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These are the numbers that should really panic Number 10 – politicalbetting.com

SystemSystem Posts: 8,489
edited June 5 in General
imageThese are the numbers that should really panic Number 10 – politicalbetting.com

Every month as we all know the website Conservativehome carries out a survey of its party member readers to find out their views including the regular cabinet satisfaction ratings.

Read the full story here

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Comments

  • DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 13,821
    As suggested at the time, Number 10 destroying heir-apparent Rishi Sunak may have been a pyrrhic victory endangering Boris by giving every other would-be heir or faction a realistic chance of victory.
  • StereodogStereodog Posts: 265
    The weird thing about this poll is that Johnson is rated so low yet ministers such as Barclay and Braverman who exist only to enable and apologise for him are rated highly.
  • Andy_JSAndy_JS Posts: 17,019
    "Several Tory MPs told the Guardian they believed the threshold of 54 letters withdrawing support for Johnson was close to being crossed – or may have been already."

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2022/may/30/johnson-lurch-to-right-adds-momentum-leadership-vote
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 39,603
    Stereodog said:

    The weird thing about this poll is that Johnson is rated so low yet ministers such as Barclay and Braverman who exist only to enable and apologise for him are rated highly.

    The weird thing about the poll is those being polled.
    Considering that, no irrational result should be surprising.
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 39,603
    Report from Kharkiv on Putin’s war on civilians.
    https://www.economist.com/europe/2022/05/29/how-war-has-changed-ukraines-second-city
    … Quick thinking saved the first-year psychology student from probable death: she ran from her kitchen to the bathroom as soon as she heard the first thuds. By the time the artillery reached her flat on Shakespeare Street on the afternoon of May 26th, slicing through the сhestnut trees to land outside her window, Ms Rebenko was two walls away from the impact. She walked away with minor cuts. At least nine others ended up in the morgue. Dina Kirsanova, a shopkeeper at a milk kiosk near the 23 August metro station, the main target of the strikes, saw at least 15 missiles in the sky. Air defences intercepted most of them, she said, preventing even greater loss of life: “It’s beyond cruel. There are no military positions here. Just simple people, trying to survive.”..

    More propaganda, @Luckyguy1983 ?
  • HeathenerHeathener Posts: 3,156
    edited May 31
    ON topic, great thread and shocking figures for Johnson. They tally with that BBC report. One MP received 7 constituency emails complaining about him submitting a letter of no confidence.

    And 479 saying 'good on you.'

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-61627796

    People are furious and hurt. Only a change of leadership will staunch this wound.

  • HeathenerHeathener Posts: 3,156

    As suggested at the time, Number 10 destroying heir-apparent Rishi Sunak may have been a pyrrhic victory endangering Boris by giving every other would-be heir or faction a realistic chance of victory.

    Good point!
  • noneoftheabovenoneoftheabove Posts: 14,139
    Stereodog said:

    The weird thing about this poll is that Johnson is rated so low yet ministers such as Barclay and Braverman who exist only to enable and apologise for him are rated highly.

    I actually think Barclay is a very good politician. Braverman is popular because she is willing to ignore the law to support the Mail and Express' fantasies.
  • HeathenerHeathener Posts: 3,156
    edited May 31
    Good piece on Johnson's 'red meat policy' lurch to the right:

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2022/may/30/johnsons-red-meat-policy-proposals-are-telling-of-his-insecurity

    "It is a moment often seen in the downward trajectory of embattled prime ministers: a whirl of new policy ideas intended to appeal to voters, but which are in fact more often aimed at placating their own MPs. Boris Johnson is, some would argue, approaching this point.

    In recent days Downing Street has briefed in favour of grammar schools and imperial measurements. Earlier weeks saw forays into other Conservative comfort zones, including bashing the EU and talking up fossil fuels.

    Such nostalgia politics is routinely promoted by Conservative backbenchers. But it is one of the paradoxes of Tory party politics that the more secure a prime minister is in office, the less they have to indulge these ideas."
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 39,603
    This should be of huge significance. While it’s a compromise to accommodate Russia friendly Hungary, it affects two thirds or more of oil exports to the EU.

    EU leaders agree to partial embargo of Russian oil imports
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/may/30/eu-nears-compromise-agreement-for-partial-ban-on-russian-oil
  • swing_voterswing_voter Posts: 1,191

    As suggested at the time, Number 10 destroying heir-apparent Rishi Sunak may have been a pyrrhic victory endangering Boris by giving every other would-be heir or faction a realistic chance of victory.

    The moment to move (if they choose to) is close - we are on the edge of June and if the Conservatives want a new leader by conference they need to move in June. I cant imagine the mentality of Tory MPs, they used to be ruthless in their pursuit of retaining power - are they really that fearful of Big Dog?
  • IshmaelZIshmaelZ Posts: 17,005
    edited May 31
    Heathener said:

    ON topic, great thread and shocking figures for Johnson. They tally with that BBC report. One MP received 7 constituency emails complaining about him submitting a letter of no confidence.

    And 479 saying 'good on you.'

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-61627796

    People are furious and hurt. Only a change of leadership will staunch this wound.

    Good

    Public service announcement: if you have a Tory mp find their website and write to them today.
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 39,603
    Some reports that Biden has approved the supply of MRLS to Ukraine (probably limited to systems with 70km range missiles).
    Would also be of big significance in countering Russia’s artillery advantage.
  • RochdalePioneersRochdalePioneers Posts: 18,484
    Some of the people highly ranked on that list:
    Braverman - who appears to be a pretend AG who disregards basics like the rule of law and foams on about Stalin
    Clarke - who you know is lying because he's been sent on the morning TV round to defend whatever nonsense position Number 10 will have abandoned by lunchtime
    Rees-Mogg - we can't implement the Brexit deal I have passionately championed as it would be self-harm
    Dorries - privatising Channel 4 in the mistaken belief it receives public funds

    What a state the Tory Party is in if they rate *that*
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 39,007
    Nigelb said:

    Report from Kharkiv on Putin’s war on civilians.
    https://www.economist.com/europe/2022/05/29/how-war-has-changed-ukraines-second-city
    … Quick thinking saved the first-year psychology student from probable death: she ran from her kitchen to the bathroom as soon as she heard the first thuds. By the time the artillery reached her flat on Shakespeare Street on the afternoon of May 26th, slicing through the сhestnut trees to land outside her window, Ms Rebenko was two walls away from the impact. She walked away with minor cuts. At least nine others ended up in the morgue. Dina Kirsanova, a shopkeeper at a milk kiosk near the 23 August metro station, the main target of the strikes, saw at least 15 missiles in the sky. Air defences intercepted most of them, she said, preventing even greater loss of life: “It’s beyond cruel. There are no military positions here. Just simple people, trying to survive.”..

    More propaganda, Luckyguy1983 ?

    Civilians do appear to be targets for the Russians - which is odd, given that his stated aim is to liberate them from the Nazis. Not sure how killing them helps with that.
  • DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 13,821
    Heathener said:

    As suggested at the time, Number 10 destroying heir-apparent Rishi Sunak may have been a pyrrhic victory endangering Boris by giving every other would-be heir or faction a realistic chance of victory.

    Good point!
    In the words of Keir Starmer at PMQs last week, hindsight is a wonderful thing!
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 39,007
    Nigelb said:

    This should be of huge significance. While it’s a compromise to accommodate Russia friendly Hungary, it affects two thirds or more of oil exports to the EU.

    EU leaders agree to partial embargo of Russian oil imports
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/may/30/eu-nears-compromise-agreement-for-partial-ban-on-russian-oil

    Will wait for the full details of the final agreement, but this does appear to be good news on the face of it. Germany and Hungary isolated by the willingness of others to cut off Putin’s supply of foreign currency.
  • StillWatersStillWaters Posts: 1,913
    Nigelb said:

    This should be of huge significance. While it’s a compromise to accommodate Russia friendly Hungary, it affects two thirds or more of oil exports to the EU.

    EU leaders agree to partial embargo of Russian oil imports
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/may/30/eu-nears-compromise-agreement-for-partial-ban-on-russian-oil

    God make me good… but not yet

    I’ll do something in 7 months time and only have a few small loopholes. But I promise I’m not talking out of both sides of my mouth
  • SouthamObserverSouthamObserver Posts: 36,679
    Nigelb said:

    This should be of huge significance. While it’s a compromise to accommodate Russia friendly Hungary, it affects two thirds or more of oil exports to the EU.

    EU leaders agree to partial embargo of Russian oil imports
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/may/30/eu-nears-compromise-agreement-for-partial-ban-on-russian-oil

    Who could possibly have imagined that Viktor Orban - the man who destroyed Hungarian democracy, the darling of the right in the UK and the US - would turn out to be Putin's principal European ally?

  • geoffwgeoffw Posts: 6,354
    Nigelb said:

    This should be of huge significance. While it’s a compromise to accommodate Russia friendly Hungary, it affects two thirds or more of oil exports to the EU.

    EU leaders agree to partial embargo of Russian oil imports
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/may/30/eu-nears-compromise-agreement-for-partial-ban-on-russian-oil

    Nevertheless they will be importing oil from somewhere and the oil market is a global market. Russia can sell its oil elsewhere, just with a bit of inconvenience. An ineffective policy masquerading as 'something' for the something-must-be-done mindset. Gas is different.
  • HeathenerHeathener Posts: 3,156

    As suggested at the time, Number 10 destroying heir-apparent Rishi Sunak may have been a pyrrhic victory endangering Boris by giving every other would-be heir or faction a realistic chance of victory.

    The moment to move (if they choose to) is close - we are on the edge of June and if the Conservatives want a new leader by conference they need to move in June. I cant imagine the mentality of Tory MPs, they used to be ruthless in their pursuit of retaining power - are they really that fearful of Big Dog?
    Yes I think this is 'it'. Now or never, 'now' being through to end of June after the by-elections.

    Expect really nasty tactics from team Dog Turd. Everything under the sun short of murder.
  • OldKingColeOldKingCole Posts: 28,169
    I suppose one redeeming feature of the chart is that Priti Patel is right at the bottom!
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 48,722

    The queues we are seeing at the UK's airports currently tell you so much about how crap senior managements often are in the private sector. They took a short-term decision to save money during covid by laying off a shedload of staff and are now inflicting the inevitable long-term consequences of that on their customers. It's the British business malaise laid bear - we are incapable of seeing beyond the end of our noses. We lionise those who cut costs as people who take the hard decisions. But there is nothing tough about doing it. It's easy. Any fool can do it. But there is almost always a price to pay. As ever, the idea that the private sector knows best is revealed by real life to be a load of old pony.

    although that doesn’t preclude the possibility that the public sector is even worse, of course.
  • geoffwgeoffw Posts: 6,354
    IshmaelZ said:

    Heathener said:

    ON topic, great thread and shocking figures for Johnson. They tally with that BBC report. One MP received 7 constituency emails complaining about him submitting a letter of no confidence.

    And 479 saying 'good on you.'

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-61627796

    People are furious and hurt. Only a change of leadership will staunch this wound.

    Good

    Public service announcement: if you have a Tory mp find their website and write to them today.
    Disinterested post from dispassionate observer with no skin in the game. O yes!

  • HeathenerHeathener Posts: 3,156
    edited May 31

    . As ever, the idea that the private sector knows best is revealed by real life to be a load of old pony.

    Setting sail with the bow doors open is the one that dropped the scales from my capitalist eyes. The 'Herald of Free Enterprise'. God, what a bitter irony.

    I knew at that moment that the private sector was all-too-capable of making appalling decisions, sometimes at the expense of people's lives.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 32,311
    edited May 31
    Nigelb said:

    Report from Kharkiv on Putin’s war on civilians.
    https://www.economist.com/europe/2022/05/29/how-war-has-changed-ukraines-second-city
    … Quick thinking saved the first-year psychology student from probable death: she ran from her kitchen to the bathroom as soon as she heard the first thuds. By the time the artillery reached her flat on Shakespeare Street on the afternoon of May 26th, slicing through the сhestnut trees to land outside her window, Ms Rebenko was two walls away from the impact. She walked away with minor cuts. At least nine others ended up in the morgue. Dina Kirsanova, a shopkeeper at a milk kiosk near the 23 August metro station, the main target of the strikes, saw at least 15 missiles in the sky. Air defences intercepted most of them, she said, preventing even greater loss of life: “It’s beyond cruel. There are no military positions here. Just simple people, trying to survive.”..

    More propaganda, @Luckyguy1983 ?

    Its a good article. Kharkiv has lost half its population, and will take years to recover.

    As we seem to be in a more attritional phase of the war, the battle of economics and war of materials becomes significant. Who can sustain the fight longer?

    Russia seems casual in its use of artillery to take control of rubble, but Ukraine is less willing to do so to its own cities for obvious reasons. Retaking them without destroying them is not an easy feat, unless the Russians retreat like they did from Kyiv, Sumy and Chernyiv, which doesn't seem likely at present.
  • swing_voterswing_voter Posts: 1,191

    Nigelb said:

    This should be of huge significance. While it’s a compromise to accommodate Russia friendly Hungary, it affects two thirds or more of oil exports to the EU.

    EU leaders agree to partial embargo of Russian oil imports
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/may/30/eu-nears-compromise-agreement-for-partial-ban-on-russian-oil

    Who could possibly have imagined that Viktor Orban - the man who destroyed Hungarian democracy, the darling of the right in the UK and the US - would turn out to be Putin's principal European ally?

    I'm trying to see it from the Hungarian perspective- all their infrastrtucture is geared towards Russian oil (so turning it off is not like the UK or France), they have absorbed millions of refugees and are struggling economically - is it any wonder why they cannot stop importing oil... I'm not sure the UK would have done so under the same conditions.
  • boulayboulay Posts: 1,143

    Some of the people highly ranked on that list:
    Braverman - who appears to be a pretend AG who disregards basics like the rule of law and foams on about Stalin
    Clarke - who you know is lying because he's been sent on the morning TV round to defend whatever nonsense position Number 10 will have abandoned by lunchtime
    Rees-Mogg - we can't implement the Brexit deal I have passionately championed as it would be self-harm
    Dorries - privatising Channel 4 in the mistaken belief it receives public funds

    What a state the Tory Party is in if they rate *that*

    I was thinking this morning whilst slowly waking up (and I clearly need help if that what I’m thinking about at that time) who would be an ideal Tory cabinet regardless of who is PM.

    Clearly if Boris goes then whoever comes in is likely to put “their” guys in but if it was a fantasy football type game I was trying to work out who would fit where.

    For example I thought that Sunak would probably be a good Foreign sec. He’s an intelligent, successful chap. Presents to the outside world quite a good reflection of what the UK can be (successful child of immigrants), global person and would work well in Washington m, Delhi, developing countries.

    Hunt in health as he gets a second bite of the cherry having probably learnt a lot since and can mix the scales lifting from his eyes with experience of the department.

    Alex Chalk from solicitor general to AG as right experience for role and can’t be worse than Braverman.

    Mordant to defence of Wallace PM otherwise Wallace stay at defence.

    Nadine Dorries in space cannon to Mars.

    I know it’s all pointless but wondered if it was possible to make a fantasy cabinet regardless of factions.
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 39,007
    edited May 31

    The queues we are seeing at the UK's airports currently tell you so much about how crap senior managements often are in the private sector. They took a short-term decision to save money during covid by laying off a shedload of staff and are now inflicting the inevitable long-term consequences of that on their customers. It's the British business malaise laid bear - we are incapable of seeing beyond the end of our noses. We lionise those who cut costs as people who take the hard decisions. But there is nothing tough about doing it. It's easy. Any fool can do it. But there is almost always a price to pay. As ever, the idea that the private sector knows best is revealed by real life to be a load of old pony.

    Not just the private sector - see NHS for details - and not just in Britain.

    I am aware of an airline that laid off a couple of hundred A380 captains during the pandemic - and is now discovering that A380 captains don’t grow on trees, doubly so when offering less money than before the pandemic.
  • IshmaelZIshmaelZ Posts: 17,005
    "I'm not leaving until the bailiffs come". That was the latest email sent to me from a tenant. This is the third tenant this year I am evicting due to rent arrears.

    In my entire landlord career of 20 years, I have never seen an environment turn so quickly and so badly – and that includes the financial crisis and pandemic. The amount of money owed in rental arrears is in the thousands of pounds and quickly rising. Supposedly good tenants are souring quickly and I am left wondering who I can trust."

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/buy-to-let/had-evict-three-tenants-year-going-get-worse/

    very very ominous
  • RochdalePioneersRochdalePioneers Posts: 18,484

    The queues we are seeing at the UK's airports currently tell you so much about how crap senior managements often are in the private sector. They took a short-term decision to save money during covid by laying off a shedload of staff and are now inflicting the inevitable long-term consequences of that on their customers. It's the British business malaise laid bear - we are incapable of seeing beyond the end of our noses. We lionise those who cut costs as people who take the hard decisions. But there is nothing tough about doing it. It's easy. Any fool can do it. But there is almost always a price to pay. As ever, the idea that the private sector knows best is revealed by real life to be a load of old pony.

    I can understand the need for a business to lay off a chunk of its staff in a downturn. There's no work for you - sorry - so here's some cash to go away and when things pick up replacement hires are easy. Harder to justify if its a megabucks company, much easier if its small and on the brink.

    But the play only works if "replacement hires are easy". And what seems to have caught the airport companies with their pants down is the new environment we find ourselves in post-Covid. A whole stack of people - 610k - have decided they may as well stop working completely. Which means big pockets of unfillable jobs in key sectors in certain places.

    Which is how we find ourselves here - airports unable to hire the staff they need to function as an airport. As the likes of Manchestoh Airport are council owned and have had months I assume this isn't a salary issue as they must have been offering more and more money to bring in anyone they can get. So its conditions - people just don't want to do the work, don't need to do the work as other jobs available, and likely some could be tempted but shift work and they have kids.

    Manchester Airport - to take one example - was not a small business on the brink. It could have kept all its staff on, but chose not to. Because staff are disposable and can easily be replaced. Can't they? Better treatment and relations with staff equals a better job being done equals happier customers. Why haven't companies understood this?
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 32,311
    geoffw said:

    Nigelb said:

    This should be of huge significance. While it’s a compromise to accommodate Russia friendly Hungary, it affects two thirds or more of oil exports to the EU.

    EU leaders agree to partial embargo of Russian oil imports
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/may/30/eu-nears-compromise-agreement-for-partial-ban-on-russian-oil

    Nevertheless they will be importing oil from somewhere and the oil market is a global market. Russia can sell its oil elsewhere, just with a bit of inconvenience. An ineffective policy masquerading as 'something' for the something-must-be-done mindset. Gas is different.
    One difficulty is that dislike of what Russia is doing is mostly a European and North American thing. Africa, Middle East and Latin America are more mixed in opinion, and India remains pro-Russian.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/may/30/negative-views-of-russia-mainly-limited-to-western-liberal-democracies-poll-shows?utm_term=Autofeed&CMP=twt_b-gdnnews&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Twitter#Echobox=1653885569
  • Big_G_NorthWalesBig_G_NorthWales Posts: 52,189

    The queues we are seeing at the UK's airports currently tell you so much about how crap senior managements often are in the private sector. They took a short-term decision to save money during covid by laying off a shedload of staff and are now inflicting the inevitable long-term consequences of that on their customers. It's the British business malaise laid bear - we are incapable of seeing beyond the end of our noses. We lionise those who cut costs as people who take the hard decisions. But there is nothing tough about doing it. It's easy. Any fool can do it. But there is almost always a price to pay. As ever, the idea that the private sector knows best is revealed by real life to be a load of old pony.

    Good morning

    Apparently Dublin, Schipol, and US airports were all chaotic as well and it is rather simplistic to suggest this is only a UK problem

    It is clearly far wider spread than that
  • RochdalePioneersRochdalePioneers Posts: 18,484
    boulay said:

    Some of the people highly ranked on that list:
    Braverman - who appears to be a pretend AG who disregards basics like the rule of law and foams on about Stalin
    Clarke - who you know is lying because he's been sent on the morning TV round to defend whatever nonsense position Number 10 will have abandoned by lunchtime
    Rees-Mogg - we can't implement the Brexit deal I have passionately championed as it would be self-harm
    Dorries - privatising Channel 4 in the mistaken belief it receives public funds

    What a state the Tory Party is in if they rate *that*

    I was thinking this morning whilst slowly waking up (and I clearly need help if that what I’m thinking about at that time) who would be an ideal Tory cabinet regardless of who is PM.

    Clearly if Boris goes then whoever comes in is likely to put “their” guys in but if it was a fantasy football type game I was trying to work out who would fit where.

    For example I thought that Sunak would probably be a good Foreign sec. He’s an intelligent, successful chap. Presents to the outside world quite a good reflection of what the UK can be (successful child of immigrants), global person and would work well in Washington m, Delhi, developing countries.

    Hunt in health as he gets a second bite of the cherry having probably learnt a lot since and can mix the scales lifting from his eyes with experience of the department.

    Alex Chalk from solicitor general to AG as right experience for role and can’t be worse than Braverman.

    Mordant to defence of Wallace PM otherwise Wallace stay at defence.

    Nadine Dorries in space cannon to Mars.

    I know it’s all pointless but wondered if it was possible to make a fantasy cabinet regardless of factions.
    "Space cannon to Mars".

    Great idea! Elon Musk probably needs a test article for his new rocket.
  • HeathenerHeathener Posts: 3,156
    edited May 31
    Sandpit said:

    The queues we are seeing at the UK's airports currently tell you so much about how crap senior managements often are in the private sector. They took a short-term decision to save money during covid by laying off a shedload of staff and are now inflicting the inevitable long-term consequences of that on their customers. It's the British business malaise laid bear - we are incapable of seeing beyond the end of our noses. We lionise those who cut costs as people who take the hard decisions. But there is nothing tough about doing it. It's easy. Any fool can do it. But there is almost always a price to pay. As ever, the idea that the private sector knows best is revealed by real life to be a load of old pony.

    Not just the private sector, and not just in Britain.

    I am aware of an airline that laid off a couple of hundred A380 captains during the pandemic - and is now discovering that A380 captains don’t grow on trees, doubly so when offering less money than before the pandemic.
    Emirates also parked most of those A380's in the desert and have had no end of problems as a result: overheating, sand, electrical issues.

    I know it's state owned but very much run as a private sector company really, no? With a Brit at the helm of course.

  • MattWMattW Posts: 13,836
    Morning all.

    Some of the people highly ranked on that list:
    Braverman - who appears to be a pretend AG who disregards basics like the rule of law and foams on about Stalin

    What's this Stalin thing about? I must have missed that.
  • geoffwgeoffw Posts: 6,354
    Foxy said:

    geoffw said:

    Nigelb said:

    This should be of huge significance. While it’s a compromise to accommodate Russia friendly Hungary, it affects two thirds or more of oil exports to the EU.

    EU leaders agree to partial embargo of Russian oil imports
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/may/30/eu-nears-compromise-agreement-for-partial-ban-on-russian-oil

    Nevertheless they will be importing oil from somewhere and the oil market is a global market. Russia can sell its oil elsewhere, just with a bit of inconvenience. An ineffective policy masquerading as 'something' for the something-must-be-done mindset. Gas is different.
    One difficulty is that dislike of what Russia is doing is mostly a European and North American thing. Africa, Middle East and Latin America are more mixed in opinion, and India remains pro-Russian.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/may/30/negative-views-of-russia-mainly-limited-to-western-liberal-democracies-poll-shows?utm_term=Autofeed&CMP=twt_b-gdnnews&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Twitter#Echobox=1653885569
    My enemy's enemy is my friend is the prevailing attitude of "anti-colonialists". They don't care about the rights and wrongs of an unprovoked invasion of a peaceful country.

  • HeathenerHeathener Posts: 3,156
    IshmaelZ said:

    "I'm not leaving until the bailiffs come". That was the latest email sent to me from a tenant. This is the third tenant this year I am evicting due to rent arrears.

    How nasty of you
  • IshmaelZIshmaelZ Posts: 17,005
    geoffw said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    Heathener said:

    ON topic, great thread and shocking figures for Johnson. They tally with that BBC report. One MP received 7 constituency emails complaining about him submitting a letter of no confidence.

    And 479 saying 'good on you.'

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-61627796

    People are furious and hurt. Only a change of leadership will staunch this wound.

    Good

    Public service announcement: if you have a Tory mp find their website and write to them today.
    Disinterested post from dispassionate observer with no skin in the game. O yes!
    The skin I have in the game is, I live here. The Bojo to go market has stayed irrational longer than I have stayed solvent, though, OK, I think I clean up on a free £10 bet at 4/1 if he goes this year.
  • RochdalePioneersRochdalePioneers Posts: 18,484
    IshmaelZ said:

    "I'm not leaving until the bailiffs come". That was the latest email sent to me from a tenant. This is the third tenant this year I am evicting due to rent arrears.

    In my entire landlord career of 20 years, I have never seen an environment turn so quickly and so badly – and that includes the financial crisis and pandemic. The amount of money owed in rental arrears is in the thousands of pounds and quickly rising. Supposedly good tenants are souring quickly and I am left wondering who I can trust."

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/buy-to-let/had-evict-three-tenants-year-going-get-worse/

    very very ominous

    The really ominous bit is when they point out that selling up and getting out of the business is the only sensible move. Which takes properties out of the rental market. And both pushes up rental prices even more and reduces supply. So we're back facing houses empty and people not having anywhere to live.
  • IshmaelZIshmaelZ Posts: 17,005
    Heathener said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    "I'm not leaving until the bailiffs come". That was the latest email sent to me from a tenant. This is the third tenant this year I am evicting due to rent arrears.

    How nasty of you
    Only sort of language these people understand

    Not a joking matter though. Winter with homelessness and fuel crises and food unaffordable.
  • HeathenerHeathener Posts: 3,156
    boulay said:

    Some of the people highly ranked on that list:
    Braverman - who appears to be a pretend AG who disregards basics like the rule of law and foams on about Stalin
    Clarke - who you know is lying because he's been sent on the morning TV round to defend whatever nonsense position Number 10 will have abandoned by lunchtime
    Rees-Mogg - we can't implement the Brexit deal I have passionately championed as it would be self-harm
    Dorries - privatising Channel 4 in the mistaken belief it receives public funds

    What a state the Tory Party is in if they rate *that*

    I was thinking this morning whilst slowly waking up (and I clearly need help if that what I’m thinking about at that time) who would be an ideal Tory cabinet regardless of who is PM.

    Mordant to defence of Wallace PM otherwise Wallace stay at defence.
    Penny Mordaunt was superb in Defence before. Had the credentials.

    It's typically vindictive and insecure of Boris Johnson to have her removed because she didn't kneel down and perform fellatio on him.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 32,311
    edited May 31
    geoffw said:

    Foxy said:

    geoffw said:

    Nigelb said:

    This should be of huge significance. While it’s a compromise to accommodate Russia friendly Hungary, it affects two thirds or more of oil exports to the EU.

    EU leaders agree to partial embargo of Russian oil imports
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/may/30/eu-nears-compromise-agreement-for-partial-ban-on-russian-oil

    Nevertheless they will be importing oil from somewhere and the oil market is a global market. Russia can sell its oil elsewhere, just with a bit of inconvenience. An ineffective policy masquerading as 'something' for the something-must-be-done mindset. Gas is different.
    One difficulty is that dislike of what Russia is doing is mostly a European and North American thing. Africa, Middle East and Latin America are more mixed in opinion, and India remains pro-Russian.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/may/30/negative-views-of-russia-mainly-limited-to-western-liberal-democracies-poll-shows?utm_term=Autofeed&CMP=twt_b-gdnnews&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Twitter#Echobox=1653885569
    My enemy's enemy is my friend is the prevailing attitude of "anti-colonialists". They don't care about the rights and wrongs of an unprovoked invasion of a peaceful country.

    Yes, though I would understand from India a dislike of invasion and occupation accompanied by famine.

    The practical issue though is that these countries will not support tough sanctions on Russia. Indeed would Britons be keen if they made the mental connection between sanctions and the price of their heating?
  • RochdalePioneersRochdalePioneers Posts: 18,484
    MattW said:

    Morning all.

    Some of the people highly ranked on that list:
    Braverman - who appears to be a pretend AG who disregards basics like the rule of law and foams on about Stalin

    What's this Stalin thing about? I must have missed that.
    Last week at AG's Questions. Emily Thornberry asks a question about if the AG never comments on her advise why two newspapers were copying from it verbatim and did she she leak it yes or no? Braverman starts a rambling non-answer. Thornberry says "yes or no" a few times from a sedentary position on the opposition front bench.

    At which point Braverman unleashes her inner Patel and starts snarling on about patriotism, ending by saying her heroes are Churchill and Thatcher and that Thornberry's are "Corbyn and Stalin". At which point she firmly gets told to sit down and shut up by Madam Deputy Speaker.
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 39,007
    IshmaelZ said:

    "I'm not leaving until the bailiffs come". That was the latest email sent to me from a tenant. This is the third tenant this year I am evicting due to rent arrears.

    In my entire landlord career of 20 years, I have never seen an environment turn so quickly and so badly – and that includes the financial crisis and pandemic. The amount of money owed in rental arrears is in the thousands of pounds and quickly rising. Supposedly good tenants are souring quickly and I am left wondering who I can trust."

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/buy-to-let/had-evict-three-tenants-year-going-get-worse/

    very very ominous

    That’s worrying, especially that this downturn doesn’t appear (yet!) to have high unemployment associated with it.

    Is it a warning of unemployment to come, or is it a regulatory issue, that tenants have collectively realised they can get away for months without paying rent before they get evicted?
  • MattWMattW Posts: 13,836
    OT: I see that Chinese researchers have (says the BBC R4 this morning) shown that drinking coffee means fewer people die.

    So I've had an extra double espresso this AM so I live a bit longer.

    I wonder of China has done a deal with Brazil?

    (Done using some NHS data, so expect the 'Tories privatizing the NHS' conspiraloons to be out to play.)
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 32,311
    Heathener said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    "I'm not leaving until the bailiffs come". That was the latest email sent to me from a tenant. This is the third tenant this year I am evicting due to rent arrears.

    How nasty of you
    A quote from the article, not from our porcine poster, I think.
  • HeathenerHeathener Posts: 3,156
    edited May 31
    IshmaelZ said:

    Heathener said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    "I'm not leaving until the bailiffs come". That was the latest email sent to me from a tenant. This is the third tenant this year I am evicting due to rent arrears.

    How nasty of you
    Only sort of language these people understand

    Not a joking matter though. Winter with homelessness and fuel crises and food unaffordable.
    Edit
  • HeathenerHeathener Posts: 3,156
    Foxy said:

    Heathener said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    "I'm not leaving until the bailiffs come". That was the latest email sent to me from a tenant. This is the third tenant this year I am evicting due to rent arrears.

    How nasty of you
    A quote from the article, not from our porcine poster, I think.
    Oh. Oooops.

    Sorry.
  • HeathenerHeathener Posts: 3,156
    Ishmael apologies: I thought that was you. It was a quote from the article.

    Doh.
  • bondegezoubondegezou Posts: 1,082
    geoffw said:

    Foxy said:

    geoffw said:

    Nigelb said:

    This should be of huge significance. While it’s a compromise to accommodate Russia friendly Hungary, it affects two thirds or more of oil exports to the EU.

    EU leaders agree to partial embargo of Russian oil imports
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/may/30/eu-nears-compromise-agreement-for-partial-ban-on-russian-oil

    Nevertheless they will be importing oil from somewhere and the oil market is a global market. Russia can sell its oil elsewhere, just with a bit of inconvenience. An ineffective policy masquerading as 'something' for the something-must-be-done mindset. Gas is different.
    One difficulty is that dislike of what Russia is doing is mostly a European and North American thing. Africa, Middle East and Latin America are more mixed in opinion, and India remains pro-Russian.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/may/30/negative-views-of-russia-mainly-limited-to-western-liberal-democracies-poll-shows?utm_term=Autofeed&CMP=twt_b-gdnnews&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Twitter#Echobox=1653885569
    My enemy's enemy is my friend is the prevailing attitude of "anti-colonialists". They don't care about the rights and wrongs of an unprovoked invasion of a peaceful country.

    I think anti-colonialists care deeply about the wrongs of an unprovoked invasion of a peaceful country, specifically their own peaceful country that was invaded without provocation by an imperial power. I think they should care more about the imperialist invasion of Ukraine by Russia, but I can understand if they have a different perspective on the topic than the West.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 32,311
    Sandpit said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    "I'm not leaving until the bailiffs come". That was the latest email sent to me from a tenant. This is the third tenant this year I am evicting due to rent arrears.

    In my entire landlord career of 20 years, I have never seen an environment turn so quickly and so badly – and that includes the financial crisis and pandemic. The amount of money owed in rental arrears is in the thousands of pounds and quickly rising. Supposedly good tenants are souring quickly and I am left wondering who I can trust."

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/buy-to-let/had-evict-three-tenants-year-going-get-worse/

    very very ominous

    That’s worrying, especially that this downturn doesn’t appear (yet!) to have high unemployment associated with it.

    Is it a warning of unemployment to come, or is it a regulatory issue, that tenants have collectively realised they can get away for months without paying rent before they get evicted?
    Or is it that their other bills have gone so high that they cannot pay them all, and have defaulted on the rent.
  • RochdalePioneersRochdalePioneers Posts: 18,484

    The queues we are seeing at the UK's airports currently tell you so much about how crap senior managements often are in the private sector. They took a short-term decision to save money during covid by laying off a shedload of staff and are now inflicting the inevitable long-term consequences of that on their customers. It's the British business malaise laid bear - we are incapable of seeing beyond the end of our noses. We lionise those who cut costs as people who take the hard decisions. But there is nothing tough about doing it. It's easy. Any fool can do it. But there is almost always a price to pay. As ever, the idea that the private sector knows best is revealed by real life to be a load of old pony.

    I can understand the need for a business to lay off a chunk of its staff in a downturn. There's no work for you - sorry - so here's some cash to go away and when things pick up replacement hires are easy. Harder to justify if its a megabucks company, much easier if its small and on the brink.

    But the play only works if "replacement hires are easy". And what seems to have caught the airport companies with their pants down is the new environment we find ourselves in post-Covid. A whole stack of people - 610k - have decided they may as well stop working completely. Which means big pockets of unfillable jobs in key sectors in certain places.

    Which is how we find ourselves here - airports unable to hire the staff they need to function as an airport. As the likes of Manchestoh Airport are council owned and have had months I assume this isn't a salary issue as they must have been offering more and more money to bring in anyone they can get. So its conditions - people just don't want to do the work, don't need to do the work as other jobs available, and likely some could be tempted but shift work and they have kids.

    Manchester Airport - to take one example - was not a small business on the brink. It could have kept all its staff on, but chose not to. Because staff are disposable and can easily be replaced. Can't they? Better treatment and relations with staff equals a better job being done equals happier customers. Why haven't companies understood this?

    The relentless short-termism is so depressingly self-destructive. Cutting staff numbers is always described as "tough". Those who do it are lionised as hard-headed business pragmatists, willing to make the difficult calls. That they never think through the consequences of such decisions gets much less attention.

    I've been in the position of being the senior manager saying "we need to cut staff" - the choice was reduce the wage bill or fold very quickly. Then furlough came along and I was the senior manager banging the drum to put most people onto it. Including myself. And when that didn't work I recommended we cut staff. Myself included.

    I know that some companies have this cycle of "fire people and make those who are left work harder". But for many during the last 2 years the choice was fire / furlough or fold. But that doesn't include the likes of Manchester Airport who could have kept people on and then been able to function when the recovery came.
  • geoffwgeoffw Posts: 6,354
    Foxy said:

    geoffw said:

    Foxy said:

    geoffw said:

    Nigelb said:

    This should be of huge significance. While it’s a compromise to accommodate Russia friendly Hungary, it affects two thirds or more of oil exports to the EU.

    EU leaders agree to partial embargo of Russian oil imports
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/may/30/eu-nears-compromise-agreement-for-partial-ban-on-russian-oil

    Nevertheless they will be importing oil from somewhere and the oil market is a global market. Russia can sell its oil elsewhere, just with a bit of inconvenience. An ineffective policy masquerading as 'something' for the something-must-be-done mindset. Gas is different.
    One difficulty is that dislike of what Russia is doing is mostly a European and North American thing. Africa, Middle East and Latin America are more mixed in opinion, and India remains pro-Russian.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/may/30/negative-views-of-russia-mainly-limited-to-western-liberal-democracies-poll-shows?utm_term=Autofeed&CMP=twt_b-gdnnews&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Twitter#Echobox=1653885569
    My enemy's enemy is my friend is the prevailing attitude of "anti-colonialists". They don't care about the rights and wrongs of an unprovoked invasion of a peaceful country.

    Yes, though I would understand from India a dislike of invasion and occupation accompanied by famine.

    The practical issue though is that these countries will not support tough sanctions on Russia. Indeed would Britons be keen if they made the mental connection between sanctions and the price of their heating?
    "would Britons …" , moreso than Germans it seems.

  • SouthamObserverSouthamObserver Posts: 36,679
    Sandpit said:

    The queues we are seeing at the UK's airports currently tell you so much about how crap senior managements often are in the private sector. They took a short-term decision to save money during covid by laying off a shedload of staff and are now inflicting the inevitable long-term consequences of that on their customers. It's the British business malaise laid bear - we are incapable of seeing beyond the end of our noses. We lionise those who cut costs as people who take the hard decisions. But there is nothing tough about doing it. It's easy. Any fool can do it. But there is almost always a price to pay. As ever, the idea that the private sector knows best is revealed by real life to be a load of old pony.

    Not just the private sector - see NHS for details - and not just in Britain.

    I am aware of an airline that laid off a couple of hundred A380 captains during the pandemic - and is now discovering that A380 captains don’t grow on trees, doubly so when offering less money than before the pandemic.

    In this country we seem to believe that even public sector organisations should be run like businesses. That's where we start to go wrong - especially when so many businesses are so badly run.

  • IshmaelZIshmaelZ Posts: 17,005
    Foxy said:

    Heathener said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    "I'm not leaving until the bailiffs come". That was the latest email sent to me from a tenant. This is the third tenant this year I am evicting due to rent arrears.

    How nasty of you
    A quote from the article, not from our porcine poster, I think.
    Shit, I thought she was joking. I would never in a m years be a landlord precisely because I could never do that to anyone.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 48,722
    boulay said:

    Some of the people highly ranked on that list:
    Braverman - who appears to be a pretend AG who disregards basics like the rule of law and foams on about Stalin
    Clarke - who you know is lying because he's been sent on the morning TV round to defend whatever nonsense position Number 10 will have abandoned by lunchtime
    Rees-Mogg - we can't implement the Brexit deal I have passionately championed as it would be self-harm
    Dorries - privatising Channel 4 in the mistaken belief it receives public funds

    What a state the Tory Party is in if they rate *that*

    I was thinking this morning whilst slowly waking up (and I clearly need help if that what I’m thinking about at that time) who would be an ideal Tory cabinet regardless of who is PM.

    Clearly if Boris goes then whoever comes in is likely to put “their” guys in but if it was a fantasy football type game I was trying to work out who would fit where.

    For example I thought that Sunak would probably be a good Foreign sec. He’s an intelligent, successful chap. Presents to the outside world quite a good reflection of what the UK can be (successful child of immigrants), global person and would work well in Washington m, Delhi, developing countries.

    Hunt in health as he gets a second bite of the cherry having probably learnt a lot since and can mix the scales lifting from his eyes with experience of the department.

    Alex Chalk from solicitor general to AG as right experience for role and can’t be worse than Braverman.

    Mordant to defence of Wallace PM otherwise Wallace stay at defence.

    Nadine Dorries in space cannon to Mars.

    I know it’s all pointless but wondered if it was possible to make a fantasy cabinet regardless of factions.
    Why? What has Mars done to deserve that?
  • StillWatersStillWaters Posts: 1,913

    Nigelb said:

    This should be of huge significance. While it’s a compromise to accommodate Russia friendly Hungary, it affects two thirds or more of oil exports to the EU.

    EU leaders agree to partial embargo of Russian oil imports
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/may/30/eu-nears-compromise-agreement-for-partial-ban-on-russian-oil

    Who could possibly have imagined that Viktor Orban - the man who destroyed Hungarian democracy, the darling of the right in the UK and the US - would turn out to be Putin's principal European ally?

    You mean that Brexit Britain actually turned out to be nothing like Orban’s Hungary? Colour me shocked!
  • IshmaelZIshmaelZ Posts: 17,005
    Heathener said:

    Ishmael apologies: I thought that was you. It was a quote from the article.

    Doh.

    No problem!
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 48,722
    Sandpit said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    "I'm not leaving until the bailiffs come". That was the latest email sent to me from a tenant. This is the third tenant this year I am evicting due to rent arrears.

    In my entire landlord career of 20 years, I have never seen an environment turn so quickly and so badly – and that includes the financial crisis and pandemic. The amount of money owed in rental arrears is in the thousands of pounds and quickly rising. Supposedly good tenants are souring quickly and I am left wondering who I can trust."

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/buy-to-let/had-evict-three-tenants-year-going-get-worse/

    very very ominous

    That’s worrying, especially that this downturn doesn’t appear (yet!) to have high unemployment associated with it.

    Is it a warning of unemployment to come, or is it a regulatory issue, that tenants have collectively realised they can get away for months without paying rent before they get evicted?
    I think it’s probably rampant inflation eating away at their disposable income. Something has to give and they’ve twigged they can, as you say, fail to pay and get away with it for several months.

    What they do next is a different question. Councils are going to find it really expensive housing so many evicted tenants in anything other than council houses and they’ve not got enough of those already.
  • SouthamObserverSouthamObserver Posts: 36,679

    Nigelb said:

    This should be of huge significance. While it’s a compromise to accommodate Russia friendly Hungary, it affects two thirds or more of oil exports to the EU.

    EU leaders agree to partial embargo of Russian oil imports
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/may/30/eu-nears-compromise-agreement-for-partial-ban-on-russian-oil

    Who could possibly have imagined that Viktor Orban - the man who destroyed Hungarian democracy, the darling of the right in the UK and the US - would turn out to be Putin's principal European ally?

    You mean that Brexit Britain actually turned out to be nothing like Orban’s Hungary? Colour me shocked!

    Hmmm - relentless government grift and lies, criminalising peaceful protest, taking away the Electoral Commission's independence, making it harder to vote, bypassing Parliament, reducing the power of the courts to scrutinise the executive, placemen in media oversight positions, walking away from international treaty commitments. Where could this government possibly have got those ideas from?

  • StillWatersStillWaters Posts: 1,913
    Heathener said:

    As suggested at the time, Number 10 destroying heir-apparent Rishi Sunak may have been a pyrrhic victory endangering Boris by giving every other would-be heir or faction a realistic chance of victory.

    The moment to move (if they choose to) is close - we are on the edge of June and if the Conservatives want a new leader by conference they need to move in June. I cant imagine the mentality of Tory MPs, they used to be ruthless in their pursuit of retaining power - are they really that fearful of Big Dog?
    Yes I think this is 'it'. Now or never, 'now' being through to end of June after the by-elections.

    Expect really nasty tactics from team Dog Turd. Everything under the sun short of murder.
    I think you are mixing up your memes.

    “Dog turd” is Amber Heard not BoJo… one’s a BPD abuser taking advantage of a battered and confused victim… the other is a Texan.
  • EabhalEabhal Posts: 1,488
    IshmaelZ said:

    Foxy said:

    Heathener said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    "I'm not leaving until the bailiffs come". That was the latest email sent to me from a tenant. This is the third tenant this year I am evicting due to rent arrears.

    How nasty of you
    A quote from the article, not from our porcine poster, I think.
    Shit, I thought she was joking. I would never in a m years be a landlord precisely because I could never do that to anyone.
    Minor damage to my belongings (bad scratch
    on my bike frame last week...) stresses me out way to much to ever be a landlord!

    Quite awkward as thinking about renting with girlfriend to see if we can actually live together - but what do I do with my little flat?
  • SouthamObserverSouthamObserver Posts: 36,679

    The queues we are seeing at the UK's airports currently tell you so much about how crap senior managements often are in the private sector. They took a short-term decision to save money during covid by laying off a shedload of staff and are now inflicting the inevitable long-term consequences of that on their customers. It's the British business malaise laid bear - we are incapable of seeing beyond the end of our noses. We lionise those who cut costs as people who take the hard decisions. But there is nothing tough about doing it. It's easy. Any fool can do it. But there is almost always a price to pay. As ever, the idea that the private sector knows best is revealed by real life to be a load of old pony.

    I can understand the need for a business to lay off a chunk of its staff in a downturn. There's no work for you - sorry - so here's some cash to go away and when things pick up replacement hires are easy. Harder to justify if its a megabucks company, much easier if its small and on the brink.

    But the play only works if "replacement hires are easy". And what seems to have caught the airport companies with their pants down is the new environment we find ourselves in post-Covid. A whole stack of people - 610k - have decided they may as well stop working completely. Which means big pockets of unfillable jobs in key sectors in certain places.

    Which is how we find ourselves here - airports unable to hire the staff they need to function as an airport. As the likes of Manchestoh Airport are council owned and have had months I assume this isn't a salary issue as they must have been offering more and more money to bring in anyone they can get. So its conditions - people just don't want to do the work, don't need to do the work as other jobs available, and likely some could be tempted but shift work and they have kids.

    Manchester Airport - to take one example - was not a small business on the brink. It could have kept all its staff on, but chose not to. Because staff are disposable and can easily be replaced. Can't they? Better treatment and relations with staff equals a better job being done equals happier customers. Why haven't companies understood this?

    The relentless short-termism is so depressingly self-destructive. Cutting staff numbers is always described as "tough". Those who do it are lionised as hard-headed business pragmatists, willing to make the difficult calls. That they never think through the consequences of such decisions gets much less attention.

    I've been in the position of being the senior manager saying "we need to cut staff" - the choice was reduce the wage bill or fold very quickly. Then furlough came along and I was the senior manager banging the drum to put most people onto it. Including myself. And when that didn't work I recommended we cut staff. Myself included.

    I know that some companies have this cycle of "fire people and make those who are left work harder". But for many during the last 2 years the choice was fire / furlough or fold. But that doesn't include the likes of Manchester Airport who could have kept people on and then been able to function when the recovery came.

    Totally agree.

  • noneoftheabovenoneoftheabove Posts: 14,139

    IshmaelZ said:

    "I'm not leaving until the bailiffs come". That was the latest email sent to me from a tenant. This is the third tenant this year I am evicting due to rent arrears.

    In my entire landlord career of 20 years, I have never seen an environment turn so quickly and so badly – and that includes the financial crisis and pandemic. The amount of money owed in rental arrears is in the thousands of pounds and quickly rising. Supposedly good tenants are souring quickly and I am left wondering who I can trust."

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/buy-to-let/had-evict-three-tenants-year-going-get-worse/

    very very ominous

    The really ominous bit is when they point out that selling up and getting out of the business is the only sensible move. Which takes properties out of the rental market. And both pushes up rental prices even more and reduces supply. So we're back facing houses empty and people not having anywhere to live.
    No! If a house leaves the rental market it does not disappear into thin air. It is bought by an owner who would otherwise be renting. That person will be towards the higher end of the local renter affordability scale. By taking them out of the group of potential renters it actually moves down rents for the remaining renters.
  • TheuniondivvieTheuniondivvie Posts: 33,454
    Foxy said:

    geoffw said:

    Nigelb said:

    This should be of huge significance. While it’s a compromise to accommodate Russia friendly Hungary, it affects two thirds or more of oil exports to the EU.

    EU leaders agree to partial embargo of Russian oil imports
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/may/30/eu-nears-compromise-agreement-for-partial-ban-on-russian-oil

    Nevertheless they will be importing oil from somewhere and the oil market is a global market. Russia can sell its oil elsewhere, just with a bit of inconvenience. An ineffective policy masquerading as 'something' for the something-must-be-done mindset. Gas is different.
    One difficulty is that dislike of what Russia is doing is mostly a European and North American thing. Africa, Middle East and Latin America are more mixed in opinion, and India remains pro-Russian.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/may/30/negative-views-of-russia-mainly-limited-to-western-liberal-democracies-poll-shows?utm_term=Autofeed&CMP=twt_b-gdnnews&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Twitter#Echobox=1653885569
    It’s a kind of mirror image of recurring pin head dancing on refugees, ie it’s not racist to have more sympathy for white Christian Ukrainian refugees who have dishwashers = why should we care too much about what is being done to thousands of Ukes when the same and worse has been happening to millions of black, brown and yellow people for years.

    Of course the UK in best having and eating cake style manages to loudly virtual signal over Ukraine while being obstructive over accepting refugees - win, win!
  • IshmaelZIshmaelZ Posts: 17,005
    Sandpit said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    "I'm not leaving until the bailiffs come". That was the latest email sent to me from a tenant. This is the third tenant this year I am evicting due to rent arrears.

    In my entire landlord career of 20 years, I have never seen an environment turn so quickly and so badly – and that includes the financial crisis and pandemic. The amount of money owed in rental arrears is in the thousands of pounds and quickly rising. Supposedly good tenants are souring quickly and I am left wondering who I can trust."

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/buy-to-let/had-evict-three-tenants-year-going-get-worse/

    very very ominous

    That’s worrying, especially that this downturn doesn’t appear (yet!) to have high unemployment associated with it.

    Is it a warning of unemployment to come, or is it a regulatory issue, that tenants have collectively realised they can get away for months without paying rent before they get evicted?
    Markets including markets in loopholes tend to be efficient. If you want your theory to stand up you need to point to some recent, major, tenant friendly (ie UnConservative) change in the law. I don't know of any. I f it were a longer standing thing they'd have been doing it already.
  • noneoftheabovenoneoftheabove Posts: 14,139
    Sandpit said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    "I'm not leaving until the bailiffs come". That was the latest email sent to me from a tenant. This is the third tenant this year I am evicting due to rent arrears.

    In my entire landlord career of 20 years, I have never seen an environment turn so quickly and so badly – and that includes the financial crisis and pandemic. The amount of money owed in rental arrears is in the thousands of pounds and quickly rising. Supposedly good tenants are souring quickly and I am left wondering who I can trust."

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/buy-to-let/had-evict-three-tenants-year-going-get-worse/

    very very ominous

    That’s worrying, especially that this downturn doesn’t appear (yet!) to have high unemployment associated with it.

    Is it a warning of unemployment to come, or is it a regulatory issue, that tenants have collectively realised they can get away for months without paying rent before they get evicted?
    10m Brits skipped a meal last month because of affordability.

    The change is not to do with either unemployment or regulations, just affordability.
  • Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 58,560
    Good morning, everyone.

    Mr. Observer, amused that you manage to try and attack the UK for the EU watering down their sanctions due to Hungary's pro-Russian sympathies.
  • JohnLilburneJohnLilburne Posts: 5,623
    ydoethur said:

    Sandpit said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    "I'm not leaving until the bailiffs come". That was the latest email sent to me from a tenant. This is the third tenant this year I am evicting due to rent arrears.

    In my entire landlord career of 20 years, I have never seen an environment turn so quickly and so badly – and that includes the financial crisis and pandemic. The amount of money owed in rental arrears is in the thousands of pounds and quickly rising. Supposedly good tenants are souring quickly and I am left wondering who I can trust."

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/buy-to-let/had-evict-three-tenants-year-going-get-worse/

    very very ominous

    That’s worrying, especially that this downturn doesn’t appear (yet!) to have high unemployment associated with it.

    Is it a warning of unemployment to come, or is it a regulatory issue, that tenants have collectively realised they can get away for months without paying rent before they get evicted?
    I think it’s probably rampant inflation eating away at their disposable income. Something has to give and they’ve twigged they can, as you say, fail to pay and get away with it for several months.

    What they do next is a different question. Councils are going to find it really expensive housing so many evicted tenants in anything other than council houses and they’ve not got enough of those already.
    Rents are stupidly high. People pay them because they need somewhere to live. And while some people saved money during the pandemic, others ate into their reserves. So when prices go up, they have little wriggle-room.

    Could just be the start of the buy-to-let bubble bursting.
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 39,007
    IshmaelZ said:

    Sandpit said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    "I'm not leaving until the bailiffs come". That was the latest email sent to me from a tenant. This is the third tenant this year I am evicting due to rent arrears.

    In my entire landlord career of 20 years, I have never seen an environment turn so quickly and so badly – and that includes the financial crisis and pandemic. The amount of money owed in rental arrears is in the thousands of pounds and quickly rising. Supposedly good tenants are souring quickly and I am left wondering who I can trust."

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/buy-to-let/had-evict-three-tenants-year-going-get-worse/

    very very ominous

    That’s worrying, especially that this downturn doesn’t appear (yet!) to have high unemployment associated with it.

    Is it a warning of unemployment to come, or is it a regulatory issue, that tenants have collectively realised they can get away for months without paying rent before they get evicted?
    Markets including markets in loopholes tend to be efficient. If you want your theory to stand up you need to point to some recent, major, tenant friendly (ie UnConservative) change in the law. I don't know of any. I f it were a longer standing thing they'd have been doing it already.
    As I understand it there was a ban on evictions during the pandemic, and there’s now a very long backlog of court cases, such that it takes an awful long time for the landlord to go through the process of evicting a non-paying tenant.
  • MattWMattW Posts: 13,836
    edited May 31
    Sandpit said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    "I'm not leaving until the bailiffs come". That was the latest email sent to me from a tenant. This is the third tenant this year I am evicting due to rent arrears.

    In my entire landlord career of 20 years, I have never seen an environment turn so quickly and so badly – and that includes the financial crisis and pandemic. The amount of money owed in rental arrears is in the thousands of pounds and quickly rising. Supposedly good tenants are souring quickly and I am left wondering who I can trust."

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/buy-to-let/had-evict-three-tenants-year-going-get-worse/

    very very ominous

    That’s worrying, especially that this downturn doesn’t appear (yet!) to have high unemployment associated with it.

    Is it a warning of unemployment to come, or is it a regulatory issue, that tenants have collectively realised they can get away for months without paying rent before they get evicted?
    It's not really enough information to be useful imo, because we are not told.

    We know some things from the profile. The portfolio is geographically spread countrywide, so there will be management fees on everything, which will be costing 13-15% of total income. We know that there has not been major investment in energy efficiency, because it was being written about as a challenge in 2021 by the Secret Landlord - sensible people did that when they renovated or refurbished from about 2014 on and took advantage of the wide range of schemes available throughout.

    That would have protected Ts from rising expenses, but it has not been done. Some of mine are challenged, but their bills are 30-40% below what they would have been, so significantly mitigated.
    (https://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/buy-to-let/landlord-20-years-everything-learnt/)

    We don't know where his problems are, or what sort of tenants they are with. Or what rent levels are charged. Or how hard he drives his rents wrt market - where is his balance between long-term tenancies and maximum rents? It's a choice.

    It can't be job losses, as we have full employment.

    And arrears significant enough to cause eviction do not occur overnight - it would normally be several months at least. Given that there is a large portfolio, "thousands of ££" could still be quite marginal.

    IMO we are not told enough.
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 22,459
    edited May 31
    MattW said:

    Morning all.

    Some of the people highly ranked on that list:
    Braverman - who appears to be a pretend AG who disregards basics like the rule of law and foams on about Stalin

    What's this Stalin thing about? I must have missed that.
    She had a rant about Ms Thornberry being a Leninist or something when she was pinned down about the legality of the latest problem area. Rather than answer the question. Obvs been learning lessons from the Prime Minister with his Saville references.

    https://www.indy100.com/politics/suella-braverman-attorney-general-protocol
  • TheuniondivvieTheuniondivvie Posts: 33,454

    Nigelb said:

    This should be of huge significance. While it’s a compromise to accommodate Russia friendly Hungary, it affects two thirds or more of oil exports to the EU.

    EU leaders agree to partial embargo of Russian oil imports
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/may/30/eu-nears-compromise-agreement-for-partial-ban-on-russian-oil

    Who could possibly have imagined that Viktor Orban - the man who destroyed Hungarian democracy, the darling of the right in the UK and the US - would turn out to be Putin's principal European ally?

    You mean that Brexit Britain actually turned out to be nothing like Orban’s Hungary? Colour me shocked!

    Hmmm - relentless government grift and lies, criminalising peaceful protest, taking away the Electoral Commission's independence, making it harder to vote, bypassing Parliament, reducing the power of the courts to scrutinise the executive, placemen in media oversight positions, walking away from international treaty commitments. Where could this government possibly have got those ideas from?

    I’m old enough to remember Brexiteers boosting Orban & Hungary as part of the awkward squad that would ally with the UK in the great patriotic war against the EU.
  • StockyStocky Posts: 8,148
    Stereodog said:

    The weird thing about this poll is that Johnson is rated so low yet ministers such as Barclay and Braverman who exist only to enable and apologise for him are rated highly.

    Barclay was rated by May - he was in her cabinet. From what I can gather he's well-regarded generally and a mild-mannered sort of chap. Outsider for next leader if Johnson clings on for a few more years IMO.
  • IshmaelZIshmaelZ Posts: 17,005
    ydoethur said:

    Sandpit said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    "I'm not leaving until the bailiffs come". That was the latest email sent to me from a tenant. This is the third tenant this year I am evicting due to rent arrears.

    In my entire landlord career of 20 years, I have never seen an environment turn so quickly and so badly – and that includes the financial crisis and pandemic. The amount of money owed in rental arrears is in the thousands of pounds and quickly rising. Supposedly good tenants are souring quickly and I am left wondering who I can trust."

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/buy-to-let/had-evict-three-tenants-year-going-get-worse/

    very very ominous

    That’s worrying, especially that this downturn doesn’t appear (yet!) to have high unemployment associated with it.

    Is it a warning of unemployment to come, or is it a regulatory issue, that tenants have collectively realised they can get away for months without paying rent before they get evicted?
    I think it’s probably rampant inflation eating away at their disposable income. Something has to give and they’ve twigged they can, as you say, fail to pay and get away with it for several months.

    What they do next is a different question. Councils are going to find it really expensive housing so many evicted tenants in anything other than council houses and they’ve not got enough of those already.
    Well, OK. I think it is a bit 19th century to regard the existence of tenant protection as a problem, and their relying on it as "getting away with it." But then, I am not a landlord

    I think the tenants are a bit buggered if they try to do the decent thing anyway, aren't they, because the council can then label them intentionally homeless?
  • noneoftheabovenoneoftheabove Posts: 14,139
    Stocky said:

    Stereodog said:

    The weird thing about this poll is that Johnson is rated so low yet ministers such as Barclay and Braverman who exist only to enable and apologise for him are rated highly.

    Barclay was rated by May - he was in her cabinet. From what I can gather he's well-regarded generally and a mild-mannered sort of chap. Outsider for next leader if Johnson clings on for a few more years IMO.
    If Starmer is playing the Kinnock role transitioning Labour back to the centre, why can't Barclay play Major, a bit of sensible grey to replace a once but no longer popular leader on the other side?
  • Dura_AceDura_Ace Posts: 9,474
    Heathener said:

    Good piece on Johnson's 'red meat policy' lurch to the right:

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2022/may/30/johnsons-red-meat-policy-proposals-are-telling-of-his-insecurity

    "It is a moment often seen in the downward trajectory of embattled prime ministers: a whirl of new policy ideas intended to appeal to voters, but which are in fact more often aimed at placating their own MPs. Boris Johnson is, some would argue, approaching this point.

    In recent days Downing Street has briefed in favour of grammar schools and imperial measurements. Earlier weeks saw forays into other Conservative comfort zones, including bashing the EU and talking up fossil fuels.

    Such nostalgia politics is routinely promoted by Conservative backbenchers. But it is one of the paradoxes of Tory party politics that the more secure a prime minister is in office, the less they have to indulge these ideas."

    If Johnson loses both by-elections he'll have to go Full Tonto and offer a vote on fox hunting.
  • IshmaelZIshmaelZ Posts: 17,005
    Sandpit said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    Sandpit said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    "I'm not leaving until the bailiffs come". That was the latest email sent to me from a tenant. This is the third tenant this year I am evicting due to rent arrears.

    In my entire landlord career of 20 years, I have never seen an environment turn so quickly and so badly – and that includes the financial crisis and pandemic. The amount of money owed in rental arrears is in the thousands of pounds and quickly rising. Supposedly good tenants are souring quickly and I am left wondering who I can trust."

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/buy-to-let/had-evict-three-tenants-year-going-get-worse/

    very very ominous

    That’s worrying, especially that this downturn doesn’t appear (yet!) to have high unemployment associated with it.

    Is it a warning of unemployment to come, or is it a regulatory issue, that tenants have collectively realised they can get away for months without paying rent before they get evicted?
    Markets including markets in loopholes tend to be efficient. If you want your theory to stand up you need to point to some recent, major, tenant friendly (ie UnConservative) change in the law. I don't know of any. I f it were a longer standing thing they'd have been doing it already.
    As I understand it there was a ban on evictions during the pandemic, and there’s now a very long backlog of court cases, such that it takes an awful long time for the landlord to go through the process of evicting a non-paying tenant.
    Ah yes good point. good example of how we have completely blocked the pandemic and its consequences from memory, at least I have
  • noneoftheabovenoneoftheabove Posts: 14,139
    Dura_Ace said:

    Heathener said:

    Good piece on Johnson's 'red meat policy' lurch to the right:

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2022/may/30/johnsons-red-meat-policy-proposals-are-telling-of-his-insecurity

    "It is a moment often seen in the downward trajectory of embattled prime ministers: a whirl of new policy ideas intended to appeal to voters, but which are in fact more often aimed at placating their own MPs. Boris Johnson is, some would argue, approaching this point.

    In recent days Downing Street has briefed in favour of grammar schools and imperial measurements. Earlier weeks saw forays into other Conservative comfort zones, including bashing the EU and talking up fossil fuels.

    Such nostalgia politics is routinely promoted by Conservative backbenchers. But it is one of the paradoxes of Tory party politics that the more secure a prime minister is in office, the less they have to indulge these ideas."

    If Johnson loses both by-elections he'll have to go Full Tonto and offer a vote on fox hunting.
    Pritis 24 election manifesto will be led by the restoration of the death penalty, not just for cop killers but also random foxes.
  • Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 58,560
    Mr. Above, will that be the Jolyon Clause?
  • MattWMattW Posts: 13,836
    edited May 31
    IshmaelZ said:

    ydoethur said:

    Sandpit said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    "I'm not leaving until the bailiffs come". That was the latest email sent to me from a tenant. This is the third tenant this year I am evicting due to rent arrears.

    In my entire landlord career of 20 years, I have never seen an environment turn so quickly and so badly – and that includes the financial crisis and pandemic. The amount of money owed in rental arrears is in the thousands of pounds and quickly rising. Supposedly good tenants are souring quickly and I am left wondering who I can trust."

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/buy-to-let/had-evict-three-tenants-year-going-get-worse/

    very very ominous

    That’s worrying, especially that this downturn doesn’t appear (yet!) to have high unemployment associated with it.

    Is it a warning of unemployment to come, or is it a regulatory issue, that tenants have collectively realised they can get away for months without paying rent before they get evicted?
    I think it’s probably rampant inflation eating away at their disposable income. Something has to give and they’ve twigged they can, as you say, fail to pay and get away with it for several months.

    What they do next is a different question. Councils are going to find it really expensive housing so many evicted tenants in anything other than council houses and they’ve not got enough of those already.
    Well, OK. I think it is a bit 19th century to regard the existence of tenant protection as a problem, and their relying on it as "getting away with it." But then, I am not a landlord

    I think the tenants are a bit buggered if they try to do the decent thing anyway, aren't they, because the council can then label them intentionally homeless?
    Yes.

    "I'm not leaving until the bailiffs come" is very often a Council forcing a T to stay as long as possible so they don't have to provide accommodation. It's been a problem forever.

    It also forces the T to get a CCJ plus a couple of thousand extra debt (current court costs) in order to get a priority on the Council list, which means they get no credit for the next 6 years plus the extra debt. It is an abusive policy.

    And it's a game that Councils have played forever.

    Another one is to go into an HMO and register each room for a Band A council tax as a separate dwelling.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 32,311
    edited May 31
    I think the airports and seaports problem is the same as the dining and hospitality industry. They lost lots of people over the pandemic, even those on furlough, and now cannot recruit and train replacements. The same goes to an extent in NHS, Teaching etc etc. A lot of it comes down to management not valuing the skills of the workers and thinking them easily replaced.

    The planes were flying fine a couple of weeks back. They just can't cope with peak demand, similarly dining places can cope on a weekday, but not weekend. Time your pleasures well.
  • MattWMattW Posts: 13,836
    Stereodog said:

    The weird thing about this poll is that Johnson is rated so low yet ministers such as Barclay and Braverman who exist only to enable and apologise for him are rated highly.

    I'm never sure who this "poll" actually represents.

    Is it Tory members of whom only a subset read ConHome, or registered readers of ConHome - many of whom are patently not Tories?
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 20,937

    The queues we are seeing at the UK's airports currently tell you so much about how crap senior managements often are in the private sector. They took a short-term decision to save money during covid by laying off a shedload of staff and are now inflicting the inevitable long-term consequences of that on their customers. It's the British business malaise laid bear - we are incapable of seeing beyond the end of our noses. We lionise those who cut costs as people who take the hard decisions. But there is nothing tough about doing it. It's easy. Any fool can do it. But there is almost always a price to pay. As ever, the idea that the private sector knows best is revealed by real life to be a load of old pony.

    I can understand the need for a business to lay off a chunk of its staff in a downturn. There's no work for you - sorry - so here's some cash to go away and when things pick up replacement hires are easy. Harder to justify if its a megabucks company, much easier if its small and on the brink.

    But the play only works if "replacement hires are easy". And what seems to have caught the airport companies with their pants down is the new environment we find ourselves in post-Covid. A whole stack of people - 610k - have decided they may as well stop working completely. Which means big pockets of unfillable jobs in key sectors in certain places.

    Which is how we find ourselves here - airports unable to hire the staff they need to function as an airport. As the likes of Manchestoh Airport are council owned and have had months I assume this isn't a salary issue as they must have been offering more and more money to bring in anyone they can get. So its conditions - people just don't want to do the work, don't need to do the work as other jobs available, and likely some could be tempted but shift work and they have kids.

    Manchester Airport - to take one example - was not a small business on the brink. It could have kept all its staff on, but chose not to. Because staff are disposable and can easily be replaced. Can't they? Better treatment and relations with staff equals a better job being done equals happier customers. Why haven't companies understood this?
    AIUI the problem is the security clearance. They can't start to train till they get it. It takes weeks. By the time it arrives they've found other work.
  • IshmaelZIshmaelZ Posts: 17,005
    Dura_Ace said:

    Heathener said:

    Good piece on Johnson's 'red meat policy' lurch to the right:

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2022/may/30/johnsons-red-meat-policy-proposals-are-telling-of-his-insecurity

    "It is a moment often seen in the downward trajectory of embattled prime ministers: a whirl of new policy ideas intended to appeal to voters, but which are in fact more often aimed at placating their own MPs. Boris Johnson is, some would argue, approaching this point.

    In recent days Downing Street has briefed in favour of grammar schools and imperial measurements. Earlier weeks saw forays into other Conservative comfort zones, including bashing the EU and talking up fossil fuels.

    Such nostalgia politics is routinely promoted by Conservative backbenchers. But it is one of the paradoxes of Tory party politics that the more secure a prime minister is in office, the less they have to indulge these ideas."

    If Johnson loses both by-elections he'll have to go Full Tonto and offer a vote on fox hunting.
    Our best hope there is: monarchy abolished, SF start taking seats, hold whip hand in minority government. In the meantime there's always the Emerald Isle. Begorrah.
  • StillWatersStillWaters Posts: 1,913
    Heathener said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    "I'm not leaving until the bailiffs come". That was the latest email sent to me from a tenant. This is the third tenant this year I am evicting due to rent arrears.

    How nasty of you
    I believe it is a quote from the article not @IshmaelZ

    But if someone is not paying for the product they are using, why should the supplier continue to provide it?
  • MattWMattW Posts: 13,836
    edited May 31
    IshmaelZ said:

    Sandpit said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    Sandpit said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    "I'm not leaving until the bailiffs come". That was the latest email sent to me from a tenant. This is the third tenant this year I am evicting due to rent arrears.

    In my entire landlord career of 20 years, I have never seen an environment turn so quickly and so badly – and that includes the financial crisis and pandemic. The amount of money owed in rental arrears is in the thousands of pounds and quickly rising. Supposedly good tenants are souring quickly and I am left wondering who I can trust."

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/buy-to-let/had-evict-three-tenants-year-going-get-worse/

    very very ominous

    That’s worrying, especially that this downturn doesn’t appear (yet!) to have high unemployment associated with it.

    Is it a warning of unemployment to come, or is it a regulatory issue, that tenants have collectively realised they can get away for months without paying rent before they get evicted?
    Markets including markets in loopholes tend to be efficient. If you want your theory to stand up you need to point to some recent, major, tenant friendly (ie UnConservative) change in the law. I don't know of any. I f it were a longer standing thing they'd have been doing it already.
    As I understand it there was a ban on evictions during the pandemic, and there’s now a very long backlog of court cases, such that it takes an awful long time for the landlord to go through the process of evicting a non-paying tenant.
    Ah yes good point. good example of how we have completely blocked the pandemic and its consequences from memory, at least I have
    Yes. Correct. During the pandemic eviction was 12-18 months, and I had to sit on 2 empty properties in my mum's estate as they would need to be sold to meet the terms of the will - and we could not lock them in for that long plus a 6 month minimum term.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 48,722
    IshmaelZ said:

    ydoethur said:

    Sandpit said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    "I'm not leaving until the bailiffs come". That was the latest email sent to me from a tenant. This is the third tenant this year I am evicting due to rent arrears.

    In my entire landlord career of 20 years, I have never seen an environment turn so quickly and so badly – and that includes the financial crisis and pandemic. The amount of money owed in rental arrears is in the thousands of pounds and quickly rising. Supposedly good tenants are souring quickly and I am left wondering who I can trust."

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/buy-to-let/had-evict-three-tenants-year-going-get-worse/

    very very ominous

    That’s worrying, especially that this downturn doesn’t appear (yet!) to have high unemployment associated with it.

    Is it a warning of unemployment to come, or is it a regulatory issue, that tenants have collectively realised they can get away for months without paying rent before they get evicted?
    I think it’s probably rampant inflation eating away at their disposable income. Something has to give and they’ve twigged they can, as you say, fail to pay and get away with it for several months.

    What they do next is a different question. Councils are going to find it really expensive housing so many evicted tenants in anything other than council houses and they’ve not got enough of those already.
    Well, OK. I think it is a bit 19th century to regard the existence of tenant protection as a problem, and their relying on it as "getting away with it." But then, I am not a landlord

    I think the tenants are a bit buggered if they try to do the decent thing anyway, aren't they, because the council can then label them intentionally homeless?
    Yes. I was once warned not to try and assist a family in rent arrears financially for that reason.

    As for getting away with it, well, they're not paying money they owe and facing no immediate sanction due to the collapse of the legal system. What would you call it?

    The bigger issue is the lack of grown-up thinking ont he part of landlords. If a good tenant gets into difficulty and can't pay the full whack, the first thing they should consider is asking for a temporary reduction in the rent. But most won't bother because they know their landlords won't wear it. Which is stupid of the landlords, who will then get nothing at all, have huge legal bills and lose a good tenant.

    Bad tenants of course are a somewhat different case, but there are plenty of people who will otherwise have impeccable records feeling the strain right now, and a wise landlord would consider that.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 75,434
    Sandpit said:

    Nigelb said:

    Report from Kharkiv on Putin’s war on civilians.
    https://www.economist.com/europe/2022/05/29/how-war-has-changed-ukraines-second-city
    … Quick thinking saved the first-year psychology student from probable death: she ran from her kitchen to the bathroom as soon as she heard the first thuds. By the time the artillery reached her flat on Shakespeare Street on the afternoon of May 26th, slicing through the сhestnut trees to land outside her window, Ms Rebenko was two walls away from the impact. She walked away with minor cuts. At least nine others ended up in the morgue. Dina Kirsanova, a shopkeeper at a milk kiosk near the 23 August metro station, the main target of the strikes, saw at least 15 missiles in the sky. Air defences intercepted most of them, she said, preventing even greater loss of life: “It’s beyond cruel. There are no military positions here. Just simple people, trying to survive.”..

    More propaganda, Luckyguy1983 ?

    Civilians do appear to be targets for the Russians - which is odd, given that his stated aim is to liberate them from the Nazis. Not sure how killing them helps with that.
    They didnt welcome the Russisn army with open arms, therefore they must be part of the nazi regime of course.
  • StillWatersStillWaters Posts: 1,913

    IshmaelZ said:

    "I'm not leaving until the bailiffs come". That was the latest email sent to me from a tenant. This is the third tenant this year I am evicting due to rent arrears.

    In my entire landlord career of 20 years, I have never seen an environment turn so quickly and so badly – and that includes the financial crisis and pandemic. The amount of money owed in rental arrears is in the thousands of pounds and quickly rising. Supposedly good tenants are souring quickly and I am left wondering who I can trust."

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/buy-to-let/had-evict-three-tenants-year-going-get-worse/

    very very ominous

    The really ominous bit is when they point out that selling up and getting out of the business is the only sensible move. Which takes properties out of the rental market. And both pushes up rental prices even more and reduces supply. So we're back facing houses empty and people not having anywhere to live.
    Although increased supply of properties should reduce prices
  • Scott_xPScott_xP Posts: 22,072
    Carrie Antionette strikes again...

    The head housekeeper at Chequers has resigned after claims of tensions with Carrie Johnson https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/chequers-housekeeper-forced-out-by-clash-with-carrie-johnson-86jmv0ljd?utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Twitter#Echobox=1653952429-1
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 39,007
    edited May 31
    dixiedean said:

    The queues we are seeing at the UK's airports currently tell you so much about how crap senior managements often are in the private sector. They took a short-term decision to save money during covid by laying off a shedload of staff and are now inflicting the inevitable long-term consequences of that on their customers. It's the British business malaise laid bear - we are incapable of seeing beyond the end of our noses. We lionise those who cut costs as people who take the hard decisions. But there is nothing tough about doing it. It's easy. Any fool can do it. But there is almost always a price to pay. As ever, the idea that the private sector knows best is revealed by real life to be a load of old pony.

    I can understand the need for a business to lay off a chunk of its staff in a downturn. There's no work for you - sorry - so here's some cash to go away and when things pick up replacement hires are easy. Harder to justify if its a megabucks company, much easier if its small and on the brink.

    But the play only works if "replacement hires are easy". And what seems to have caught the airport companies with their pants down is the new environment we find ourselves in post-Covid. A whole stack of people - 610k - have decided they may as well stop working completely. Which means big pockets of unfillable jobs in key sectors in certain places.

    Which is how we find ourselves here - airports unable to hire the staff they need to function as an airport. As the likes of Manchestoh Airport are council owned and have had months I assume this isn't a salary issue as they must have been offering more and more money to bring in anyone they can get. So its conditions - people just don't want to do the work, don't need to do the work as other jobs available, and likely some could be tempted but shift work and they have kids.

    Manchester Airport - to take one example - was not a small business on the brink. It could have kept all its staff on, but chose not to. Because staff are disposable and can easily be replaced. Can't they? Better treatment and relations with staff equals a better job being done equals happier customers. Why haven't companies understood this?
    AIUI the problem is the security clearance. They can't start to train till they get it. It takes weeks. By the time it arrives they've found other work.
    That’s a good point. A lot of laid-off or found-better-jobs workers at airports will have had airside passes, so finding replacements takes a lot longer.

    They should put the new staff on payroll immediately, have them classroom training, and start moaning loudly about whichever government agency (MI5?) issues security clearances.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 32,311
    dixiedean said:

    The queues we are seeing at the UK's airports currently tell you so much about how crap senior managements often are in the private sector. They took a short-term decision to save money during covid by laying off a shedload of staff and are now inflicting the inevitable long-term consequences of that on their customers. It's the British business malaise laid bear - we are incapable of seeing beyond the end of our noses. We lionise those who cut costs as people who take the hard decisions. But there is nothing tough about doing it. It's easy. Any fool can do it. But there is almost always a price to pay. As ever, the idea that the private sector knows best is revealed by real life to be a load of old pony.

    I can understand the need for a business to lay off a chunk of its staff in a downturn. There's no work for you - sorry - so here's some cash to go away and when things pick up replacement hires are easy. Harder to justify if its a megabucks company, much easier if its small and on the brink.

    But the play only works if "replacement hires are easy". And what seems to have caught the airport companies with their pants down is the new environment we find ourselves in post-Covid. A whole stack of people - 610k - have decided they may as well stop working completely. Which means big pockets of unfillable jobs in key sectors in certain places.

    Which is how we find ourselves here - airports unable to hire the staff they need to function as an airport. As the likes of Manchestoh Airport are council owned and have had months I assume this isn't a salary issue as they must have been offering more and more money to bring in anyone they can get. So its conditions - people just don't want to do the work, don't need to do the work as other jobs available, and likely some could be tempted but shift work and they have kids.

    Manchester Airport - to take one example - was not a small business on the brink. It could have kept all its staff on, but chose not to. Because staff are disposable and can easily be replaced. Can't they? Better treatment and relations with staff equals a better job being done equals happier customers. Why haven't companies understood this?
    AIUI the problem is the security clearance. They can't start to train till they get it. It takes weeks. By the time it arrives they've found other work.
    We have the same with DBR checks. We appoint staff, but they get a job elsewhere before they can start.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 48,722

    Mr. Above, will that be the Jolyon Clause?

    Johnson's an expert on jollies.
  • bondegezoubondegezou Posts: 1,082
    Sandpit said:

    dixiedean said:

    The queues we are seeing at the UK's airports currently tell you so much about how crap senior managements often are in the private sector. They took a short-term decision to save money during covid by laying off a shedload of staff and are now inflicting the inevitable long-term consequences of that on their customers. It's the British business malaise laid bear - we are incapable of seeing beyond the end of our noses. We lionise those who cut costs as people who take the hard decisions. But there is nothing tough about doing it. It's easy. Any fool can do it. But there is almost always a price to pay. As ever, the idea that the private sector knows best is revealed by real life to be a load of old pony.

    I can understand the need for a business to lay off a chunk of its staff in a downturn. There's no work for you - sorry - so here's some cash to go away and when things pick up replacement hires are easy. Harder to justify if its a megabucks company, much easier if its small and on the brink.

    But the play only works if "replacement hires are easy". And what seems to have caught the airport companies with their pants down is the new environment we find ourselves in post-Covid. A whole stack of people - 610k - have decided they may as well stop working completely. Which means big pockets of unfillable jobs in key sectors in certain places.

    Which is how we find ourselves here - airports unable to hire the staff they need to function as an airport. As the likes of Manchestoh Airport are council owned and have had months I assume this isn't a salary issue as they must have been offering more and more money to bring in anyone they can get. So its conditions - people just don't want to do the work, don't need to do the work as other jobs available, and likely some could be tempted but shift work and they have kids.

    Manchester Airport - to take one example - was not a small business on the brink. It could have kept all its staff on, but chose not to. Because staff are disposable and can easily be replaced. Can't they? Better treatment and relations with staff equals a better job being done equals happier customers. Why haven't companies understood this?
    AIUI the problem is the security clearance. They can't start to train till they get it. It takes weeks. By the time it arrives they've found other work.
    That’s a good point. A lot of laid-off or found-better-jobs workers at airports will have had airside passes, so finding replacements takes a lot longer.

    They should put the new staff on payroll immediately, have them classroom training, and start moaning loudly about whichever government agency (MI5?) issues security clearances.
    It’s alright, the Government has committed to cutting the number of civil servants, which will solve this problem by… um… oh, look, do you want to buy those mangoes in pounds and ounces?
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 20,937
    edited May 31
    Foxy said:

    dixiedean said:

    The queues we are seeing at the UK's airports currently tell you so much about how crap senior managements often are in the private sector. They took a short-term decision to save money during covid by laying off a shedload of staff and are now inflicting the inevitable long-term consequences of that on their customers. It's the British business malaise laid bear - we are incapable of seeing beyond the end of our noses. We lionise those who cut costs as people who take the hard decisions. But there is nothing tough about doing it. It's easy. Any fool can do it. But there is almost always a price to pay. As ever, the idea that the private sector knows best is revealed by real life to be a load of old pony.

    I can understand the need for a business to lay off a chunk of its staff in a downturn. There's no work for you - sorry - so here's some cash to go away and when things pick up replacement hires are easy. Harder to justify if its a megabucks company, much easier if its small and on the brink.

    But the play only works if "replacement hires are easy". And what seems to have caught the airport companies with their pants down is the new environment we find ourselves in post-Covid. A whole stack of people - 610k - have decided they may as well stop working completely. Which means big pockets of unfillable jobs in key sectors in certain places.

    Which is how we find ourselves here - airports unable to hire the staff they need to function as an airport. As the likes of Manchestoh Airport are council owned and have had months I assume this isn't a salary issue as they must have been offering more and more money to bring in anyone they can get. So its conditions - people just don't want to do the work, don't need to do the work as other jobs available, and likely some could be tempted but shift work and they have kids.

    Manchester Airport - to take one example - was not a small business on the brink. It could have kept all its staff on, but chose not to. Because staff are disposable and can easily be replaced. Can't they? Better treatment and relations with staff equals a better job being done equals happier customers. Why haven't companies understood this?
    AIUI the problem is the security clearance. They can't start to train till they get it. It takes weeks. By the time it arrives they've found other work.
    We have the same with DBR checks. We appoint staff, but they get a job elsewhere before they can start.
    Teaching assistants. The same.
    They are now advertising jobs for immediate start after half term for those with existing Enhanced DBS Only.
    Unfortunately. Almost everyone of them is already in education.
This discussion has been closed.