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  • ydoethur said:

    It is disturbing to reflect that so far I haven’t seen a single leadership contender who either (a) stands out from the rest as somebody of talent and energy or (b) might tempt me to vote Labour in 2024.

    Labour are really doing a very bad job right now of trying to head back to government.
    This is their 1997 and William Hague era.
  • House of Lords = House of Unelected Has-Beens :lol:


    What a pity that your party blocked reform plans during the coalition. It is like it is because of the Tories
  • nunu2nunu2 Posts: 1,453
    edited December 2019
    Dom is not only a genius, but also very sensible.

    But I hope the government increases the number of degree apprenticeships and not just the number of degrees.
  • House of Lords = House of Unelected Has-Beens :lol:


    What a pity that your party blocked reform plans during the coalition. It is like it is because of the Tories
    I am not a member of the Tory Party, or any other party.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,045

    ydoethur said:

    It is disturbing to reflect that so far I haven’t seen a single leadership contender who either (a) stands out from the rest as somebody of talent and energy or (b) might tempt me to vote Labour in 2024.

    Labour are really doing a very bad job right now of trying to head back to government.
    I think you are massively misunderestimating Ian Lavery.
    Sure, I love for voting for people who take thousands from unions in redundancy payments they’re not entitled to. Especially when this means they don’t pay tax on it.
  • ydoethur said:

    It is disturbing to reflect that so far I haven’t seen a single leadership contender who either (a) stands out from the rest as somebody of talent and energy or (b) might tempt me to vote Labour in 2024.

    Labour are really doing a very bad job right now of trying to head back to government.
    I think you are massively misunderestimating Ian Lavery.
    "Ejaculate? In our moment of victory? I think you overestimate their chances!"
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,045

    ydoethur said:

    It is disturbing to reflect that so far I haven’t seen a single leadership contender who either (a) stands out from the rest as somebody of talent and energy or (b) might tempt me to vote Labour in 2024.

    Labour are really doing a very bad job right now of trying to head back to government.
    This is their 1997 and William Hague era.
    More like 1931 and a rerun of George Lansbury.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,045

    ydoethur said:

    It is disturbing to reflect that so far I haven’t seen a single leadership contender who either (a) stands out from the rest as somebody of talent and energy or (b) might tempt me to vote Labour in 2024.

    Labour are really doing a very bad job right now of trying to head back to government.
    I think you are massively misunderestimating Ian Lavery.
    "Ejaculate? In our moment of victory? I think you overestimate their chances!"
    Ian Lavery’s marginal victory in Wansbeck would Cushing my fears of him as PM.
  • ydoethur said:

    ydoethur said:

    It is disturbing to reflect that so far I haven’t seen a single leadership contender who either (a) stands out from the rest as somebody of talent and energy or (b) might tempt me to vote Labour in 2024.

    Labour are really doing a very bad job right now of trying to head back to government.
    I think you are massively misunderestimating Ian Lavery.
    Sure, I love for voting for people who take thousands from unions in redundancy payments they’re not entitled to. Especially when this means they don’t pay tax on it.
    If he becomes leader I might work in a comparison between Ian Lavery and Prince Andrew.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,045

    ydoethur said:

    ydoethur said:

    It is disturbing to reflect that so far I haven’t seen a single leadership contender who either (a) stands out from the rest as somebody of talent and energy or (b) might tempt me to vote Labour in 2024.

    Labour are really doing a very bad job right now of trying to head back to government.
    I think you are massively misunderestimating Ian Lavery.
    Sure, I love for voting for people who take thousands from unions in redundancy payments they’re not entitled to. Especially when this means they don’t pay tax on it.
    If he becomes leader I might work in a comparison between Ian Lavery and Prince Andrew.
    I think that’s a little unfair.

    Prince Andrew at least did some travel and glad handing of dodgy foreign businessmen to earn that money.
  • Good news for Starmer. He'd have lost to Rayner, but can definitely beat RLB.
  • I see Morris Dancer has been advising Putin on history.

    Polish PM furious at Putin rewriting history of second world war.

    Mateusz Morawiecki attacks Russian president’s ‘lies’ blaming Poland for start of war


    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/dec/30/polish-pm-furious-at-putin-rewriting-history-of-second-world-war
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 116,908

    Good news for Starmer. He'd have lost to Rayner, but can definitely beat RLB.
    If Starmer is Portillo, Rayner is David Davis to Long Bailey's IDS
  • alteregoalterego Posts: 1,100

    Good news for Starmer. He'd have lost to Rayner, but can definitely beat RLB.
    Dream on
  • I see Morris Dancer has been advising Putin on history.

    Polish PM furious at Putin rewriting history of second world war.

    Mateusz Morawiecki attacks Russian president’s ‘lies’ blaming Poland for start of war


    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/dec/30/polish-pm-furious-at-putin-rewriting-history-of-second-world-war

    Russia invaded Poland too! On 17th September 1939.
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 116,908

    ydoethur said:

    It is disturbing to reflect that so far I haven’t seen a single leadership contender who either (a) stands out from the rest as somebody of talent and energy or (b) might tempt me to vote Labour in 2024.

    Labour are really doing a very bad job right now of trying to head back to government.
    This is their 1997 and William Hague era.
    No 2001 and their IDS era, the government has been re elected with a big majority as it was then, in 1997 the Government had only just been elected
  • Pulpstar said:

    Other bets on this for show, Long-Bailey for dough.

    I'm holding my position - she's no cert but I've got her as a slightly superior result to most others.
    Thank you as usual, keep up the good work matey.
  • OllyTOllyT Posts: 4,912
    ydoethur said:

    It is disturbing to reflect that so far I haven’t seen a single leadership contender who either (a) stands out from the rest as somebody of talent and energy or (b) might tempt me to vote Labour in 2024.

    Labour are really doing a very bad job right now of trying to head back to government.
    Agreed. I was going to rejoin to vote for a new leader but so far nobody has come forward that I would vote for either as leader or even at a GE.

    Dan Jarvis or Yvette Cooper are the only possibles that would have me rejoining and if neither won I'd be resigning again the next week.
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 62,040
    viewcode said:

    ydoethur said:

    Alistair said:

    Dune is a proper rubbish book.

    It divides me a little bit. It’s essentially Game of Thrones in space, to all intents and purposes (before Game of Thrones was a thing), but I veer wildly between being rather impressed by its world building and thinking it’s a fairly interesting tale completely submerged in a lot of over-baked guff. Certainly the Lynch film trended towards the latter.
    It certainly needed spicing up in places.
    It was a mix of many influences. A melange, you could say.
    And a strange ability to worm its way into your affections.

    And curiously popularised the concept of jihad in US culture.
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 53,880
    So... I've not seen the Last Jedi, but am off to see the Rise of Skywalker this afternoon.

    This will be the 87th Adam Driver movie I'll have watched this year.
  • viewcodeviewcode Posts: 18,528

    I see Morris Dancer has been advising Putin on history.

    Polish PM furious at Putin rewriting history of second world war.

    Mateusz Morawiecki attacks Russian president’s ‘lies’ blaming Poland for start of war


    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/dec/30/polish-pm-furious-at-putin-rewriting-history-of-second-world-war

    Russia invaded Poland too! On 17th September 1939.
    Russia doesn't invade countries, it enters them after invitations from concerned citizens to liberate them from their unsympathetic regime. See Hungary 1956, Czechoslovakia 1968, Afghanistan 1979, Georgia 2008, Ukraine 2014, Estonia 2021, Latvia 2024, Lithuania 2028, Poland 2032...

    Maybe we can get a t-shirt printed.
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 62,040

    HYUFD said:

    ydoethur said:

    Well, that was better than The Last Jedi. And I think probably better than The Force Awakens.

    But it was no Empire Strikes Back.

    Well it was the final one so hopefully we can have non Star Wars movies to talk about next Christmas
    I expect Denis Villeneuve's take on Dune might well be the blockbuster next Christmas.
    The film I am most looking forward to next year is Jojo Rabbit. I do like Taika Waititi a great deal as a filmmaker and this looks utterly surreal.
    Got to watch it over Christmas, and it’s a lot better than the trailer suggests (which laudably doesn’t tell the entire story, as so many now do).
    Possibly the best film I’ve seen this year.
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 62,040
    rcs1000 said:

    So... I've not seen the Last Jedi, but am off to see the Rise of Skywalker this afternoon.

    This will be the 87th Adam Driver movie I'll have watched this year.

    Is there a Baby Driver in The Mandalorian ? :smile:
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 62,040

    I see Morris Dancer has been advising Putin on history.

    Polish PM furious at Putin rewriting history of second world war.

    Mateusz Morawiecki attacks Russian president’s ‘lies’ blaming Poland for start of war


    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/dec/30/polish-pm-furious-at-putin-rewriting-history-of-second-world-war

    Or perhaps has been taking lessons from Trump ?
    We know he’s fond of the Goebbels approach to propaganda.
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 62,040
    OllyT said:

    ydoethur said:

    It is disturbing to reflect that so far I haven’t seen a single leadership contender who either (a) stands out from the rest as somebody of talent and energy or (b) might tempt me to vote Labour in 2024.

    Labour are really doing a very bad job right now of trying to head back to government.
    Agreed. I was going to rejoin to vote for a new leader but so far nobody has come forward that I would vote for either as leader or even at a GE.

    Dan Jarvis or Yvette Cooper are the only possibles that would have me rejoining and if neither won I'd be resigning again the next week.
    Bit desperate holding out for Dan...
  • ByronicByronic Posts: 3,578
    edited December 2019
    They really are evil scum. Thank fuck they were defeated, and defeated soundly. Britain dodged a bullet.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,045
    Nigelb said:

    OllyT said:

    ydoethur said:

    It is disturbing to reflect that so far I haven’t seen a single leadership contender who either (a) stands out from the rest as somebody of talent and energy or (b) might tempt me to vote Labour in 2024.

    Labour are really doing a very bad job right now of trying to head back to government.
    Agreed. I was going to rejoin to vote for a new leader but so far nobody has come forward that I would vote for either as leader or even at a GE.

    Dan Jarvis or Yvette Cooper are the only possibles that would have me rejoining and if neither won I'd be resigning again the next week.
    Bit desperate holding out for Dan...
    Will Dan Dare?

    I’ll get my coat.

    Good night.
  • MaxPBMaxPB Posts: 37,606
    I haven't kept up with the news, do we know who was behind the attacks in New York and the graffiti in London yet?
  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 58,094
    edited December 2019
    Nigelb said:

    OllyT said:

    ydoethur said:

    It is disturbing to reflect that so far I haven’t seen a single leadership contender who either (a) stands out from the rest as somebody of talent and energy or (b) might tempt me to vote Labour in 2024.

    Labour are really doing a very bad job right now of trying to head back to government.
    Agreed. I was going to rejoin to vote for a new leader but so far nobody has come forward that I would vote for either as leader or even at a GE.

    Dan Jarvis or Yvette Cooper are the only possibles that would have me rejoining and if neither won I'd be resigning again the next week.
    Bit desperate holding out for Dan...
    It is beyond belief that Lab members are about to elect these two. Luckily, I have anticipated how stupid these members are and bet accordingly. :smiley:
  • ydoethur said:

    Nigelb said:

    OllyT said:

    ydoethur said:

    It is disturbing to reflect that so far I haven’t seen a single leadership contender who either (a) stands out from the rest as somebody of talent and energy or (b) might tempt me to vote Labour in 2024.

    Labour are really doing a very bad job right now of trying to head back to government.
    Agreed. I was going to rejoin to vote for a new leader but so far nobody has come forward that I would vote for either as leader or even at a GE.

    Dan Jarvis or Yvette Cooper are the only possibles that would have me rejoining and if neither won I'd be resigning again the next week.
    Bit desperate holding out for Dan...
    Will Dan Dare?

    I’ll get my coat.

    Good night.
    Mekont see it.
  • ByronicByronic Posts: 3,578
    The FT has been writing about Brexit again

    https://www.ft.com/content/05e5fcf0-176a-11ea-9ee4-11f260415385?segmentid=acee4131-99c2-09d3-a635-873e61754ec6

    But this time... they are trying to be OPTIMISTIC
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 62,040
    MaxPB said:

    I haven't kept up with the news, do we know who was behind the attacks in New York and the graffiti in London yet?

    I believe there has been an arrest in NY.
  • MaxPBMaxPB Posts: 37,606
    edited December 2019
    Nigelb said:

    MaxPB said:

    I haven't kept up with the news, do we know who was behind the attacks in New York and the graffiti in London yet?

    I believe there has been an arrest in NY.
    Oh good. Hope they lock that c*** up for eternity. There's no redemption for this kind of scum. As we saw on London bridge recently.
  • MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 50,042
    Byronic said:

    How exciting is Brexit?

    Just think: next year, and for the rest of the decade, Britain is going to try something NEW. Something no country has done, ever. We are gonna reverse globalisation, step aside from Davos man-wank, we are going to return the country to its voters, and say: Here, this is what you asked for, suck it and see.

    Will it be a disaster? Maybe, but maybe not. NO ONE FUCKING KNOWS

    What we do know is that this is genuinely revolutionary. And WE are the country that is trying this. Not America, France, Japan, Malta, the Maldives, Gabon or a mad island near Wallis & Futuna.

    WE are doing this brave and crazy thing. WE are gonna be a different nation.

    Go, us.

    Like the UK kick-starting privatisation, it will be another idea to circle the globe......

    Maybe.
  • ByronicByronic Posts: 3,578

    Byronic said:

    How exciting is Brexit?

    Just think: next year, and for the rest of the decade, Britain is going to try something NEW. Something no country has done, ever. We are gonna reverse globalisation, step aside from Davos man-wank, we are going to return the country to its voters, and say: Here, this is what you asked for, suck it and see.

    Will it be a disaster? Maybe, but maybe not. NO ONE FUCKING KNOWS

    What we do know is that this is genuinely revolutionary. And WE are the country that is trying this. Not America, France, Japan, Malta, the Maldives, Gabon or a mad island near Wallis & Futuna.

    WE are doing this brave and crazy thing. WE are gonna be a different nation.

    Go, us.

    Like the UK kick-starting privatisation, it will be another idea to circle the globe......

    Maybe.
    I'm suddenly seized with giddy optimism!

    Fuck it. Let's try it.
  • RobDRobD Posts: 58,953
    Byronic said:

    The FT has been writing about Brexit again

    https://www.ft.com/content/05e5fcf0-176a-11ea-9ee4-11f260415385?segmentid=acee4131-99c2-09d3-a635-873e61754ec6

    But this time... they are trying to be OPTIMISTIC

    The editor will be stripped of his legion d'honor forthwith.
  • viewcode said:

    I see Morris Dancer has been advising Putin on history.

    Polish PM furious at Putin rewriting history of second world war.

    Mateusz Morawiecki attacks Russian president’s ‘lies’ blaming Poland for start of war


    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/dec/30/polish-pm-furious-at-putin-rewriting-history-of-second-world-war

    Russia invaded Poland too! On 17th September 1939.
    Russia doesn't invade countries, it enters them after invitations from concerned citizens to liberate them from their unsympathetic regime. See Hungary 1956, Czechoslovakia 1968, Afghanistan 1979, Georgia 2008, Ukraine 2014, Estonia 2021, Latvia 2024, Lithuania 2028, Poland 2032...

    Maybe we can get a t-shirt printed.
    I’m fairly certain they were invading Germany in 1945 and were quite happy to describe it as such...
  • viewcodeviewcode Posts: 18,528

    viewcode said:

    I see Morris Dancer has been advising Putin on history.

    Polish PM furious at Putin rewriting history of second world war.

    Mateusz Morawiecki attacks Russian president’s ‘lies’ blaming Poland for start of war


    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/dec/30/polish-pm-furious-at-putin-rewriting-history-of-second-world-war

    Russia invaded Poland too! On 17th September 1939.
    Russia doesn't invade countries, it enters them after invitations from concerned citizens to liberate them from their unsympathetic regime. See Hungary 1956, Czechoslovakia 1968, Afghanistan 1979, Georgia 2008, Ukraine 2014, Estonia 2021, Latvia 2024, Lithuania 2028, Poland 2032...

    Maybe we can get a t-shirt printed.
    I’m fairly certain they were invading Germany in 1945 and were quite happy to describe it as such...
    In fairness to them, they did have over twenty million good reasons to do so... :(
  • viewcodeviewcode Posts: 18,528
    It's weird. I've clocked off for the day. I have no papers to review and the paper I'm writing is being reviewed by the editorial board. I don't go back to work until Thursday. I am not catching a train tonight nor tomorrow night.

    Pause.

    Drums fingers.

    Damn, is this what you puny humans call "time off"? Lord, but it is weird... :)

    [wanders off to get yoghurt]
  • isamisam Posts: 40,848
    Byronic said:

    How exciting is Brexit?

    Just think: next year, and for the rest of the decade, Britain is going to try something NEW. Something no country has done, ever. We are gonna reverse globalisation, step aside from Davos man-wank, we are going to return the country to its voters, and say: Here, this is what you asked for, suck it and see.

    Will it be a disaster? Maybe, but maybe not. NO ONE FUCKING KNOWS

    What we do know is that this is genuinely revolutionary. And WE are the country that is trying this. Not America, France, Japan, Malta, the Maldives, Gabon or a mad island near Wallis & Futuna.

    WE are doing this brave and crazy thing. WE are gonna be a different nation.

    Go, us.

    “ This makes it doubly important to raise living standards in so-called left behind areas. Productivity must increase in the lower paid and often insecure jobs within Britain’s domestically-oriented economy, such as care work and online shopping delivery. Government policy needs to look beyond glamorous high tech jobs.

    That means better alternatives to university education, including for adults, and a package of reforms aimed at reducing one-sided flexibility where workers bear all the risk. The Augar review of higher education and the Taylor review of the future of work provide “oven-ready” proposals.”

    Taking the fight to the biggest capitalist project ever known
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 44,036
    Byronic said:

    They really are evil scum. Thank fuck they were defeated, and defeated soundly. Britain dodged a bullet.
    If you ever want to really upset the SWP scum, mention Martin James Smith...
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 53,880
    Byronic said:

    The FT has been writing about Brexit again

    https://www.ft.com/content/05e5fcf0-176a-11ea-9ee4-11f260415385?segmentid=acee4131-99c2-09d3-a635-873e61754ec6

    But this time... they are trying to be OPTIMISTIC

    That's not actually that optimistic an article. It is correct in its recognition of the challenges, but to my mind the big question is around governance. I believe companies and countries prosper when they have the good feedback loops in place.

    They try things, they evaluate whether those things have worked (and why) and they adjust.

    The larger the organisation, and the more insulated it is from the real world, the less well those feedback loops work. It is why, I believe, that smaller countries are inherently nimbler than large ones. And for large ones, it's very important to have proper democratic structures in place.

    That is the optimistic, governance based, argument for Brexit.

    What scares me about BJ is that he thinks in terms of outcomes and not processes. I hope I am wrong. I hope uses his ample majority well. I hope he is able to help the left behind.
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 44,036
    Sandpit said:

    Pulpstar said:

    Cummings is correct here - better to give Manchester University and others cash beefing up their research departments rather than try and create something new.
    Agree, if the university is prepared to embrace the new mission and identity thay would make it the MIT of the UK, rather than just Manchester uni rolling in cash.
    Yeah, there had better be very tight spending guidelines attached to the money. If they don’t just want to see it disappear into the blob. If they’re going to be like MIT, they’ll also be funding a lot of scholarships for the most able in STEM subjects.
    Strong rumours of a massive uptick in the number of places for nurses and doctors at Uni. Think - multiple birds with a single stone.
  • eekeek Posts: 24,866
    Going back to the question from yesterday regarding regional governments - I give you this approach for identifying regions.

    https://twitter.com/DrDionGeorgiou/status/1211764389252157442

    Different governments for London at the weekend would add to the fun.
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 53,880

    Sandpit said:

    Pulpstar said:

    Cummings is correct here - better to give Manchester University and others cash beefing up their research departments rather than try and create something new.
    Agree, if the university is prepared to embrace the new mission and identity thay would make it the MIT of the UK, rather than just Manchester uni rolling in cash.
    Yeah, there had better be very tight spending guidelines attached to the money. If they don’t just want to see it disappear into the blob. If they’re going to be like MIT, they’ll also be funding a lot of scholarships for the most able in STEM subjects.
    Strong rumours of a massive uptick in the number of places for nurses and doctors at Uni. Think - multiple birds with a single stone.
    Haven't nursing courses been generally undersubscribed, causing them to close?

    In other words, lack of places is not the fundamental problem.
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 44,036
    Sandpit said:

    rcs1000 said:

    viewcode said:

    kle4 said:

    viewcode said:
    I love that kind of thing.
    I got the code quiz right at the end, without looking at the comments! And I haven't coded in Javascript since (thinks) 2012 at the latest! Pause. OK, that's not really something to boast about... :)

    I've looked at date formats frequently over the years, particularly for timestamps. You find yourself writing yyyy-mm-dd-hh-mm-ss and then you get tripped up by those which use milliseconds as well.
    I just use milliseconds since the Unix Epoch for everything.

    It does sometimes cause confusion.
    So either you’re hoping to retire before 2038, or hoping that 2038 generates another millennium bug’s worth of work to enable you to retire?
    In Vernor Vinge's "A Deepness in the Sky", 10s of thousands of years from now, only elite code archeologists know that the The Clock started not when humans first landed on the Moon, but 15 megaseconds later, give or take.
  • New thread

  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 53,880
    isam said:

    Byronic said:

    How exciting is Brexit?

    Just think: next year, and for the rest of the decade, Britain is going to try something NEW. Something no country has done, ever. We are gonna reverse globalisation, step aside from Davos man-wank, we are going to return the country to its voters, and say: Here, this is what you asked for, suck it and see.

    Will it be a disaster? Maybe, but maybe not. NO ONE FUCKING KNOWS

    What we do know is that this is genuinely revolutionary. And WE are the country that is trying this. Not America, France, Japan, Malta, the Maldives, Gabon or a mad island near Wallis & Futuna.

    WE are doing this brave and crazy thing. WE are gonna be a different nation.

    Go, us.

    “ This makes it doubly important to raise living standards in so-called left behind areas. Productivity must increase in the lower paid and often insecure jobs within Britain’s domestically-oriented economy, such as care work and online shopping delivery. Government policy needs to look beyond glamorous high tech jobs.

    That means better alternatives to university education, including for adults, and a package of reforms aimed at reducing one-sided flexibility where workers bear all the risk. The Augar review of higher education and the Taylor review of the future of work provide “oven-ready” proposals.”

    Taking the fight to the biggest capitalist project ever known
    I'm not sure the EU is "the biggest capitalist project ever known". It is a political project to create a EU-wide polity. Freedom of Movement is a means to that end.
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 44,036
    MaxPB said:

    Nigelb said:

    MaxPB said:

    I haven't kept up with the news, do we know who was behind the attacks in New York and the graffiti in London yet?

    I believe there has been an arrest in NY.
    Oh good. Hope they lock that c*** up for eternity. There's no redemption for this kind of scum. As we saw on London bridge recently.
    No - we should always try to redeem. We just need a better process for discerning the results of the attempt.

    “To try and fail is at least to learn; to fail to try is to suffer the inestimable loss of what might have been.”
  • isamisam Posts: 40,848
    rcs1000 said:

    isam said:

    Byronic said:

    How exciting is Brexit?

    Just think: next year, and for the rest of the decade, Britain is going to try something NEW. Something no country has done, ever. We are gonna reverse globalisation, step aside from Davos man-wank, we are going to return the country to its voters, and say: Here, this is what you asked for, suck it and see.

    Will it be a disaster? Maybe, but maybe not. NO ONE FUCKING KNOWS

    What we do know is that this is genuinely revolutionary. And WE are the country that is trying this. Not America, France, Japan, Malta, the Maldives, Gabon or a mad island near Wallis & Futuna.

    WE are doing this brave and crazy thing. WE are gonna be a different nation.

    Go, us.

    “ This makes it doubly important to raise living standards in so-called left behind areas. Productivity must increase in the lower paid and often insecure jobs within Britain’s domestically-oriented economy, such as care work and online shopping delivery. Government policy needs to look beyond glamorous high tech jobs.

    That means better alternatives to university education, including for adults, and a package of reforms aimed at reducing one-sided flexibility where workers bear all the risk. The Augar review of higher education and the Taylor review of the future of work provide “oven-ready” proposals.”

    Taking the fight to the biggest capitalist project ever known
    I'm not sure the EU is "the biggest capitalist project ever known". It is a political project to create a EU-wide polity. Freedom of Movement is a means to that end.
    It delivers people prepared to accept lower pay and working conditions than the established labour market to corporates across the continent, and protects this deal by labelling anyone who notices racist or xenophobic. Worked for a decade or two anyway.
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 62,040

    MaxPB said:

    Nigelb said:

    MaxPB said:

    I haven't kept up with the news, do we know who was behind the attacks in New York and the graffiti in London yet?

    I believe there has been an arrest in NY.
    Oh good. Hope they lock that c*** up for eternity. There's no redemption for this kind of scum. As we saw on London bridge recently.
    No - we should always try to redeem. We just need a better process for discerning the results of the attempt.

    “To try and fail is at least to learn; to fail to try is to suffer the inestimable loss of what might have been.”
    I think we might first give him a trial...
This discussion has been closed.