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BoJo would find it more challenging facing Angela Rayner – politicalbetting.com

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  • Options
    rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 60,111
    edited September 2021

    Foxy said:

    Rising taxes
    Rising interest rates
    Rising prices
    Food, energy and petrol shortages.

    Could be a fun old winter, eh?

    Rising hospital waiting lists too.

    Just as well I still have last years Christmas Dinner in the freezer. At least until the power cuts hit.
    ITV Wales was so depressing over Wales NHS which has the longest A & E waiting times and waiting lists ever, and the second worst ambulance response times
    V bleak article in this week's New Statesman from a GP. NHS totally at its limits and only September.

    Even on-call doctors are struggling to get an ambulance out to emergencies on their hotlines - sometimes takes hours. Bed blockers filling hospitals because so few care staff so no places for them to be discharged. Precious critical beds taken up by the unvaxxed with covid.
  • Options
    darkagedarkage Posts: 5,016

    darkage said:

    eek said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    I worked for many years in Councils, and the reality on the ground is that you need a private rented sector for two reasons:

    1) housing of vulnerable people as the state do not do it, most of the time, for good reasons.
    2) Inward investment, people doing up properties promotes economic activity in the area.

    If you kill the private rented sector through punitive wealth taxes, then you run in to those two problems summarised above.

    Switzerland has a wealth tax.
    So does New York (ie a property tax)

    Do they have a rental sector?
    Oh, they do.
    You cannot compare Darlington with Zurich or New York.
    Why not?
    Because houses cost nothing in Darlington. You can buy a house there for £30,000. Go in to the rural hinterlands of County Durham, and houses are being given away for next to nothing to first time buyers, if they do the place up.

    Landlords coming in, buying the properties, doing them up and renting them out to people who have issues in their lives that mean that home ownership isn't right for them can only be regarded as a social good. They take the burden away from the state and generate economic activity.

    Love to know where in Darlington you wou;d buy a house for £30k. £60k will get you a 2 up, 2 down Terrance in the Denes, prices little different since 2004

    Equally I wouldn’t want that sort of hassle for £400 or so a month, there are far too many things that could go wrong


    https://www.rightmove.co.uk/properties/113532656#/?channel=RES_BUY

    Doesn't take too long to do a search on rightmove, but there you go.

    You are absolutely correct. Why go in to such hassle for £400 a month. There is too much regulation and responsibility, which is another reason that landlords are quitting the sector.
    You can get £4800 a year for a £35k investment?
    Thats a gross yield, before your costs are taken in to account, and is based on the assumption that the rent is actually paid on time.
  • Options
    PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 77,015

    Huge queues at petrol pumps tomorrow then.

    I filled up at Morrisons today, no queue; no pumps off.
  • Options
    eekeek Posts: 26,553
    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    eek said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    I worked for many years in Councils, and the reality on the ground is that you need a private rented sector for two reasons:

    1) housing of vulnerable people as the state do not do it, most of the time, for good reasons.
    2) Inward investment, people doing up properties promotes economic activity in the area.

    If you kill the private rented sector through punitive wealth taxes, then you run in to those two problems summarised above.

    Switzerland has a wealth tax.
    So does New York (ie a property tax)

    Do they have a rental sector?
    Oh, they do.
    You cannot compare Darlington with Zurich or New York.
    Why not?
    Because houses cost nothing in Darlington. You can buy a house there for £30,000. Go in to the rural hinterlands of County Durham, and houses are being given away for next to nothing to first time buyers, if they do the place up.

    Landlords coming in, buying the properties, doing them up and renting them out to people who have issues in their lives that mean that home ownership isn't right for them can only be regarded as a social good. They take the burden away from the state and generate economic activity.

    Love to know where in Darlington you wou;d buy a house for £30k. £60k will get you a 2 up, 2 down Terrance in the Denes, prices little different since 2004

    Equally I wouldn’t want that sort of hassle for £400 or so a month, there are far too many things that could go wrong


    https://www.rightmove.co.uk/properties/113532656#/?channel=RES_BUY

    Doesn't take too long to do a search on rightmove, but there you go.

    You are absolutely correct. Why go in to such hassle for £400 a month. There is too much regulation and responsibility, which is another reason that landlords are quitting the sector.
    You can get £4800 a year for a £35k investment?
    Thats a gross yield, before your costs are taken in to account, and is based on the assumption that the rent is actually paid.
    FTFY
  • Options
    Andy_JSAndy_JS Posts: 30,228
    Not good.

    "Supermodel Linda Evangelista has said she has been left "permanently deformed" due to an adverse reaction to a fat reduction procedure. The 56-year-old revealed she had experienced a rare cosmetic side effect of the treatment five years ago which actually increased her fat cells. "I have been left, as the media has described, 'unrecognisable'," she told her 900,000 Instagram followers. Evangelista explained it was the reason she'd disappeared from the public eye."

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-58662756
  • Options
    there is growing expectation/resignation in EU that U.K. will trigger Article 16.

    https://twitter.com/pmdfoster/status/1441128928953909248?s=20
  • Options
    SandpitSandpit Posts: 51,714
    Andy_JS said:

    Not good.

    "Supermodel Linda Evangelista has said she has been left "permanently deformed" due to an adverse reaction to a fat reduction procedure. The 56-year-old revealed she had experienced a rare cosmetic side effect of the treatment five years ago which actually increased her fat cells. "I have been left, as the media has described, 'unrecognisable'," she told her 900,000 Instagram followers. Evangelista explained it was the reason she'd disappeared from the public eye."

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-58662756

    And in a totally unrelated story, said supermodel has just filed a lawsuit against a cosmetic surgery clinic.
    Getting her own version of events in the media first.
  • Options
    Looking like this winter is going to the worst as far as crisis, economic turmoil, inflation, shortages and general shit goes in at least 40 years.

    Is Boris the right man to guide us through?

    We shall soon see.

    Don't count Sir K out just yet would be my prediction.
  • Options
    eekeek Posts: 26,553
    Sandpit said:

    darkage said:

    eek said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    I worked for many years in Councils, and the reality on the ground is that you need a private rented sector for two reasons:

    1) housing of vulnerable people as the state do not do it, most of the time, for good reasons.
    2) Inward investment, people doing up properties promotes economic activity in the area.

    If you kill the private rented sector through punitive wealth taxes, then you run in to those two problems summarised above.

    Switzerland has a wealth tax.
    So does New York (ie a property tax)

    Do they have a rental sector?
    Oh, they do.
    You cannot compare Darlington with Zurich or New York.
    Why not?
    Because houses cost nothing in Darlington. You can buy a house there for £30,000. Go in to the rural hinterlands of County Durham, and houses are being given away for next to nothing to first time buyers, if they do the place up.

    Landlords coming in, buying the properties, doing them up and renting them out to people who have issues in their lives that mean that home ownership isn't right for them can only be regarded as a social good. They take the burden away from the state and generate economic activity.

    Love to know where in Darlington you wou;d buy a house for £30k. £60k will get you a 2 up, 2 down Terrance in the Denes, prices little different since 2004

    Equally I wouldn’t want that sort of hassle for £400 or so a month, there are far too many things that could go wrong


    https://www.rightmove.co.uk/properties/113532656#/?channel=RES_BUY

    Doesn't take too long to do a search on rightmove, but there you go.

    You are absolutely correct. Why go in to such hassle for £400 a month. There is too much regulation and responsibility, which is another reason that landlords are quitting the sector.
    An advert with one photo, of the outside front of the property. One can obviously assume, that ‘requires modernisation’ means it’s completely gutted and unlivable inside, until you spend £20k more than the £35k asking price?
    Actually given the forthcoming epc rules you probably need another 10k on top to add external insulation to the outer wall. Mid terraces are better there as there is less you need to insulate.
  • Options
    Andy_JS said:

    Not good.

    "Supermodel Linda Evangelista has said she has been left "permanently deformed" due to an adverse reaction to a fat reduction procedure. The 56-year-old revealed she had experienced a rare cosmetic side effect of the treatment five years ago which actually increased her fat cells. "I have been left, as the media has described, 'unrecognisable'," she told her 900,000 Instagram followers. Evangelista explained it was the reason she'd disappeared from the public eye."

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-58662756

    No. But caveat emptor surely?

  • Options
    QuincelQuincel Posts: 4,041
    Carnyx said:

    Sandpit said:

    darkage said:

    eek said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    I worked for many years in Councils, and the reality on the ground is that you need a private rented sector for two reasons:

    1) housing of vulnerable people as the state do not do it, most of the time, for good reasons.
    2) Inward investment, people doing up properties promotes economic activity in the area.

    If you kill the private rented sector through punitive wealth taxes, then you run in to those two problems summarised above.

    Switzerland has a wealth tax.
    So does New York (ie a property tax)

    Do they have a rental sector?
    Oh, they do.
    You cannot compare Darlington with Zurich or New York.
    Why not?
    Because houses cost nothing in Darlington. You can buy a house there for £30,000. Go in to the rural hinterlands of County Durham, and houses are being given away for next to nothing to first time buyers, if they do the place up.

    Landlords coming in, buying the properties, doing them up and renting them out to people who have issues in their lives that mean that home ownership isn't right for them can only be regarded as a social good. They take the burden away from the state and generate economic activity.

    Love to know where in Darlington you wou;d buy a house for £30k. £60k will get you a 2 up, 2 down Terrance in the Denes, prices little different since 2004

    Equally I wouldn’t want that sort of hassle for £400 or so a month, there are far too many things that could go wrong


    https://www.rightmove.co.uk/properties/113532656#/?channel=RES_BUY

    Doesn't take too long to do a search on rightmove, but there you go.

    You are absolutely correct. Why go in to such hassle for £400 a month. There is too much regulation and responsibility, which is another reason that landlords are quitting the sector.
    An advert with one photo, of the outside front of the property. One can obviously assume, that ‘requires modernisation’ means it’s completely gutted and unlivable inside, until you spend £20k more than the £35k asking price?
    No ch, no double glazing, bottom energy rating, and so on.
    On the energy rating, any prospective PB-landlords should be aware of MEES:

    https://www.gov.uk/guidance/domestic-private-rented-property-minimum-energy-efficiency-standard-landlord-guidance
  • Options

    there is growing expectation/resignation in EU that U.K. will trigger Article 16.

    https://twitter.com/pmdfoster/status/1441128928953909248?s=20

    As they should.
    Because GB-NI trade is collapsing.

    Remind me who signed that deal.
  • Options
    SandpitSandpit Posts: 51,714
    eek said:

    Sandpit said:

    darkage said:

    eek said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    I worked for many years in Councils, and the reality on the ground is that you need a private rented sector for two reasons:

    1) housing of vulnerable people as the state do not do it, most of the time, for good reasons.
    2) Inward investment, people doing up properties promotes economic activity in the area.

    If you kill the private rented sector through punitive wealth taxes, then you run in to those two problems summarised above.

    Switzerland has a wealth tax.
    So does New York (ie a property tax)

    Do they have a rental sector?
    Oh, they do.
    You cannot compare Darlington with Zurich or New York.
    Why not?
    Because houses cost nothing in Darlington. You can buy a house there for £30,000. Go in to the rural hinterlands of County Durham, and houses are being given away for next to nothing to first time buyers, if they do the place up.

    Landlords coming in, buying the properties, doing them up and renting them out to people who have issues in their lives that mean that home ownership isn't right for them can only be regarded as a social good. They take the burden away from the state and generate economic activity.

    Love to know where in Darlington you wou;d buy a house for £30k. £60k will get you a 2 up, 2 down Terrance in the Denes, prices little different since 2004

    Equally I wouldn’t want that sort of hassle for £400 or so a month, there are far too many things that could go wrong


    https://www.rightmove.co.uk/properties/113532656#/?channel=RES_BUY

    Doesn't take too long to do a search on rightmove, but there you go.

    You are absolutely correct. Why go in to such hassle for £400 a month. There is too much regulation and responsibility, which is another reason that landlords are quitting the sector.
    An advert with one photo, of the outside front of the property. One can obviously assume, that ‘requires modernisation’ means it’s completely gutted and unlivable inside, until you spend £20k more than the £35k asking price?
    Actually given the forthcoming epc rules you probably need another 10k on top to add external insulation to the outer wall. Mid terraces are better there as there is less you need to insulate.
    So you’re up to £80k or £90k by the time it’s rentable, a lot of which needs to be in cash rather than mortgage, and then it’s £400 or £500 a month in income. That’s more marginal than the headline figures might suggest!
  • Options
    eekeek Posts: 26,553
    Quincel said:

    Carnyx said:

    Sandpit said:

    darkage said:

    eek said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    I worked for many years in Councils, and the reality on the ground is that you need a private rented sector for two reasons:

    1) housing of vulnerable people as the state do not do it, most of the time, for good reasons.
    2) Inward investment, people doing up properties promotes economic activity in the area.

    If you kill the private rented sector through punitive wealth taxes, then you run in to those two problems summarised above.

    Switzerland has a wealth tax.
    So does New York (ie a property tax)

    Do they have a rental sector?
    Oh, they do.
    You cannot compare Darlington with Zurich or New York.
    Why not?
    Because houses cost nothing in Darlington. You can buy a house there for £30,000. Go in to the rural hinterlands of County Durham, and houses are being given away for next to nothing to first time buyers, if they do the place up.

    Landlords coming in, buying the properties, doing them up and renting them out to people who have issues in their lives that mean that home ownership isn't right for them can only be regarded as a social good. They take the burden away from the state and generate economic activity.

    Love to know where in Darlington you wou;d buy a house for £30k. £60k will get you a 2 up, 2 down Terrance in the Denes, prices little different since 2004

    Equally I wouldn’t want that sort of hassle for £400 or so a month, there are far too many things that could go wrong


    https://www.rightmove.co.uk/properties/113532656#/?channel=RES_BUY

    Doesn't take too long to do a search on rightmove, but there you go.

    You are absolutely correct. Why go in to such hassle for £400 a month. There is too much regulation and responsibility, which is another reason that landlords are quitting the sector.
    An advert with one photo, of the outside front of the property. One can obviously assume, that ‘requires modernisation’ means it’s completely gutted and unlivable inside, until you spend £20k more than the £35k asking price?
    No ch, no double glazing, bottom energy rating, and so on.
    On the energy rating, any prospective PB-landlords should be aware of MEES:

    https://www.gov.uk/guidance/domestic-private-rented-property-minimum-energy-efficiency-standard-landlord-guidance
    Yep, see my point below. That house needs £35k of work on it to meet the long term requirements (external insulation would be the only way to get there)
  • Options
    PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 77,015
    Precious critical beds taken up by the unvaxxed with covid.
    Should be billed for the full, true cost. Its not like giving up a decades long smoking or drink addiction. Heck it's not like developing healthy eating and exercise habits or asking someone to give up motorcycles or horse riding. It's going to the clinic, taking an hour out of a couple of days and getting an injection. Its so so so easy compared to the rest of life

  • Options
    rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 60,111
    edited September 2021
    As the good book said...




    (Times)
  • Options

    Foxy said:

    Rising taxes
    Rising interest rates
    Rising prices
    Food, energy and petrol shortages.

    Could be a fun old winter, eh?

    Rising hospital waiting lists too.

    Just as well I still have last years Christmas Dinner in the freezer. At least until the power cuts hit.
    ITV Wales was so depressing over Wales NHS which has the longest A & E waiting times and waiting lists ever, and the second worst ambulance response times
    V bleak article in this week's New Statesman from a GP. NHS totally at its limits and only September.

    Even on-call doctors are struggling to get an ambulance out to emergencies on their hotlines - sometimes takes hours. Bed blockers filling hospitals because so few care staff so no places for them to be discharged. Precious critical beds taken up by the unvaxxed with covid.
    Indeed and of course it is devolved to the Welsh government, so in Wales it is their problem but also ours
  • Options
    carnforthcarnforth Posts: 3,796
    Quincel said:

    Carnyx said:

    Sandpit said:

    darkage said:

    eek said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    I worked for many years in Councils, and the reality on the ground is that you need a private rented sector for two reasons:

    1) housing of vulnerable people as the state do not do it, most of the time, for good reasons.
    2) Inward investment, people doing up properties promotes economic activity in the area.

    If you kill the private rented sector through punitive wealth taxes, then you run in to those two problems summarised above.

    Switzerland has a wealth tax.
    So does New York (ie a property tax)

    Do they have a rental sector?
    Oh, they do.
    You cannot compare Darlington with Zurich or New York.
    Why not?
    Because houses cost nothing in Darlington. You can buy a house there for £30,000. Go in to the rural hinterlands of County Durham, and houses are being given away for next to nothing to first time buyers, if they do the place up.

    Landlords coming in, buying the properties, doing them up and renting them out to people who have issues in their lives that mean that home ownership isn't right for them can only be regarded as a social good. They take the burden away from the state and generate economic activity.

    Love to know where in Darlington you wou;d buy a house for £30k. £60k will get you a 2 up, 2 down Terrance in the Denes, prices little different since 2004

    Equally I wouldn’t want that sort of hassle for £400 or so a month, there are far too many things that could go wrong


    https://www.rightmove.co.uk/properties/113532656#/?channel=RES_BUY

    Doesn't take too long to do a search on rightmove, but there you go.

    You are absolutely correct. Why go in to such hassle for £400 a month. There is too much regulation and responsibility, which is another reason that landlords are quitting the sector.
    An advert with one photo, of the outside front of the property. One can obviously assume, that ‘requires modernisation’ means it’s completely gutted and unlivable inside, until you spend £20k more than the £35k asking price?
    No ch, no double glazing, bottom energy rating, and so on.
    On the energy rating, any prospective PB-landlords should be aware of MEES:

    https://www.gov.uk/guidance/domestic-private-rented-property-minimum-energy-efficiency-standard-landlord-guidance
    "The cost cap: you will never be required to spend more than £3,500 (including VAT) on energy efficiency improvements."

    If you're double glazing anyway, you're probably at £3500 just with that.
  • Options

    Looking like this winter is going to the worst as far as crisis, economic turmoil, inflation, shortages and general shit goes in at least 40 years.

    Is Boris the right man to guide us through?

    We shall soon see.

    Don't count Sir K out just yet would be my prediction.

    The budget in October will be a big test for Rishi
  • Options
    Andy_JSAndy_JS Posts: 30,228
    Results from the Isle of Man general election have started to come through. VoteUK forum for details.
  • Options

    there is growing expectation/resignation in EU that U.K. will trigger Article 16.

    https://twitter.com/pmdfoster/status/1441128928953909248?s=20

    As they should.
    Because GB-NI trade is collapsing.

    Remind me who signed that deal.
    The sad thing, if it happens, is that it will no doubt be marketed as evidence of Boris's machismo.
  • Options
    darkagedarkage Posts: 5,016
    Sandpit said:

    eek said:

    Sandpit said:

    darkage said:

    eek said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    I worked for many years in Councils, and the reality on the ground is that you need a private rented sector for two reasons:

    1) housing of vulnerable people as the state do not do it, most of the time, for good reasons.
    2) Inward investment, people doing up properties promotes economic activity in the area.

    If you kill the private rented sector through punitive wealth taxes, then you run in to those two problems summarised above.

    Switzerland has a wealth tax.
    So does New York (ie a property tax)

    Do they have a rental sector?
    Oh, they do.
    You cannot compare Darlington with Zurich or New York.
    Why not?
    Because houses cost nothing in Darlington. You can buy a house there for £30,000. Go in to the rural hinterlands of County Durham, and houses are being given away for next to nothing to first time buyers, if they do the place up.

    Landlords coming in, buying the properties, doing them up and renting them out to people who have issues in their lives that mean that home ownership isn't right for them can only be regarded as a social good. They take the burden away from the state and generate economic activity.

    Love to know where in Darlington you wou;d buy a house for £30k. £60k will get you a 2 up, 2 down Terrance in the Denes, prices little different since 2004

    Equally I wouldn’t want that sort of hassle for £400 or so a month, there are far too many things that could go wrong


    https://www.rightmove.co.uk/properties/113532656#/?channel=RES_BUY

    Doesn't take too long to do a search on rightmove, but there you go.

    You are absolutely correct. Why go in to such hassle for £400 a month. There is too much regulation and responsibility, which is another reason that landlords are quitting the sector.
    An advert with one photo, of the outside front of the property. One can obviously assume, that ‘requires modernisation’ means it’s completely gutted and unlivable inside, until you spend £20k more than the £35k asking price?
    Actually given the forthcoming epc rules you probably need another 10k on top to add external insulation to the outer wall. Mid terraces are better there as there is less you need to insulate.
    So you’re up to £80k or £90k by the time it’s rentable, a lot of which needs to be in cash rather than mortgage, and then it’s £400 or £500 a month in income. That’s more marginal than the headline figures might suggest!
    You may have just proved my initial point as to why landlords are giving up thus leaving a shortage of available housing in the private rented sector. However I think the renovation/investment is not quite at the level imagined, for instance there is a cap at £3500 for improvements towards improving the EPC rating.
  • Options

    Looking like this winter is going to the worst as far as crisis, economic turmoil, inflation, shortages and general shit goes in at least 40 years.

    Is Boris the right man to guide us through?

    We shall soon see.

    Don't count Sir K out just yet would be my prediction.

    The budget in October will be a big test for Rishi
    Massive.
  • Options

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    Pulpstar said:

    darkage said:

    I worked for many years in Councils, and the reality on the ground is that you need a private rented sector for two reasons:

    1) housing of vulnerable people as the state do not do it, most of the time, for good reasons.
    2) Inward investment, people doing up properties promotes economic activity in the area.

    If you kill the private rented sector through punitive wealth taxes, then you jeopordise those two issues summarised above.

    Can you go through point 1 slowly for me ?
    I've been round this before on here. So people present themselves as homeless. The Council have a duty to house them. There is no Council Housing. So the Council need private landlords. If there are no landlords, then there is nowhere to house these people.
    If landlords sell up because Council Tax has been replaced with a £150 per annum tax (on your numbers) then who would they have sold their homes to?

    Or do you expect the homes to be demolished?

    Council houses were sold off via right to buy so people could own their own home, not so that people could buy other people's homes.
    I don't know who came up with 'abolish council tax' idea, but it is a total non starter. Such taxes are merely paying for services provided by the Council. If they aren't funded by Council tax, they need to be funded some other way. How?

    None of this changes the problem that you need a private rented sector; rents are increasing because landlords are quitting the private rented sector, amongst other things. Supply and demand etc.
    Council tax should be scrapped because its regressive, expensive and inefficient to collect, and based on valuations from the dark ages.

    Property tax should pay for council services.
    Better still a land tax, a property tax is a disincentive to improve the property.
  • Options

    there is growing expectation/resignation in EU that U.K. will trigger Article 16.

    https://twitter.com/pmdfoster/status/1441128928953909248?s=20

    As they should.
    Because GB-NI trade is collapsing.

    Remind me who signed that deal.
    The sad thing, if it happens, is that it will no doubt be marketed as evidence of Boris's machismo.
    I do not think it would do Boris any harm in the red wall seats
  • Options
    eekeek Posts: 26,553
    carnforth said:

    Quincel said:

    Carnyx said:

    Sandpit said:

    darkage said:

    eek said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    I worked for many years in Councils, and the reality on the ground is that you need a private rented sector for two reasons:

    1) housing of vulnerable people as the state do not do it, most of the time, for good reasons.
    2) Inward investment, people doing up properties promotes economic activity in the area.

    If you kill the private rented sector through punitive wealth taxes, then you run in to those two problems summarised above.

    Switzerland has a wealth tax.
    So does New York (ie a property tax)

    Do they have a rental sector?
    Oh, they do.
    You cannot compare Darlington with Zurich or New York.
    Why not?
    Because houses cost nothing in Darlington. You can buy a house there for £30,000. Go in to the rural hinterlands of County Durham, and houses are being given away for next to nothing to first time buyers, if they do the place up.

    Landlords coming in, buying the properties, doing them up and renting them out to people who have issues in their lives that mean that home ownership isn't right for them can only be regarded as a social good. They take the burden away from the state and generate economic activity.

    Love to know where in Darlington you wou;d buy a house for £30k. £60k will get you a 2 up, 2 down Terrance in the Denes, prices little different since 2004

    Equally I wouldn’t want that sort of hassle for £400 or so a month, there are far too many things that could go wrong


    https://www.rightmove.co.uk/properties/113532656#/?channel=RES_BUY

    Doesn't take too long to do a search on rightmove, but there you go.

    You are absolutely correct. Why go in to such hassle for £400 a month. There is too much regulation and responsibility, which is another reason that landlords are quitting the sector.
    An advert with one photo, of the outside front of the property. One can obviously assume, that ‘requires modernisation’ means it’s completely gutted and unlivable inside, until you spend £20k more than the £35k asking price?
    No ch, no double glazing, bottom energy rating, and so on.
    On the energy rating, any prospective PB-landlords should be aware of MEES:

    https://www.gov.uk/guidance/domestic-private-rented-property-minimum-energy-efficiency-standard-landlord-guidance
    "The cost cap: you will never be required to spend more than £3,500 (including VAT) on energy efficiency improvements."

    If you're double glazing anyway, you're probably at £3500 just with that.
    You would be over paying for double glazing then. The issue is that once you spend £3500 you need to apply for an exemption and that exemption may be removed at any point.
  • Options
    PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 77,015
    carnforth said:

    Quincel said:

    Carnyx said:

    Sandpit said:

    darkage said:

    eek said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    I worked for many years in Councils, and the reality on the ground is that you need a private rented sector for two reasons:

    1) housing of vulnerable people as the state do not do it, most of the time, for good reasons.
    2) Inward investment, people doing up properties promotes economic activity in the area.

    If you kill the private rented sector through punitive wealth taxes, then you run in to those two problems summarised above.

    Switzerland has a wealth tax.
    So does New York (ie a property tax)

    Do they have a rental sector?
    Oh, they do.
    You cannot compare Darlington with Zurich or New York.
    Why not?
    Because houses cost nothing in Darlington. You can buy a house there for £30,000. Go in to the rural hinterlands of County Durham, and houses are being given away for next to nothing to first time buyers, if they do the place up.

    Landlords coming in, buying the properties, doing them up and renting them out to people who have issues in their lives that mean that home ownership isn't right for them can only be regarded as a social good. They take the burden away from the state and generate economic activity.

    Love to know where in Darlington you wou;d buy a house for £30k. £60k will get you a 2 up, 2 down Terrance in the Denes, prices little different since 2004

    Equally I wouldn’t want that sort of hassle for £400 or so a month, there are far too many things that could go wrong


    https://www.rightmove.co.uk/properties/113532656#/?channel=RES_BUY

    Doesn't take too long to do a search on rightmove, but there you go.

    You are absolutely correct. Why go in to such hassle for £400 a month. There is too much regulation and responsibility, which is another reason that landlords are quitting the sector.
    An advert with one photo, of the outside front of the property. One can obviously assume, that ‘requires modernisation’ means it’s completely gutted and unlivable inside, until you spend £20k more than the £35k asking price?
    No ch, no double glazing, bottom energy rating, and so on.
    On the energy rating, any prospective PB-landlords should be aware of MEES:

    https://www.gov.uk/guidance/domestic-private-rented-property-minimum-energy-efficiency-standard-landlord-guidance
    "The cost cap: you will never be required to spend more than £3,500 (including VAT) on energy efficiency improvements."

    If you're double glazing anyway, you're probably at £3500 just with that.
    Not sure how long the double glazing will last judging by the stuff opposite (Is that even housing ?)
  • Options
    Pulpstar said:

    Precious critical beds taken up by the unvaxxed with covid.
    Should be billed for the full, true cost. Its not like giving up a decades long smoking or drink addiction. Heck it's not like developing healthy eating and exercise habits or asking someone to give up motorcycles or horse riding. It's going to the clinic, taking an hour out of a couple of days and getting an injection. Its so so so easy compared to the rest of life

    I'm close to the end of my tether with the anti-vaxxers. It's contrary to all my normal opinions, but I'm beginning to come to the view that if they don't want to take advantage of modern medical science by taking the vaccine that we should make that an all-or-nothing sort of choice, reopen the nightingale hospitals, and have the anti-vaxxers treated for Covid there with only the medical science available to Florence in the 19th century.
  • Options
    isamisam Posts: 41,118

    Looking like this winter is going to the worst as far as crisis, economic turmoil, inflation, shortages and general shit goes in at least 40 years.

    Is Boris the right man to guide us through?

    We shall soon see.

    Don't count Sir K out just yet would be my prediction.

    It won’t be worse than last winter when people were banned from having Christmas dinner with their families
  • Options

    there is growing expectation/resignation in EU that U.K. will trigger Article 16.

    https://twitter.com/pmdfoster/status/1441128928953909248?s=20

    As they should.
    Because GB-NI trade is collapsing.

    Remind me who signed that deal.
    The sad thing, if it happens, is that it will no doubt be marketed as evidence of Boris's machismo.
    I do not think it would do Boris any harm in the red wall seats
    They wont notice when the UC cut hits them right between the eyes.
  • Options
    Andy_JSAndy_JS Posts: 30,228
    There have been 96 homicides in London this year so far. 83 of the victims were male.

    https://www.murdermap.co.uk/statistics/london-murders-2021-latest-total/
  • Options
    carnforthcarnforth Posts: 3,796
    Pulpstar said:

    carnforth said:

    Quincel said:

    Carnyx said:

    Sandpit said:

    darkage said:

    eek said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    I worked for many years in Councils, and the reality on the ground is that you need a private rented sector for two reasons:

    1) housing of vulnerable people as the state do not do it, most of the time, for good reasons.
    2) Inward investment, people doing up properties promotes economic activity in the area.

    If you kill the private rented sector through punitive wealth taxes, then you run in to those two problems summarised above.

    Switzerland has a wealth tax.
    So does New York (ie a property tax)

    Do they have a rental sector?
    Oh, they do.
    You cannot compare Darlington with Zurich or New York.
    Why not?
    Because houses cost nothing in Darlington. You can buy a house there for £30,000. Go in to the rural hinterlands of County Durham, and houses are being given away for next to nothing to first time buyers, if they do the place up.

    Landlords coming in, buying the properties, doing them up and renting them out to people who have issues in their lives that mean that home ownership isn't right for them can only be regarded as a social good. They take the burden away from the state and generate economic activity.

    Love to know where in Darlington you wou;d buy a house for £30k. £60k will get you a 2 up, 2 down Terrance in the Denes, prices little different since 2004

    Equally I wouldn’t want that sort of hassle for £400 or so a month, there are far too many things that could go wrong


    https://www.rightmove.co.uk/properties/113532656#/?channel=RES_BUY

    Doesn't take too long to do a search on rightmove, but there you go.

    You are absolutely correct. Why go in to such hassle for £400 a month. There is too much regulation and responsibility, which is another reason that landlords are quitting the sector.
    An advert with one photo, of the outside front of the property. One can obviously assume, that ‘requires modernisation’ means it’s completely gutted and unlivable inside, until you spend £20k more than the £35k asking price?
    No ch, no double glazing, bottom energy rating, and so on.
    On the energy rating, any prospective PB-landlords should be aware of MEES:

    https://www.gov.uk/guidance/domestic-private-rented-property-minimum-energy-efficiency-standard-landlord-guidance
    "The cost cap: you will never be required to spend more than £3,500 (including VAT) on energy efficiency improvements."

    If you're double glazing anyway, you're probably at £3500 just with that.
    Not sure how long the double glazing will last judging by the stuff opposite (Is that even housing ?)
    Looks like (ex?) light industrial.

    PB should buy the house, and we can settle these discussions with reality.

    (The description mentions a boiler in the bathroom, so it seems it does have central heating.)
  • Options

    As the good book said...




    (Times)

    Because nothing reduces panic better than No 10 urging people not to panic.
  • Options

    there is growing expectation/resignation in EU that U.K. will trigger Article 16.

    https://twitter.com/pmdfoster/status/1441128928953909248?s=20

    As they should.
    Because GB-NI trade is collapsing.

    Remind me who signed that deal.
    The sad thing, if it happens, is that it will no doubt be marketed as evidence of Boris's machismo.
    I do not think it would do Boris any harm in the red wall seats
    They wont notice when the UC cut hits them right between the eyes.
    Looks like that is under consideration in the budget

    As I said it is a big moment for Rishi and I will be looking for fairness and help for the lower paid and impoverished pensioners
  • Options
    TimTTimT Posts: 6,341
    OK. This article on the future of the Quad is worth resetting my password yet again for, to enable me to share with you. Very interesting insights and predictions, which intuitively feel right, especially the idea that it will be China's own actions that are the glue to strengthen the Quad and be an impediment to China's own ambitions.

    The other thing that this article does is demonstrate with glaring clarity just how in reverse Japan's economy has been for a while.

    https://www.cnbc.com/quad-summit-and-china-game-theory-predictions-for-the-future-of-the-quad/

    For anyone interested in geopolitics, I'd say this is a must read.
  • Options

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    Pulpstar said:

    darkage said:

    I worked for many years in Councils, and the reality on the ground is that you need a private rented sector for two reasons:

    1) housing of vulnerable people as the state do not do it, most of the time, for good reasons.
    2) Inward investment, people doing up properties promotes economic activity in the area.

    If you kill the private rented sector through punitive wealth taxes, then you jeopordise those two issues summarised above.

    Can you go through point 1 slowly for me ?
    I've been round this before on here. So people present themselves as homeless. The Council have a duty to house them. There is no Council Housing. So the Council need private landlords. If there are no landlords, then there is nowhere to house these people.
    If landlords sell up because Council Tax has been replaced with a £150 per annum tax (on your numbers) then who would they have sold their homes to?

    Or do you expect the homes to be demolished?

    Council houses were sold off via right to buy so people could own their own home, not so that people could buy other people's homes.
    I don't know who came up with 'abolish council tax' idea, but it is a total non starter. Such taxes are merely paying for services provided by the Council. If they aren't funded by Council tax, they need to be funded some other way. How?

    None of this changes the problem that you need a private rented sector; rents are increasing because landlords are quitting the private rented sector, amongst other things. Supply and demand etc.
    Council tax should be scrapped because its regressive, expensive and inefficient to collect, and based on valuations from the dark ages.

    Property tax should pay for council services.
    Better still a land tax, a property tax is a disincentive to improve the property.
    Agreed.

    I don't see any reason why building an extension should lead to an increase in taxes, its the same land being used.

    Similarly I don't see why buying land and "banking" it should lead to a reduction in taxes.
  • Options
    Big_G_NorthWalesBig_G_NorthWales Posts: 61,208
    edited September 2021
    Farooq said:

    there is growing expectation/resignation in EU that U.K. will trigger Article 16.

    https://twitter.com/pmdfoster/status/1441128928953909248?s=20

    As they should.
    Because GB-NI trade is collapsing.

    Remind me who signed that deal.
    The sad thing, if it happens, is that it will no doubt be marketed as evidence of Boris's machismo.
    I do not think it would do Boris any harm in the red wall seats
    They wont notice when the UC cut hits them right between the eyes.
    Looks like that is under consideration in the budget

    As I said it is a big moment for Rishi and I will be looking for fairness and help for the lower paid and impoverished pensioners
    And if you see none of those things, then what?
    I am not pre judging his budget but those are the areas that need attention and there was some talk today that those on UC are to keep more of their earnings
  • Options
    Andy_JS said:

    Results from the Isle of Man general election have started to come through. VoteUK forum for details.

    Results so far are confirming exit polling

    https://www.iomelections.com/2021/results/
  • Options
    isam said:

    Looking like this winter is going to the worst as far as crisis, economic turmoil, inflation, shortages and general shit goes in at least 40 years.

    Is Boris the right man to guide us through?

    We shall soon see.

    Don't count Sir K out just yet would be my prediction.

    It won’t be worse than last winter when people were banned from having Christmas dinner with their families
    Slightly different, though.

    Christmas 2020 was a fiasco. And that sudden fall down the cliff edge from "It'll be lovely" to "It'll be limited but fine" to "REMAIN INDOORS" should have led to heads rolling. My memory of that time was having half done gift shopping at the moment when London was reconfined to barracks. And that's before we get onto schools.

    But there was some legitimate slack to be cut. It was a mismanagement of the virus, but the virus was a substantial foe. If Christmas 2021 is rubbish, let alone the rest of winter 2021/2, it will be much more because of distinctive decisions that the UK government has taken. And if the plan is to say "this is a consequence of what the voters asked the government to do" (which is a line they seem to be trying)... good luck with that. They'll need it.
  • Options
    FoxyFoxy Posts: 46,736

    Foxy said:

    Rising taxes
    Rising interest rates
    Rising prices
    Food, energy and petrol shortages.

    Could be a fun old winter, eh?

    Rising hospital waiting lists too.

    Just as well I still have last years Christmas Dinner in the freezer. At least until the power cuts hit.
    ITV Wales was so depressing over Wales NHS which has the longest A & E waiting times and waiting lists ever, and the second worst ambulance response times
    V bleak article in this week's New Statesman from a GP. NHS totally at its limits and only September.

    Even on-call doctors are struggling to get an ambulance out to emergencies on their hotlines - sometimes takes hours. Bed blockers filling hospitals because so few care staff so no places for them to be discharged. Precious critical beds taken up by the unvaxxed with covid.
    Wow, it is a bleak article, but sadly my view from the hospital ain't very different. This resonated with me:

    "Steadily eroding pay and conditions are significant reasons why staff quit. But survey evidence suggests these are less important than the demoralising inability to provide the standard of care they trained for, in a system that has been progressively starved of resources relative to need. And ill-health is compounding these retention problems."

    https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/health/2021/09/state-of-a-covid-nation-why-this-winter-could-push-the-nhs-to-breaking-point
  • Options
    isamisam Posts: 41,118

    isam said:

    Looking like this winter is going to the worst as far as crisis, economic turmoil, inflation, shortages and general shit goes in at least 40 years.

    Is Boris the right man to guide us through?

    We shall soon see.

    Don't count Sir K out just yet would be my prediction.

    It won’t be worse than last winter when people were banned from having Christmas dinner with their families
    Slightly different, though.

    Christmas 2020 was a fiasco. And that sudden fall down the cliff edge from "It'll be lovely" to "It'll be limited but fine" to "REMAIN INDOORS" should have led to heads rolling. My memory of that time was having half done gift shopping at the moment when London was reconfined to barracks. And that's before we get onto schools.

    But there was some legitimate slack to be cut. It was a mismanagement of the virus, but the virus was a substantial foe. If Christmas 2021 is rubbish, let alone the rest of winter 2021/2, it will be much more because of distinctive decisions that the UK government has taken. And if the plan is to say "this is a consequence of what the voters asked the government to do" (which is a line they seem to be trying)... good luck with that. They'll need it.
    Well of course - when the govt ‘gets away’ with a forecast disaster, the forecaster with nothing to lose has to say the next one will be worse
  • Options
    PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 77,015
    carnforth said:

    Pulpstar said:

    carnforth said:

    Quincel said:

    Carnyx said:

    Sandpit said:

    darkage said:

    eek said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    I worked for many years in Councils, and the reality on the ground is that you need a private rented sector for two reasons:

    1) housing of vulnerable people as the state do not do it, most of the time, for good reasons.
    2) Inward investment, people doing up properties promotes economic activity in the area.

    If you kill the private rented sector through punitive wealth taxes, then you run in to those two problems summarised above.

    Switzerland has a wealth tax.
    So does New York (ie a property tax)

    Do they have a rental sector?
    Oh, they do.
    You cannot compare Darlington with Zurich or New York.
    Why not?
    Because houses cost nothing in Darlington. You can buy a house there for £30,000. Go in to the rural hinterlands of County Durham, and houses are being given away for next to nothing to first time buyers, if they do the place up.

    Landlords coming in, buying the properties, doing them up and renting them out to people who have issues in their lives that mean that home ownership isn't right for them can only be regarded as a social good. They take the burden away from the state and generate economic activity.

    Love to know where in Darlington you wou;d buy a house for £30k. £60k will get you a 2 up, 2 down Terrance in the Denes, prices little different since 2004

    Equally I wouldn’t want that sort of hassle for £400 or so a month, there are far too many things that could go wrong


    https://www.rightmove.co.uk/properties/113532656#/?channel=RES_BUY

    Doesn't take too long to do a search on rightmove, but there you go.

    You are absolutely correct. Why go in to such hassle for £400 a month. There is too much regulation and responsibility, which is another reason that landlords are quitting the sector.
    An advert with one photo, of the outside front of the property. One can obviously assume, that ‘requires modernisation’ means it’s completely gutted and unlivable inside, until you spend £20k more than the £35k asking price?
    No ch, no double glazing, bottom energy rating, and so on.
    On the energy rating, any prospective PB-landlords should be aware of MEES:

    https://www.gov.uk/guidance/domestic-private-rented-property-minimum-energy-efficiency-standard-landlord-guidance
    "The cost cap: you will never be required to spend more than £3,500 (including VAT) on energy efficiency improvements."

    If you're double glazing anyway, you're probably at £3500 just with that.
    Not sure how long the double glazing will last judging by the stuff opposite (Is that even housing ?)
    Looks like (ex?) light industrial.

    PB should buy the house, and we can settle these discussions with reality.

    (The description mentions a boiler in the bathroom, so it seems it does have central heating.)
    Project lead gets to go on the telly with Dion Dublin.
  • Options
    TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 42,085
    isam said:

    Looking like this winter is going to the worst as far as crisis, economic turmoil, inflation, shortages and general shit goes in at least 40 years.

    Is Boris the right man to guide us through?

    We shall soon see.

    Don't count Sir K out just yet would be my prediction.

    It won’t be worse than last winter when people were banned from having Christmas dinner with their families
    It seems like a dream meeting my sister in a car park to exchange presents I wonder whether people will recall that time and say well at least we can all meet up now ain't life great. Or whether it will be a "that was then" experience and people will find new things to worry/complain about.
  • Options
    TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 42,085
    Foxy said:

    Foxy said:

    Rising taxes
    Rising interest rates
    Rising prices
    Food, energy and petrol shortages.

    Could be a fun old winter, eh?

    Rising hospital waiting lists too.

    Just as well I still have last years Christmas Dinner in the freezer. At least until the power cuts hit.
    ITV Wales was so depressing over Wales NHS which has the longest A & E waiting times and waiting lists ever, and the second worst ambulance response times
    V bleak article in this week's New Statesman from a GP. NHS totally at its limits and only September.

    Even on-call doctors are struggling to get an ambulance out to emergencies on their hotlines - sometimes takes hours. Bed blockers filling hospitals because so few care staff so no places for them to be discharged. Precious critical beds taken up by the unvaxxed with covid.
    Wow, it is a bleak article, but sadly my view from the hospital ain't very different. This resonated with me:

    "Steadily eroding pay and conditions are significant reasons why staff quit. But survey evidence suggests these are less important than the demoralising inability to provide the standard of care they trained for, in a system that has been progressively starved of resources relative to need. And ill-health is compounding these retention problems."

    https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/health/2021/09/state-of-a-covid-nation-why-this-winter-could-push-the-nhs-to-breaking-point
    Not to minimise the problem but there have been NHS at breaking point headlines and articles every year for the past 20 years.

    We as a country evidently are happy to put up with it.
  • Options
    SeaShantyIrish2SeaShantyIrish2 Posts: 16,675
    edited September 2021

    Andy_JS said:

    Results from the Isle of Man general election have started to come through. VoteUK forum for details.

    Results so far are confirming exit polling

    https://www.iomelections.com/2021/results/
    CORRECTION - at least one result the exit poll did NOT predict, indeed was way off:

    Rushen (2)

    Juan Watterson (I - current Speaker HoK) 2,384 - elected
    Michelle Haywood 1,386 - elected
    Mark Kemp 1,163
    Andrew Langan-Newton 1,109

    Exit poll said winners were #1 Watterson, #2 Langan-Newton, who ran for the Manx Green Party; note only one incumbent in this constituency as one seat was vacant

  • Options
    FoxyFoxy Posts: 46,736
    TOPPING said:

    Foxy said:

    Foxy said:

    Rising taxes
    Rising interest rates
    Rising prices
    Food, energy and petrol shortages.

    Could be a fun old winter, eh?

    Rising hospital waiting lists too.

    Just as well I still have last years Christmas Dinner in the freezer. At least until the power cuts hit.
    ITV Wales was so depressing over Wales NHS which has the longest A & E waiting times and waiting lists ever, and the second worst ambulance response times
    V bleak article in this week's New Statesman from a GP. NHS totally at its limits and only September.

    Even on-call doctors are struggling to get an ambulance out to emergencies on their hotlines - sometimes takes hours. Bed blockers filling hospitals because so few care staff so no places for them to be discharged. Precious critical beds taken up by the unvaxxed with covid.
    Wow, it is a bleak article, but sadly my view from the hospital ain't very different. This resonated with me:

    "Steadily eroding pay and conditions are significant reasons why staff quit. But survey evidence suggests these are less important than the demoralising inability to provide the standard of care they trained for, in a system that has been progressively starved of resources relative to need. And ill-health is compounding these retention problems."

    https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/health/2021/09/state-of-a-covid-nation-why-this-winter-could-push-the-nhs-to-breaking-point
    Not to minimise the problem but there have been NHS at breaking point headlines and articles every year for the past 20 years.

    We as a country evidently are happy to put up with it.
    Sure, everything is fine. There is no wolf.
  • Options
    Farooq said:

    Farooq said:

    there is growing expectation/resignation in EU that U.K. will trigger Article 16.

    https://twitter.com/pmdfoster/status/1441128928953909248?s=20

    As they should.
    Because GB-NI trade is collapsing.

    Remind me who signed that deal.
    The sad thing, if it happens, is that it will no doubt be marketed as evidence of Boris's machismo.
    I do not think it would do Boris any harm in the red wall seats
    They wont notice when the UC cut hits them right between the eyes.
    Looks like that is under consideration in the budget

    As I said it is a big moment for Rishi and I will be looking for fairness and help for the lower paid and impoverished pensioners
    And if you see none of those things, then what?
    I am not pre judging his budget but those are the areas that need attention and there was some talk today that those on UC are to keep more of their earnings
    That's a lot of words for "then nothing"
    With respect there is little I could say to you that would not be criticised so be it
  • Options
    TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 42,085
    Foxy said:

    TOPPING said:

    Foxy said:

    Foxy said:

    Rising taxes
    Rising interest rates
    Rising prices
    Food, energy and petrol shortages.

    Could be a fun old winter, eh?

    Rising hospital waiting lists too.

    Just as well I still have last years Christmas Dinner in the freezer. At least until the power cuts hit.
    ITV Wales was so depressing over Wales NHS which has the longest A & E waiting times and waiting lists ever, and the second worst ambulance response times
    V bleak article in this week's New Statesman from a GP. NHS totally at its limits and only September.

    Even on-call doctors are struggling to get an ambulance out to emergencies on their hotlines - sometimes takes hours. Bed blockers filling hospitals because so few care staff so no places for them to be discharged. Precious critical beds taken up by the unvaxxed with covid.
    Wow, it is a bleak article, but sadly my view from the hospital ain't very different. This resonated with me:

    "Steadily eroding pay and conditions are significant reasons why staff quit. But survey evidence suggests these are less important than the demoralising inability to provide the standard of care they trained for, in a system that has been progressively starved of resources relative to need. And ill-health is compounding these retention problems."

    https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/health/2021/09/state-of-a-covid-nation-why-this-winter-could-push-the-nhs-to-breaking-point
    Not to minimise the problem but there have been NHS at breaking point headlines and articles every year for the past 20 years.

    We as a country evidently are happy to put up with it.
    Sure, everything is fine. There is no wolf.
    I'm just saying that there have been such headlines for years (that famous montage of Graun front pages) and here we are.

    So we as a nation must be content to put up with it.
  • Options
    isamisam Posts: 41,118

    Farooq said:

    Farooq said:

    there is growing expectation/resignation in EU that U.K. will trigger Article 16.

    https://twitter.com/pmdfoster/status/1441128928953909248?s=20

    As they should.
    Because GB-NI trade is collapsing.

    Remind me who signed that deal.
    The sad thing, if it happens, is that it will no doubt be marketed as evidence of Boris's machismo.
    I do not think it would do Boris any harm in the red wall seats
    They wont notice when the UC cut hits them right between the eyes.
    Looks like that is under consideration in the budget

    As I said it is a big moment for Rishi and I will be looking for fairness and help for the lower paid and impoverished pensioners
    And if you see none of those things, then what?
    I am not pre judging his budget but those are the areas that need attention and there was some talk today that those on UC are to keep more of their earnings
    That's a lot of words for "then nothing"
    With respect there is little I could say to you that would not be criticised so be it
    @Roy_G_Biv -esque I’d say
  • Options
    Foxy said:

    TOPPING said:

    Foxy said:

    Foxy said:

    Rising taxes
    Rising interest rates
    Rising prices
    Food, energy and petrol shortages.

    Could be a fun old winter, eh?

    Rising hospital waiting lists too.

    Just as well I still have last years Christmas Dinner in the freezer. At least until the power cuts hit.
    ITV Wales was so depressing over Wales NHS which has the longest A & E waiting times and waiting lists ever, and the second worst ambulance response times
    V bleak article in this week's New Statesman from a GP. NHS totally at its limits and only September.

    Even on-call doctors are struggling to get an ambulance out to emergencies on their hotlines - sometimes takes hours. Bed blockers filling hospitals because so few care staff so no places for them to be discharged. Precious critical beds taken up by the unvaxxed with covid.
    Wow, it is a bleak article, but sadly my view from the hospital ain't very different. This resonated with me:

    "Steadily eroding pay and conditions are significant reasons why staff quit. But survey evidence suggests these are less important than the demoralising inability to provide the standard of care they trained for, in a system that has been progressively starved of resources relative to need. And ill-health is compounding these retention problems."

    https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/health/2021/09/state-of-a-covid-nation-why-this-winter-could-push-the-nhs-to-breaking-point
    Not to minimise the problem but there have been NHS at breaking point headlines and articles every year for the past 20 years.

    We as a country evidently are happy to put up with it.
    Sure, everything is fine. There is no wolf.
    To be fair everything is not fine in the NHS throughout the devolved administrations but billions are being put in and it is not a infinite resource

    Add in social care and climate change and it is fair to ask just how is it all going to be financed
  • Options
    PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 77,015
    Foxy said:

    Foxy said:

    Rising taxes
    Rising interest rates
    Rising prices
    Food, energy and petrol shortages.

    Could be a fun old winter, eh?

    Rising hospital waiting lists too.

    Just as well I still have last years Christmas Dinner in the freezer. At least until the power cuts hit.
    ITV Wales was so depressing over Wales NHS which has the longest A & E waiting times and waiting lists ever, and the second worst ambulance response times
    V bleak article in this week's New Statesman from a GP. NHS totally at its limits and only September.

    Even on-call doctors are struggling to get an ambulance out to emergencies on their hotlines - sometimes takes hours. Bed blockers filling hospitals because so few care staff so no places for them to be discharged. Precious critical beds taken up by the unvaxxed with covid.
    Wow, it is a bleak article, but sadly my view from the hospital ain't very different. This resonated with me:

    "Steadily eroding pay and conditions are significant reasons why staff quit. But survey evidence suggests these are less important than the demoralising inability to provide the standard of care they trained for, in a system that has been progressively starved of resources relative to need. And ill-health is compounding these retention problems."

    https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/health/2021/09/state-of-a-covid-nation-why-this-winter-could-push-the-nhs-to-breaking-point
    The NHS has had more funding increase than any other govt department though. What do you suggest ?
  • Options
    FoxyFoxy Posts: 46,736
    TOPPING said:

    Foxy said:

    TOPPING said:

    Foxy said:

    Foxy said:

    Rising taxes
    Rising interest rates
    Rising prices
    Food, energy and petrol shortages.

    Could be a fun old winter, eh?

    Rising hospital waiting lists too.

    Just as well I still have last years Christmas Dinner in the freezer. At least until the power cuts hit.
    ITV Wales was so depressing over Wales NHS which has the longest A & E waiting times and waiting lists ever, and the second worst ambulance response times
    V bleak article in this week's New Statesman from a GP. NHS totally at its limits and only September.

    Even on-call doctors are struggling to get an ambulance out to emergencies on their hotlines - sometimes takes hours. Bed blockers filling hospitals because so few care staff so no places for them to be discharged. Precious critical beds taken up by the unvaxxed with covid.
    Wow, it is a bleak article, but sadly my view from the hospital ain't very different. This resonated with me:

    "Steadily eroding pay and conditions are significant reasons why staff quit. But survey evidence suggests these are less important than the demoralising inability to provide the standard of care they trained for, in a system that has been progressively starved of resources relative to need. And ill-health is compounding these retention problems."

    https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/health/2021/09/state-of-a-covid-nation-why-this-winter-could-push-the-nhs-to-breaking-point
    Not to minimise the problem but there have been NHS at breaking point headlines and articles every year for the past 20 years.

    We as a country evidently are happy to put up with it.
    Sure, everything is fine. There is no wolf.
    I'm just saying that there have been such headlines for years (that famous montage of Graun front pages) and here we are.

    So we as a nation must be content to put up with it.
    Well, that belief will be tested severely these next few months.

    Do you not get the feeling that things are spiralling out of control?
  • Options
    MattWMattW Posts: 20,472
    edited September 2021
    Carnyx said:

    Sandpit said:

    darkage said:

    eek said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    I worked for many years in Councils, and the reality on the ground is that you need a private rented sector for two reasons:

    1) housing of vulnerable people as the state do not do it, most of the time, for good reasons.
    2) Inward investment, people doing up properties promotes economic activity in the area.

    If you kill the private rented sector through punitive wealth taxes, then you run in to those two problems summarised above.

    Switzerland has a wealth tax.
    So does New York (ie a property tax)

    Do they have a rental sector?
    Oh, they do.
    You cannot compare Darlington with Zurich or New York.
    Why not?
    Because houses cost nothing in Darlington. You can buy a house there for £30,000. Go in to the rural hinterlands of County Durham, and houses are being given away for next to nothing to first time buyers, if they do the place up.

    Landlords coming in, buying the properties, doing them up and renting them out to people who have issues in their lives that mean that home ownership isn't right for them can only be regarded as a social good. They take the burden away from the state and generate economic activity.

    Love to know where in Darlington you wou;d buy a house for £30k. £60k will get you a 2 up, 2 down Terrance in the Denes, prices little different since 2004

    Equally I wouldn’t want that sort of hassle for £400 or so a month, there are far too many things that could go wrong


    https://www.rightmove.co.uk/properties/113532656#/?channel=RES_BUY

    Doesn't take too long to do a search on rightmove, but there you go.

    You are absolutely correct. Why go in to such hassle for £400 a month. There is too much regulation and responsibility, which is another reason that landlords are quitting the sector.
    An advert with one photo, of the outside front of the property. One can obviously assume, that ‘requires modernisation’ means it’s completely gutted and unlivable inside, until you spend £20k more than the £35k asking price?
    No ch, no double glazing, bottom energy rating, and so on.
    That'll need 30-40k spending.

    And I'd say the "offers over" price is probably a flash of the knickers.
  • Options
    Foxy said:

    TOPPING said:

    Foxy said:

    TOPPING said:

    Foxy said:

    Foxy said:

    Rising taxes
    Rising interest rates
    Rising prices
    Food, energy and petrol shortages.

    Could be a fun old winter, eh?

    Rising hospital waiting lists too.

    Just as well I still have last years Christmas Dinner in the freezer. At least until the power cuts hit.
    ITV Wales was so depressing over Wales NHS which has the longest A & E waiting times and waiting lists ever, and the second worst ambulance response times
    V bleak article in this week's New Statesman from a GP. NHS totally at its limits and only September.

    Even on-call doctors are struggling to get an ambulance out to emergencies on their hotlines - sometimes takes hours. Bed blockers filling hospitals because so few care staff so no places for them to be discharged. Precious critical beds taken up by the unvaxxed with covid.
    Wow, it is a bleak article, but sadly my view from the hospital ain't very different. This resonated with me:

    "Steadily eroding pay and conditions are significant reasons why staff quit. But survey evidence suggests these are less important than the demoralising inability to provide the standard of care they trained for, in a system that has been progressively starved of resources relative to need. And ill-health is compounding these retention problems."

    https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/health/2021/09/state-of-a-covid-nation-why-this-winter-could-push-the-nhs-to-breaking-point
    Not to minimise the problem but there have been NHS at breaking point headlines and articles every year for the past 20 years.

    We as a country evidently are happy to put up with it.
    Sure, everything is fine. There is no wolf.
    I'm just saying that there have been such headlines for years (that famous montage of Graun front pages) and here we are.

    So we as a nation must be content to put up with it.
    Well, that belief will be tested severely these next few months.

    Do you not get the feeling that things are spiralling out of control?
    Yes. When ambulances are stuck outside A&E departments because they can't offload patients, so their aren't enough ambulances to go out to answer emergency calls, the system has become dysfunctional and people will die unnecessarily. That seems out of control to my simple mind.
  • Options
    MattWMattW Posts: 20,472
    carnforth said:

    Quincel said:

    Carnyx said:

    Sandpit said:

    darkage said:

    eek said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    darkage said:

    I worked for many years in Councils, and the reality on the ground is that you need a private rented sector for two reasons:

    1) housing of vulnerable people as the state do not do it, most of the time, for good reasons.
    2) Inward investment, people doing up properties promotes economic activity in the area.

    If you kill the private rented sector through punitive wealth taxes, then you run in to those two problems summarised above.

    Switzerland has a wealth tax.
    So does New York (ie a property tax)

    Do they have a rental sector?
    Oh, they do.
    You cannot compare Darlington with Zurich or New York.
    Why not?
    Because houses cost nothing in Darlington. You can buy a house there for £30,000. Go in to the rural hinterlands of County Durham, and houses are being given away for next to nothing to first time buyers, if they do the place up.

    Landlords coming in, buying the properties, doing them up and renting them out to people who have issues in their lives that mean that home ownership isn't right for them can only be regarded as a social good. They take the burden away from the state and generate economic activity.

    Love to know where in Darlington you wou;d buy a house for £30k. £60k will get you a 2 up, 2 down Terrance in the Denes, prices little different since 2004

    Equally I wouldn’t want that sort of hassle for £400 or so a month, there are far too many things that could go wrong


    https://www.rightmove.co.uk/properties/113532656#/?channel=RES_BUY

    Doesn't take too long to do a search on rightmove, but there you go.

    You are absolutely correct. Why go in to such hassle for £400 a month. There is too much regulation and responsibility, which is another reason that landlords are quitting the sector.
    An advert with one photo, of the outside front of the property. One can obviously assume, that ‘requires modernisation’ means it’s completely gutted and unlivable inside, until you spend £20k more than the £35k asking price?
    No ch, no double glazing, bottom energy rating, and so on.
    On the energy rating, any prospective PB-landlords should be aware of MEES:

    https://www.gov.uk/guidance/domestic-private-rented-property-minimum-energy-efficiency-standard-landlord-guidance
    "The cost cap: you will never be required to spend more than £3,500 (including VAT) on energy efficiency improvements."

    If you're double glazing anyway, you're probably at £3500 just with that.
    Proposals to increase it to £10k were consulted on last January. Sensible.

    And to bring forward the EPC level C requirement to 2025 - which is too soon as the staff to renovate are not sufficiently available. We talked about this earlier.
  • Options
    FoxyFoxy Posts: 46,736
    Pulpstar said:

    Foxy said:

    Foxy said:

    Rising taxes
    Rising interest rates
    Rising prices
    Food, energy and petrol shortages.

    Could be a fun old winter, eh?

    Rising hospital waiting lists too.

    Just as well I still have last years Christmas Dinner in the freezer. At least until the power cuts hit.
    ITV Wales was so depressing over Wales NHS which has the longest A & E waiting times and waiting lists ever, and the second worst ambulance response times
    V bleak article in this week's New Statesman from a GP. NHS totally at its limits and only September.

    Even on-call doctors are struggling to get an ambulance out to emergencies on their hotlines - sometimes takes hours. Bed blockers filling hospitals because so few care staff so no places for them to be discharged. Precious critical beds taken up by the unvaxxed with covid.
    Wow, it is a bleak article, but sadly my view from the hospital ain't very different. This resonated with me:

    "Steadily eroding pay and conditions are significant reasons why staff quit. But survey evidence suggests these are less important than the demoralising inability to provide the standard of care they trained for, in a system that has been progressively starved of resources relative to need. And ill-health is compounding these retention problems."

    https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/health/2021/09/state-of-a-covid-nation-why-this-winter-could-push-the-nhs-to-breaking-point
    The NHS has had more funding increase than any other govt department though. What do you suggest ?
    I don't think it primarily about funding. The problem is shortness of capacity, staff vacancies, inadequate bed numbers, atrophy of postgraduate training, demoralisation.

    Money cannot fix a broken system.
  • Options
    TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 42,085
    edited September 2021
    Foxy said:

    TOPPING said:

    Foxy said:

    TOPPING said:

    Foxy said:

    Foxy said:

    Rising taxes
    Rising interest rates
    Rising prices
    Food, energy and petrol shortages.

    Could be a fun old winter, eh?

    Rising hospital waiting lists too.

    Just as well I still have last years Christmas Dinner in the freezer. At least until the power cuts hit.
    ITV Wales was so depressing over Wales NHS which has the longest A & E waiting times and waiting lists ever, and the second worst ambulance response times
    V bleak article in this week's New Statesman from a GP. NHS totally at its limits and only September.

    Even on-call doctors are struggling to get an ambulance out to emergencies on their hotlines - sometimes takes hours. Bed blockers filling hospitals because so few care staff so no places for them to be discharged. Precious critical beds taken up by the unvaxxed with covid.
    Wow, it is a bleak article, but sadly my view from the hospital ain't very different. This resonated with me:

    "Steadily eroding pay and conditions are significant reasons why staff quit. But survey evidence suggests these are less important than the demoralising inability to provide the standard of care they trained for, in a system that has been progressively starved of resources relative to need. And ill-health is compounding these retention problems."

    https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/health/2021/09/state-of-a-covid-nation-why-this-winter-could-push-the-nhs-to-breaking-point
    Not to minimise the problem but there have been NHS at breaking point headlines and articles every year for the past 20 years.

    We as a country evidently are happy to put up with it.
    Sure, everything is fine. There is no wolf.
    I'm just saying that there have been such headlines for years (that famous montage of Graun front pages) and here we are.

    So we as a nation must be content to put up with it.
    Well, that belief will be tested severely these next few months.

    Do you not get the feeling that things are spiralling out of control?
    I think the govt is certainly losing it (control).

    But the NHS has pretty well been ringfenced spending wise. That's not to say I am at all a fan of the NHS model as you may be aware from my various posts about my experiences (and the anecdotal experiences of just about everyone I know) with it.

    Another NHS in crisis headline won't I believe gain traction.
  • Options
    Foxy said:

    TOPPING said:

    Foxy said:

    Foxy said:

    Rising taxes
    Rising interest rates
    Rising prices
    Food, energy and petrol shortages.

    Could be a fun old winter, eh?

    Rising hospital waiting lists too.

    Just as well I still have last years Christmas Dinner in the freezer. At least until the power cuts hit.
    ITV Wales was so depressing over Wales NHS which has the longest A & E waiting times and waiting lists ever, and the second worst ambulance response times
    V bleak article in this week's New Statesman from a GP. NHS totally at its limits and only September.

    Even on-call doctors are struggling to get an ambulance out to emergencies on their hotlines - sometimes takes hours. Bed blockers filling hospitals because so few care staff so no places for them to be discharged. Precious critical beds taken up by the unvaxxed with covid.
    Wow, it is a bleak article, but sadly my view from the hospital ain't very different. This resonated with me:

    "Steadily eroding pay and conditions are significant reasons why staff quit. But survey evidence suggests these are less important than the demoralising inability to provide the standard of care they trained for, in a system that has been progressively starved of resources relative to need. And ill-health is compounding these retention problems."

    https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/health/2021/09/state-of-a-covid-nation-why-this-winter-could-push-the-nhs-to-breaking-point
    Not to minimise the problem but there have been NHS at breaking point headlines and articles every year for the past 20 years.

    We as a country evidently are happy to put up with it.
    Sure, everything is fine. There is no wolf.
    Interesting story that one. One moral, the one often drawn, is to not cry wolf prematurely, in case you aren't believed. The other is that you have to be careful about discounting wolf-crying just because it has turned out wrong in the past.

    Even if there hasn't been a wolf in the past, there might still be one this time. You have to judge the evidence and the risk/benefit on its merits...
  • Options
    TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 42,085
    Foxy said:

    Pulpstar said:

    Foxy said:

    Foxy said:

    Rising taxes
    Rising interest rates
    Rising prices
    Food, energy and petrol shortages.

    Could be a fun old winter, eh?

    Rising hospital waiting lists too.

    Just as well I still have last years Christmas Dinner in the freezer. At least until the power cuts hit.
    ITV Wales was so depressing over Wales NHS which has the longest A & E waiting times and waiting lists ever, and the second worst ambulance response times
    V bleak article in this week's New Statesman from a GP. NHS totally at its limits and only September.

    Even on-call doctors are struggling to get an ambulance out to emergencies on their hotlines - sometimes takes hours. Bed blockers filling hospitals because so few care staff so no places for them to be discharged. Precious critical beds taken up by the unvaxxed with covid.
    Wow, it is a bleak article, but sadly my view from the hospital ain't very different. This resonated with me:

    "Steadily eroding pay and conditions are significant reasons why staff quit. But survey evidence suggests these are less important than the demoralising inability to provide the standard of care they trained for, in a system that has been progressively starved of resources relative to need. And ill-health is compounding these retention problems."

    https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/health/2021/09/state-of-a-covid-nation-why-this-winter-could-push-the-nhs-to-breaking-point
    The NHS has had more funding increase than any other govt department though. What do you suggest ?
    I don't think it primarily about funding. The problem is shortness of capacity, staff vacancies, inadequate bed numbers, atrophy of postgraduate training, demoralisation.

    Money cannot fix a broken system.
    Is my point. The model needs reforming but no govt dares to do so.
  • Options
    Andy_JSAndy_JS Posts: 30,228
    edited September 2021
    Maybe ReformUK need to think of a new name, one that actually makes them sound like the populist party they are. The word "reform" arguably sounds too bland.
  • Options
    isamisam Posts: 41,118
    edited September 2021

    Foxy said:

    TOPPING said:

    Foxy said:

    Foxy said:

    Rising taxes
    Rising interest rates
    Rising prices
    Food, energy and petrol shortages.

    Could be a fun old winter, eh?

    Rising hospital waiting lists too.

    Just as well I still have last years Christmas Dinner in the freezer. At least until the power cuts hit.
    ITV Wales was so depressing over Wales NHS which has the longest A & E waiting times and waiting lists ever, and the second worst ambulance response times
    V bleak article in this week's New Statesman from a GP. NHS totally at its limits and only September.

    Even on-call doctors are struggling to get an ambulance out to emergencies on their hotlines - sometimes takes hours. Bed blockers filling hospitals because so few care staff so no places for them to be discharged. Precious critical beds taken up by the unvaxxed with covid.
    Wow, it is a bleak article, but sadly my view from the hospital ain't very different. This resonated with me:

    "Steadily eroding pay and conditions are significant reasons why staff quit. But survey evidence suggests these are less important than the demoralising inability to provide the standard of care they trained for, in a system that has been progressively starved of resources relative to need. And ill-health is compounding these retention problems."

    https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/health/2021/09/state-of-a-covid-nation-why-this-winter-could-push-the-nhs-to-breaking-point
    Not to minimise the problem but there have been NHS at breaking point headlines and articles every year for the past 20 years.

    We as a country evidently are happy to put up with it.
    Sure, everything is fine. There is no wolf.
    Interesting story that one. One moral, the one often drawn, is to not cry wolf prematurely, in case you aren't believed. The other is that you have to be careful about discounting wolf-crying just because it has turned out wrong in the past.

    Even if there hasn't been a wolf in the past, there might still be one this time. You have to judge the evidence and the risk/benefit on its merits...
    …..

    ‘Johnson Variant’ 🙄





  • Options
    carnforthcarnforth Posts: 3,796

    Foxy said:

    TOPPING said:

    Foxy said:

    Foxy said:

    Rising taxes
    Rising interest rates
    Rising prices
    Food, energy and petrol shortages.

    Could be a fun old winter, eh?

    Rising hospital waiting lists too.

    Just as well I still have last years Christmas Dinner in the freezer. At least until the power cuts hit.
    ITV Wales was so depressing over Wales NHS which has the longest A & E waiting times and waiting lists ever, and the second worst ambulance response times
    V bleak article in this week's New Statesman from a GP. NHS totally at its limits and only September.

    Even on-call doctors are struggling to get an ambulance out to emergencies on their hotlines - sometimes takes hours. Bed blockers filling hospitals because so few care staff so no places for them to be discharged. Precious critical beds taken up by the unvaxxed with covid.
    Wow, it is a bleak article, but sadly my view from the hospital ain't very different. This resonated with me:

    "Steadily eroding pay and conditions are significant reasons why staff quit. But survey evidence suggests these are less important than the demoralising inability to provide the standard of care they trained for, in a system that has been progressively starved of resources relative to need. And ill-health is compounding these retention problems."

    https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/health/2021/09/state-of-a-covid-nation-why-this-winter-could-push-the-nhs-to-breaking-point
    Not to minimise the problem but there have been NHS at breaking point headlines and articles every year for the past 20 years.

    We as a country evidently are happy to put up with it.
    Sure, everything is fine. There is no wolf.
    Interesting story that one. One moral, the one often drawn, is to not cry wolf prematurely, in case you aren't believed. The other is that you have to be careful about discounting wolf-crying just because it has turned out wrong in the past.

    Even if there hasn't been a wolf in the past, there might still be one this time. You have to judge the evidence and the risk/benefit on its merits...
    I’ve heard it used as an example of how “the moral of the story” and “the ending of the story” are different concepts.
  • Options
    FoxyFoxy Posts: 46,736
    The 4 hour target for seeing and treating in ED is a very imperfect measure, but probably the single easiest measure of strain on the NHS. August's was the worst figure on record, worse than the peaks of both the initial wave and last winters one.

    The data are here:

    https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/ae-waiting-times-and-activity/

    But when I see things spiralling out of control, I don't just mean the NHS.
  • Options
    gealbhangealbhan Posts: 2,362
    Andy_JS said:

    Maybe ReformUK need to think of a new name, one that actually makes them sound like the populist party they are. The word "reform" arguably sounds too bland.

    I think it should start with New.
  • Options
    Andy_JSAndy_JS Posts: 30,228
    We've known for decades that the percentage of older people would be much higher than it used to be, and therefore the NHS would come under pressure in a way it didn't before. Did we adequately prepare for that over the last 20 or 30 years? Probably not.
  • Options
    carnforth said:

    Foxy said:

    TOPPING said:

    Foxy said:

    Foxy said:

    Rising taxes
    Rising interest rates
    Rising prices
    Food, energy and petrol shortages.

    Could be a fun old winter, eh?

    Rising hospital waiting lists too.

    Just as well I still have last years Christmas Dinner in the freezer. At least until the power cuts hit.
    ITV Wales was so depressing over Wales NHS which has the longest A & E waiting times and waiting lists ever, and the second worst ambulance response times
    V bleak article in this week's New Statesman from a GP. NHS totally at its limits and only September.

    Even on-call doctors are struggling to get an ambulance out to emergencies on their hotlines - sometimes takes hours. Bed blockers filling hospitals because so few care staff so no places for them to be discharged. Precious critical beds taken up by the unvaxxed with covid.
    Wow, it is a bleak article, but sadly my view from the hospital ain't very different. This resonated with me:

    "Steadily eroding pay and conditions are significant reasons why staff quit. But survey evidence suggests these are less important than the demoralising inability to provide the standard of care they trained for, in a system that has been progressively starved of resources relative to need. And ill-health is compounding these retention problems."

    https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/health/2021/09/state-of-a-covid-nation-why-this-winter-could-push-the-nhs-to-breaking-point
    Not to minimise the problem but there have been NHS at breaking point headlines and articles every year for the past 20 years.

    We as a country evidently are happy to put up with it.
    Sure, everything is fine. There is no wolf.
    Interesting story that one. One moral, the one often drawn, is to not cry wolf prematurely, in case you aren't believed. The other is that you have to be careful about discounting wolf-crying just because it has turned out wrong in the past.

    Even if there hasn't been a wolf in the past, there might still be one this time. You have to judge the evidence and the risk/benefit on its merits...
    I’ve heard it used as an example of how “the moral of the story” and “the ending of the story” are different concepts.
    Ooh. Intriguing- can you point me towards some more?

    One of the things I'm thinking about in a different context is the way that really good stories- the sort that a community like a nation or faith get built around- have different, complementary but all healthy interpretations. Really effective politicians can do the same...
  • Options
    rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 55,300
    Andy_JS said:

    There have been 96 homicides in London this year so far. 83 of the victims were male.

    https://www.murdermap.co.uk/statistics/london-murders-2021-latest-total/

    All the more reason for compulsory sexism training in schools. No way should murderers get away with just killing people of one sex.
  • Options
    gealbhangealbhan Posts: 2,362
    gealbhan said:

    Andy_JS said:

    Maybe ReformUK need to think of a new name, one that actually makes them sound like the populist party they are. The word "reform" arguably sounds too bland.

    I think it should start with New.
    How about these?

    UK Alternative
    New Citizen
    UK Forward
    UK Advance
    The Civic Rally
    Reform For Freedom
  • Options
    gealbhangealbhan Posts: 2,362

    As the good book said...




    (Times)

    Because nothing reduces panic better than No 10 urging people not to panic.
    Oh my God. Are they really saying that? That’s just a day away from saying: abandon the cities!
  • Options
    SeaShantyIrish2SeaShantyIrish2 Posts: 16,675
    edited September 2021
    gealbhan said:

    gealbhan said:

    Andy_JS said:

    Maybe ReformUK need to think of a new name, one that actually makes them sound like the populist party they are. The word "reform" arguably sounds too bland.

    I think it should start with New.
    How about these?

    UK Alternative
    New Citizen
    UK Forward
    UK Advance
    The Civic Rally
    Reform For Freedom
    Vox (Not Vax!) Pop
    Proud Blokes
    True British Voice
    Britain Unwoke!
  • Options
    gealbhangealbhan Posts: 2,362

    gealbhan said:

    gealbhan said:

    Andy_JS said:

    Maybe ReformUK need to think of a new name, one that actually makes them sound like the populist party they are. The word "reform" arguably sounds too bland.

    I think it should start with New.
    How about these?

    UK Alternative
    New Citizen
    UK Forward
    UK Advance
    The Civic Rally
    Reform For Freedom
    Vox (Not Vax!) Pop
    Proud Blokes
    True British Voice
    Britain Unwoke!
    The John Bull Party
  • Options
    I don't count myelf as a great reader of the tea leaves, but I'm pretty sure the Tories would rip both of your arms off now of you offered Anglea R as their opponent at the next election.
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