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During the four years of Trump the Republicans have lost the House, the Senate and the Presidency –

SystemSystem Posts: 8,489
edited January 8 in General
imageDuring the four years of Trump the Republicans have lost the House, the Senate and the Presidency – politicalbetting.com

Back in November 2016 when Trump won his unexpected presidential victory over Hillary Clinton the party controlled the Senate, the House of Representatives and after Obama stood down two months later the White House.

Read the full story here

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Comments

  • MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 36,845
    First to the barricades...er, Scotland?
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 53,302
    Coronavirus: Women on exercise trip 'surrounded by police'

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-derbyshire-55560814

    Weren't Derbyshire the ones that got the drones out last March?
  • MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 36,845

    Coronavirus: Women on exercise trip 'surrounded by police'

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-derbyshire-55560814

    Weren't Derbyshire the ones that got the drones out last March?

    Uh-huh....
  • MaxPBMaxPB Posts: 23,895

    kle4 said:

    I see that in the Great British tradition of always needing an enemy to prove our greatness, having comprehensively defeated the EU we have now turned our attention to China. I expect France to reappear in due course; a bit more of a manageable foe than China.

    Incidentally, for those who suggest that 'slave labour' in China is prevalent and a good reason for finding different suppliers, I assume they will apply the same principle to Bangladesh, for example, and a whole host of countries in South Asia and elsewhere in the world from which we buy cheap goods on the back of wages that do little to remove the factory workers from grinding poverty.

    That is one seriously weak dismissal of the specific level of concerns with China's regime as some kind of manifestation of exceptionalism.

    Risible.
    Thanks. But why? I suspect that Chinese assemblers of I-phones have a better existence than many working in the sweatshops of the world making clothes for Primark - for example.
    Do you?

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-china-51697800

    "According to the report, the factories claim to be part of the supply chain for 83 well-known global brands, including Nike, Apple and Dell."
  • MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 36,845

    Coronavirus: Women on exercise trip 'surrounded by police'

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-derbyshire-55560814

    Weren't Derbyshire the ones that got the drones out last March?

    "A hot drink is classed as a picnic."

    Thank God they didn't bring a Scotch egg.....
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 9,887
    Yep. Trump attracts some slavish devotion.
    The prevailing effect is toxic on the wider public.
    No obvious route out of this GOP conundrum.
    SAD!
  • Philip_ThompsonPhilip_Thompson Posts: 47,349

    HYUFD said:

    HYUFD said:

    HYUFD said:

    An eventful Christmas day for the chief executive of the Equality and Human Rights Commission.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-55573412

    It is funny how these top London lawyers have so much difficulty in understanding the lockdown rules. Their antennae are ready to detect subtle breaches of equality regulation. She's been hot on the trail of antisemites in the Jolly Old Labour Party -- but a simple rule on lockdown like "Do Not Travel to Your Second Home" is completely beyond her ken.

    "I would like to apologise to the local community, where we feel deeply embedded," said Mrs Hilsenrath.

    So, basically the Llanegryn locals were the happy Stasis 😁😁😁& got Gog Plod to chase her out of Wales on Xmas day & leaked the story so it is all over the press.

    And yet the little second-homer (probably third-homer) still believes the locals love her ("deeply embedded").

    If you live in Hertfordshire and your children all go to school in Hertfordshire and you work in London, you are not deeply embedded in a small Welsh village

    Still, it sounds as though she is in for the 100 per cent DomCum treatment.

    The Equality and Human Rights Commission said they will consider whether further action against its chief executive is needed. "She has apologised for this error of judgement," said EHRC chair Baroness Kishwer Falkner.

    Whoooo, "need to consider whether further action is needed".

    Baroness Falkner is a LibDem, so I am sure she'll take a generous view of the perils of owning many homes.

    And if not perhaps an appeal to the pb SecondHome Club (it is solidly LibDem) ?

    Wales was a particularly odd place for someone from England to want to spend Christmas, when for us already here, Christmas had to be cancelled by the hapless Drakeford. Johnson, on the other hand had been in the enviable position of having timed his pre-Christmas precautions such, that Christmas in England was safely saved.
    The reasons are I guess:

    (i) Gwynedd (at the moment) has one of the lowest rate of infections in the country, whilst Hertfordshire is one of the highest.

    (ii) London lawyers are irredeemably selfish, the most selfish people on the planet (always excepting London bankers & skiers😁).

    Londoners with second homes occupy a unique place in the nation. They think they are loved ("deeply embedded in the village"). In fact, everyone loathes and hates them.

    They are unpopular with the Left (for their privilege) and the Right (for their faux-liberalism).
    Hypocrisy clings to this constituency like a stink.

    Still, I expect the darling will suffer no longterm problems, if a LibDem Baroness is in charge of looking into whether she did anything wrong.

    I hope her Council Tax payments are up to date -- there is surcharge on second homes in Gwynedd, but it is up to second-homers to declare, so it is widely evaded.

    It will be embarrassing if a new set of excuses have to be devised for the Chief Executive of the Equality and Human Rights Commission if there is Council Tax underpayment from failing to self-declare the second home.
    Small point of order: it's as common now on the right for people to object to genuine liberalism as it is for them to object to the faux version.
    The central political development of the past five years across the west has been the mainstreaming of illiberalism in the political right.

    And a great number of those on the liberal right do not even realise they're in a struggle to the death over the soul of their ideology.
    Cameron and Boris are both members of the liberal right which is why I support them both.

    Theresa May was far more authoritarian, illiberal right which is why I opposed her.

    Liberal right is doing OK in this country.
    Boris is of course so liberal he has ended free movement to and from the EU
    While liberalising movement with the rest of the world, which has got less attention.

    Liberalising movement with the rest of the world and not discriminating in favour of predominantly white Europeans only is the right thing to do. It isn't what eg Farage would have done, or May.
    He hasn't, all that has changed is EU migrants will now face the same immigration rules as rest of the world migrants.

    Boris has introduced one of the biggest restrictions on immigration to the UK of any PM in UK history, Cameron may be a liberal, Boris is not
    Wrong.

    "The new rules make it easier for non-EU migrants to get a working visa in the UK"

    https://www.euractiv.com/section/uk-europe/news/uk-sets-out-steep-barriers-for-eu-migrants-from-2021/
    No, non-EU migrants will still only really be able to get a working visa for skilled jobs, all that has happened is EU migrants without sufficient qualifications and an offer to do a job of sufficient skill will no longer be able to come here.

    Whereas before EU migrants could come here to do any job regardless of skill level unlike non-EU migrants now neither EU migrants or non-EU migrants will be able to benefit from free movement to the UK to do any job regardless of skill level
    Guess what? We will still have as many migrants, just more will be from outside the EU. How pointless was that? The UK government has been able to fully control 50% of migration whilst inside EU. They did nothing. The whole migrant debate was another crock of shit to gull the gullible. Oh, sorry did I mention you again @Philip_Thompson ?
    Idiot.

    If we are getting more non EU migration then that means we have made it easier for skilled non EU migrants to come here, which is a good thing; and policy.

    If we are getting fewer unskilled minimum wage EU migrants on tax credits, but more skilled non EU migration then that is an improvement. It is not saying nothing has changed unless your intention is to stop migration. Is that your intention? It is not mine.
  • FloaterFloater Posts: 11,407

    Coronavirus: Women on exercise trip 'surrounded by police'

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-derbyshire-55560814

    Weren't Derbyshire the ones that got the drones out last March?

    "A hot drink is classed as a picnic."

    Thank God they didn't bring a Scotch egg.....
    I loved the line "against the SPIRIT of..."


    So not a breach then

    The police seem absolutely determined to lose public trust.
  • TimTTimT Posts: 2,119

    Coronavirus: Women on exercise trip 'surrounded by police'

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-derbyshire-55560814

    Weren't Derbyshire the ones that got the drones out last March?

    "A hot drink is classed as a picnic."

    Thank God they didn't bring a Scotch egg.....
    This is what kills acceptance of commonsense guidance - uncommon sense enforcement of vagueness. I seriously hope these two women find some lawyers to challenge this ridiculous police behaviour.
  • kjhkjh Posts: 2,711

    Coronavirus: Women on exercise trip 'surrounded by police'

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-derbyshire-55560814

    Weren't Derbyshire the ones that got the drones out last March?

    A bit of an over-reaction I think. It is stuff like this that causes people to lose confidence in the police. I can understand them being there to stop flagrant breaches, but in this case a quiet word along the lines of 'OK this time now you are here, but in future don't drive to your exercise'. No fine and no comment about a drink. I mean really!
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 9,230

    First to the barricades...er, Scotland?

    Funny you should say that given it's the Tories who love Mr Trump so much.

    OT but coincidentally, this is from the Speccy. Knives being sharpened?

    https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/boris-johnsons-scotland-problem
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 34,732
    Scott_xP said:
    Am I right in thinking we don't have any for enough months that there shouldn't in fact be any great demand for it?
  • TimTTimT Posts: 2,119
    edited January 8
    DavidL said:

    Scott_xP said:
    Am I right in thinking we don't have any for enough months that there shouldn't in fact be any great demand for it?
    I also think our order of the Moderna vaccine was small - 4m initially upped to 7m IIRC. But still good to have additional options.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 53,302
    edited January 8
    DavidL said:

    Scott_xP said:
    Am I right in thinking we don't have any for enough months that there shouldn't in fact be any great demand for it?
    I believe start of April is when it will be available worldwide. I don't think it is going to form key part of the strategy.

    J&J is the big one that could really help. One shot, no -70 million degrees. Could do 1000s and 1000s of a day via drive through.
  • contrariancontrarian Posts: 3,730
    I love it when people who are implacably opposed to the Republican Party try to give it lessons. Presumably to maintain the notion that everything is alright in the West and its business as usual, and what you are seeing is not a hologram.

    But here's the thing. It really isn't all right.

    The right is completely split in America. The party elite and the Trumpist base despise each other totally. The latter will not turn out for the former, as Georgia showed, and what follows is a hugely bitter primaries battle between the two factions ahead of 2022. When millions will not turn out again and the democrat hegemony intensifies.

    Meanwhile, the Democrats will be deliberating just how much of a Jihad they want to declare on the many millions of Americans who turned out for Trump and now have zero faith in their country, its electoral system and its institutions.

    Trump showed his millions of supporters a glimpse of an America they were comfortable with and where they were welcome and valuable citizens.

    They are not going back to the likes of Romney. Not now. Not ever.
  • OldKingColeOldKingCole Posts: 20,924
    edited January 8
    DavidL said:

    Scott_xP said:
    Am I right in thinking we don't have any for enough months that there shouldn't in fact be any great demand for it?
    Newspaper stories circulating that Drinkaware says one shouldn't have any alcohol for two days before vaccination and two weeks afterwards.
    I can't find any serious scientific posts which confirm this. The Russians say don't drink too much before and after theirs but that's about it.


    Edit; New Scientist says no problem with Pfizer vaccine.
  • kjhkjh Posts: 2,711
    @MarqueeMark re your post on the last thread - I didn't just like it just because I agreed. To be honest I'm not sure re the nuclear deterrent myself, but in one fell swoop you convinced me with a cracking post.

    Although I was tongue in cheek re wanting to hear a counter argument, because this has happened to me a couple of times in the last few days (I am obviously a pushover), I genuinely wanted to read a counter argument to you to see if I could be persuaded back the other way.
  • Daveyboy1961Daveyboy1961 Posts: 485

    Hijack a tanker 1000s of miles from home and requires the SBS to be called out to regain control, no charges, go for a walk by a reservoir 5 miles from your house.....

    I don't know the tanker story..?
  • Mary_BattyMary_Batty Posts: 295

    I love it when people who are implacably opposed to the Republican Party try to give it lessons. Presumably to maintain the notion that everything is alright in the West and its business as usual, and what you are seeing is not a hologram.

    But here's the thing. It really isn't all right.

    The right is completely split in America. The party elite and the Trumpist base despise each other totally. The latter will not turn out for the former, as Georgia showed, and what follows is a hugely bitter primaries battle between the two factions ahead of 2022. When millions will not turn out again and the democrat hegemony intensifies.

    Meanwhile, the Democrats will be deliberating just how much of a Jihad they want to declare on the many millions of Americans who turned out for Trump and now have zero faith in their country, its electoral system and its institutions.

    Trump showed his millions of supporters a glimpse of an America they were comfortable with and where they were welcome and valuable citizens.

    They are not going back to the likes of Romney. Not now. Not ever.

    I think you need to refer to your dosage instructions. You're either taking too little or too much.
  • Daveyboy1961Daveyboy1961 Posts: 485

    Coronavirus: Women on exercise trip 'surrounded by police'

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-derbyshire-55560814

    Weren't Derbyshire the ones that got the drones out last March?

    I think this is a little over the top.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 53,302

    Hijack a tanker 1000s of miles from home and requires the SBS to be called out to regain control, no charges, go for a walk by a reservoir 5 miles from your house.....

    I don't know the tanker story..?
    7 Nigerians stowed away on an oil tanker and took over the ship when the crew wouldn't let them off. The SBS had to be called out to recover control.

    Oil tanker stormed by SBS was denied port access by France and Spain

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2020/oct/27/oil-tanker-stormed-by-sbs-was-denied-port-access-by-france-and-spain#:~:text=Oil tanker stormed by SBS was denied port access by France and Spain,-This article is&text=An oil tanker that was,leading up to the incident.
  • WhisperingOracleWhisperingOracle Posts: 3,726
    edited January 8
    Carnyx said:

    First to the barricades...er, Scotland?

    Funny you should say that given it's the Tories who love Mr Trump so much.

    OT but coincidentally, this is from the Speccy. Knives being sharpened?

    https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/boris-johnsons-scotland-problem
    Some interesting stuff there.

    "The Prime Minister knows that to lose Scotland would be a resigning matter. And there’s a chance he wouldn’t even be allowed to get that far: his party might not keep a leader who looked close to losing the union.

    Rishi Sunak is viewed by Tory strategists as the cabinet minister with the best appeal in Scotland, outranking both Starmer and Gordon Brown among Scottish swing voters."
  • MaxPBMaxPB Posts: 23,895
    DavidL said:

    Scott_xP said:
    Am I right in thinking we don't have any for enough months that there shouldn't in fact be any great demand for it?
    April and only 7m doses, Moderna are definitely pursuing a private sector strategy so that 7m may end up being a lot more as employers and private health providers secure their own supplies.
  • CarlottaVanceCarlottaVance Posts: 44,520

    HYUFD said:

    HYUFD said:

    An eventful Christmas day for the chief executive of the Equality and Human Rights Commission.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-55573412

    It is funny how these top London lawyers have so much difficulty in understanding the lockdown rules. Their antennae are ready to detect subtle breaches of equality regulation. She's been hot on the trail of antisemites in the Jolly Old Labour Party -- but a simple rule on lockdown like "Do Not Travel to Your Second Home" is completely beyond her ken.

    "I would like to apologise to the local community, where we feel deeply embedded," said Mrs Hilsenrath.

    So, basically the Llanegryn locals were the happy Stasis 😁😁😁& got Gog Plod to chase her out of Wales on Xmas day & leaked the story so it is all over the press.

    And yet the little second-homer (probably third-homer) still believes the locals love her ("deeply embedded").

    If you live in Hertfordshire and your children all go to school in Hertfordshire and you work in London, you are not deeply embedded in a small Welsh village

    Still, it sounds as though she is in for the 100 per cent DomCum treatment.

    The Equality and Human Rights Commission said they will consider whether further action against its chief executive is needed. "She has apologised for this error of judgement," said EHRC chair Baroness Kishwer Falkner.

    Whoooo, "need to consider whether further action is needed".

    Baroness Falkner is a LibDem, so I am sure she'll take a generous view of the perils of owning many homes.

    And if not perhaps an appeal to the pb SecondHome Club (it is solidly LibDem) ?

    Wales was a particularly odd place for someone from England to want to spend Christmas, when for us already here, Christmas had to be cancelled by the hapless Drakeford. Johnson, on the other hand had been in the enviable position of having timed his pre-Christmas precautions such, that Christmas in England was safely saved.
    The reasons are I guess:

    (i) Gwynedd (at the moment) has one of the lowest rate of infections in the country, whilst Hertfordshire is one of the highest.

    (ii) London lawyers are irredeemably selfish, the most selfish people on the planet (always excepting London bankers & skiers😁).

    Londoners with second homes occupy a unique place in the nation. They think they are loved ("deeply embedded in the village"). In fact, everyone loathes and hates them.

    They are unpopular with the Left (for their privilege) and the Right (for their faux-liberalism).
    Hypocrisy clings to this constituency like a stink.

    Still, I expect the darling will suffer no longterm problems, if a LibDem Baroness is in charge of looking into whether she did anything wrong.

    I hope her Council Tax payments are up to date -- there is surcharge on second homes in Gwynedd, but it is up to second-homers to declare, so it is widely evaded.

    It will be embarrassing if a new set of excuses have to be devised for the Chief Executive of the Equality and Human Rights Commission if there is Council Tax underpayment from failing to self-declare the second home.
    Small point of order: it's as common now on the right for people to object to genuine liberalism as it is for them to object to the faux version.
    The central political development of the past five years across the west has been the mainstreaming of illiberalism in the political right.

    And a great number of those on the liberal right do not even realise they're in a struggle to the death over the soul of their ideology.
    Cameron and Boris are both members of the liberal right which is why I support them both.

    Theresa May was far more authoritarian, illiberal right which is why I opposed her.

    Liberal right is doing OK in this country.
    Boris is of course so liberal he has ended free movement to and from the EU
    While liberalising movement with the rest of the world, which has got less attention.

    Liberalising movement with the rest of the world and not discriminating in favour of predominantly white Europeans only is the right thing to do. It isn't what eg Farage would have done, or May.
    He hasn't, all that has changed is EU migrants will now face the same immigration rules as rest of the world migrants.

    Boris has introduced one of the biggest restrictions on immigration to the UK of any PM in UK history, Cameron may be a liberal, Boris is not
    Wrong.

    "The new rules make it easier for non-EU migrants to get a working visa in the UK"

    https://www.euractiv.com/section/uk-europe/news/uk-sets-out-steep-barriers-for-eu-migrants-from-2021/
    Indeed.

    It creates, how shall we say "A Level Playing Field" for immigration.

    They can hardly object, can they?
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 9,230

    Hijack a tanker 1000s of miles from home and requires the SBS to be called out to regain control, no charges, go for a walk by a reservoir 5 miles from your house.....

    I don't know the tanker story..?
    https://www.bournemouthecho.co.uk/news/18822138.tanker-hijacking-know-poole-sbs/
  • contrariancontrarian Posts: 3,730

    I love it when people who are implacably opposed to the Republican Party try to give it lessons. Presumably to maintain the notion that everything is alright in the West and its business as usual, and what you are seeing is not a hologram.

    But here's the thing. It really isn't all right.

    The right is completely split in America. The party elite and the Trumpist base despise each other totally. The latter will not turn out for the former, as Georgia showed, and what follows is a hugely bitter primaries battle between the two factions ahead of 2022. When millions will not turn out again and the democrat hegemony intensifies.

    Meanwhile, the Democrats will be deliberating just how much of a Jihad they want to declare on the many millions of Americans who turned out for Trump and now have zero faith in their country, its electoral system and its institutions.

    Trump showed his millions of supporters a glimpse of an America they were comfortable with and where they were welcome and valuable citizens.

    They are not going back to the likes of Romney. Not now. Not ever.

    I think you need to refer to your dosage instructions. You're either taking too little or too much.
    Argument free insults from one of the many posters on here who don;t like to be confronted with opinions that are not their own.

  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 9,230

    Carnyx said:

    First to the barricades...er, Scotland?

    Funny you should say that given it's the Tories who love Mr Trump so much.

    OT but coincidentally, this is from the Speccy. Knives being sharpened?

    https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/boris-johnsons-scotland-problem
    Some interesting stuff there.

    "The Prime Minister knows that to lose Scotland would be a resigning matter. And there’s a chance he wouldn’t even be allowed to get that far: his party might not keep a leader who looked close to losing the union.

    Rishi Sunak is viewed by Tory strategists as the cabinet minister with the best appeal, outranking both Starmer and Gordon Brown among Scottish swing voters."
    Michael Gove isn't mentioned in quite the same way ...
  • kjhkjh Posts: 2,711
    kjh said:

    @MarqueeMark re your post on the last thread - I didn't just like it just because I agreed. To be honest I'm not sure re the nuclear deterrent myself, but in one fell swoop you convinced me with a cracking post.

    Although I was tongue in cheek re wanting to hear a counter argument, because this has happened to me a couple of times in the last few days (I am obviously a pushover), I genuinely wanted to read a counter argument to you to see if I could be persuaded back the other way.

    PS You know a post is a good one when you 'like' one that you don't or didn't before agree with.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 53,302
    MaxPB said:

    DavidL said:

    Scott_xP said:
    Am I right in thinking we don't have any for enough months that there shouldn't in fact be any great demand for it?
    April and only 7m doses, Moderna are definitely pursuing a private sector strategy so that 7m may end up being a lot more as employers and private health providers secure their own supplies.
  • StockyStocky Posts: 4,665

    I love it when people who are implacably opposed to the Republican Party try to give it lessons. Presumably to maintain the notion that everything is alright in the West and its business as usual, and what you are seeing is not a hologram.

    But here's the thing. It really isn't all right.

    The right is completely split in America. The party elite and the Trumpist base despise each other totally. The latter will not turn out for the former, as Georgia showed, and what follows is a hugely bitter primaries battle between the two factions ahead of 2022. When millions will not turn out again and the democrat hegemony intensifies.

    Meanwhile, the Democrats will be deliberating just how much of a Jihad they want to declare on the many millions of Americans who turned out for Trump and now have zero faith in their country, its electoral system and its institutions.

    Trump showed his millions of supporters a glimpse of an America they were comfortable with and where they were welcome and valuable citizens.

    They are not going back to the likes of Romney. Not now. Not ever.

    Trouble is, their "zero faith in their country, its electoral system and its institutions" is based on delusion. How to cleanse this?
  • OnlyLivingBoyOnlyLivingBoy Posts: 4,702

    DavidL said:

    Scott_xP said:
    Am I right in thinking we don't have any for enough months that there shouldn't in fact be any great demand for it?
    I believe start of April is when it will be available worldwide. I don't think it is going to form key part of the strategy.

    J&J is the big one that could really help. One shot, no -70 million degrees. Could do 1000s and 1000s of a day via drive through.
    The EU is getting the Moderna vaccine in a few days.
  • FishingFishing Posts: 1,478

    Coronavirus: Women on exercise trip 'surrounded by police'

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-derbyshire-55560814

    Weren't Derbyshire the ones that got the drones out last March?

    It's great that they don't have any serious crime there so they can afford to waste their time harrassing innocent people.
  • MaxPBMaxPB Posts: 23,895
    edited January 8

    MaxPB said:

    DavidL said:

    Scott_xP said:
    Am I right in thinking we don't have any for enough months that there shouldn't in fact be any great demand for it?
    April and only 7m doses, Moderna are definitely pursuing a private sector strategy so that 7m may end up being a lot more as employers and private health providers secure their own supplies.
    Let's see what the delivery schedule is for the additional 10m. Still good though.

    That makes 57m mRNA doses of approved vaccines, 100m adenovirus from AZ approved and 52m adenovirus from J&J nearing approval. Have to say our vaccine portfolio really is world beating. Hats off to the taskforce.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 53,302
    At this rate, come the summer we will be swimming in vaccines.
  • CarlottaVanceCarlottaVance Posts: 44,520
    edited January 8

    First to the barricades...er, Scotland?


    I wouldn't mess with the Polis.....



    There is a handy "Shop a Neighbour" online form:

    https://www.scotland.police.uk/secureforms/covid19/
  • kjhkjh Posts: 2,711

    At this rate, come the summer we will be swimming in vaccines.

    Yuk.
  • Stocky said:

    I love it when people who are implacably opposed to the Republican Party try to give it lessons. Presumably to maintain the notion that everything is alright in the West and its business as usual, and what you are seeing is not a hologram.

    But here's the thing. It really isn't all right.

    The right is completely split in America. The party elite and the Trumpist base despise each other totally. The latter will not turn out for the former, as Georgia showed, and what follows is a hugely bitter primaries battle between the two factions ahead of 2022. When millions will not turn out again and the democrat hegemony intensifies.

    Meanwhile, the Democrats will be deliberating just how much of a Jihad they want to declare on the many millions of Americans who turned out for Trump and now have zero faith in their country, its electoral system and its institutions.

    Trump showed his millions of supporters a glimpse of an America they were comfortable with and where they were welcome and valuable citizens.

    They are not going back to the likes of Romney. Not now. Not ever.

    Trouble is, their "zero faith in their country, its electoral system and its institutions" is based on delusion. How to cleanse this?
    It's not entirely delusional. America needs multiple kinds of reform.
  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 38,775

    At this rate, come the summer we will be swimming in vaccines.

    At some point the relative efficacy will become a factor. What a great position to be in.
  • Philip_ThompsonPhilip_Thompson Posts: 47,349

    DavidL said:

    Scott_xP said:
    Am I right in thinking we don't have any for enough months that there shouldn't in fact be any great demand for it?
    I believe start of April is when it will be available worldwide. I don't think it is going to form key part of the strategy.

    J&J is the big one that could really help. One shot, no -70 million degrees. Could do 1000s and 1000s of a day via drive through.
    The EU is getting the Moderna vaccine in a few days.
    How many are they getting in a few days? Source?
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 53,302

    DavidL said:

    Scott_xP said:
    Am I right in thinking we don't have any for enough months that there shouldn't in fact be any great demand for it?
    I believe start of April is when it will be available worldwide. I don't think it is going to form key part of the strategy.

    J&J is the big one that could really help. One shot, no -70 million degrees. Could do 1000s and 1000s of a day via drive through.
    The EU is getting the Moderna vaccine in a few days.
    Are they? Have Moderna / US changed their policy on no worldwide delivery until April?
  • BarnesianBarnesian Posts: 6,733

    DavidL said:

    Scott_xP said:
    Am I right in thinking we don't have any for enough months that there shouldn't in fact be any great demand for it?
    Newspaper stories circulating that Drinkaware says one shouldn't have any alcohol for two days before vaccination and two weeks afterwards.
    I can't find any serious scientific posts which confirm this. The Russians say don't drink too much before and after theirs but that's about it.


    Edit; New Scientist says no problem with Pfizer vaccine.
    I've tested it. Sample of one. I had the Pfizer jab on 30 Dec and 12 units of alcohol on New Years Eve. Not a problem.
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 9,230
    Carnyx said:

    Carnyx said:

    First to the barricades...er, Scotland?

    Funny you should say that given it's the Tories who love Mr Trump so much.

    OT but coincidentally, this is from the Speccy. Knives being sharpened?

    https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/boris-johnsons-scotland-problem
    Some interesting stuff there.

    "The Prime Minister knows that to lose Scotland would be a resigning matter. And there’s a chance he wouldn’t even be allowed to get that far: his party might not keep a leader who looked close to losing the union.

    Rishi Sunak is viewed by Tory strategists as the cabinet minister with the best appeal, outranking both Starmer and Gordon Brown among Scottish swing voters."
    Michael Gove isn't mentioned in quite the same way ...
    PS Also interesting (given current wisdomn on PB) is that the Tories seem quite worried by an indicative referendum - ie not at all dismissive of it.
  • OldKingColeOldKingCole Posts: 20,924
    Barnesian said:

    DavidL said:

    Scott_xP said:
    Am I right in thinking we don't have any for enough months that there shouldn't in fact be any great demand for it?
    Newspaper stories circulating that Drinkaware says one shouldn't have any alcohol for two days before vaccination and two weeks afterwards.
    I can't find any serious scientific posts which confirm this. The Russians say don't drink too much before and after theirs but that's about it.


    Edit; New Scientist says no problem with Pfizer vaccine.
    I've tested it. Sample of one. I had the Pfizer jab on 30 Dec and 12 units of alcohol on New Years Eve. Not a problem.
    LOL. And you haven't had the pox in the week since, either!
  • BluestBlueBluestBlue Posts: 2,966
    edited January 8

    I love it when people who are implacably opposed to the Republican Party try to give it lessons. Presumably to maintain the notion that everything is alright in the West and its business as usual, and what you are seeing is not a hologram.

    But here's the thing. It really isn't all right.

    The right is completely split in America. The party elite and the Trumpist base despise each other totally. The latter will not turn out for the former, as Georgia showed, and what follows is a hugely bitter primaries battle between the two factions ahead of 2022. When millions will not turn out again and the democrat hegemony intensifies.

    Meanwhile, the Democrats will be deliberating just how much of a Jihad they want to declare on the many millions of Americans who turned out for Trump and now have zero faith in their country, its electoral system and its institutions.

    Trump showed his millions of supporters a glimpse of an America they were comfortable with and where they were welcome and valuable citizens.

    They are not going back to the likes of Romney. Not now. Not ever.

    They don't have to go back to the likes of Romney, who was far from a perfect candidate, but unless the right want to be out of power in the US indefinitely they need to recognize that the demographics are no longer there for a pure Trump strategy. I certainly don't want the Democrats to remain in power long enough for the Squad to take over from the Bidenists, so the Republicans had better get a move on and assemble a more effective voter coalition while they still can.
  • Philip_ThompsonPhilip_Thompson Posts: 47,349
    Carnyx said:

    Carnyx said:

    Carnyx said:

    First to the barricades...er, Scotland?

    Funny you should say that given it's the Tories who love Mr Trump so much.

    OT but coincidentally, this is from the Speccy. Knives being sharpened?

    https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/boris-johnsons-scotland-problem
    Some interesting stuff there.

    "The Prime Minister knows that to lose Scotland would be a resigning matter. And there’s a chance he wouldn’t even be allowed to get that far: his party might not keep a leader who looked close to losing the union.

    Rishi Sunak is viewed by Tory strategists as the cabinet minister with the best appeal, outranking both Starmer and Gordon Brown among Scottish swing voters."
    Michael Gove isn't mentioned in quite the same way ...
    PS Also interesting (given current wisdomn on PB) is that the Tories seem quite worried by an indicative referendum - ie not at all dismissive of it.
    What current wisdom on PB?

    Apart from HYUFD who isn't worried (or welcoming) of another referendum?
  • MaxPBMaxPB Posts: 23,895
    edited January 8

    DavidL said:

    Scott_xP said:
    Am I right in thinking we don't have any for enough months that there shouldn't in fact be any great demand for it?
    I believe start of April is when it will be available worldwide. I don't think it is going to form key part of the strategy.

    J&J is the big one that could really help. One shot, no -70 million degrees. Could do 1000s and 1000s of a day via drive through.
    The EU is getting the Moderna vaccine in a few days.
    From where? The Swiss production line isn't slated to deliver until March (which means April delivery after batch testing) and they aren't exporting any doses from the US yet. They did approve it a couple of days ago though.

    Maybe there's a pilot production line ready in their Swiss production line. Would be very interested to know.
  • LostPasswordLostPassword Posts: 2,466
    DavidL said:

    There is an obvious and understandable temptation to just let him go away, hopefully far away. The US has precedence for this in the way it dealt with the losing side in the Civil War.

    Personally, I think that would be a mistake. His conduct this last month has been completely unacceptable and dangerous to a democracy. Locking up 50 or 500 or 5000 of those naïve fools who did his bidding is not enough. It needs to be made crystal clear than even the President is not above the law and will suffer the consequences of criminal incitement and sedition. If that, in passing, destroys the political career of Ted Cruz then that is a win win for me.

    I think all of the GOP Senators and Representatives who put their name to objecting to the election results are part of the Coup Caucus.

    If Giuliani's voicemail, intended for one of them, is anything to go by then I think there will be enough evidence to prosecute some of them too.

    I hope that the only route back for the GOP lies in splitting on anti and pro-coup lines.

    I fear that it won't happen and that there are too many voters willing to support it.

    Remember also the Pennsylvania State Senate where the Republican majority was able to stop a Democrat from being seated. That's on the pro-coup side of the divide. Has that been resolved now?
  • contrariancontrarian Posts: 3,730
    Stocky said:

    I love it when people who are implacably opposed to the Republican Party try to give it lessons. Presumably to maintain the notion that everything is alright in the West and its business as usual, and what you are seeing is not a hologram.

    But here's the thing. It really isn't all right.

    The right is completely split in America. The party elite and the Trumpist base despise each other totally. The latter will not turn out for the former, as Georgia showed, and what follows is a hugely bitter primaries battle between the two factions ahead of 2022. When millions will not turn out again and the democrat hegemony intensifies.

    Meanwhile, the Democrats will be deliberating just how much of a Jihad they want to declare on the many millions of Americans who turned out for Trump and now have zero faith in their country, its electoral system and its institutions.

    Trump showed his millions of supporters a glimpse of an America they were comfortable with and where they were welcome and valuable citizens.

    They are not going back to the likes of Romney. Not now. Not ever.

    Trouble is, their "zero faith in their country, its electoral system and its institutions" is based on delusion. How to cleanse this?
    Well the democrats could stop fighting every request for audits tooth and nail. They could stop their officials from making last minute unconstitutional amendments to state voting rules. They could stop sending postals to people who do not request them. They could stop trying to get around ballot witness examination rules. They could get their districts to declare early so it doesn;t look like they are just waiting to see how many ballots they need. They could admit that dead voter scams are going on, even if they don;t affect the result. They could outlaw counting days and days after results.

    Stuff like that.

    Right now, the system could not be better designed to give the impression of fraud, even when there is none.
  • BluestBlueBluestBlue Posts: 2,966

    Carnyx said:

    First to the barricades...er, Scotland?

    Funny you should say that given it's the Tories who love Mr Trump so much.

    OT but coincidentally, this is from the Speccy. Knives being sharpened?

    https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/boris-johnsons-scotland-problem
    Some interesting stuff there.

    "The Prime Minister knows that to lose Scotland would be a resigning matter. And there’s a chance he wouldn’t even be allowed to get that far: his party might not keep a leader who looked close to losing the union.

    Rishi Sunak is viewed by Tory strategists as the cabinet minister with the best appeal in Scotland, outranking both Starmer and Gordon Brown among Scottish swing voters."
    That sounds like complete (Katy) Balls...
  • bigjohnowlsbigjohnowls Posts: 15,846

    DavidL said:

    Scott_xP said:
    Am I right in thinking we don't have any for enough months that there shouldn't in fact be any great demand for it?
    I believe start of April is when it will be available worldwide. I don't think it is going to form key part of the strategy.

    J&J is the big one that could really help. One shot, no -70 million degrees. Could do 1000s and 1000s of a day via drive through.
    The EU is getting the Moderna vaccine in a few days.
    Are they? Have Moderna / US changed their policy on no worldwide delivery until April?
    VDL says more than 75 million doses will be available in the EU by the second quarter of 2021.

    So suspect you are right
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 9,230

    Carnyx said:

    Carnyx said:

    Carnyx said:

    First to the barricades...er, Scotland?

    Funny you should say that given it's the Tories who love Mr Trump so much.

    OT but coincidentally, this is from the Speccy. Knives being sharpened?

    https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/boris-johnsons-scotland-problem
    Some interesting stuff there.

    "The Prime Minister knows that to lose Scotland would be a resigning matter. And there’s a chance he wouldn’t even be allowed to get that far: his party might not keep a leader who looked close to losing the union.

    Rishi Sunak is viewed by Tory strategists as the cabinet minister with the best appeal, outranking both Starmer and Gordon Brown among Scottish swing voters."
    Michael Gove isn't mentioned in quite the same way ...
    PS Also interesting (given current wisdomn on PB) is that the Tories seem quite worried by an indicative referendum - ie not at all dismissive of it.
    What current wisdom on PB?

    Apart from HYUFD who isn't worried (or welcoming) of another referendum?
    Certainly not the impression I have from others who seem to have the view that a referendum without London permission |(and so indicative) would be illegal, useless, etc. But it's not so much what the PBers think as what ios being portrayed as Tory planning.
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 39,210
    DavidL said:

    Scott_xP said:
    Am I right in thinking we don't have any for enough months that there shouldn't in fact be any great demand for it?
    Do you want the Oxford (Russell Group) vaccine or the Moderna (Poly) one?

    Let the snobbery commence.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 20,920

    At this rate, come the summer we will be swimming in vaccines.

    We probably need to. The viral vector vaccines like AZN will be ineffective next year, due to immune response to the vector. This seems to be a problem with Sputnik. The mRNA vaccines much less so, but whether long lasting protection develops is unknown as yet.
  • Nigel_ForemainNigel_Foremain Posts: 6,003

    HYUFD said:

    HYUFD said:

    HYUFD said:

    An eventful Christmas day for the chief executive of the Equality and Human Rights Commission.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-55573412

    It is funny how these top London lawyers have so much difficulty in understanding the lockdown rules. Their antennae are ready to detect subtle breaches of equality regulation. She's been hot on the trail of antisemites in the Jolly Old Labour Party -- but a simple rule on lockdown like "Do Not Travel to Your Second Home" is completely beyond her ken.

    "I would like to apologise to the local community, where we feel deeply embedded," said Mrs Hilsenrath.

    So, basically the Llanegryn locals were the happy Stasis 😁😁😁& got Gog Plod to chase her out of Wales on Xmas day & leaked the story so it is all over the press.

    And yet the little second-homer (probably third-homer) still believes the locals love her ("deeply embedded").

    If you live in Hertfordshire and your children all go to school in Hertfordshire and you work in London, you are not deeply embedded in a small Welsh village

    Still, it sounds as though she is in for the 100 per cent DomCum treatment.

    The Equality and Human Rights Commission said they will consider whether further action against its chief executive is needed. "She has apologised for this error of judgement," said EHRC chair Baroness Kishwer Falkner.

    Whoooo, "need to consider whether further action is needed".

    Baroness Falkner is a LibDem, so I am sure she'll take a generous view of the perils of owning many homes.

    And if not perhaps an appeal to the pb SecondHome Club (it is solidly LibDem) ?

    Wales was a particularly odd place for someone from England to want to spend Christmas, when for us already here, Christmas had to be cancelled by the hapless Drakeford. Johnson, on the other hand had been in the enviable position of having timed his pre-Christmas precautions such, that Christmas in England was safely saved.
    The reasons are I guess:

    (i) Gwynedd (at the moment) has one of the lowest rate of infections in the country, whilst Hertfordshire is one of the highest.

    (ii) London lawyers are irredeemably selfish, the most selfish people on the planet (always excepting London bankers & skiers😁).

    Londoners with second homes occupy a unique place in the nation. They think they are loved ("deeply embedded in the village"). In fact, everyone loathes and hates them.

    They are unpopular with the Left (for their privilege) and the Right (for their faux-liberalism).
    Hypocrisy clings to this constituency like a stink.

    Still, I expect the darling will suffer no longterm problems, if a LibDem Baroness is in charge of looking into whether she did anything wrong.

    I hope her Council Tax payments are up to date -- there is surcharge on second homes in Gwynedd, but it is up to second-homers to declare, so it is widely evaded.

    It will be embarrassing if a new set of excuses have to be devised for the Chief Executive of the Equality and Human Rights Commission if there is Council Tax underpayment from failing to self-declare the second home.
    Small point of order: it's as common now on the right for people to object to genuine liberalism as it is for them to object to the faux version.
    The central political development of the past five years across the west has been the mainstreaming of illiberalism in the political right.

    And a great number of those on the liberal right do not even realise they're in a struggle to the death over the soul of their ideology.
    Cameron and Boris are both members of the liberal right which is why I support them both.

    Theresa May was far more authoritarian, illiberal right which is why I opposed her.

    Liberal right is doing OK in this country.
    Boris is of course so liberal he has ended free movement to and from the EU
    While liberalising movement with the rest of the world, which has got less attention.

    Liberalising movement with the rest of the world and not discriminating in favour of predominantly white Europeans only is the right thing to do. It isn't what eg Farage would have done, or May.
    He hasn't, all that has changed is EU migrants will now face the same immigration rules as rest of the world migrants.

    Boris has introduced one of the biggest restrictions on immigration to the UK of any PM in UK history, Cameron may be a liberal, Boris is not
    Wrong.

    "The new rules make it easier for non-EU migrants to get a working visa in the UK"

    https://www.euractiv.com/section/uk-europe/news/uk-sets-out-steep-barriers-for-eu-migrants-from-2021/
    No, non-EU migrants will still only really be able to get a working visa for skilled jobs, all that has happened is EU migrants without sufficient qualifications and an offer to do a job of sufficient skill will no longer be able to come here.

    Whereas before EU migrants could come here to do any job regardless of skill level unlike non-EU migrants now neither EU migrants or non-EU migrants will be able to benefit from free movement to the UK to do any job regardless of skill level
    Guess what? We will still have as many migrants, just more will be from outside the EU. How pointless was that? The UK government has been able to fully control 50% of migration whilst inside EU. They did nothing. The whole migrant debate was another crock of shit to gull the gullible. Oh, sorry did I mention you again @Philip_Thompson ?
    Idiot.

    If we are getting more non EU migration then that means we have made it easier for skilled non EU migrants to come here, which is a good thing; and policy.

    If we are getting fewer unskilled minimum wage EU migrants on tax credits, but more skilled non EU migration then that is an improvement. It is not saying nothing has changed unless your intention is to stop migration. Is that your intention? It is not mine.
    Calling others idiots when you spend most of your waking hours on here talking shit about things you have no knowledge of says more about you than me. Seriously, what else do you do with your time? Do you have any actual experience of anything other than taking views from the Daily Express about the EU and Brexit? I bet you also have a thing for Princess Diana! I am sure for most of us PB is an occasional opportunity to vent or debate whilst we are doing other things, but you want to turn it into a full time job? As your secret idol Donald Trump would say, SAD! And you have the temerity to call any one else an idiot? Take the massive great beam out of your own eye you populist prick. Try posting less often and you might say something that makes sense or is interesting. Tell us about some real life experience you have that might enlighten us perhaps? Not possible? Thought so.
  • Scott_xPScott_xP Posts: 11,379
    But, but, but, the PB Brexit braintrust told us this couldn't happen...

  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 10,115
    TimT said:

    One of the most ludicrous headlines (and experts) on the Capitol storming so far: "The US Capitol protests this week have given ‘a blueprint' to ISIS ‘for attacking" the pivotal institution in the future, according to a terrorism expert."

    So, ISIS now know that all they have to do to storm the Capitol is assemble some 10,000 white hicks wearing MAGA regalia and get their President to tell them to do it. Yeah, I can see how ISIS could replicate that at will.

    To be fair -

    - Wait for a MAGA riot/attack on building.
    - Get your guys to dress up MAGA style
    - Go in with the crowd

    Imagine, say the Mumbai attackers in the crowd at the Capitol. They wait until they are in....
  • WhisperingOracleWhisperingOracle Posts: 3,726
    edited January 8
    Debbie
    @debs63 Its not over yet. We are waiting for the 11th hour, which I have been told is this weekend. I have been ridiculed too by my family but we can say I told you so! Winking face
    7:58 AM · Jan 8, 2021·Twitter


    @flyby_solutions
    and 2 others
    No wonder your family are ridiculing you Debbie. You're in Wales so he's not even your president. It's like being gutted when Mugabe was deposed.
  • MexicanpeteMexicanpete Posts: 8,690

    DavidL said:

    Scott_xP said:
    Am I right in thinking we don't have any for enough months that there shouldn't in fact be any great demand for it?
    I believe start of April is when it will be available worldwide. I don't think it is going to form key part of the strategy.

    J&J is the big one that could really help. One shot, no -70 million degrees. Could do 1000s and 1000s of a day via drive through.
    The EU is getting the Moderna vaccine in a few days.
    How many are they getting in a few days? Source?
    Don't worry Phil. Boris won the vaccine war! The EU should be grateful he's letting them benefit from his industry.
  • MaxPBMaxPB Posts: 23,895

    DavidL said:

    Scott_xP said:
    Am I right in thinking we don't have any for enough months that there shouldn't in fact be any great demand for it?
    I believe start of April is when it will be available worldwide. I don't think it is going to form key part of the strategy.

    J&J is the big one that could really help. One shot, no -70 million degrees. Could do 1000s and 1000s of a day via drive through.
    The EU is getting the Moderna vaccine in a few days.
    Are they? Have Moderna / US changed their policy on no worldwide delivery until April?
    VDL says more than 75 million doses will be available in the EU by the second quarter of 2021.

    So suspect you are right
    That lines up with our research on it too, European deliveries are all coming from their Swiss production line which is still being scaled. It's possible that a pilot line is ready so small quantities will be available soon though.
  • TimTTimT Posts: 2,119

    At this rate, come the summer we will be swimming in vaccines.

    At some point the relative efficacy will become a factor. What a great position to be in.
    Not just relative efficacy. All these factors will come into play with more options -
    1. ease and scale of production/availability of reagents for production
    2. price
    3. ease and cost of distribution
    4. duration of viability in storage
    5. one vs two dose requirements

    As you say, what a great position to be in.
  • PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 63,352
    TimT said:

    Coronavirus: Women on exercise trip 'surrounded by police'

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-derbyshire-55560814

    Weren't Derbyshire the ones that got the drones out last March?

    "A hot drink is classed as a picnic."

    Thank God they didn't bring a Scotch egg.....
    This is what kills acceptance of commonsense guidance - uncommon sense enforcement of vagueness. I seriously hope these two women find some lawyers to challenge this ridiculous police behaviour.
    I think I'd just challenge it pro se, what they're doing is entirely within regulations.

    At this rate, come the summer we will be swimming in vaccines.

    Hopefully !

  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 38,775
    Joe Grogan, former White House domestic policy adviser to Trump:

    “yesterday was the worst day for the Republican Party since Lincoln’s assassination.”

    https://www.thedailybeast.com/after-capitol-riot-trump-officials-rush-to-keep-him-from-sparking-another-conflictat-home-or-abroad

  • BarnesianBarnesian Posts: 6,733
    I think there are three different issues with the challenge of China.

    In rank order they are:

    1. Our security - the ability of China to threaten and blackmail us with superior technology in AI, cyber, embedded technology in the West etc. This is similar to the nuclear blackmail of the cold war and has superseded it. The West needs to develop competing technologies.

    2. Economic - the ability of China to outcompete the West in terms of trade and use its economic muscle to threaten smaller players eg Australia. We need economic and trade alliances.

    3. Human rights - we are rightly dismayed by China's treatment of its own people but we should recognise that there is very little we can do about it. The priority should be our own security.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 53,302
    MaxPB said:

    DavidL said:

    Scott_xP said:
    Am I right in thinking we don't have any for enough months that there shouldn't in fact be any great demand for it?
    I believe start of April is when it will be available worldwide. I don't think it is going to form key part of the strategy.

    J&J is the big one that could really help. One shot, no -70 million degrees. Could do 1000s and 1000s of a day via drive through.
    The EU is getting the Moderna vaccine in a few days.
    Are they? Have Moderna / US changed their policy on no worldwide delivery until April?
    VDL says more than 75 million doses will be available in the EU by the second quarter of 2021.

    So suspect you are right
    That lines up with our research on it too, European deliveries are all coming from their Swiss production line which is still being scaled. It's possible that a pilot line is ready so small quantities will be available soon though.
    From BBC....

    As agreed when the UK originally pre-ordered the vaccine, supplies will begin to be delivered to the UK from spring once Moderna expands its production capability.
  • OnlyLivingBoyOnlyLivingBoy Posts: 4,702
    MaxPB said:

    DavidL said:

    Scott_xP said:
    Am I right in thinking we don't have any for enough months that there shouldn't in fact be any great demand for it?
    I believe start of April is when it will be available worldwide. I don't think it is going to form key part of the strategy.

    J&J is the big one that could really help. One shot, no -70 million degrees. Could do 1000s and 1000s of a day via drive through.
    The EU is getting the Moderna vaccine in a few days.
    From where? The Swiss production line isn't slated to deliver until March (which means April delivery after batch testing) and they aren't exporting any doses from the US yet. They did approve it a couple of days ago though.

    Maybe there's a pilot production line ready in their Swiss production line. Would be very interested to know.
    According to CNN, quoting a statement from Moderna, rollout of Moderna's vaccine in the EU is to start next week.

    https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/amp.cnn.com/cnn/2021/01/06/europe/moderna-approval-eu-intl/index.html
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 20,920

    Stocky said:

    I love it when people who are implacably opposed to the Republican Party try to give it lessons. Presumably to maintain the notion that everything is alright in the West and its business as usual, and what you are seeing is not a hologram.

    But here's the thing. It really isn't all right.

    The right is completely split in America. The party elite and the Trumpist base despise each other totally. The latter will not turn out for the former, as Georgia showed, and what follows is a hugely bitter primaries battle between the two factions ahead of 2022. When millions will not turn out again and the democrat hegemony intensifies.

    Meanwhile, the Democrats will be deliberating just how much of a Jihad they want to declare on the many millions of Americans who turned out for Trump and now have zero faith in their country, its electoral system and its institutions.

    Trump showed his millions of supporters a glimpse of an America they were comfortable with and where they were welcome and valuable citizens.

    They are not going back to the likes of Romney. Not now. Not ever.

    Trouble is, their "zero faith in their country, its electoral system and its institutions" is based on delusion. How to cleanse this?
    It's not entirely delusional. America needs multiple kinds of reform.
    We are all in favour of reform. Where we differ is what those reforms should be.
  • GardenwalkerGardenwalker Posts: 5,830

    Carnyx said:

    First to the barricades...er, Scotland?

    Funny you should say that given it's the Tories who love Mr Trump so much.

    OT but coincidentally, this is from the Speccy. Knives being sharpened?

    https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/boris-johnsons-scotland-problem
    Some interesting stuff there.

    "The Prime Minister knows that to lose Scotland would be a resigning matter. And there’s a chance he wouldn’t even be allowed to get that far: his party might not keep a leader who looked close to losing the union.

    Rishi Sunak is viewed by Tory strategists as the cabinet minister with the best appeal in Scotland, outranking both Starmer and Gordon Brown among Scottish swing voters."
    Can Rishi identify Scotland on a map?
    Serious question.
  • bigjohnowlsbigjohnowls Posts: 15,846
    MaxPB said:

    MaxPB said:

    DavidL said:

    Scott_xP said:
    Am I right in thinking we don't have any for enough months that there shouldn't in fact be any great demand for it?
    April and only 7m doses, Moderna are definitely pursuing a private sector strategy so that 7m may end up being a lot more as employers and private health providers secure their own supplies.
    Let's see what the delivery schedule is for the additional 10m. Still good though.

    That makes 57m mRNA doses of approved vaccines, 100m adenovirus from AZ approved and 52m adenovirus from J&J nearing approval. Have to say our vaccine portfolio really is world beating. Hats off to the taskforce.
    But we dont currently have enough to comply with Pfizer recommended guidelines on how it should be used..

    Hopefully a short term problem now their competitors are approved.
  • Scott_xP said:

    But, but, but, the PB Brexit braintrust told us this couldn't happen...

    They also assured us that the sterling's weakness was due not to Brexit itself, but to the uncertainty around when and how Brexit would be implemented. How strange, then, the sterling remains so weak against the euro, even after Brexit has been done!
  • TimTTimT Posts: 2,119

    TimT said:

    One of the most ludicrous headlines (and experts) on the Capitol storming so far: "The US Capitol protests this week have given ‘a blueprint' to ISIS ‘for attacking" the pivotal institution in the future, according to a terrorism expert."

    So, ISIS now know that all they have to do to storm the Capitol is assemble some 10,000 white hicks wearing MAGA regalia and get their President to tell them to do it. Yeah, I can see how ISIS could replicate that at will.

    To be fair -

    - Wait for a MAGA riot/attack on building.
    - Get your guys to dress up MAGA style
    - Go in with the crowd

    Imagine, say the Mumbai attackers in the crowd at the Capitol. They wait until they are in....
    You think after this that there are going to be many more MAGA attacks? Do you think that, even if there is a willingness among the Trump fanatics to attempt this, that they will receive the same consideration from the security forces as they did on Wednesday?

    No, this attack is a one and done.
  • Daveyboy1961Daveyboy1961 Posts: 485

    HYUFD said:

    HYUFD said:

    HYUFD said:

    An eventful Christmas day for the chief executive of the Equality and Human Rights Commission.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-55573412

    It is funny how these top London lawyers have so much difficulty in understanding the lockdown rules. Their antennae are ready to detect subtle breaches of equality regulation. She's been hot on the trail of antisemites in the Jolly Old Labour Party -- but a simple rule on lockdown like "Do Not Travel to Your Second Home" is completely beyond her ken.

    "I would like to apologise to the local community, where we feel deeply embedded," said Mrs Hilsenrath.

    So, basically the Llanegryn locals were the happy Stasis 😁😁😁& got Gog Plod to chase her out of Wales on Xmas day & leaked the story so it is all over the press.

    And yet the little second-homer (probably third-homer) still believes the locals love her ("deeply embedded").

    If you live in Hertfordshire and your children all go to school in Hertfordshire and you work in London, you are not deeply embedded in a small Welsh village

    Still, it sounds as though she is in for the 100 per cent DomCum treatment.

    The Equality and Human Rights Commission said they will consider whether further action against its chief executive is needed. "She has apologised for this error of judgement," said EHRC chair Baroness Kishwer Falkner.

    Whoooo, "need to consider whether further action is needed".

    Baroness Falkner is a LibDem, so I am sure she'll take a generous view of the perils of owning many homes.

    And if not perhaps an appeal to the pb SecondHome Club (it is solidly LibDem) ?

    Wales was a particularly odd place for someone from England to want to spend Christmas, when for us already here, Christmas had to be cancelled by the hapless Drakeford. Johnson, on the other hand had been in the enviable position of having timed his pre-Christmas precautions such, that Christmas in England was safely saved.
    The reasons are I guess:

    (i) Gwynedd (at the moment) has one of the lowest rate of infections in the country, whilst Hertfordshire is one of the highest.

    (ii) London lawyers are irredeemably selfish, the most selfish people on the planet (always excepting London bankers & skiers😁).

    Londoners with second homes occupy a unique place in the nation. They think they are loved ("deeply embedded in the village"). In fact, everyone loathes and hates them.

    They are unpopular with the Left (for their privilege) and the Right (for their faux-liberalism).
    Hypocrisy clings to this constituency like a stink.

    Still, I expect the darling will suffer no longterm problems, if a LibDem Baroness is in charge of looking into whether she did anything wrong.

    I hope her Council Tax payments are up to date -- there is surcharge on second homes in Gwynedd, but it is up to second-homers to declare, so it is widely evaded.

    It will be embarrassing if a new set of excuses have to be devised for the Chief Executive of the Equality and Human Rights Commission if there is Council Tax underpayment from failing to self-declare the second home.
    Small point of order: it's as common now on the right for people to object to genuine liberalism as it is for them to object to the faux version.
    The central political development of the past five years across the west has been the mainstreaming of illiberalism in the political right.

    And a great number of those on the liberal right do not even realise they're in a struggle to the death over the soul of their ideology.
    Cameron and Boris are both members of the liberal right which is why I support them both.

    Theresa May was far more authoritarian, illiberal right which is why I opposed her.

    Liberal right is doing OK in this country.
    Boris is of course so liberal he has ended free movement to and from the EU
    While liberalising movement with the rest of the world, which has got less attention.

    Liberalising movement with the rest of the world and not discriminating in favour of predominantly white Europeans only is the right thing to do. It isn't what eg Farage would have done, or May.
    He hasn't, all that has changed is EU migrants will now face the same immigration rules as rest of the world migrants.

    Boris has introduced one of the biggest restrictions on immigration to the UK of any PM in UK history, Cameron may be a liberal, Boris is not
    Wrong.

    "The new rules make it easier for non-EU migrants to get a working visa in the UK"

    https://www.euractiv.com/section/uk-europe/news/uk-sets-out-steep-barriers-for-eu-migrants-from-2021/
    No, non-EU migrants will still only really be able to get a working visa for skilled jobs, all that has happened is EU migrants without sufficient qualifications and an offer to do a job of sufficient skill will no longer be able to come here.

    Whereas before EU migrants could come here to do any job regardless of skill level unlike non-EU migrants now neither EU migrants or non-EU migrants will be able to benefit from free movement to the UK to do any job regardless of skill level
    Guess what? We will still have as many migrants, just more will be from outside the EU. How pointless was that? The UK government has been able to fully control 50% of migration whilst inside EU. They did nothing. The whole migrant debate was another crock of shit to gull the gullible. Oh, sorry did I mention you again @Philip_Thompson ?
    Idiot.

    If we are getting more non EU migration then that means we have made it easier for skilled non EU migrants to come here, which is a good thing; and policy.

    If we are getting fewer unskilled minimum wage EU migrants on tax credits, but more skilled non EU migration then that is an improvement. It is not saying nothing has changed unless your intention is to stop migration. Is that your intention? It is not mine.
    Calling others idiots when you spend most of your waking hours on here talking shit about things you have no knowledge of says more about you than me. Seriously, what else do you do with your time? Do you have any actual experience of anything other than taking views from the Daily Express about the EU and Brexit? I bet you also have a thing for Princess Diana! I am sure for most of us PB is an occasional opportunity to vent or debate whilst we are doing other things, but you want to turn it into a full time job? As your secret idol Donald Trump would say, SAD! And you have the temerity to call any one else an idiot? Take the massive great beam out of your own eye you populist prick. Try posting less often and you might say something that makes sense or is interesting. Tell us about some real life experience you have that might enlighten us perhaps? Not possible? Thought so.
    I wouldn't bother, he's a trollish Boris Fanboi
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 81,377
    However to be fair most incoming Presidents also see their parties in control of Congress, you have to go back to 1989 to find the last time that did not happen.

    The midterms in 2022 will be a different story, Trump will not be on the ballot or even President, if the Biden-Harris administration has a low approval rating the GOP are likely to at least retake the House on the usual midterm protest vote
  • GardenwalkerGardenwalker Posts: 5,830
    edited January 8

    Scott_xP said:

    But, but, but, the PB Brexit braintrust told us this couldn't happen...

    They also assured us that the sterling's weakness was due not to Brexit itself, but to the uncertainty around when and how Brexit would be implemented. How strange, then, the sterling remains so weak against the euro, even after Brexit has been done!
    They also assured us that sterling’s fall would make our exports more competitive.

    In fact, we just ended up paying more for imports.

    We are all quite a bit poorer than we were in early 2016.
  • MaxPBMaxPB Posts: 23,895
    Foxy said:

    At this rate, come the summer we will be swimming in vaccines.

    We probably need to. The viral vector vaccines like AZN will be ineffective next year, due to immune response to the vector. This seems to be a problem with Sputnik. The mRNA vaccines much less so, but whether long lasting protection develops is unknown as yet.
    Yes, and one of considerations is that approving a new vector may require a new PI/II safety test as there is vector safety to consider which the mRNA method won't have to bother with because the vector doesn't change. They can jump straight into a new PIII trial with whatever changes are made to get a new antibody response.
  • Philip_ThompsonPhilip_Thompson Posts: 47,349
    Carnyx said:

    Carnyx said:

    Carnyx said:

    Carnyx said:

    First to the barricades...er, Scotland?

    Funny you should say that given it's the Tories who love Mr Trump so much.

    OT but coincidentally, this is from the Speccy. Knives being sharpened?

    https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/boris-johnsons-scotland-problem
    Some interesting stuff there.

    "The Prime Minister knows that to lose Scotland would be a resigning matter. And there’s a chance he wouldn’t even be allowed to get that far: his party might not keep a leader who looked close to losing the union.

    Rishi Sunak is viewed by Tory strategists as the cabinet minister with the best appeal, outranking both Starmer and Gordon Brown among Scottish swing voters."
    Michael Gove isn't mentioned in quite the same way ...
    PS Also interesting (given current wisdomn on PB) is that the Tories seem quite worried by an indicative referendum - ie not at all dismissive of it.
    What current wisdom on PB?

    Apart from HYUFD who isn't worried (or welcoming) of another referendum?
    Certainly not the impression I have from others who seem to have the view that a referendum without London permission |(and so indicative) would be illegal, useless, etc. But it's not so much what the PBers think as what ios being portrayed as Tory planning.
    By HYUFD.

    David Herdson, Casino, DavidL, Big G and more are the Tory Unionists whose views on the subject are more realistic. I don't see any absence of concern from them.
  • RogerRoger Posts: 13,707

    First to the barricades...er, Scotland?


    I wouldn't mess with the Polis.....



    There is a handy "Shop a Neighbour" online form:

    https://www.scotland.police.uk/secureforms/covid19/
    Someone showed me a directive from Gavin williamson saying if you thought your school wasn't giving enough home teaching you should report them to Ofsted.

    They're all at it
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 81,377
    edited January 8
    Carnyx said:

    Carnyx said:

    Carnyx said:

    First to the barricades...er, Scotland?

    Funny you should say that given it's the Tories who love Mr Trump so much.

    OT but coincidentally, this is from the Speccy. Knives being sharpened?

    https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/boris-johnsons-scotland-problem
    Some interesting stuff there.

    "The Prime Minister knows that to lose Scotland would be a resigning matter. And there’s a chance he wouldn’t even be allowed to get that far: his party might not keep a leader who looked close to losing the union.

    Rishi Sunak is viewed by Tory strategists as the cabinet minister with the best appeal, outranking both Starmer and Gordon Brown among Scottish swing voters."
    Michael Gove isn't mentioned in quite the same way ...
    PS Also interesting (given current wisdomn on PB) is that the Tories seem quite worried by an indicative referendum - ie not at all dismissive of it.
    There will be no legal referendum allowed by this Tory government, 2014 was a once in a generation vote, the PM has been quite clear on that.

    An indicative referendum without Westminster approval is illegal and can be ignored.

    Plus good point in that article 'But it was a rare time Nicola was off kilter,’ says a Tory MP. ‘They escalated the horrors of no deal so much that just getting a deal seemed OK, no matter what wasn’t or was in it.’
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 20,920

    Carnyx said:

    First to the barricades...er, Scotland?

    Funny you should say that given it's the Tories who love Mr Trump so much.

    OT but coincidentally, this is from the Speccy. Knives being sharpened?

    https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/boris-johnsons-scotland-problem
    Some interesting stuff there.

    "The Prime Minister knows that to lose Scotland would be a resigning matter. And there’s a chance he wouldn’t even be allowed to get that far: his party might not keep a leader who looked close to losing the union.

    Rishi Sunak is viewed by Tory strategists as the cabinet minister with the best appeal in Scotland, outranking both Starmer and Gordon Brown among Scottish swing voters."
    Can Rishi identify Scotland on a map?
    Serious question.
    His problem is reaching the top bit of the map.
  • EndillionEndillion Posts: 2,668

    Stocky said:

    I love it when people who are implacably opposed to the Republican Party try to give it lessons. Presumably to maintain the notion that everything is alright in the West and its business as usual, and what you are seeing is not a hologram.

    But here's the thing. It really isn't all right.

    The right is completely split in America. The party elite and the Trumpist base despise each other totally. The latter will not turn out for the former, as Georgia showed, and what follows is a hugely bitter primaries battle between the two factions ahead of 2022. When millions will not turn out again and the democrat hegemony intensifies.

    Meanwhile, the Democrats will be deliberating just how much of a Jihad they want to declare on the many millions of Americans who turned out for Trump and now have zero faith in their country, its electoral system and its institutions.

    Trump showed his millions of supporters a glimpse of an America they were comfortable with and where they were welcome and valuable citizens.

    They are not going back to the likes of Romney. Not now. Not ever.

    Trouble is, their "zero faith in their country, its electoral system and its institutions" is based on delusion. How to cleanse this?
    It's not entirely delusional. America needs multiple kinds of reform.
    One of the problems is that, although the US voting system leaves much to be desired in many places, the right is mostly focused on problems that don't exist. The system is broken but they're trying to fix the parts that work.
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 39,210
    FPT - nuclear weapons exist to level the playing field against those with massive conventional forces, that we couldn't hope to match, and to deter nuclear blackmail against us by nuclear armed powers.

    They're not designed to deter every and all forms of conflict, and nor should they be, but they are an essential part of our defensive arsenal. We have them in case a prospective aggressor calculates they could attack the UK, or our interests, directly without inviting an American response. So, they both serve to strengthen the Western alliance, which helps make our corner of the world such a safe and peaceful one, and our own hard power.

    I know others have equally strong views on this, but count me out from the unilateralists please. It's an ultimate insurance policy that I'm happy to have - and pay for - and helps me sleep soundly at night.
  • PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 63,352

    First to the barricades...er, Scotland?


    I wouldn't mess with the Polis.....



    There is a handy "Shop a Neighbour" online form:

    https://www.scotland.police.uk/secureforms/covid19/
    The police I'd have thought are at higher risk of being asymptomatic Covid carriers than most due to the nature of their jobs.
    They have put this family at risk.
  • MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 36,845
    Carnyx said:

    First to the barricades...er, Scotland?

    Funny you should say that given it's the Tories who love Mr Trump so much.
    Some Tories, not the Tories.....
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 10,115
    TimT said:

    TimT said:

    One of the most ludicrous headlines (and experts) on the Capitol storming so far: "The US Capitol protests this week have given ‘a blueprint' to ISIS ‘for attacking" the pivotal institution in the future, according to a terrorism expert."

    So, ISIS now know that all they have to do to storm the Capitol is assemble some 10,000 white hicks wearing MAGA regalia and get their President to tell them to do it. Yeah, I can see how ISIS could replicate that at will.

    To be fair -

    - Wait for a MAGA riot/attack on building.
    - Get your guys to dress up MAGA style
    - Go in with the crowd

    Imagine, say the Mumbai attackers in the crowd at the Capitol. They wait until they are in....
    You think after this that there are going to be many more MAGA attacks? Do you think that, even if there is a willingness among the Trump fanatics to attempt this, that they will receive the same consideration from the security forces as they did on Wednesday?

    No, this attack is a one and done.
    If you were dealing with rational individuals.....

    I am of the opinion that there will be other angry crowd gatherings with the same potential.

    As you say, what happens next depends on the response.
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 9,230

    Carnyx said:

    First to the barricades...er, Scotland?

    Funny you should say that given it's the Tories who love Mr Trump so much.

    OT but coincidentally, this is from the Speccy. Knives being sharpened?

    https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/boris-johnsons-scotland-problem
    Some interesting stuff there.

    "The Prime Minister knows that to lose Scotland would be a resigning matter. And there’s a chance he wouldn’t even be allowed to get that far: his party might not keep a leader who looked close to losing the union.

    Rishi Sunak is viewed by Tory strategists as the cabinet minister with the best appeal in Scotland, outranking both Starmer and Gordon Brown among Scottish swing voters."
    Can Rishi identify Scotland on a map?
    Serious question.
    I don't know if he can read a map (sounds horrible of me but after one or two of his colleagues ...). But he has certainly popped up to Malky G land briefly in the last year - IIRC a ferry trip to Arran or Cumbrae featured. So yes, he knows it is the cold and wet bit to the north.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 20,920

    MaxPB said:

    MaxPB said:

    DavidL said:

    Scott_xP said:
    Am I right in thinking we don't have any for enough months that there shouldn't in fact be any great demand for it?
    April and only 7m doses, Moderna are definitely pursuing a private sector strategy so that 7m may end up being a lot more as employers and private health providers secure their own supplies.
    Let's see what the delivery schedule is for the additional 10m. Still good though.

    That makes 57m mRNA doses of approved vaccines, 100m adenovirus from AZ approved and 52m adenovirus from J&J nearing approval. Have to say our vaccine portfolio really is world beating. Hats off to the taskforce.
    But we dont currently have enough to comply with Pfizer recommended guidelines on how it should be used..

    Hopefully a short term problem now their competitors are approved.
    I see the MRHA are recommending a second dose of moderna 4 weeks after the first.
  • Daveyboy1961Daveyboy1961 Posts: 485
    Foxy said:

    Carnyx said:

    First to the barricades...er, Scotland?

    Funny you should say that given it's the Tories who love Mr Trump so much.

    OT but coincidentally, this is from the Speccy. Knives being sharpened?

    https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/boris-johnsons-scotland-problem
    Some interesting stuff there.

    "The Prime Minister knows that to lose Scotland would be a resigning matter. And there’s a chance he wouldn’t even be allowed to get that far: his party might not keep a leader who looked close to losing the union.

    Rishi Sunak is viewed by Tory strategists as the cabinet minister with the best appeal in Scotland, outranking both Starmer and Gordon Brown among Scottish swing voters."
    Can Rishi identify Scotland on a map?
    Serious question.
    His problem is reaching the top bit of the map.
    Does he know where Bajor is?
  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 38,775
    Roger said:

    First to the barricades...er, Scotland?


    I wouldn't mess with the Polis.....



    There is a handy "Shop a Neighbour" online form:

    https://www.scotland.police.uk/secureforms/covid19/
    Someone showed me a directive from Gavin williamson saying if you thought your school wasn't giving enough home teaching you should report them to Ofsted.

    They're all at it
    Can I report Gavin Williamson to Ofsted?
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 9,230

    Foxy said:

    Carnyx said:

    First to the barricades...er, Scotland?

    Funny you should say that given it's the Tories who love Mr Trump so much.

    OT but coincidentally, this is from the Speccy. Knives being sharpened?

    https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/boris-johnsons-scotland-problem
    Some interesting stuff there.

    "The Prime Minister knows that to lose Scotland would be a resigning matter. And there’s a chance he wouldn’t even be allowed to get that far: his party might not keep a leader who looked close to losing the union.

    Rishi Sunak is viewed by Tory strategists as the cabinet minister with the best appeal in Scotland, outranking both Starmer and Gordon Brown among Scottish swing voters."
    Can Rishi identify Scotland on a map?
    Serious question.
    His problem is reaching the top bit of the map.
    Does he know where Bajor is?
    I don't ...
  • WhisperingOracleWhisperingOracle Posts: 3,726
    edited January 8
    Foxy said:

    Stocky said:

    I love it when people who are implacably opposed to the Republican Party try to give it lessons. Presumably to maintain the notion that everything is alright in the West and its business as usual, and what you are seeing is not a hologram.

    But here's the thing. It really isn't all right.

    The right is completely split in America. The party elite and the Trumpist base despise each other totally. The latter will not turn out for the former, as Georgia showed, and what follows is a hugely bitter primaries battle between the two factions ahead of 2022. When millions will not turn out again and the democrat hegemony intensifies.

    Meanwhile, the Democrats will be deliberating just how much of a Jihad they want to declare on the many millions of Americans who turned out for Trump and now have zero faith in their country, its electoral system and its institutions.

    Trump showed his millions of supporters a glimpse of an America they were comfortable with and where they were welcome and valuable citizens.

    They are not going back to the likes of Romney. Not now. Not ever.

    Trouble is, their "zero faith in their country, its electoral system and its institutions" is based on delusion. How to cleanse this?
    It's not entirely delusional. America needs multiple kinds of reform.
    We are all in favour of reform. Where we differ is what those reforms should be.
    Well, I do sometimes feel that point needs restating, as PB does tend to steer towards a steady-as-she-goes, centre-right default as its view.
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 9,230

    Carnyx said:

    First to the barricades...er, Scotland?

    Funny you should say that given it's the Tories who love Mr Trump so much.
    Some Tories, not the Tories.....
    Sorry! Quite right to correct me.
  • PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 63,352

    TimT said:

    One of the most ludicrous headlines (and experts) on the Capitol storming so far: "The US Capitol protests this week have given ‘a blueprint' to ISIS ‘for attacking" the pivotal institution in the future, according to a terrorism expert."

    So, ISIS now know that all they have to do to storm the Capitol is assemble some 10,000 white hicks wearing MAGA regalia and get their President to tell them to do it. Yeah, I can see how ISIS could replicate that at will.

    To be fair -

    - Wait for a MAGA riot/attack on building.
    - Get your guys to dress up MAGA style
    - Go in with the crowd

    Imagine, say the Mumbai attackers in the crowd at the Capitol. They wait until they are in....
    Yes, it's quite a simple playbook. The Trojan MAGA horse.
  • MaxPBMaxPB Posts: 23,895

    MaxPB said:

    DavidL said:

    Scott_xP said:
    Am I right in thinking we don't have any for enough months that there shouldn't in fact be any great demand for it?
    I believe start of April is when it will be available worldwide. I don't think it is going to form key part of the strategy.

    J&J is the big one that could really help. One shot, no -70 million degrees. Could do 1000s and 1000s of a day via drive through.
    The EU is getting the Moderna vaccine in a few days.
    From where? The Swiss production line isn't slated to deliver until March (which means April delivery after batch testing) and they aren't exporting any doses from the US yet. They did approve it a couple of days ago though.

    Maybe there's a pilot production line ready in their Swiss production line. Would be very interested to know.
    According to CNN, quoting a statement from Moderna, rollout of Moderna's vaccine in the EU is to start next week.

    https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/amp.cnn.com/cnn/2021/01/06/europe/moderna-approval-eu-intl/index.html
    Non-US supply coupled with UVdL saying 75m in Q2 that sounds like a pilot line. Definitely a paper launch but right now everything helps, just don't send it to France.
  • GallowgateGallowgate Posts: 12,184

    FPT - nuclear weapons exist to level the playing field against those with massive conventional forces, that we couldn't hope to match, and to deter nuclear blackmail against us by nuclear armed powers.

    They're not designed to deter every and all forms of conflict, and nor should they be, but they are an essential part of our defensive arsenal. We have them in case a prospective aggressor calculates they could attack the UK, or our interests, directly without inviting an American response. So, they both serve to strengthen the Western alliance, which helps make our corner of the world such a safe and peaceful one, and our own hard power.

    I know others have equally strong views on this, but count me out from the unilateralists please. It's an ultimate insurance policy that I'm happy to have - and pay for - and helps me sleep soundly at night.

    I too support the nuclear deterrent.
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