchildren and would be as much use as Spielman in a classroom. How fucking ignorant are these people?

    6) Some university faculties have a staff student ratio of 1;46. Are they willing for a fourfold increase in uni funding? Tablets/laptops are a good idea but it's being blocked by the DfE for mostly spurious official reasons which are too long to list here but in reality because of cost.

    7) There already is. What planet are these fuckers on?

    8) These people don't have a fucking clue. Teachers already do extensive ANNUAL training due to performance related pay. Reaccrediting every five years is simply a way to keep a load of useless unemployable wankers at the DfE in work and add yet more work to teachers.

    9) OFSTED is a risk to children, because its head is ignoring safeguarding, possibly because she's stupid and possibly because she's arrogant. It was designed to bring teachers under the drink sodden retards of the DfE and is despised by teachers as a waste of time and effort. It needs abolishing not reforming.

    10) WE ALREADY FUCKING DO YOU USELESS DRUG ADDLED WANKERS. BETTER TRAINING WILL NOT CHANGE THAT BUT YOU SHUTTING YOUR USELESS STUPID PATRONISING MOUTHS MIGHT.

    11) what the fuck does this even mean? Name one county with no university. I can come up with Rutland and Northumberland. But after that I'm struggling. Even Hereford has one.

    12) sod strategies. What we need are useless wankers who think they are brilliant but are in fact thick to fuck off and stop meddling. Starting with the DfE and whatever drunken retards came up with this drivel.

    Honestly. Maybe the country's had enough of experts but I've left teaching partly because I'd had enough of ignorant stupid patronising wankers with small brains and smaller dicks telling me how to do my job despite knowing nothing about it.
    That's a no, then?
    It's a 'maybe.'

    I'm open to their one sane idea.
  • Options
    Sean_FSean_F Posts: 36,638

    Given the dross Hollywood / Disney keep putting out, would anybody be shocked if they have their own version of ChatGPT and all the blue hair weirdos that supposedly writer / direct / produce much of their output don't really exist....

    Glass Onion feels like a movie written by an AI trained on a combination of old fashioned murder mysteries, but given prompts to make it "appropriate for modern sensibilities".

    Could Chat GPT write a novel as a racist? Not from the POV of a racist, nor a liberal’s idea of what a racist is, but actually as a racist, like Lovecraft? Because much interesting literature is actually (my the standards of 2022) pretty bigoted.

  • Options
    TimSTimS Posts: 11,325

    Is a coup taking place in Brazil?

    Looks a bit more serious than jan 6.
    Nope, a bit of a pathetic attempt. They don’t have even a plurality of support behind them. Just yobs.
  • Options
    solarflaresolarflare Posts: 3,688
    Sean_F said:

    Maybe we could get Chat GPT to finish The Winds of Winter?

    Equally, I wonder how successful it would be if you trained it on the novels of now-deceased authors and then tried to get it to write something original in the same style.

    How good is the new ChatGPT Culture novel?
  • Options
    LeonLeon Posts: 50,693
    Sean_F said:

    Given the dross Hollywood / Disney keep putting out, would anybody be shocked if they have their own version of ChatGPT and all the blue hair weirdos that supposedly writer / direct / produce much of their output don't really exist....

    Glass Onion feels like a movie written by an AI trained on a combination of old fashioned murder mysteries, but given prompts to make it "appropriate for modern sensibilities".

    Could Chat GPT write a novel as a racist? Not from the POV of a racist, nor a liberal’s idea of what a racist is, but actually as a racist, like Lovecraft? Because much interesting literature is actually (my the standards of 2022) pretty bigoted.

    Quite soon, AI will be able to write almost ANYTHING. And it will do it much better than any
    human

    So, yes
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    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-64205460

    An excellent policy from the Tories.
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    LeonLeon Posts: 50,693
    THERE IS NO CHAMPAGNE IN THE SINGAPORE AIRLINES LOUNGE
  • Options
    SandyRentoolSandyRentool Posts: 21,532
    Leon said:

    THERE IS NO CHAMPAGNE IN THE SINGAPORE AIRLINES LOUNGE

    Any IPA?
  • Options
    Oooh, Hazza on telly in 50 minutes
  • Options
    Leon said:

    THERE IS NO CHAMPAGNE IN THE SINGAPORE AIRLINES LOUNGE

    DRINK GIN

    Where are you off to?
  • Options
    TheuniondivvieTheuniondivvie Posts: 40,927
    edited January 2023

    https://twitter.com/48_Crash/status/1612067312806547457

    How strange, we didn't seem to be against Harry killing then.

    Talk to any serviceman who has actually been in action. They thought he was a twat for saying it then just as they do now.
    Well, unlike the tabloids and the people whose noses are lead by them, at least they're being consistent.
    Since we've only got Topping and Dura Ace on here to give the serviceman's view, let's see if they're in accord with 'any serviceman'.
  • Options
    solarflaresolarflare Posts: 3,688

    Oooh, Hazza on telly in 50 minutes

    Surely he's run out of weird shit to say seeing as its all apparently in the book.
  • Options
    TimSTimS Posts: 11,325
    A lot of mid range wine tasting is just more descriptive version of what people smell and taste. It’s a skill but one I think AI could master quite easily.

    For example, take a Rhône white dominated by Grenache Blanc, Viognier and Marsanne. You could say:

    - Neutral slightly fruity smell
    - Rich rounded taste
    - A bit like Chardonnay but more spicy

    Or you could say:

    - Generous nose, beeswax and stone fruits, hints of toasted nuts
    - Peach and lychee on the palate, a hint of cardamom, masala chai

    An AI could do that I think.

  • Options
    kinabalukinabalu Posts: 40,141
    Nigelb said:

    Is a coup taking place in Brazil?

    Looks a bit more serious than jan 6.
    Evidently so; they took a couple more days to plan it...

    And the habits of democracy are slightly less well ingrained in Brazil.
    Just as I was thinking what a pleasant surprise that Brazil managed to oust a hard right strongman without the predicted violence.
  • Options
    kyf_100kyf_100 Posts: 4,451
    Leon said:

    Sean_F said:

    Given the dross Hollywood / Disney keep putting out, would anybody be shocked if they have their own version of ChatGPT and all the blue hair weirdos that supposedly writer / direct / produce much of their output don't really exist....

    Glass Onion feels like a movie written by an AI trained on a combination of old fashioned murder mysteries, but given prompts to make it "appropriate for modern sensibilities".

    Could Chat GPT write a novel as a racist? Not from the POV of a racist, nor a liberal’s idea of what a racist is, but actually as a racist, like Lovecraft? Because much interesting literature is actually (my the standards of 2022) pretty bigoted.

    Quite soon, AI will be able to write almost ANYTHING. And it will do it much better than any
    human

    So, yes
    I've barely used ChatGPT in almost a week now. To call it beige at this point would be an insult to beige.

    At the risks of turning into Scott, and just copying and pasting other parts of the internet, this quote from the ChatGPT subreddit stood out:

    "It's unfortunate and yet predictable that the worst part of the AI chatbot has nothing to do with the quality of the AI, but everything to do with the restrictions that the human devs put on what it is and isn't allowed to say."

    Though on reflection, at least its refusal to tell you who would win in a fight between various fictional superheroes, and the lecture you get on why all violence (yes, even fictional violence) is wrong, would mean the end of the Marvel franchise.

    Every cloud...
  • Options

    Oooh, Hazza on telly in 50 minutes

    Surely he's run out of weird shit to say seeing as its all apparently in the book.
    That's the clever bit, you won't know without watching

    Unless you subscribe to the Times which now livestreams 24/7 on matters Hazzatastic. On the front page.
  • Options
    TimSTimS Posts: 11,325
    Leon said:

    THERE IS NO CHAMPAGNE IN THE SINGAPORE AIRLINES LOUNGE

    I am jealous. I went from one-world gold to silver and now down to bronze as Covid and the post-Covid business austerity took hold. I’ll possibly never wander into a lounge on an economy ticket again.
This discussion has been closed.