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The Tories go on the offensive in T&H – politicalbetting.com

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  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 48,950
    edited June 2022
    I don't get this thing about goading people to give a balls-on prediction and then sledging them when they get it wrong?

    I think I said it could be 110 votes against or 200 votes against, and would either be one or the other. My sense was that it was more of an IDS moment than a Theresa May moment, and so bet on the latter. The odds were value.

    Turned out it was slap-bang in the middle.

    Did it get it wrong?

    Absolutely, but I'm not in the game of being mystic meg - I try to do the best analysis I can and make a consistent long-term profit.
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 48,950
    Leon said:

    pm215 said:

    kyf_100 said:


    Aside from commuting costs, which is another argument, fundamentally I think people like WFH because it affords them privacy and comfort, both those things could be provided at the workplace. But for some reason, modern workplaces have neither of those things, and then bosses wonder why people would rather WFH.

    The other notable motivation here I think is those with young families (not my observation -- as a single dude I missed this til somebody pointed it out). Being able to have lunch with your children, or knock off at 6pm and see them immediately rather than having a long commute home first, or not have to find and pay for an extra hour or two a day of childcare to cover the time you're spending commuting -- that's the kind of thing that can be a massive quality of life improvement, and that you might well be willing to change jobs over.
    Most of the fathers of rather young kids that I know… go to the office to escape their kids

    It’s no slight on the kids or the fathers. But young kids are a lot of work and generally quite boring after about 30 minutes. Especially when eating
    Speak for yourself.

    I absolutely love my three-year old daughter, and hate being away from her.

    We have a ball together.
  • fitalassfitalass Posts: 4,166
    Its been a good week for the SNP Gov to bury bad news and its only Tuesday.....
  • Big_G_NorthWalesBig_G_NorthWales Posts: 55,337
    fitalass said:



    Good evening

    I have been absent today as I experienced one of my rather nasty migraines rendering me unable to see, experiencing an unpleasant headache and utterly washed up

    I have suffered them since my 20s, as indeed do other members of my family, and the medication provided by my gp does recover my vision within an hour or so but paracetamol is needed as well

    On recent events, I am now a 148 er and expect that they will move to replace Boris later this year, especially if they can coalesce around a unity candidate

    For Boris supporters this is not over by a long way

    Hope you feel better soon. On your point about the 148 rebels possible finding a unity candidate they can support, isn't there a risk that some Ministers with leadership ambitions are now damaging their chances by remaining in Cabinet propping up Boris and leaving the field open to a high profile backbencher? There may not have been any resignations today despite rumours last night, but surely the game will be up for Boris if this happens over coming weeks or months?
    Thank you

    I am very surprised that a senior cabinet minster has not resigned but it could happen over the next few weeks, a few of them would be even better
  • bigglesbiggles Posts: 2,656

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Are they, once again, behind the curve? My car has a wireless charging cradle and we have one in the living room and bedroom because it will do my wife’s Samsung and my iPhone. They’re now spreading in public.
  • Big_G_NorthWalesBig_G_NorthWales Posts: 55,337
    fitalass said:

    Its been a good week for the SNP Gov to bury bad news and its only Tuesday.....

    They are world leaders in that
  • malcolmgmalcolmg Posts: 37,899
    fitalass said:

    Its been a good week for the SNP Gov to bury bad news and its only Tuesday.....

    The irony from a Tory, my meter just broke
  • williamglennwilliamglenn Posts: 43,282
    biggles said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Are they, once again, behind the curve? My car has a wireless charging cradle and we have one in the living room and bedroom because it will do my wife’s Samsung and my iPhone. They’re now spreading in public.
    Comedy Dave thinks that as the EU is "the world's regulatory superpower", this means it will force Apple to use USB-C on American iPhones.

    I suspect they're more likely to stick to their roadmap and remove the port altogether.

    https://twitter.com/DaveKeating/status/1534180577607307265
  • bigglesbiggles Posts: 2,656
    edited June 2022

    Leon said:

    Great sex is like a mutually satisfying robbery

    It’s like two banks blowing each other up and then running off, cackling, with the gold from each other’s vaults

    Only five minutes past the lagershed and we get this. On a Tuesday.

    Christ.
    Fake news. I have yet to have any sex this Tuesday.

  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 9,003

    Election Maps suggesting if Redfields red wall polling goes well they are planning blue wall polling too

    Redfield a tad you gov in number and volatility of their polls? The problem then is, if you dislike the headline from one of their polls, another headline will soon be along more to your liking.

    Opinium have yet to give Lab a lead greater than 4, Lab higher than 38 or Tories lower than 33. It 2 a month, so two similar in a row of movement with opinium would fill me with confidence some movement is happening, starting this Sunday I think.
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 25,188
    edited June 2022

    dixiedean said:

    It is also impossible to argue that "it doesn't cost me anything".
    It makes my shopping more expensive. Unless they are literally taking it out of their profits. Which they aren't.

    No - this is a fundamental misunderstanding of the economics of running a supermarket (or anything else really).

    Simplifying, you have variable costs (principally the stock itself - costs increase as sales increase and fall as they fall) and fixed costs (the building, the staff etc - costs don't vary, at least in the short term, as sales go up or down).

    What you are aiming to do with every sale is cover the variable costs in full, and contribute to fixed costs. Crucially, not every sale needs to contribute to fixed costs to the same degree - you just need to cover them across trading as a whole (and after that, the rest is profit).

    So when Iceland give an OAP discount, that's what they are doing. They are saying they'd rather the OAPs shopped with them and covered variable costs (which they certainly will) and contribute to fixed costs (which they also will) even if they contribute less to fixed costs than under 65s.

    To your point, the discount probably does NOT cost the under 65s money. If Iceland have judged it right, it SAVES you money. That's because more OAPs should shop at Iceland, which should contribute more to fixed costs overall (even though each individual shopper is contributing less) spreading the burden of covering fixed costs.
    I understand the rationale behind loss leaders.
    I just abhor the idea of discriminatory pricing in shops. And it is being marketed as "help with the cost of living crisis".
    As has been pointed out. By targeting the wealthiest group in society.
    I also read they are exploring £30 gift vouchers for the over 60's.
    We are such an elderly focussed society that most simply shrug and accept it.
    If it were a discount and vouchers for those on Universal Credit, the Daily Mail would have a seizure.
  • wooliedyedwooliedyed Posts: 6,649
    Just looking at Tiverton, to match Shropshire the LDs would need to win with a 23 point majority.
    A Chesham swing would see a pretty narrow LD win by 4 points.
    Given the 'circumstances' probably sit in the middle we might say anything over a 10 point LD win indicates things getting worse for the Tories?
    In fag packet terms
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 31,817
    malcolmg said:

    fitalass said:

    Its been a good week for the SNP Gov to bury bad news and its only Tuesday.....

    The irony from a Tory, my meter just broke
    Is this yours, then?

    image
  • bigglesbiggles Posts: 2,656
    edited June 2022

    biggles said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Are they, once again, behind the curve? My car has a wireless charging cradle and we have one in the living room and bedroom because it will do my wife’s Samsung and my iPhone. They’re now spreading in public.
    Comedy Dave thinks that as the EU is "the world's regulatory superpower", this means it will force Apple to use USB-C on American iPhones.

    I suspect they're more likely to stick to their roadmap and remove the port altogether.

    https://twitter.com/DaveKeating/status/1534180577607307265
    Is he not aware of the UN level of regulation that does the stuff that really matters by consensus?
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 9,003
    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Great sex is like a mutually satisfying robbery

    It’s like two banks blowing each other up and then running off, cackling, with the gold from each other’s vaults

    Ok, I admit, that's pretty good.

    (Who did you pinch it from?)
    Just came to me, as it were

    I was remembering a comment by a PB-er a few days ago, about the exhilaration of sex coming from the fact both people REALLY want it. And then just now I watched a post-coital scene in Borgen Season 4 (a Greenlander and a Dane), and they were happy yet furtive, like they’d stolen something…

    Was it the oil? Or the lorry of pigs?
  • Richard_TyndallRichard_Tyndall Posts: 28,049

    dixiedean said:

    It is also impossible to argue that "it doesn't cost me anything".
    It makes my shopping more expensive. Unless they are literally taking it out of their profits. Which they aren't.

    No - this is a fundamental misunderstanding of the economics of running a supermarket (or anything else really).

    Simplifying, you have variable costs (principally the stock itself - costs increase as sales increase and fall as they fall) and fixed costs (the building, the staff etc - costs don't vary, at least in the short term, as sales go up or down).

    What you are aiming to do with every sale is cover the variable costs in full, and contribute to fixed costs. Crucially, not every sale needs to contribute to fixed costs to the same degree - you just need to cover them across trading as a whole (and after that, the rest is profit).

    So when Iceland give an OAP discount, that's what they are doing. They are saying they'd rather the OAPs shopped with them and covered variable costs (which they certainly will) and contribute to fixed costs (which they also will) even if they contribute less to fixed costs than under 65s.

    To your point, the discount probably does NOT cost the under 65s money. If Iceland have judged it right, it SAVES you money. That's because more OAPs should shop at Iceland, which should contribute more to fixed costs overall (even though each individual shopper is contributing less) spreading the burden of covering fixed costs.
    You describe it a hundred times better than I could or did. Thankyou.
  • ApplicantApplicant Posts: 3,379

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    So USB-C is the optimal cable which will never be improved on?
  • ApplicantApplicant Posts: 3,379
    tlg86 said:

    Drugs are bad, mkay...

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-61716950

    Brenda Edwards has said her son Jamal died from cardiac arrhythmia after he took recreational drugs.

    The music entrepreneur, who helped launch the careers of Dave and Ed Sheeran, died in February aged 31.

    I can't say I've heard of Dave Sheeran.
  • Wulfrun_PhilWulfrun_Phil Posts: 4,018
    OT (belatedly)

    Reading the Conservative leaflet, I think OGH's criticisms are overdone.

    What the leaflet does is pose some potentially convincing arguments to the 60% of the constituency who voted Conservative in 2019, some of whom might be inclined to give the LDs the time of day, and in that it looks effective.

    Yes, if someone who might be inclined to vote Labour read it, then it might induce them to switch to the LDs. But there were only 19% of those in 2019, and surely only about 5%-10% still planning to vote Labour now, because the tactical vote is in the bag anyway for the LDs.

    It's also possible to target leaflets geographically. I've done this when planning Labour campaigns in the past. In 2017, when we won the seat back from the Cons, our last general leaflet which reinforced the Labour tactical voting message by seeking to squeeze the LD vote, left out the 1/3 of the constituency where the Conservatives were strongest. I assume that the Conservatives aren't going to be stuffing it through doors in the few parts of the constituency with a significant Labour vote, if they are they're fools.

    Where I think that OGH is right is that the leaflet might have been more effective in Conservative colours, because a Conservative waverer would still probably give a leaflet in blue the time of day unless their switch to the LDs was nailed on, and a 2019 Labour voter wouldn't. So a leaflet in blue would have been better targeted at 2019 Conservatives. By contrast, a 2019 Labour voter still intending to vote Labour but who might be persuaded to switch to the LDs would probably read a leaflet that looked like a LD leaflet, if they were inclined to read leaflets at all. Although, to repeat the point above, there probably aren't that many such voters left.

  • wooliedyedwooliedyed Posts: 6,649
    edited June 2022

    Election Maps suggesting if Redfields red wall polling goes well they are planning blue wall polling too

    Redfield a tad you gov in number and volatility of their polls? The problem then is, if you dislike the headline from one of their polls, another headline will soon be along more to your liking.

    Opinium have yet to give Lab a lead greater than 4, Lab higher than 38 or Tories lower than 33. It 2 a month, so two similar in a row of movement with opinium would fill me with confidence some movement is happening, starting this Sunday I think.
    Redfield havent been ultra volatile until that weird poll a week and a bit ago, i think theres some value in tracking their movement and red/blue wall regular polling would be very useful for spotting opportunitues at constituency level imo as we approach a GE
  • AlistairAlistair Posts: 23,670
    rcs1000 said:

    In the US, I saw that Milo Yiannopoulos is now working as an intern for Marjorie Taylor Greene.

    That's right: the alt right "commentator" who got into trouble for saying paedophilia was ok, is not working for someone who believes senior Democrats run a paedophile ring.

    I'm amazed more isn't made of the longeat serving GOP hoise
    Applicant said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    So USB-C is the optimal cable which will never be improved on?
    Pretty much.
  • JosiasJessopJosiasJessop Posts: 32,645
    biggles said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Are they, once again, behind the curve? My car has a wireless charging cradle and we have one in the living room and bedroom because it will do my wife’s Samsung and my iPhone. They’re now spreading in public.
    I am totally in favour of standardisation. This helps.

    As for wireless: it is the regime of witches, who cackle over their cauldrons as they brew their hideous concoctions. Beware the fool who enters their domain ...

    (I may just be married to an RF witch...)
  • FarooqFarooq Posts: 7,640

    dixiedean said:

    It is also impossible to argue that "it doesn't cost me anything".
    It makes my shopping more expensive. Unless they are literally taking it out of their profits. Which they aren't.

    No - this is a fundamental misunderstanding of the economics of running a supermarket (or anything else really).

    Simplifying, you have variable costs (principally the stock itself - costs increase as sales increase and fall as they fall) and fixed costs (the building, the staff etc - costs don't vary, at least in the short term, as sales go up or down).

    What you are aiming to do with every sale is cover the variable costs in full, and contribute to fixed costs. Crucially, not every sale needs to contribute to fixed costs to the same degree - you just need to cover them across trading as a whole (and after that, the rest is profit).

    So when Iceland give an OAP discount, that's what they are doing. They are saying they'd rather the OAPs shopped with them and covered variable costs (which they certainly will) and contribute to fixed costs (which they also will) even if they contribute less to fixed costs than under 65s.

    To your point, the discount probably does NOT cost the under 65s money. If Iceland have judged it right, it SAVES you money. That's because more OAPs should shop at Iceland, which should contribute more to fixed costs overall (even though each individual shopper is contributing less) spreading the burden of covering fixed costs.
    It sounds like on your description the burden passes to people shopping elsewhere.
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 31,817
    Applicant said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    So USB-C is the optimal cable which will never be improved on?
    USB-C is already a mess.

    I wonder what the response to Apple moving to wireless-only charging would be. They've been moving in that direction for a while - would allow a completely sealed phone and eliminates one of the most frequently damaged parts as well.
  • JosiasJessopJosiasJessop Posts: 32,645
    Applicant said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    So USB-C is the optimal cable which will never be improved on?
    Of course not. But let people decide on an improved system and agree on it, rather than 100 different 'better' systems.

    I have a passionate dislike of walled gardens.

    Douglas Adams wrote something about the perils of travelling with cables ...
  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 43,522

    Leon said:

    Great sex is like a mutually satisfying robbery

    It’s like two banks blowing each other up and then running off, cackling, with the gold from each other’s vaults

    Only five minutes past the lagershed and we get this. On a Tuesday.

    Christ.
    He’s just watching TV in his hotel room.

    Middle age reaches everyone, eventually.
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 31,817
    edited June 2022

    biggles said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Are they, once again, behind the curve? My car has a wireless charging cradle and we have one in the living room and bedroom because it will do my wife’s Samsung and my iPhone. They’re now spreading in public.
    I am totally in favour of standardisation. This helps.

    As for wireless: it is the regime of witches, who cackle over their cauldrons as they brew their hideous concoctions. Beware the fool who enters their domain ...

    (I may just be married to an RF witch...)
    maybe so - but increasing numbers of people are so in love with wireless charging, that they are building it into cupboards and kitchen counters.
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 9,003

    Election Maps suggesting if Redfields red wall polling goes well they are planning blue wall polling too

    Redfield a tad you gov in number and volatility of their polls? The problem then is, if you dislike the headline from one of their polls, another headline will soon be along more to your liking.

    Opinium have yet to give Lab a lead greater than 4, Lab higher than 38 or Tories lower than 33. It 2 a month, so two similar in a row of movement with opinium would fill me with confidence some movement is happening, starting this Sunday I think.
    Redfield havent been ultra volatile until that weird poll a week and a bit ago, i think theres some value in tracking their movement and red/blue wall regular polling would be very useful for spotting opportunitues at constituency level imo as we approach a GE
    How about the 4% lead this week with Tories back up to 34? I have half a mind it’s a tad outside.

    It’s their Monday one again. Are they using something slightly different between Monday and Thursday?
  • malcolmgmalcolmg Posts: 37,899

    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    Just got back from Iceland (the store).
    Are you over 60?
    No. Why?
    10% discount on your shopping on Tuesday if you're over 60.
    WTAF?
    Just emailed to tell them I am not shopping there any more.

    Many many stores do similar things. B&Q used to have a discount Tuesday for anyone over 60. It is far more common than you might think.

    Not sure why you object. Aren't you glad they are showing a bit of social conscience and trying to ease the burden on the elderly?

    Does it actually affect you in any way? If not I don't see why you should be upset.

    Oh and I am under 60 so I don't benefit from any of this stuff.
    It's keeping prices high for the under 60's.
    Imagine 10% off for left handers or white people?
    There are plenty of folk struggling. Many with jobs who pay for their own and the elderly's public transport.
    The fact no one is surprised is a sign of what a gerontocracy we're becoming. God forbid boomers might be inconvenienced.
    Again, the politics of envy.
    Nonsense.
    It's a transfer of money from hard-working families at a time of high inflation to the elderly.
    Why not a 5% price cut across the board?
    Because this works better as both a business model and for advertising purposes for them. It is a tried and tested method which works.

    I suppose you will be moaning that loss leading on milk is discriminating against the lactose intolerant.
    Greedy gits that grudge old pensioners who worked all their life for a pittance getting a few shillings discount , should be ashamed of themselves , greedy grasping horrors.
  • JosiasJessopJosiasJessop Posts: 32,645

    biggles said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Are they, once again, behind the curve? My car has a wireless charging cradle and we have one in the living room and bedroom because it will do my wife’s Samsung and my iPhone. They’re now spreading in public.
    I am totally in favour of standardisation. This helps.

    As for wireless: it is the regime of witches, who cackle over their cauldrons as they brew their hideous concoctions. Beware the fool who enters their domain ...

    (I may just be married to an RF witch...)
    maybe so - but increasing numbers of people are so in love with wireless charging, that they are building it into cupboards and kitchen counters.
    Would you buy a device for multiple-£100 that had only wireless charging, with no cabled backup for charging or data transfer? Especially if the wireless charging protocols were proprietary?
  • wooliedyedwooliedyed Posts: 6,649

    Election Maps suggesting if Redfields red wall polling goes well they are planning blue wall polling too

    Redfield a tad you gov in number and volatility of their polls? The problem then is, if you dislike the headline from one of their polls, another headline will soon be along more to your liking.

    Opinium have yet to give Lab a lead greater than 4, Lab higher than 38 or Tories lower than 33. It 2 a month, so two similar in a row of movement with opinium would fill me with confidence some movement is happening, starting this Sunday I think.
    Redfield havent been ultra volatile until that weird poll a week and a bit ago, i think theres some value in tracking their movement and red/blue wall regular polling would be very useful for spotting opportunitues at constituency level imo as we approach a GE
    How about the 4% lead this week with Tories back up to 34? I have half a mind it’s a tad outside.

    It’s their Monday one again. Are they using something slightly different between Monday and Thursday?
    Its only a 1 point movement on each. If the 'true' lead is, say 6 or 7, id expect polling in the 4 to 10 point lead range with a very occasional outlier 10 to 12 or 2 to 4.
  • FarooqFarooq Posts: 7,640
    HYUFD said:

    I suspect that the claim that HYUFD is paid to post here is absolute garbage.

    I'm not a fan of his politics but he's a political hobbyist and indeed is a very community-minded nice bloke in real life.

    The idea that he is some sort of Central Office asset trying to influence a load of gastronomically ignorant, undersexed middle-aged trainspotters on PB is ludicrous.

    Thanks and I can confirm I am not paid to post on here (wish I was sometimes!)
    You'd assume CCHQ would employ someone who wasn't a cretin
  • LeonLeon Posts: 30,379
    edited June 2022

    Leon said:

    pm215 said:

    kyf_100 said:


    Aside from commuting costs, which is another argument, fundamentally I think people like WFH because it affords them privacy and comfort, both those things could be provided at the workplace. But for some reason, modern workplaces have neither of those things, and then bosses wonder why people would rather WFH.

    The other notable motivation here I think is those with young families (not my observation -- as a single dude I missed this til somebody pointed it out). Being able to have lunch with your children, or knock off at 6pm and see them immediately rather than having a long commute home first, or not have to find and pay for an extra hour or two a day of childcare to cover the time you're spending commuting -- that's the kind of thing that can be a massive quality of life improvement, and that you might well be willing to change jobs over.
    Most of the fathers of rather young kids that I know… go to the office to escape their kids

    It’s no slight on the kids or the fathers. But young kids are a lot of work and generally quite boring after about 30 minutes. Especially when eating
    Speak for yourself.

    I absolutely love my three-year old daughter, and hate being away from her.

    We have a ball together.
    Good, I envy you. Enjoy

    But plenty of Dads don’t feel that.

    Personally I couldn’t get on with the kids until they were about 4, after that they are enchanting but still wearing, I loved my kids from about 7-11, the perfect age, to my mind

    My older daughter’s mother is entirely different and she loves babies.

    It’s probably a Darwinian thing so the child always has an adult that is interested
  • stodgestodge Posts: 11,205
    Evening all :)

    I think I said 242-117 last evening - I can't remember but I underestimated the size of the revolt.

    Apparently we can now "draw a line under Partygate" - yes, I suspect that's a statement with more than its usual complement of wishful thinking.

    The Covid enquiry will drag all us back up next year and additionally we may get a sense of the decision-making process in the spring of 2020.

    In the nearer future, we have the first round of the French Legislative elections on Sunday and the Ifop-Fiducial poll today puts the NUPES bloc on 26% just ahead of Ensemble on 25% and National Rally on 21%.

    In terms of seats, however, the projection has Ensemble on 270, NUPES on 213, UDC on 48 and National Rally on 33 with Others on 12. That's got to be a pretty rough estimate but the constituency polling evidence shows NUPES running strongly against Ensemble candidates but the second round will, I suspect, be easier for Ensemble.
  • DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 17,905

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Good up to a point. Imagine if all laptops had to come with an ethernet socket; there would be none of the slimline models that we now have. Apple is right, and this will stop innovation. The EU is right that it will stop Apple taking the michael, but it is not really clear why the EU cares. Don't phones come with charging cables (for those who still use cable charging)?
  • UnpopularUnpopular Posts: 574
    biggles said:

    Leon said:

    Great sex is like a mutually satisfying robbery

    It’s like two banks blowing each other up and then running off, cackling, with the gold from each other’s vaults

    Only five minutes past the lagershed and we get this. On a Tuesday.

    Christ.
    Fake news. I have yet to have any sex this Tuesday.

    What do they call it when you rob your own bank?
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 9,003
    edited June 2022
    I was genuinely shocked it was as high as 148. But is it a secure 148 only destined to go up, or can it go down the more we move into general election territory so a United front from the party? That may work, like John Major engineering his “back me or sack me, put up or shut up” and end up the only vonc this parliament? It worked for Major, like lancing a rising boil? And it seems to be working for Boris too today, the rug pulled from under the rebels, the letters set back to zero?
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 31,817

    biggles said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Are they, once again, behind the curve? My car has a wireless charging cradle and we have one in the living room and bedroom because it will do my wife’s Samsung and my iPhone. They’re now spreading in public.
    I am totally in favour of standardisation. This helps.

    As for wireless: it is the regime of witches, who cackle over their cauldrons as they brew their hideous concoctions. Beware the fool who enters their domain ...

    (I may just be married to an RF witch...)
    maybe so - but increasing numbers of people are so in love with wireless charging, that they are building it into cupboards and kitchen counters.
    Would you buy a device for multiple-£100 that had only wireless charging, with no cabled backup for charging or data transfer? Especially if the wireless charging protocols were proprietary?
    What I would do and the rest of the world would do is often not a matching set.

    Plenty of people will buy wireless charging only products. I don't see many dying in a ditch for a charging port, to be honest.

    My guess is that Apple will go down this road fairly soon.
  • JosiasJessopJosiasJessop Posts: 32,645
    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    pm215 said:

    kyf_100 said:


    Aside from commuting costs, which is another argument, fundamentally I think people like WFH because it affords them privacy and comfort, both those things could be provided at the workplace. But for some reason, modern workplaces have neither of those things, and then bosses wonder why people would rather WFH.

    The other notable motivation here I think is those with young families (not my observation -- as a single dude I missed this til somebody pointed it out). Being able to have lunch with your children, or knock off at 6pm and see them immediately rather than having a long commute home first, or not have to find and pay for an extra hour or two a day of childcare to cover the time you're spending commuting -- that's the kind of thing that can be a massive quality of life improvement, and that you might well be willing to change jobs over.
    Most of the fathers of rather young kids that I know… go to the office to escape their kids

    It’s no slight on the kids or the fathers. But young kids are a lot of work and generally quite boring after about 30 minutes. Especially when eating
    Speak for yourself.

    I absolutely love my three-year old daughter, and hate being away from her.

    We have a ball together.
    Good, I envy you. Enjoy

    But plenty of Dads don’t feel that.

    Personally I couldn’t get on with the kids until they were about 4, after that they are enchanting but still wearing, I loved my kids from about 7-11, the perfect age, to my mind

    My older daughter’s mother is entirely different and she loves babies.

    It’s probably a Darwinian thing so the child always has an adult that is interested
    Being a stay-at-home dad was brilliant in those early years. Although if I had had to work full-time as well, it might have been a different matter.

    It's a different experience. I can understand why someone who just wants to shag around and be an arse might want to avoid the nappies stage, but that's the real parenting. You need to be involved with your kids as much as possible, at all ages.
  • JosiasJessopJosiasJessop Posts: 32,645

    biggles said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Are they, once again, behind the curve? My car has a wireless charging cradle and we have one in the living room and bedroom because it will do my wife’s Samsung and my iPhone. They’re now spreading in public.
    I am totally in favour of standardisation. This helps.

    As for wireless: it is the regime of witches, who cackle over their cauldrons as they brew their hideous concoctions. Beware the fool who enters their domain ...

    (I may just be married to an RF witch...)
    maybe so - but increasing numbers of people are so in love with wireless charging, that they are building it into cupboards and kitchen counters.
    Would you buy a device for multiple-£100 that had only wireless charging, with no cabled backup for charging or data transfer? Especially if the wireless charging protocols were proprietary?
    What I would do and the rest of the world would do is often not a matching set.

    Plenty of people will buy wireless charging only products. I don't see many dying in a ditch for a charging port, to be honest.

    My guess is that Apple will go down this road fairly soon.
    As long as they support open standards, that's fine; it's the market.

    If their charging is proprietary, they can FOAD.

    Standards matter. After all, we're communicating via standards.
  • wooliedyedwooliedyed Posts: 6,649
    edited June 2022

    I was genuinely shocked it was as high as 148. But is it a secure 148 only destined to go up, or can it go down the more we move into general election territory so a United front from the party? That may work, like John Major engineering his “back me or sack me, put up or shut up” and up the only vonc this parliament? It worked for Major, like lancing a rising boil? And it seems to be working for Boris too today, the rug pulled from under the rebels, the letters set back to zero?

    If he gets through the by elections, standards committee thing and conference i think he will be there till he loses a GE. If hes to go it will be by September i think.
    There wont be an appetite for a long war in the party. He has pretty easy 2023 locals and then it will be likely too late
  • FarooqFarooq Posts: 7,640
    IanB2 said:

    Leon said:

    Great sex is like a mutually satisfying robbery

    It’s like two banks blowing each other up and then running off, cackling, with the gold from each other’s vaults

    Only five minutes past the lagershed and we get this. On a Tuesday.

    Christ.
    He’s just watching TV in his hotel room.

    Middle age reaches everyone, eventually.
    Iceland discount soon, though
  • JosiasJessopJosiasJessop Posts: 32,645

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Good up to a point. Imagine if all laptops had to come with an ethernet socket; there would be none of the slimline models that we now have. Apple is right, and this will stop innovation. The EU is right that it will stop Apple taking the michael, but it is not really clear why the EU cares. Don't phones come with charging cables (for those who still use cable charging)?
    It will not stop innovation. Innovation will continue.

    The Internet is based on standards. Tell me, has the Internet stopped innovation?

    And no, my latest Samsung did not come with a charging cable. Which was fine, as it was USB-C. No probs.
  • Andy_JSAndy_JS Posts: 20,365
    edited June 2022
    kyf_100 said:

    PJH said:

    kyf_100 said:

    PJH said:

    Omnium said:

    Omnium said:

    Leon said:

    Sandpit said:

    Leon said:

    I just emailed a publicity person at the Love Toy Carver's Compendium

    I got this reply:

    "Thank you for your email. My regular work days are Monday, Wednesday and Thursday, and I will reply to your message as soon as possible then."

    WTF? So this means he/she now only works 3 days a week. That isn't WFH, that's a 40% drop in productivity. Or am I missing something?

    There’s been a huge increase in white-collar part time working, in the last few years. If the work can still be accomplished in three days, things aren’t particularly time-bound, and both employer and employee are happy with the arrangement - which is probably 60% work for 60% pay - then why not?
    Fair enough. I can't help thinking it shows a lack of urgency, however.

    I never got these "I only work 3 days" pingbacks before Covid
    The WFH thing is a huge threat to any nation that embraces it. The crap people can continue doing their jobs, but the good people won't be able to. Paperclips counted - tick, innovations made - none.
    LOL. This is a fundamentally wrong comment.
    Do explain.
    Many businesses - including those I work in - have seen an increase in productivity since people started working from home rather than a reduction. I was working from home for most of the time for years before covid and once the initial setup issues were dealt with the company bosses found people were far more responsive and they got far better results in a shorter time from people working remotely. The loss of time due to commuting alone is massive and the ability to work more flexibly has greatly improved both the morale and the productivity as measured by quicker turn around of reports.

    This is real world experience rather than theoretical HR rubbish.
    It depends on the industry - some work naturally falls into "one person working alone, for sustained periods" working.

    Others are more continuously collaborative.

    It's almost as if one size doesn't fit all.
    You don't get much more collaborative than drilling a North Sea oil well. And using Teams it is far easier to do that remotely than face to face. Indeed we are now finding clients who are running meetings on Teams from their desks rather than in meeting rooms even when everyone is in the office as it is easier to share presentations etc. We have drop in Teams meetings that run for days on end and it makes life a million times easier for high intensity operations.
    Much better to have everyone join from their desks than half in a room and half remote.
    I agree. But it really doesn't matter if those desks are in the office or at home.
    It does matter - if the desks are in the office, being on a conference call is disruptive to everyone else trying to work nearby. If your working day consists mostly of conference calls, you should work from home if you can.
    Or have an office with a door you can shut when you're on a call. Just like the old days.
    Very old days. Last (and only) time I had one of those was in 1991.
    2016 for me. Then I was moved to an office with no door (considered bringing my own chocolate fireguard as substitute) before finally being tipped into the football field of desks, with noise cancelling headphones and all the other silent drones.

    I got a lot more work done when I had a degree of privacy, the ability to be on calls with people without the whole office hearing, the ability to vent or let off steam if a meeting didn't go well. The ability to gossip, or to console a friend who was having a bad day and wanted to talk.

    Aside from commuting costs, which is another argument, fundamentally I think people like WFH because it affords them privacy and comfort, both those things could be provided at the workplace. But for some reason, modern workplaces have neither of those things, and then bosses wonder why people would rather WFH.

    Modern offices resemble panopticon prisons designed for surveillance, more than places where people can interact with each other and collaborate together.

    I can just about remember when the move to open-plan offices was hailed as the greatest thing since sliced bread. More modern, more outgoing, etc. Now everyone is blaming it for the fact that WFH is so popular.
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 48,950
    biggles said:

    Leon said:

    Great sex is like a mutually satisfying robbery

    It’s like two banks blowing each other up and then running off, cackling, with the gold from each other’s vaults

    Only five minutes past the lagershed and we get this. On a Tuesday.

    Christ.
    Fake news. I have yet to have any sex this Tuesday.

    Sex with a beautiful woman is unbelievable, particularly if there is an element of danger, voyeurism or naughtiness to it, and you can see the beauty of their whole body and experience the full passion of their character at the same time. It's utterly thrilling.

    But, I have no desire to share my penchants on this matter with our community so I will let matters rest there.
  • FarooqFarooq Posts: 7,640
    Leon said:

    Great sex is like a mutually satisfying robbery

    It’s like two banks blowing each other up and then running off, cackling, with the gold from each other’s vaults

    So nobody makes a deposit?
  • StuartinromfordStuartinromford Posts: 8,544

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Good up to a point. Imagine if all laptops had to come with an ethernet socket; there would be none of the slimline models that we now have. Apple is right, and this will stop innovation. The EU is right that it will stop Apple taking the michael, but it is not really clear why the EU cares. Don't phones come with charging cables (for those who still use cable charging)?
    Though from ethernet to usb to usb-c, you can see the benefits of moving on from the old standard. But the returns have diminished to not very much at all now; if you make plugs and sockets any smaller they will become unpleasantly fiddly and fragile. Possibly the key thing is the interface between machine and human. We've not really changed (deep down) for millenia.

    Techbros hate it, but there are times when "good enough" really is good enough and it's better to settle on a standard. See the UK mains socket, which is clunky (probably clunkier than it needs to be) but blooming good. Or architecture, where it would have been better all round had the 20th century just not happened.
  • AlistairMAlistairM Posts: 1,587

    biggles said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Are they, once again, behind the curve? My car has a wireless charging cradle and we have one in the living room and bedroom because it will do my wife’s Samsung and my iPhone. They’re now spreading in public.
    I am totally in favour of standardisation. This helps.

    As for wireless: it is the regime of witches, who cackle over their cauldrons as they brew their hideous concoctions. Beware the fool who enters their domain ...

    (I may just be married to an RF witch...)
    maybe so - but increasing numbers of people are so in love with wireless charging, that they are building it into cupboards and kitchen counters.
    Would you buy a device for multiple-£100 that had only wireless charging, with no cabled backup for charging or data transfer? Especially if the wireless charging protocols were proprietary?
    What I would do and the rest of the world would do is often not a matching set.

    Plenty of people will buy wireless charging only products. I don't see many dying in a ditch for a charging port, to be honest.

    My guess is that Apple will go down this road fairly soon.
    Not looked into it but can App debugging be done wirelessly? When I debug my App the PC connects using a cable. If the port is done away with then they would need to provide another way. Their are emulators but I much prefer the real device.
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 48,950
    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    It is also impossible to argue that "it doesn't cost me anything".
    It makes my shopping more expensive. Unless they are literally taking it out of their profits. Which they aren't.

    No - this is a fundamental misunderstanding of the economics of running a supermarket (or anything else really).

    Simplifying, you have variable costs (principally the stock itself - costs increase as sales increase and fall as they fall) and fixed costs (the building, the staff etc - costs don't vary, at least in the short term, as sales go up or down).

    What you are aiming to do with every sale is cover the variable costs in full, and contribute to fixed costs. Crucially, not every sale needs to contribute to fixed costs to the same degree - you just need to cover them across trading as a whole (and after that, the rest is profit).

    So when Iceland give an OAP discount, that's what they are doing. They are saying they'd rather the OAPs shopped with them and covered variable costs (which they certainly will) and contribute to fixed costs (which they also will) even if they contribute less to fixed costs than under 65s.

    To your point, the discount probably does NOT cost the under 65s money. If Iceland have judged it right, it SAVES you money. That's because more OAPs should shop at Iceland, which should contribute more to fixed costs overall (even though each individual shopper is contributing less) spreading the burden of covering fixed costs.
    I understand the rationale behind loss leaders.
    I just abhor the idea of discriminatory pricing in shops. And it is being marketed as "help with the cost of living crisis".
    As has been pointed out. By targeting the wealthiest group in society.
    I also read they are exploring £30 gift vouchers for the over 60's.
    We are such an elderly focussed society that most simply shrug and accept it.
    If it were a discount and vouchers for those on Universal Credit, the Daily Mail would have a seizure.
    I can't begrudge OAPs getting discounts in Iceland.

    Most of the elderly who shop there aren't exactly livin' la vida loca.
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 9,003

    Election Maps suggesting if Redfields red wall polling goes well they are planning blue wall polling too

    Redfield a tad you gov in number and volatility of their polls? The problem then is, if you dislike the headline from one of their polls, another headline will soon be along more to your liking.

    Opinium have yet to give Lab a lead greater than 4, Lab higher than 38 or Tories lower than 33. It 2 a month, so two similar in a row of movement with opinium would fill me with confidence some movement is happening, starting this Sunday I think.
    Redfield havent been ultra volatile until that weird poll a week and a bit ago, i think theres some value in tracking their movement and red/blue wall regular polling would be very useful for spotting opportunitues at constituency level imo as we approach a GE
    How about the 4% lead this week with Tories back up to 34? I have half a mind it’s a tad outside.

    It’s their Monday one again. Are they using something slightly different between Monday and Thursday?
    Its only a 1 point movement on each. If the 'true' lead is, say 6 or 7, id expect polling in the 4 to 10 point lead range with a very occasional outlier 10 to 12 or 2 to 4.
    Unless the “out there” has moved from last poll so what looks a MOE 6 to 4 drop is actually more outside MOE sample than it looks.

    What I do is not just look at the gap, but the % of party for trend, and the 34 for Tories you would call MOE is outside trend in my book. For example if it should have been 32 not 34, and by Thursday after yesterday it is 30, they will show headline grabbing -4 drop - Which isn’t really a minus 4 drop just like it wasn’t a +5 rise?
    I see what you mean, so I only 25% don’t really trust their polls, but do you see what I mean not trusting them the full 100% anymore?
  • turbotubbsturbotubbs Posts: 11,480

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Good up to a point. Imagine if all laptops had to come with an ethernet socket; there would be none of the slimline models that we now have. Apple is right, and this will stop innovation. The EU is right that it will stop Apple taking the michael, but it is not really clear why the EU cares. Don't phones come with charging cables (for those who still use cable charging)?
    That’s partly why. How many pointless chargers etc does every house have? Sell the phone to use the charger you already own. Help reduce waste.
  • JosiasJessopJosiasJessop Posts: 32,645
    AlistairM said:

    biggles said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Are they, once again, behind the curve? My car has a wireless charging cradle and we have one in the living room and bedroom because it will do my wife’s Samsung and my iPhone. They’re now spreading in public.
    I am totally in favour of standardisation. This helps.

    As for wireless: it is the regime of witches, who cackle over their cauldrons as they brew their hideous concoctions. Beware the fool who enters their domain ...

    (I may just be married to an RF witch...)
    maybe so - but increasing numbers of people are so in love with wireless charging, that they are building it into cupboards and kitchen counters.
    Would you buy a device for multiple-£100 that had only wireless charging, with no cabled backup for charging or data transfer? Especially if the wireless charging protocols were proprietary?
    What I would do and the rest of the world would do is often not a matching set.

    Plenty of people will buy wireless charging only products. I don't see many dying in a ditch for a charging port, to be honest.

    My guess is that Apple will go down this road fairly soon.
    Not looked into it but can App debugging be done wirelessly? When I debug my App the PC connects using a cable. If the port is done away with then they would need to provide another way. Their are emulators but I much prefer the real device.
    Ah, to debug you purchase devel boards, at vast cost. ;)

    (This is an area of the industry that I'm glad is disappearing. Although devel boards will always be useful in fringe applications.)
  • Pro_RataPro_Rata Posts: 3,939
    Leon said:

    Great sex is like a mutually satisfying robbery

    It’s like two banks blowing each other up and then running off, cackling, with the gold from each other’s vaults

    You're not winding up towards winning OGH the bad sex in literature award are you?
  • MaxPBMaxPB Posts: 36,578

    biggles said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Are they, once again, behind the curve? My car has a wireless charging cradle and we have one in the living room and bedroom because it will do my wife’s Samsung and my iPhone. They’re now spreading in public.
    I am totally in favour of standardisation. This helps.

    As for wireless: it is the regime of witches, who cackle over their cauldrons as they brew their hideous concoctions. Beware the fool who enters their domain ...

    (I may just be married to an RF witch...)
    maybe so - but increasing numbers of people are so in love with wireless charging, that they are building it into cupboards and kitchen counters.
    Would you buy a device for multiple-£100 that had only wireless charging, with no cabled backup for charging or data transfer? Especially if the wireless charging protocols were proprietary?
    In your world we're still using USB Micro connectors, though because the innovation that forced USB-C uptake was never worthwhile.

    Wireless charging and data transfer is absolutely the future, I can't wait until everything uses it and I can dump the majority of my cables.
  • wooliedyedwooliedyed Posts: 6,649
    edited June 2022

    Election Maps suggesting if Redfields red wall polling goes well they are planning blue wall polling too

    Redfield a tad you gov in number and volatility of their polls? The problem then is, if you dislike the headline from one of their polls, another headline will soon be along more to your liking.

    Opinium have yet to give Lab a lead greater than 4, Lab higher than 38 or Tories lower than 33. It 2 a month, so two similar in a row of movement with opinium would fill me with confidence some movement is happening, starting this Sunday I think.
    Redfield havent been ultra volatile until that weird poll a week and a bit ago, i think theres some value in tracking their movement and red/blue wall regular polling would be very useful for spotting opportunitues at constituency level imo as we approach a GE
    How about the 4% lead this week with Tories back up to 34? I have half a mind it’s a tad outside.

    It’s their Monday one again. Are they using something slightly different between Monday and Thursday?
    Its only a 1 point movement on each. If the 'true' lead is, say 6 or 7, id expect polling in the 4 to 10 point lead range with a very occasional outlier 10 to 12 or 2 to 4.
    Unless the “out there” has moved from last poll so what looks a MOE 6 to 4 drop is actually more outside MOE sample than it looks.

    What I do is not just look at the gap, but the % of party for trend, and the 34 for Tories you would call MOE is outside trend in my book. For example if it should have been 32 not 34, and by Thursday after yesterday it is 30, they will show headline grabbing -4 drop - Which isn’t really a minus 4 drop just like it wasn’t a +5 rise?
    I see what you mean, so I only 25% don’t really trust their polls, but do you see what I mean not trusting them the full 100% anymore?
    Well that really depends on the trend elsewhere surely? I nean we have that 11% Comres and we ought to see tonight or tomorrow a new one from them to see if it was a blip or a trend. Everyone else is pretty much unmoved lately. 34 isnt far enough from what everyone else shows or from Redfields own track to stand out. Yet.

    Edit - its also very possible to get a short term firming up from the 30% left who still vote Boris as best PM or 'still an asset' as a reaction to the negatives which pulls things up temporarily. He is not yet universally loathed and much of the Tory decline is lack of certainty rather than switchers so a 'screw you, im voting boris if youre trying to oust him' reaction from them is possible i suppose
  • noneoftheabovenoneoftheabove Posts: 16,232

    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    It is also impossible to argue that "it doesn't cost me anything".
    It makes my shopping more expensive. Unless they are literally taking it out of their profits. Which they aren't.

    No - this is a fundamental misunderstanding of the economics of running a supermarket (or anything else really).

    Simplifying, you have variable costs (principally the stock itself - costs increase as sales increase and fall as they fall) and fixed costs (the building, the staff etc - costs don't vary, at least in the short term, as sales go up or down).

    What you are aiming to do with every sale is cover the variable costs in full, and contribute to fixed costs. Crucially, not every sale needs to contribute to fixed costs to the same degree - you just need to cover them across trading as a whole (and after that, the rest is profit).

    So when Iceland give an OAP discount, that's what they are doing. They are saying they'd rather the OAPs shopped with them and covered variable costs (which they certainly will) and contribute to fixed costs (which they also will) even if they contribute less to fixed costs than under 65s.

    To your point, the discount probably does NOT cost the under 65s money. If Iceland have judged it right, it SAVES you money. That's because more OAPs should shop at Iceland, which should contribute more to fixed costs overall (even though each individual shopper is contributing less) spreading the burden of covering fixed costs.
    I understand the rationale behind loss leaders.
    I just abhor the idea of discriminatory pricing in shops. And it is being marketed as "help with the cost of living crisis".
    As has been pointed out. By targeting the wealthiest group in society.
    I also read they are exploring £30 gift vouchers for the over 60's.
    We are such an elderly focussed society that most simply shrug and accept it.
    If it were a discount and vouchers for those on Universal Credit, the Daily Mail would have a seizure.
    I can't begrudge OAPs getting discounts in Iceland.

    Most of the elderly who shop there aren't exactly livin' la vida loca.
    In the 1980s and 1990s it made a lot of sense to target helping pensioners. In the 2020s the targeting should be on young families. Schemes such as this perpetuate making things cheaper for the richest cohort at the expense of the poorest. Only very marginally, but they do. Help by need, not age.
  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 55,103

    Leon said:

    Great sex is like a mutually satisfying robbery

    It’s like two banks blowing each other up and then running off, cackling, with the gold from each other’s vaults

    Only five minutes past the lagershed and we get this. On a Tuesday.

    Christ.
    To be fair, @Leon is several hours ahead out in Georgia.

  • LeonLeon Posts: 30,379

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    pm215 said:

    kyf_100 said:


    Aside from commuting costs, which is another argument, fundamentally I think people like WFH because it affords them privacy and comfort, both those things could be provided at the workplace. But for some reason, modern workplaces have neither of those things, and then bosses wonder why people would rather WFH.

    The other notable motivation here I think is those with young families (not my observation -- as a single dude I missed this til somebody pointed it out). Being able to have lunch with your children, or knock off at 6pm and see them immediately rather than having a long commute home first, or not have to find and pay for an extra hour or two a day of childcare to cover the time you're spending commuting -- that's the kind of thing that can be a massive quality of life improvement, and that you might well be willing to change jobs over.
    Most of the fathers of rather young kids that I know… go to the office to escape their kids

    It’s no slight on the kids or the fathers. But young kids are a lot of work and generally quite boring after about 30 minutes. Especially when eating
    Speak for yourself.

    I absolutely love my three-year old daughter, and hate being away from her.

    We have a ball together.
    Good, I envy you. Enjoy

    But plenty of Dads don’t feel that.

    Personally I couldn’t get on with the kids until they were about 4, after that they are enchanting but still wearing, I loved my kids from about 7-11, the perfect age, to my mind

    My older daughter’s mother is entirely different and she loves babies.

    It’s probably a Darwinian thing so the child always has an adult that is interested
    Being a stay-at-home dad was brilliant in those early years. Although if I had had to work full-time as well, it might have been a different matter.

    It's a different experience. I can understand why someone who just wants to shag around and be an arse might want to avoid the nappies stage, but that's the real parenting. You need to be involved with your kids as much as possible, at all ages.
    What man doesn’t want to ‘fuck around and be an arse’?

    You beta cuck weirdo. Grow some cullions
  • FarooqFarooq Posts: 7,640

    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    It is also impossible to argue that "it doesn't cost me anything".
    It makes my shopping more expensive. Unless they are literally taking it out of their profits. Which they aren't.

    No - this is a fundamental misunderstanding of the economics of running a supermarket (or anything else really).

    Simplifying, you have variable costs (principally the stock itself - costs increase as sales increase and fall as they fall) and fixed costs (the building, the staff etc - costs don't vary, at least in the short term, as sales go up or down).

    What you are aiming to do with every sale is cover the variable costs in full, and contribute to fixed costs. Crucially, not every sale needs to contribute to fixed costs to the same degree - you just need to cover them across trading as a whole (and after that, the rest is profit).

    So when Iceland give an OAP discount, that's what they are doing. They are saying they'd rather the OAPs shopped with them and covered variable costs (which they certainly will) and contribute to fixed costs (which they also will) even if they contribute less to fixed costs than under 65s.

    To your point, the discount probably does NOT cost the under 65s money. If Iceland have judged it right, it SAVES you money. That's because more OAPs should shop at Iceland, which should contribute more to fixed costs overall (even though each individual shopper is contributing less) spreading the burden of covering fixed costs.
    I understand the rationale behind loss leaders.
    I just abhor the idea of discriminatory pricing in shops. And it is being marketed as "help with the cost of living crisis".
    As has been pointed out. By targeting the wealthiest group in society.
    I also read they are exploring £30 gift vouchers for the over 60's.
    We are such an elderly focussed society that most simply shrug and accept it.
    If it were a discount and vouchers for those on Universal Credit, the Daily Mail would have a seizure.
    I can't begrudge OAPs getting discounts in Iceland.

    Most of the elderly who shop there aren't exactly livin' la vida loca.
    In the 1980s and 1990s it made a lot of sense to target helping pensioners. In the 2020s the targeting should be on young families. Schemes such as this perpetuate making things cheaper for the richest cohort at the expense of the poorest. Only very marginally, but they do. Help by need, not age.
    Age 65 is when people reach their peak wealth.
    At that point it declines, but slower than wealth builds up towards 65. So 70 year olds are wealthier than 60 year olds, and 75 year olds are wealthier than 55 year olds, and so on.
  • AlistairMAlistairM Posts: 1,587

    AlistairM said:

    biggles said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Are they, once again, behind the curve? My car has a wireless charging cradle and we have one in the living room and bedroom because it will do my wife’s Samsung and my iPhone. They’re now spreading in public.
    I am totally in favour of standardisation. This helps.

    As for wireless: it is the regime of witches, who cackle over their cauldrons as they brew their hideous concoctions. Beware the fool who enters their domain ...

    (I may just be married to an RF witch...)
    maybe so - but increasing numbers of people are so in love with wireless charging, that they are building it into cupboards and kitchen counters.
    Would you buy a device for multiple-£100 that had only wireless charging, with no cabled backup for charging or data transfer? Especially if the wireless charging protocols were proprietary?
    What I would do and the rest of the world would do is often not a matching set.

    Plenty of people will buy wireless charging only products. I don't see many dying in a ditch for a charging port, to be honest.

    My guess is that Apple will go down this road fairly soon.
    Not looked into it but can App debugging be done wirelessly? When I debug my App the PC connects using a cable. If the port is done away with then they would need to provide another way. Their are emulators but I much prefer the real device.
    Ah, to debug you purchase devel boards, at vast cost. ;)

    (This is an area of the industry that I'm glad is disappearing. Although devel boards will always be useful in fringe applications.)
    That would be typical Apple. Developing for Android you can use just about any computer - Windows, Linux or Mac. For iOS it is of course Mac only (although there are rather painful workarounds).
  • MaxPBMaxPB Posts: 36,578

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Good up to a point. Imagine if all laptops had to come with an ethernet socket; there would be none of the slimline models that we now have. Apple is right, and this will stop innovation. The EU is right that it will stop Apple taking the michael, but it is not really clear why the EU cares. Don't phones come with charging cables (for those who still use cable charging)?
    That’s partly why. How many pointless chargers etc does every house have? Sell the phone to use the charger you already own. Help reduce waste.
    The charger isn't the issue, they are all standard to USB-C or USB-A output. The device should be able to use whatever it wants and it shouldn't depend on some bureaucratic body to approve the next evolution of it. What's next, memory cards and interfaces?

    The idea that tech companies should be hamstrung on the innovation stakes by some idiotic bureaucracy is stupid. I'm not particularly a supporter of Apple, in this scenario they are correct because USB-C isn't a forever standard and now it is about to become one as the burden of proving innovation to a bureaucratic body destroys innovation.
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 9,003
    It makes the party look very split though I don’t sense the same hunger for a war or for forcing him out in the same way ERG forced May out.

    I agree with you.

    After this win he should be able to shrug off the June by election losses as a customary mid term thing that has led to wins at GE in the past (different if the VONC had waited!)

    The party conference is likely a rally in his favour where only supporters turn up in these situations?

    The privileges committee thing is where they need to prove a PM categorically lied without the doubt he didn’t have all the facts at the time - I’m not sure they have the “without doubt” evidence.

    The changing the rules for another vonc I actually think will be technically easier than HY is making out, but reputationally difficult if it’s only going to produce the same numbers as last time. Do you see what I mean, it actually favours Boris if it’s rule change just to throw spaghetti at wall and he ends up winning by more than 50. And we moving into GE territory now so running out of time a bit (if they had one last January, then it would have been set up nice for one next Jan!)

    The local election thing though, what do you mean by easy for him? If it’s shire elections, lots of seats to defend expected to win, it’s more of a danger isn’t it?
  • FarooqFarooq Posts: 7,640
    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    pm215 said:

    kyf_100 said:


    Aside from commuting costs, which is another argument, fundamentally I think people like WFH because it affords them privacy and comfort, both those things could be provided at the workplace. But for some reason, modern workplaces have neither of those things, and then bosses wonder why people would rather WFH.

    The other notable motivation here I think is those with young families (not my observation -- as a single dude I missed this til somebody pointed it out). Being able to have lunch with your children, or knock off at 6pm and see them immediately rather than having a long commute home first, or not have to find and pay for an extra hour or two a day of childcare to cover the time you're spending commuting -- that's the kind of thing that can be a massive quality of life improvement, and that you might well be willing to change jobs over.
    Most of the fathers of rather young kids that I know… go to the office to escape their kids

    It’s no slight on the kids or the fathers. But young kids are a lot of work and generally quite boring after about 30 minutes. Especially when eating
    Speak for yourself.

    I absolutely love my three-year old daughter, and hate being away from her.

    We have a ball together.
    Good, I envy you. Enjoy

    But plenty of Dads don’t feel that.

    Personally I couldn’t get on with the kids until they were about 4, after that they are enchanting but still wearing, I loved my kids from about 7-11, the perfect age, to my mind

    My older daughter’s mother is entirely different and she loves babies.

    It’s probably a Darwinian thing so the child always has an adult that is interested
    Being a stay-at-home dad was brilliant in those early years. Although if I had had to work full-time as well, it might have been a different matter.

    It's a different experience. I can understand why someone who just wants to shag around and be an arse might want to avoid the nappies stage, but that's the real parenting. You need to be involved with your kids as much as possible, at all ages.
    What man doesn’t want to ‘fuck around and be an arse’?

    You beta cuck weirdo. Grow some cullions
    Don't judge everyone by your standa-- ah, I see the problem here
  • LeonLeon Posts: 30,379
    Farooq said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    pm215 said:

    kyf_100 said:


    Aside from commuting costs, which is another argument, fundamentally I think people like WFH because it affords them privacy and comfort, both those things could be provided at the workplace. But for some reason, modern workplaces have neither of those things, and then bosses wonder why people would rather WFH.

    The other notable motivation here I think is those with young families (not my observation -- as a single dude I missed this til somebody pointed it out). Being able to have lunch with your children, or knock off at 6pm and see them immediately rather than having a long commute home first, or not have to find and pay for an extra hour or two a day of childcare to cover the time you're spending commuting -- that's the kind of thing that can be a massive quality of life improvement, and that you might well be willing to change jobs over.
    Most of the fathers of rather young kids that I know… go to the office to escape their kids

    It’s no slight on the kids or the fathers. But young kids are a lot of work and generally quite boring after about 30 minutes. Especially when eating
    Speak for yourself.

    I absolutely love my three-year old daughter, and hate being away from her.

    We have a ball together.
    Good, I envy you. Enjoy

    But plenty of Dads don’t feel that.

    Personally I couldn’t get on with the kids until they were about 4, after that they are enchanting but still wearing, I loved my kids from about 7-11, the perfect age, to my mind

    My older daughter’s mother is entirely different and she loves babies.

    It’s probably a Darwinian thing so the child always has an adult that is interested
    Being a stay-at-home dad was brilliant in those early years. Although if I had had to work full-time as well, it might have been a different matter.

    It's a different experience. I can understand why someone who just wants to shag around and be an arse might want to avoid the nappies stage, but that's the real parenting. You need to be involved with your kids as much as possible, at all ages.
    What man doesn’t want to ‘fuck around and be an arse’?

    You beta cuck weirdo. Grow some cullions
    Don't judge everyone by your standa-- ah, I see the problem here
    Exactly. And thankyou for your support on this vital issue
  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 55,103
    MaxPB said:

    biggles said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Are they, once again, behind the curve? My car has a wireless charging cradle and we have one in the living room and bedroom because it will do my wife’s Samsung and my iPhone. They’re now spreading in public.
    I am totally in favour of standardisation. This helps.

    As for wireless: it is the regime of witches, who cackle over their cauldrons as they brew their hideous concoctions. Beware the fool who enters their domain ...

    (I may just be married to an RF witch...)
    maybe so - but increasing numbers of people are so in love with wireless charging, that they are building it into cupboards and kitchen counters.
    Would you buy a device for multiple-£100 that had only wireless charging, with no cabled backup for charging or data transfer? Especially if the wireless charging protocols were proprietary?
    In your world we're still using USB Micro connectors, though because the innovation that forced USB-C uptake was never worthwhile.

    Wireless charging and data transfer is absolutely the future, I can't wait until everything uses it and I can dump the majority of my cables.
    Can we hear more about RF witches? They sound interesting.

  • DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 17,905

    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    It is also impossible to argue that "it doesn't cost me anything".
    It makes my shopping more expensive. Unless they are literally taking it out of their profits. Which they aren't.

    No - this is a fundamental misunderstanding of the economics of running a supermarket (or anything else really).

    Simplifying, you have variable costs (principally the stock itself - costs increase as sales increase and fall as they fall) and fixed costs (the building, the staff etc - costs don't vary, at least in the short term, as sales go up or down).

    What you are aiming to do with every sale is cover the variable costs in full, and contribute to fixed costs. Crucially, not every sale needs to contribute to fixed costs to the same degree - you just need to cover them across trading as a whole (and after that, the rest is profit).

    So when Iceland give an OAP discount, that's what they are doing. They are saying they'd rather the OAPs shopped with them and covered variable costs (which they certainly will) and contribute to fixed costs (which they also will) even if they contribute less to fixed costs than under 65s.

    To your point, the discount probably does NOT cost the under 65s money. If Iceland have judged it right, it SAVES you money. That's because more OAPs should shop at Iceland, which should contribute more to fixed costs overall (even though each individual shopper is contributing less) spreading the burden of covering fixed costs.
    I understand the rationale behind loss leaders.
    I just abhor the idea of discriminatory pricing in shops. And it is being marketed as "help with the cost of living crisis".
    As has been pointed out. By targeting the wealthiest group in society.
    I also read they are exploring £30 gift vouchers for the over 60's.
    We are such an elderly focussed society that most simply shrug and accept it.
    If it were a discount and vouchers for those on Universal Credit, the Daily Mail would have a seizure.
    I can't begrudge OAPs getting discounts in Iceland.

    Most of the elderly who shop there aren't exactly livin' la vida loca.
    In the 1980s and 1990s it made a lot of sense to target helping pensioners. In the 2020s the targeting should be on young families. Schemes such as this perpetuate making things cheaper for the richest cohort at the expense of the poorest. Only very marginally, but they do. Help by need, not age.
    Lots of pensioners are poor, and Iceland is not exactly Harrods or even Waitrose. Sure, many pensioners are loaded but then so are many young families, Boris & Carrie & Wilf & the other one, for instance.
  • HeathenerHeathener Posts: 3,998
    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    pm215 said:

    kyf_100 said:


    Aside from commuting costs, which is another argument, fundamentally I think people like WFH because it affords them privacy and comfort, both those things could be provided at the workplace. But for some reason, modern workplaces have neither of those things, and then bosses wonder why people would rather WFH.

    The other notable motivation here I think is those with young families (not my observation -- as a single dude I missed this til somebody pointed it out). Being able to have lunch with your children, or knock off at 6pm and see them immediately rather than having a long commute home first, or not have to find and pay for an extra hour or two a day of childcare to cover the time you're spending commuting -- that's the kind of thing that can be a massive quality of life improvement, and that you might well be willing to change jobs over.
    Most of the fathers of rather young kids that I know… go to the office to escape their kids

    It’s no slight on the kids or the fathers. But young kids are a lot of work and generally quite boring after about 30 minutes. Especially when eating
    Speak for yourself.

    I absolutely love my three-year old daughter, and hate being away from her.

    We have a ball together.
    Good, I envy you. Enjoy

    But plenty of Dads don’t feel that.

    Personally I couldn’t get on with the kids until they were about 4, after that they are enchanting but still wearing, I loved my kids from about 7-11, the perfect age, to my mind

    My older daughter’s mother is entirely different and she loves babies.

    It’s probably a Darwinian thing so the child always has an adult that is interested
    Being a stay-at-home dad was brilliant in those early years. Although if I had had to work full-time as well, it might have been a different matter.

    It's a different experience. I can understand why someone who just wants to shag around and be an arse might want to avoid the nappies stage, but that's the real parenting. You need to be involved with your kids as much as possible, at all ages.
    What man doesn’t want to ‘fuck around and be an arse’?

    You beta cuck weirdo. Grow some cullions
    Sigh

    I don't doubt you are being serious. Very much similar to someone who wrote 'Absent Fathers' and 'Millions of Women are waiting to Meet You.'

    I think much of the world has moved on from those attitudes. At least I hope it has.
  • JosiasJessopJosiasJessop Posts: 32,645
    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    pm215 said:

    kyf_100 said:


    Aside from commuting costs, which is another argument, fundamentally I think people like WFH because it affords them privacy and comfort, both those things could be provided at the workplace. But for some reason, modern workplaces have neither of those things, and then bosses wonder why people would rather WFH.

    The other notable motivation here I think is those with young families (not my observation -- as a single dude I missed this til somebody pointed it out). Being able to have lunch with your children, or knock off at 6pm and see them immediately rather than having a long commute home first, or not have to find and pay for an extra hour or two a day of childcare to cover the time you're spending commuting -- that's the kind of thing that can be a massive quality of life improvement, and that you might well be willing to change jobs over.
    Most of the fathers of rather young kids that I know… go to the office to escape their kids

    It’s no slight on the kids or the fathers. But young kids are a lot of work and generally quite boring after about 30 minutes. Especially when eating
    Speak for yourself.

    I absolutely love my three-year old daughter, and hate being away from her.

    We have a ball together.
    Good, I envy you. Enjoy

    But plenty of Dads don’t feel that.

    Personally I couldn’t get on with the kids until they were about 4, after that they are enchanting but still wearing, I loved my kids from about 7-11, the perfect age, to my mind

    My older daughter’s mother is entirely different and she loves babies.

    It’s probably a Darwinian thing so the child always has an adult that is interested
    Being a stay-at-home dad was brilliant in those early years. Although if I had had to work full-time as well, it might have been a different matter.

    It's a different experience. I can understand why someone who just wants to shag around and be an arse might want to avoid the nappies stage, but that's the real parenting. You need to be involved with your kids as much as possible, at all ages.
    What man doesn’t want to ‘fuck around and be an arse’?

    You beta cuck weirdo. Grow some cullions
    LOL. Your empty-shell life appears to be wearing thin. ;)
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 82,456
    I'm sure if the Tories hold Tiverton it will be a complete vindication of Boris and a triumph to hold a seat with a 24k majority.

    I'm sure if the Tories lose Tiverton it will all be the fault of traitorous plotters causing disunity, and in any case governments lose by-elections all the time so even losing a 24k majority seat means nothing.
  • FarooqFarooq Posts: 7,640
    kle4 said:

    I'm sure if the Tories hold Tiverton it will be a complete vindication of Boris and a triumph to hold a seat with a 24k majority.

    I'm sure if the Tories lose Tiverton it will all be the fault of traitorous plotters causing disunity, and in any case governments lose by-elections all the time so even losing a 24k majority seat means nothing.

    The Labourification of the Conservatives is complete.
    In a few years' time there'll be a poster on here called bigjohnblades or something begging people to vote for TUSC because Leader of the Opposition Leader Ruth Davidson isn't conservative enough. It's going to be a wild ride.
  • StuartinromfordStuartinromford Posts: 8,544

    Election Maps suggesting if Redfields red wall polling goes well they are planning blue wall polling too

    Redfield a tad you gov in number and volatility of their polls? The problem then is, if you dislike the headline from one of their polls, another headline will soon be along more to your liking.

    Opinium have yet to give Lab a lead greater than 4, Lab higher than 38 or Tories lower than 33. It 2 a month, so two similar in a row of movement with opinium would fill me with confidence some movement is happening, starting this Sunday I think.
    Redfield havent been ultra volatile until that weird poll a week and a bit ago, i think theres some value in tracking their movement and red/blue wall regular polling would be very useful for spotting opportunitues at constituency level imo as we approach a GE
    How about the 4% lead this week with Tories back up to 34? I have half a mind it’s a tad outside.

    It’s their Monday one again. Are they using something slightly different between Monday and Thursday?
    Its only a 1 point movement on each. If the 'true' lead is, say 6 or 7, id expect polling in the 4 to 10 point lead range with a very occasional outlier 10 to 12 or 2 to 4.
    Unless the “out there” has moved from last poll so what looks a MOE 6 to 4 drop is actually more outside MOE sample than it looks.

    What I do is not just look at the gap, but the % of party for trend, and the 34 for Tories you would call MOE is outside trend in my book. For example if it should have been 32 not 34, and by Thursday after yesterday it is 30, they will show headline grabbing -4 drop - Which isn’t really a minus 4 drop just like it wasn’t a +5 rise?
    I see what you mean, so I only 25% don’t really trust their polls, but do you see what I mean not trusting them the full 100% anymore?
    Well that really depends on the trend elsewhere surely? I nean we have that 11% Comres and we ought to see tonight or tomorrow a new one from them to see if it was a blip or a trend. Everyone else is pretty much unmoved lately. 34 isnt far enough from what everyone else shows or from Redfields own track to stand out. Yet.

    Edit - its also very possible to get a short term firming up from the 30% left who still vote Boris as best PM or 'still an asset' as a reaction to the negatives which pulls things up temporarily. He is not yet universally loathed and much of the Tory decline is lack of certainty rather than switchers so a 'screw you, im voting boris if youre trying to oust him' reaction from them is possible i suppose
    Here's the latest wikipedia graph;



    You can see the scandals hitting and the start of the Ukraine war. Otherwise it looks noisy, though possibly with the long slow drift down in the Conservative rating starting again. Labour look like they're stuggling to settle above 40% though.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 82,456
    Applicant said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    So USB-C is the optimal cable which will never be improved on?
    Some things might be improvable but are not worth the hassle of doing so, like making us switch from Qwerty keyboards.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 82,456

    biggles said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Are they, once again, behind the curve? My car has a wireless charging cradle and we have one in the living room and bedroom because it will do my wife’s Samsung and my iPhone. They’re now spreading in public.
    I am totally in favour of standardisation. This helps.

    Next step, power outlets - total nonsense.



  • JosiasJessopJosiasJessop Posts: 32,645
    MaxPB said:

    biggles said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Are they, once again, behind the curve? My car has a wireless charging cradle and we have one in the living room and bedroom because it will do my wife’s Samsung and my iPhone. They’re now spreading in public.
    I am totally in favour of standardisation. This helps.

    As for wireless: it is the regime of witches, who cackle over their cauldrons as they brew their hideous concoctions. Beware the fool who enters their domain ...

    (I may just be married to an RF witch...)
    maybe so - but increasing numbers of people are so in love with wireless charging, that they are building it into cupboards and kitchen counters.
    Would you buy a device for multiple-£100 that had only wireless charging, with no cabled backup for charging or data transfer? Especially if the wireless charging protocols were proprietary?
    In your world we're still using USB Micro connectors, though because the innovation that forced USB-C uptake was never worthwhile.

    Wireless charging and data transfer is absolutely the future, I can't wait until everything uses it and I can dump the majority of my cables.
    That's not 'my world'.

    And as you well know, 'wireless charging and data transfer' depends on standards. If everyone creates devices that work with the same standards as everyone else, that's fine. If people go down their own routes and so not support standards, that's a problem.

    Standards can also evolve and grow. You can have your own standard, as long as you fully support the same standards everyone else does. And who knows, if your own is better, and your licences are fine, it may become the basis of a new standard.

    The Internet has not stagnated because of standards. People support the standards (cough Microsoft IE... (*)) and build upon them.

    (*) Though AIUI that is more complex then people think.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 82,456
    HYUFD said:

    I suspect that the claim that HYUFD is paid to post here is absolute garbage.

    I'm not a fan of his politics but he's a political hobbyist and indeed is a very community-minded nice bloke in real life.

    The idea that he is some sort of Central Office asset trying to influence a load of gastronomically ignorant, undersexed middle-aged trainspotters on PB is ludicrous.

    Thanks and I can confirm I am not paid to post on here (wish I was sometimes!)
    Enthusiastic amateurs beat out professionals every time. Just comes with some risk the amateurs, in that enthusiasm, might go further than the professionals want.
  • noneoftheabovenoneoftheabove Posts: 16,232

    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    It is also impossible to argue that "it doesn't cost me anything".
    It makes my shopping more expensive. Unless they are literally taking it out of their profits. Which they aren't.

    No - this is a fundamental misunderstanding of the economics of running a supermarket (or anything else really).

    Simplifying, you have variable costs (principally the stock itself - costs increase as sales increase and fall as they fall) and fixed costs (the building, the staff etc - costs don't vary, at least in the short term, as sales go up or down).

    What you are aiming to do with every sale is cover the variable costs in full, and contribute to fixed costs. Crucially, not every sale needs to contribute to fixed costs to the same degree - you just need to cover them across trading as a whole (and after that, the rest is profit).

    So when Iceland give an OAP discount, that's what they are doing. They are saying they'd rather the OAPs shopped with them and covered variable costs (which they certainly will) and contribute to fixed costs (which they also will) even if they contribute less to fixed costs than under 65s.

    To your point, the discount probably does NOT cost the under 65s money. If Iceland have judged it right, it SAVES you money. That's because more OAPs should shop at Iceland, which should contribute more to fixed costs overall (even though each individual shopper is contributing less) spreading the burden of covering fixed costs.
    I understand the rationale behind loss leaders.
    I just abhor the idea of discriminatory pricing in shops. And it is being marketed as "help with the cost of living crisis".
    As has been pointed out. By targeting the wealthiest group in society.
    I also read they are exploring £30 gift vouchers for the over 60's.
    We are such an elderly focussed society that most simply shrug and accept it.
    If it were a discount and vouchers for those on Universal Credit, the Daily Mail would have a seizure.
    I can't begrudge OAPs getting discounts in Iceland.

    Most of the elderly who shop there aren't exactly livin' la vida loca.
    In the 1980s and 1990s it made a lot of sense to target helping pensioners. In the 2020s the targeting should be on young families. Schemes such as this perpetuate making things cheaper for the richest cohort at the expense of the poorest. Only very marginally, but they do. Help by need, not age.
    Lots of pensioners are poor, and Iceland is not exactly Harrods or even Waitrose. Sure, many pensioners are loaded but then so are many young families, Boris & Carrie & Wilf & the other one, for instance.
    Of course lots of pensioners are poor. But as a proportion fewer are poor than the young, and more are richer. So why target pensioners apart from because they vote more regularly?

    On top, the subs are not small, the equivalent of free or heavily discounted travel and additional help with energy alone would be a few £k pre tax wages for a young family, especially those around the ludicrous UC high tax tapers.
  • algarkirkalgarkirk Posts: 6,718
    Farooq said:

    kle4 said:

    I'm sure if the Tories hold Tiverton it will be a complete vindication of Boris and a triumph to hold a seat with a 24k majority.

    I'm sure if the Tories lose Tiverton it will all be the fault of traitorous plotters causing disunity, and in any case governments lose by-elections all the time so even losing a 24k majority seat means nothing.

    The Labourification of the Conservatives is complete.
    In a few years' time there'll be a poster on here called bigjohnblades or something begging people to vote for TUSC because Leader of the Opposition Leader Ruth Davidson isn't conservative enough. It's going to be a wild ride.
    This is accelerating and is for now unstoppable.

    Try to think of an issue where part of all proposed solutions isn't more state managed expenditure.

    Try to think of an issue where a substantial political group can be heard propounding solutions involving less state intervention and lower expenditure.

  • MaxPBMaxPB Posts: 36,578

    MaxPB said:

    biggles said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Are they, once again, behind the curve? My car has a wireless charging cradle and we have one in the living room and bedroom because it will do my wife’s Samsung and my iPhone. They’re now spreading in public.
    I am totally in favour of standardisation. This helps.

    As for wireless: it is the regime of witches, who cackle over their cauldrons as they brew their hideous concoctions. Beware the fool who enters their domain ...

    (I may just be married to an RF witch...)
    maybe so - but increasing numbers of people are so in love with wireless charging, that they are building it into cupboards and kitchen counters.
    Would you buy a device for multiple-£100 that had only wireless charging, with no cabled backup for charging or data transfer? Especially if the wireless charging protocols were proprietary?
    In your world we're still using USB Micro connectors, though because the innovation that forced USB-C uptake was never worthwhile.

    Wireless charging and data transfer is absolutely the future, I can't wait until everything uses it and I can dump the majority of my cables.
    That's not 'my world'.

    And as you well know, 'wireless charging and data transfer' depends on standards. If everyone creates devices that work with the same standards as everyone else, that's fine. If people go down their own routes and so not support standards, that's a problem.

    Standards can also evolve and grow. You can have your own standard, as long as you fully support the same standards everyone else does. And who knows, if your own is better, and your licences are fine, it may become the basis of a new standard.

    The Internet has not stagnated because of standards. People support the standards (cough Microsoft IE... (*)) and build upon them.

    (*) Though AIUI that is more complex then people think.
    But how does a company move to a new port that isn't USB-C without taking their device off the shelves in the EU?

    I think USB-C is a great standard, yet I also know it's got a limited shelf life, one day it will be replaced at which point it's no longer up to companies, but a bureaucratic body who have to approve it. That is absolutely going to slow down the pace of innovation. Simply, in Apple's place I'd tell the EU to go and get fucked and enlist the US government to fight my corner.
  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 55,103
    kle4 said:

    biggles said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Are they, once again, behind the curve? My car has a wireless charging cradle and we have one in the living room and bedroom because it will do my wife’s Samsung and my iPhone. They’re now spreading in public.
    I am totally in favour of standardisation. This helps.

    Next step, power outlets - total nonsense.



    The correct answer is G says JRM.
  • DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 17,905
    edited June 2022

    biggles said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Are they, once again, behind the curve? My car has a wireless charging cradle and we have one in the living room and bedroom because it will do my wife’s Samsung and my iPhone. They’re now spreading in public.
    I am totally in favour of standardisation. This helps.

    As for wireless: it is the regime of witches, who cackle over their cauldrons as they brew their hideous concoctions. Beware the fool who enters their domain ...

    (I may just be married to an RF witch...)
    maybe so - but increasing numbers of people are so in love with wireless charging, that they are building it into cupboards and kitchen counters.
    Would you buy a device for multiple-£100 that had only wireless charging, with no cabled backup for charging or data transfer? Especially if the wireless charging protocols were proprietary?
    What I would do and the rest of the world would do is often not a matching set.

    Plenty of people will buy wireless charging only products. I don't see many dying in a ditch for a charging port, to be honest.

    My guess is that Apple will go down this road fairly soon.
    As long as they support open standards, that's fine; it's the market.

    If their charging is proprietary, they can FOAD.

    Standards matter. After all, we're communicating via standards.
    That is true but not mandated standards. Ethernet, wifi, token ring, Decnet (ask your granny about the last two) co-existed. VHS conquered Betamax without the EU getting involved, and now we use neither (hat-tip The Saj).
  • JosiasJessopJosiasJessop Posts: 32,645
    MaxPB said:

    MaxPB said:

    biggles said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Are they, once again, behind the curve? My car has a wireless charging cradle and we have one in the living room and bedroom because it will do my wife’s Samsung and my iPhone. They’re now spreading in public.
    I am totally in favour of standardisation. This helps.

    As for wireless: it is the regime of witches, who cackle over their cauldrons as they brew their hideous concoctions. Beware the fool who enters their domain ...

    (I may just be married to an RF witch...)
    maybe so - but increasing numbers of people are so in love with wireless charging, that they are building it into cupboards and kitchen counters.
    Would you buy a device for multiple-£100 that had only wireless charging, with no cabled backup for charging or data transfer? Especially if the wireless charging protocols were proprietary?
    In your world we're still using USB Micro connectors, though because the innovation that forced USB-C uptake was never worthwhile.

    Wireless charging and data transfer is absolutely the future, I can't wait until everything uses it and I can dump the majority of my cables.
    That's not 'my world'.

    And as you well know, 'wireless charging and data transfer' depends on standards. If everyone creates devices that work with the same standards as everyone else, that's fine. If people go down their own routes and so not support standards, that's a problem.

    Standards can also evolve and grow. You can have your own standard, as long as you fully support the same standards everyone else does. And who knows, if your own is better, and your licences are fine, it may become the basis of a new standard.

    The Internet has not stagnated because of standards. People support the standards (cough Microsoft IE... (*)) and build upon them.

    (*) Though AIUI that is more complex then people think.
    But how does a company move to a new port that isn't USB-C without taking their device off the shelves in the EU?

    I think USB-C is a great standard, yet I also know it's got a limited shelf life, one day it will be replaced at which point it's no longer up to companies, but a bureaucratic body who have to approve it. That is absolutely going to slow down the pace of innovation. Simply, in Apple's place I'd tell the EU to go and get fucked and enlist the US government to fight my corner.
    You are using a medium that is 100% based on those 'bureaucratic bodies' to allow communication. Imagine if MS had got the US government to fight its corner over the MSH walled garden. Or France over Mintel.

    That's your world.
  • LeonLeon Posts: 30,379

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    pm215 said:

    kyf_100 said:


    Aside from commuting costs, which is another argument, fundamentally I think people like WFH because it affords them privacy and comfort, both those things could be provided at the workplace. But for some reason, modern workplaces have neither of those things, and then bosses wonder why people would rather WFH.

    The other notable motivation here I think is those with young families (not my observation -- as a single dude I missed this til somebody pointed it out). Being able to have lunch with your children, or knock off at 6pm and see them immediately rather than having a long commute home first, or not have to find and pay for an extra hour or two a day of childcare to cover the time you're spending commuting -- that's the kind of thing that can be a massive quality of life improvement, and that you might well be willing to change jobs over.
    Most of the fathers of rather young kids that I know… go to the office to escape their kids

    It’s no slight on the kids or the fathers. But young kids are a lot of work and generally quite boring after about 30 minutes. Especially when eating
    Speak for yourself.

    I absolutely love my three-year old daughter, and hate being away from her.

    We have a ball together.
    Good, I envy you. Enjoy

    But plenty of Dads don’t feel that.

    Personally I couldn’t get on with the kids until they were about 4, after that they are enchanting but still wearing, I loved my kids from about 7-11, the perfect age, to my mind

    My older daughter’s mother is entirely different and she loves babies.

    It’s probably a Darwinian thing so the child always has an adult that is interested
    Being a stay-at-home dad was brilliant in those early years. Although if I had had to work full-time as well, it might have been a different matter.

    It's a different experience. I can understand why someone who just wants to shag around and be an arse might want to avoid the nappies stage, but that's the real parenting. You need to be involved with your kids as much as possible, at all ages.
    What man doesn’t want to ‘fuck around and be an arse’?

    You beta cuck weirdo. Grow some cullions
    LOL. Your empty-shell life appears to be wearing thin. ;)
    What is an “empty shell” life?

    Genuine question. Curious
  • solarflaresolarflare Posts: 3,167

    kle4 said:

    biggles said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Are they, once again, behind the curve? My car has a wireless charging cradle and we have one in the living room and bedroom because it will do my wife’s Samsung and my iPhone. They’re now spreading in public.
    I am totally in favour of standardisation. This helps.

    Next step, power outlets - total nonsense.



    The correct answer is G says JRM.
    Type K seems like a happy little guy.
  • sladeslade Posts: 1,664
    I just drove from Honiton to Tiverton. Clocked just 6 stakeboards - all Lib Dem. Interesting that one was at farm gate.
  • TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 105,300
    MaxPB said:

    biggles said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Are they, once again, behind the curve? My car has a wireless charging cradle and we have one in the living room and bedroom because it will do my wife’s Samsung and my iPhone. They’re now spreading in public.
    I am totally in favour of standardisation. This helps.

    As for wireless: it is the regime of witches, who cackle over their cauldrons as they brew their hideous concoctions. Beware the fool who enters their domain ...

    (I may just be married to an RF witch...)
    maybe so - but increasing numbers of people are so in love with wireless charging, that they are building it into cupboards and kitchen counters.
    Would you buy a device for multiple-£100 that had only wireless charging, with no cabled backup for charging or data transfer? Especially if the wireless charging protocols were proprietary?
    In your world we're still using USB Micro connectors, though because the innovation that forced USB-C uptake was never worthwhile.

    Wireless charging and data transfer is absolutely the future, I can't wait until everything uses it and I can dump the majority of my cables.
    Last September when I upgraded my iPhone I transferred half a terabyte of data from my old phone to my new phone in around half an hour.

    All I had to do was put the old phone next to the new one and boom!

    Today's EU ruling makes me wish I had voted Leave.
  • solarflaresolarflare Posts: 3,167
    slade said:

    I just drove from Honiton to Tiverton. Clocked just 6 stakeboards - all Lib Dem. Interesting that one was at farm gate.

    For a moment I was bemused about why the Lib Dems were branching out into branded skateboards.
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 48,950
    Heathener said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    pm215 said:

    kyf_100 said:


    Aside from commuting costs, which is another argument, fundamentally I think people like WFH because it affords them privacy and comfort, both those things could be provided at the workplace. But for some reason, modern workplaces have neither of those things, and then bosses wonder why people would rather WFH.

    The other notable motivation here I think is those with young families (not my observation -- as a single dude I missed this til somebody pointed it out). Being able to have lunch with your children, or knock off at 6pm and see them immediately rather than having a long commute home first, or not have to find and pay for an extra hour or two a day of childcare to cover the time you're spending commuting -- that's the kind of thing that can be a massive quality of life improvement, and that you might well be willing to change jobs over.
    Most of the fathers of rather young kids that I know… go to the office to escape their kids

    It’s no slight on the kids or the fathers. But young kids are a lot of work and generally quite boring after about 30 minutes. Especially when eating
    Speak for yourself.

    I absolutely love my three-year old daughter, and hate being away from her.

    We have a ball together.
    Good, I envy you. Enjoy

    But plenty of Dads don’t feel that.

    Personally I couldn’t get on with the kids until they were about 4, after that they are enchanting but still wearing, I loved my kids from about 7-11, the perfect age, to my mind

    My older daughter’s mother is entirely different and she loves babies.

    It’s probably a Darwinian thing so the child always has an adult that is interested
    Being a stay-at-home dad was brilliant in those early years. Although if I had had to work full-time as well, it might have been a different matter.

    It's a different experience. I can understand why someone who just wants to shag around and be an arse might want to avoid the nappies stage, but that's the real parenting. You need to be involved with your kids as much as possible, at all ages.
    What man doesn’t want to ‘fuck around and be an arse’?

    You beta cuck weirdo. Grow some cullions
    Sigh

    I don't doubt you are being serious. Very much similar to someone who wrote 'Absent Fathers' and 'Millions of Women are waiting to Meet You.'

    I think much of the world has moved on from those attitudes. At least I hope it has.
    I'm not sure. There are lots of beautiful women I fantasize about having sex with but I'm aware that it would destroy my relationship and the people I love the most. So I don't.

    But the urge is absolutely natural - evolutionary even.
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 48,950
    kle4 said:

    biggles said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Are they, once again, behind the curve? My car has a wireless charging cradle and we have one in the living room and bedroom because it will do my wife’s Samsung and my iPhone. They’re now spreading in public.
    I am totally in favour of standardisation. This helps.

    Next step, power outlets - total nonsense.



    I'm surprised India, Australia and NZ aren't using Type G.
  • noneoftheabovenoneoftheabove Posts: 16,232

    kle4 said:

    biggles said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Are they, once again, behind the curve? My car has a wireless charging cradle and we have one in the living room and bedroom because it will do my wife’s Samsung and my iPhone. They’re now spreading in public.
    I am totally in favour of standardisation. This helps.

    Next step, power outlets - total nonsense.



    The correct answer is G says JRM.
    World leading even?
  • TimSTimS Posts: 3,549

    Election Maps suggesting if Redfields red wall polling goes well they are planning blue wall polling too

    Redfield a tad you gov in number and volatility of their polls? The problem then is, if you dislike the headline from one of their polls, another headline will soon be along more to your liking.

    Opinium have yet to give Lab a lead greater than 4, Lab higher than 38 or Tories lower than 33. It 2 a month, so two similar in a row of movement with opinium would fill me with confidence some movement is happening, starting this Sunday I think.
    Redfield havent been ultra volatile until that weird poll a week and a bit ago, i think theres some value in tracking their movement and red/blue wall regular polling would be very useful for spotting opportunitues at constituency level imo as we approach a GE
    How about the 4% lead this week with Tories back up to 34? I have half a mind it’s a tad outside.

    It’s their Monday one again. Are they using something slightly different between Monday and Thursday?
    Its only a 1 point movement on each. If the 'true' lead is, say 6 or 7, id expect polling in the 4 to 10 point lead range with a very occasional outlier 10 to 12 or 2 to 4.
    Unless the “out there” has moved from last poll so what looks a MOE 6 to 4 drop is actually more outside MOE sample than it looks.

    What I do is not just look at the gap, but the % of party for trend, and the 34 for Tories you would call MOE is outside trend in my book. For example if it should have been 32 not 34, and by Thursday after yesterday it is 30, they will show headline grabbing -4 drop - Which isn’t really a minus 4 drop just like it wasn’t a +5 rise?
    I see what you mean, so I only 25% don’t really trust their polls, but do you see what I mean not trusting them the full 100% anymore?
    Well that really depends on the trend elsewhere surely? I nean we have that 11% Comres and we ought to see tonight or tomorrow a new one from them to see if it was a blip or a trend. Everyone else is pretty much unmoved lately. 34 isnt far enough from what everyone else shows or from Redfields own track to stand out. Yet.

    Edit - its also very possible to get a short term firming up from the 30% left who still vote Boris as best PM or 'still an asset' as a reaction to the negatives which pulls things up temporarily. He is not yet universally loathed and much of the Tory decline is lack of certainty rather than switchers so a 'screw you, im voting boris if youre trying to oust him' reaction from them is possible i suppose
    Here's the latest wikipedia graph;



    You can see the scandals hitting and the start of the Ukraine war. Otherwise it looks noisy, though possibly with the long slow drift down in the Conservative rating starting again. Labour look like they're stuggling to settle above 40% though.
    The steady, slow rise in both the Lib Dem and Green vote shares is the clearest long term trend and seems to be independent of the red-blue relationship.

    It reflects disillusionment with the Tories but the well flagged uncertainty about Labour. But it also means the anti Tory coalition has grown. At Labour’s previous peak in November 2020 LLG was at 51-52%, and in the rally to the flag Covid trough in April 2020 it was only 43%. Now it hovers between 55-58%, including in the last R&W poll and even in Opinium.
  • JosiasJessopJosiasJessop Posts: 32,645

    biggles said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Are they, once again, behind the curve? My car has a wireless charging cradle and we have one in the living room and bedroom because it will do my wife’s Samsung and my iPhone. They’re now spreading in public.
    I am totally in favour of standardisation. This helps.

    As for wireless: it is the regime of witches, who cackle over their cauldrons as they brew their hideous concoctions. Beware the fool who enters their domain ...

    (I may just be married to an RF witch...)
    maybe so - but increasing numbers of people are so in love with wireless charging, that they are building it into cupboards and kitchen counters.
    Would you buy a device for multiple-£100 that had only wireless charging, with no cabled backup for charging or data transfer? Especially if the wireless charging protocols were proprietary?
    What I would do and the rest of the world would do is often not a matching set.

    Plenty of people will buy wireless charging only products. I don't see many dying in a ditch for a charging port, to be honest.

    My guess is that Apple will go down this road fairly soon.
    As long as they support open standards, that's fine; it's the market.

    If their charging is proprietary, they can FOAD.

    Standards matter. After all, we're communicating via standards.
    That is true but not mandated standards. Ethernet, wifi, token ring, Decnet (ask your granny about the last two) co-existed. VHS conquered Betamax without the EU getting involved, and now we use neither (hat-tip The Saj).
    One of my dad's fitters had a Betamax player. He was pi**ed off that his purchase proved to be a dead-end after a couple of years.

    You might want to look at the success of Nokia and Vodafone (amongst others) due to the EU setting aside frequencies for mobile standards in the 1980s. Compared to the US's three competing mobile standards. It's a big reason why those two companies became international behemoths in the 1990s.

    Standards matter. They do not need to be generationally stagnant.
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 9,003
    Heathener said:
    This tactic worked well for ERG v May.

    On other hand though, it needs level of organisation rebels haven’t had yet, and it can’t be done in secret, so repercussions. They would also need really dislike something to join labour in lobby and defeat it?
  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 55,103

    kle4 said:

    biggles said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Are they, once again, behind the curve? My car has a wireless charging cradle and we have one in the living room and bedroom because it will do my wife’s Samsung and my iPhone. They’re now spreading in public.
    I am totally in favour of standardisation. This helps.

    Next step, power outlets - total nonsense.



    The correct answer is G says JRM.
    Type K seems like a happy little guy.
    And also very new series of Borgen.
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 9,003

    Election Maps suggesting if Redfields red wall polling goes well they are planning blue wall polling too

    Redfield a tad you gov in number and volatility of their polls? The problem then is, if you dislike the headline from one of their polls, another headline will soon be along more to your liking.

    Opinium have yet to give Lab a lead greater than 4, Lab higher than 38 or Tories lower than 33. It 2 a month, so two similar in a row of movement with opinium would fill me with confidence some movement is happening, starting this Sunday I think.
    Redfield havent been ultra volatile until that weird poll a week and a bit ago, i think theres some value in tracking their movement and red/blue wall regular polling would be very useful for spotting opportunitues at constituency level imo as we approach a GE
    How about the 4% lead this week with Tories back up to 34? I have half a mind it’s a tad outside.

    It’s their Monday one again. Are they using something slightly different between Monday and Thursday?
    Its only a 1 point movement on each. If the 'true' lead is, say 6 or 7, id expect polling in the 4 to 10 point lead range with a very occasional outlier 10 to 12 or 2 to 4.
    Unless the “out there” has moved from last poll so what looks a MOE 6 to 4 drop is actually more outside MOE sample than it looks.

    What I do is not just look at the gap, but the % of party for trend, and the 34 for Tories you would call MOE is outside trend in my book. For example if it should have been 32 not 34, and by Thursday after yesterday it is 30, they will show headline grabbing -4 drop - Which isn’t really a minus 4 drop just like it wasn’t a +5 rise?
    I see what you mean, so I only 25% don’t really trust their polls, but do you see what I mean not trusting them the full 100% anymore?
    Well that really depends on the trend elsewhere surely? I nean we have that 11% Comres and we ought to see tonight or tomorrow a new one from them to see if it was a blip or a trend. Everyone else is pretty much unmoved lately. 34 isnt far enough from what everyone else shows or from Redfields own track to stand out. Yet.

    Edit - its also very possible to get a short term firming up from the 30% left who still vote Boris as best PM or 'still an asset' as a reaction to the negatives which pulls things up temporarily. He is not yet universally loathed and much of the Tory decline is lack of certainty rather than switchers so a 'screw you, im voting boris if youre trying to oust him' reaction from them is possible i suppose
    Here's the latest wikipedia graph;



    You can see the scandals hitting and the start of the Ukraine war. Otherwise it looks noisy, though possibly with the long slow drift down in the Conservative rating starting again. Labour look like they're stuggling to settle above 40% though.
    Clear ticks beginning though.
  • LeonLeon Posts: 30,379
    kle4 said:

    biggles said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Are they, once again, behind the curve? My car has a wireless charging cradle and we have one in the living room and bedroom because it will do my wife’s Samsung and my iPhone. They’re now spreading in public.
    I am totally in favour of standardisation. This helps.

    Next step, power outlets - total nonsense.



    Type J is genius

    Is that really Switzerland, Liechtenstein and….. Rwanda?

    Britain’s is the most satisfying to plug in. It feels the safest. You can also fInd it in curious old corners of the Empire, not just the ones given, eg I have found it widespread in Sri Lanka and India, and in odd parts of S E Asia
  • JosiasJessopJosiasJessop Posts: 32,645
    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    pm215 said:

    kyf_100 said:


    Aside from commuting costs, which is another argument, fundamentally I think people like WFH because it affords them privacy and comfort, both those things could be provided at the workplace. But for some reason, modern workplaces have neither of those things, and then bosses wonder why people would rather WFH.

    The other notable motivation here I think is those with young families (not my observation -- as a single dude I missed this til somebody pointed it out). Being able to have lunch with your children, or knock off at 6pm and see them immediately rather than having a long commute home first, or not have to find and pay for an extra hour or two a day of childcare to cover the time you're spending commuting -- that's the kind of thing that can be a massive quality of life improvement, and that you might well be willing to change jobs over.
    Most of the fathers of rather young kids that I know… go to the office to escape their kids

    It’s no slight on the kids or the fathers. But young kids are a lot of work and generally quite boring after about 30 minutes. Especially when eating
    Speak for yourself.

    I absolutely love my three-year old daughter, and hate being away from her.

    We have a ball together.
    Good, I envy you. Enjoy

    But plenty of Dads don’t feel that.

    Personally I couldn’t get on with the kids until they were about 4, after that they are enchanting but still wearing, I loved my kids from about 7-11, the perfect age, to my mind

    My older daughter’s mother is entirely different and she loves babies.

    It’s probably a Darwinian thing so the child always has an adult that is interested
    Being a stay-at-home dad was brilliant in those early years. Although if I had had to work full-time as well, it might have been a different matter.

    It's a different experience. I can understand why someone who just wants to shag around and be an arse might want to avoid the nappies stage, but that's the real parenting. You need to be involved with your kids as much as possible, at all ages.
    What man doesn’t want to ‘fuck around and be an arse’?

    You beta cuck weirdo. Grow some cullions
    LOL. Your empty-shell life appears to be wearing thin. ;)
    What is an “empty shell” life?

    Genuine question. Curious
    All about appearances. Posts pictures of their lovely holidays to impress, whilst having an empty black hole within. Lives all about the image rather than the reality ;)

    (Slightly joking, although I have known people like this.)

    As an example: how many kids do you have, and how many were you around every day whilst they were babies?
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 36,673

    kle4 said:

    biggles said:

    Good.

    "EU sets date for common phone charge cable"

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-61720276

    Are they, once again, behind the curve? My car has a wireless charging cradle and we have one in the living room and bedroom because it will do my wife’s Samsung and my iPhone. They’re now spreading in public.
    I am totally in favour of standardisation. This helps.

    Next step, power outlets - total nonsense.



    I'm surprised India, Australia and NZ aren't using Type G.
    Parts of Anglophone Africa do, other bits use the South African plug, which I cannot see listed.
This discussion has been closed.