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Cuckoo? – politicalbetting.com

SystemSystem Posts: 11,002
edited March 2023 in General
imageCuckoo? – politicalbetting.com

It is a measure of how seriously the Swiss authorities view Credit Suisse’s position that they are, according to weekend reports, orchestrating a UBS takeover.

Read the full story here

«13

Comments

  • fitalassfitalass Posts: 4,279
    First
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 55,171
    I love this 21st Century gag of an existential global crisis every 24 months.

    Cracking fun.
  • SeaShantyIrish2SeaShantyIrish2 Posts: 15,450
    She's back! And so is fitalass!
  • ReedReed Posts: 152
    I agree with nearly every word of this. The big banks need to be broken up and salaries reduced to levels of public utility providers such as water companies.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 91,526
    Speaking of things which are cuckoo, whilst Youtube can do what it likes it may be the first time I've thought Bridgen had a point in having a grievance. For one thing, the speech was probably a laugh riot of idiocy and many people are now denied that through the main platform.

    @YouTube have taken down the speech I gave in Parliament today. I am an elected member of the UK Parliament. The speech was given in the Chamber of the House of Commons and responded to by a Government Minister, what chance has anyone else got of putting their views on YouTube?
    https://twitter.com/ABridgen/status/1636824545330905117
  • ReedReed Posts: 152
    kle4 said:

    Speaking of things which are cuckoo, whilst Youtube can do what it likes it may be the first time I've thought Bridgen had a point in having a grievance. For one thing, the speech was probably a laugh riot of idiocy and many people are now denied that through the main platform.

    @YouTube have taken down the speech I gave in Parliament today. I am an elected member of the UK Parliament. The speech was given in the Chamber of the House of Commons and responded to by a Government Minister, what chance has anyone else got of putting their views on YouTube?
    https://twitter.com/ABridgen/status/1636824545330905117

    Disgusting decision by youtube though you can still see the speech on rumble. Whatever else you think of him hes a brave man.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 91,526
    For the best part of a century, Switzerland’s financial USP was discretion, carefully protected by banking secrecy laws. Or, more bluntly, Swiss banks were where you hid your money, few questions asked. That ended as a result of US fury on discovering how UBS and others had helped US taxpayers evade tax. So the new USP became expertise: put your money in Switzerland not to hide it but because Swiss bankers know how to manage it well.

    Shows how behand the times I am. Where do people now go to hide their money? I guess they just invent incrediblty complex and opaque corproate structures to move things about or something.

    Even for some enthusiastic capitalists I can see the final paragraph striking a chord. Big global institutions, when they go wrong, seem to go really wrong.
  • WillGWillG Posts: 2,058
    kle4 said:

    For the best part of a century, Switzerland’s financial USP was discretion, carefully protected by banking secrecy laws. Or, more bluntly, Swiss banks were where you hid your money, few questions asked. That ended as a result of US fury on discovering how UBS and others had helped US taxpayers evade tax. So the new USP became expertise: put your money in Switzerland not to hide it but because Swiss bankers know how to manage it well.

    Shows how behand the times I am. Where do people now go to hide their money? I guess they just invent incrediblty complex and opaque corproate structures to move things about or something.

    Even for some enthusiastic capitalists I can see the final paragraph striking a chord. Big global institutions, when they go wrong, seem to go really wrong.

    British dependencies.
  • SeaShantyIrish2SeaShantyIrish2 Posts: 15,450
    Perhaps worth noting, if only in passing, that the original Glass-Steagall Act, was named for two rather conservative (economically and especially socially) Southern Democrats:

    > US Senator Carter Glass of Virginia, previously US Representative and Woodrow Wilson's Secretary of the Treasury
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carter_Glass

    > US Representative Henry B. Steagall of Alabama,
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_B._Steagall

    The election of Franklin Roosevelt in 1932, was preceded by Democratic takeover of US Congress, which was further enhanced by virtue of FDR's coattails. This in turn put numerous Southern Democrats into key committee chairs, thanks to their seniority in office, thanks to the Solid South amplified by Dixie custom of re-electing incumbents to increase their clout in Our Nation's Capital.

    Also worth noting that, back in them days, the South was, in economic terms, like the West and (most of the) Midwest, opposed to the domination of the Northeast in general and Wall Street in particular.

    Hence even Southern conservatives wanted to clamp down on high finance in the 1930s, for their specific sins AND on general principles.

    Way less true to day - to put it mildly.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 91,526
    WillG said:

    kle4 said:

    For the best part of a century, Switzerland’s financial USP was discretion, carefully protected by banking secrecy laws. Or, more bluntly, Swiss banks were where you hid your money, few questions asked. That ended as a result of US fury on discovering how UBS and others had helped US taxpayers evade tax. So the new USP became expertise: put your money in Switzerland not to hide it but because Swiss bankers know how to manage it well.

    Shows how behand the times I am. Where do people now go to hide their money? I guess they just invent incrediblty complex and opaque corproate structures to move things about or something.

    Even for some enthusiastic capitalists I can see the final paragraph striking a chord. Big global institutions, when they go wrong, seem to go really wrong.

    British dependencies.
    Of course. Well, now I know. Next step is to get enough money to hide. Maybe Richard Sharp could help.
  • eekeek Posts: 24,875
    edited March 2023
    If you have an android phone and use Google’s Markdown screenshot editing software find someone else’s

    https://twitter.com/ItsSimonTime/status/1636857478263750656
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 91,526
    Reed said:

    kle4 said:

    Speaking of things which are cuckoo, whilst Youtube can do what it likes it may be the first time I've thought Bridgen had a point in having a grievance. For one thing, the speech was probably a laugh riot of idiocy and many people are now denied that through the main platform.

    @YouTube have taken down the speech I gave in Parliament today. I am an elected member of the UK Parliament. The speech was given in the Chamber of the House of Commons and responded to by a Government Minister, what chance has anyone else got of putting their views on YouTube?
    https://twitter.com/ABridgen/status/1636824545330905117

    Whatever else you think of him hes a brave man.
    Er, no. Where does the 'brave' come into it? He's a crank, and he should be allowed to be a crank, but people are not being brave just because they get ridiculed for what they say.

    Is Erich von Daniken 'brave' because people mock him?
  • A defiant Boris Johnson is preparing an extraordinary televised defence of his actions during the Partygate scandal, as his allies this weekend accused the parliamentary inquiry into the affair of relying on weak evidence compiled by a former civil servant recruited by the Labour party.

    With a potentially explosive appearance at the Commons privileges committee due on Wednesday, the Observer can reveal that the former PM’s legal team intends to publish written evidence, including new witness statements, supporting Johnson’s claim that he did not knowingly mislead MPs over lockdown parties – as well as examples of the advice he was given at the time.

    The document, overseen by his lead counsel David Pannick, is set to be published before Wednesday’s five-hour hearing. It is expected to warn the cross-party committee that it will effectively be ripping up parliamentary precedent should it sanction Johnson, who, the document will say, gave his honest views at the time and corrected the record when he learned of wrongdoing.


    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2023/mar/18/boris-johnson-makes-last-ditch-bid-to-discredit-partygate-probe
  • ReedReed Posts: 152
    kle4 said:

    Speaking of things which are cuckoo, whilst Youtube can do what it likes it may be the first time I've thought Bridgen had a point in having a grievance. For one thing, the speech was probably a laugh riot of idiocy and many people are now denied that through the main platform.

    @YouTube have taken down the speech I gave in Parliament today. I am an elected member of the UK Parliament. The speech was given in the Chamber of the House of Commons and responded to by a Government Minister, what chance has anyone else got of putting their views on YouTube?
    https://twitter.com/ABridgen/status/1636824545330905117

    Youtube have now reinstated Andrew Bridgen speech.

    Pleased to see that after such a large public outcry my speech has been reinstated on YouTube. Power does rest with the people, a salutary lesson for our self appointed masters.

    youtube.com

    https://twitter.com/ABridgen/status/1637109145118601216?s=20
  • There is also speculation this weekend that Johnson may be using his resignation honours list to reward those who have helped him through the inquiry – an allegation his team rejects as “completely untrue”. The Observer has been told that several figures who have featured in the inquiry also appeared in the draft version of Johnson’s honours list.
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 55,171
    WillG said:

    kle4 said:

    For the best part of a century, Switzerland’s financial USP was discretion, carefully protected by banking secrecy laws. Or, more bluntly, Swiss banks were where you hid your money, few questions asked. That ended as a result of US fury on discovering how UBS and others had helped US taxpayers evade tax. So the new USP became expertise: put your money in Switzerland not to hide it but because Swiss bankers know how to manage it well.

    Shows how behand the times I am. Where do people now go to hide their money? I guess they just invent incrediblty complex and opaque corproate structures to move things about or something.

    Even for some enthusiastic capitalists I can see the final paragraph striking a chord. Big global institutions, when they go wrong, seem to go really wrong.

    British dependencies.
    Makes me proud to be British.
  • ReedReed Posts: 152
    kle4 said:

    Reed said:

    kle4 said:

    Speaking of things which are cuckoo, whilst Youtube can do what it likes it may be the first time I've thought Bridgen had a point in having a grievance. For one thing, the speech was probably a laugh riot of idiocy and many people are now denied that through the main platform.

    @YouTube have taken down the speech I gave in Parliament today. I am an elected member of the UK Parliament. The speech was given in the Chamber of the House of Commons and responded to by a Government Minister, what chance has anyone else got of putting their views on YouTube?
    https://twitter.com/ABridgen/status/1636824545330905117

    Whatever else you think of him hes a brave man.
    Er, no. Where does the 'brave' come into it? He's a crank, and he should be allowed to be a crank, but people are not being brave just because they get ridiculed for what they say.

    Is Erich von Daniken 'brave' because people mock him?
    Yes but i imagine hes widely shunned in westminster now and persona non grata.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 91,526
    edited March 2023

    A defiant Boris Johnson is preparing an extraordinary televised defence of his actions during the Partygate scandal, as his allies this weekend accused the parliamentary inquiry into the affair of relying on weak evidence compiled by a former civil servant recruited by the Labour party.

    With a potentially explosive appearance at the Commons privileges committee due on Wednesday, the Observer can reveal that the former PM’s legal team intends to publish written evidence, including new witness statements, supporting Johnson’s claim that he did not knowingly mislead MPs over lockdown parties – as well as examples of the advice he was given at the time.

    The document, overseen by his lead counsel David Pannick, is set to be published before Wednesday’s five-hour hearing. It is expected to warn the cross-party committee that it will effectively be ripping up parliamentary precedent should it sanction Johnson, who, the document will say, gave his honest views at the time and corrected the record when he learned of wrongdoing.


    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2023/mar/18/boris-johnson-makes-last-ditch-bid-to-discredit-partygate-probe

    When in a very weak position sometimes attack is the best defence. And we know Boris is good at bluster. I imagine he will use every opportunity to turn things around to attack the process and the Committee members - as that is what he needs to maximise the Tory vote against any sanctions, should that be recommended. It's what Paterson lacked - any even slightly credible reason to reject the sanction other than 'He's one of us'.

    He's building a pretext for his mates to reject any conclusions, whilst pretending they are not outright defending his conduct. To confuse the issue of whether he could really have believed what he was saying (which is indeed very hard to prove).
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 91,526
    Reed said:

    kle4 said:

    Reed said:

    kle4 said:

    Speaking of things which are cuckoo, whilst Youtube can do what it likes it may be the first time I've thought Bridgen had a point in having a grievance. For one thing, the speech was probably a laugh riot of idiocy and many people are now denied that through the main platform.

    @YouTube have taken down the speech I gave in Parliament today. I am an elected member of the UK Parliament. The speech was given in the Chamber of the House of Commons and responded to by a Government Minister, what chance has anyone else got of putting their views on YouTube?
    https://twitter.com/ABridgen/status/1636824545330905117

    Whatever else you think of him hes a brave man.
    Er, no. Where does the 'brave' come into it? He's a crank, and he should be allowed to be a crank, but people are not being brave just because they get ridiculed for what they say.

    Is Erich von Daniken 'brave' because people mock him?
    Yes but i imagine hes widely shunned in westminster now and persona non grata.
    That's not being brave, it's facing consequences. I imagine he still has some friends in Westminster, they just tell him not to talk politics with them and focus on the local football match/hunt/ballet/whatever they are into.
  • SeaShantyIrish2SeaShantyIrish2 Posts: 15,450
    edited March 2023

    A defiant Boris Johnson is preparing an extraordinary televised defence of his actions during the Partygate scandal, as his allies this weekend accused the parliamentary inquiry into the affair of relying on weak evidence compiled by a former civil servant recruited by the Labour party.

    With a potentially explosive appearance at the Commons privileges committee due on Wednesday, the Observer can reveal that the former PM’s legal team intends to publish written evidence, including new witness statements, supporting Johnson’s claim that he did not knowingly mislead MPs over lockdown parties – as well as examples of the advice he was given at the time.

    The document, overseen by his lead counsel David Pannick, is set to be published before Wednesday’s five-hour hearing. It is expected to warn the cross-party committee that it will effectively be ripping up parliamentary precedent should it sanction Johnson, who, the document will say, gave his honest views at the time and corrected the record when he learned of wrongdoing.


    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2023/mar/18/boris-johnson-makes-last-ditch-bid-to-discredit-partygate-probe

    When politicos are reduced to relying upon their LEGAL team, as opposed to their political team, it is NOT a good sign re: their political future.

    EDIT - Just sayin'
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 91,526

    WillG said:

    kle4 said:

    For the best part of a century, Switzerland’s financial USP was discretion, carefully protected by banking secrecy laws. Or, more bluntly, Swiss banks were where you hid your money, few questions asked. That ended as a result of US fury on discovering how UBS and others had helped US taxpayers evade tax. So the new USP became expertise: put your money in Switzerland not to hide it but because Swiss bankers know how to manage it well.

    Shows how behand the times I am. Where do people now go to hide their money? I guess they just invent incrediblty complex and opaque corproate structures to move things about or something.

    Even for some enthusiastic capitalists I can see the final paragraph striking a chord. Big global institutions, when they go wrong, seem to go really wrong.

    British dependencies.
    Makes me proud to be British.
    If we can hold on to nothing else but our ability to wash dirty money and loot cultural artifacts, then that is still something.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,053

    A defiant Boris Johnson is preparing an extraordinary televised defence of his actions during the Partygate scandal, as his allies this weekend accused the parliamentary inquiry into the affair of relying on weak evidence compiled by a former civil servant recruited by the Labour party.

    With a potentially explosive appearance at the Commons privileges committee due on Wednesday, the Observer can reveal that the former PM’s legal team intends to publish written evidence, including new witness statements, supporting Johnson’s claim that he did not knowingly mislead MPs over lockdown parties – as well as examples of the advice he was given at the time.

    The document, overseen by his lead counsel David Pannick, is set to be published before Wednesday’s five-hour hearing. It is expected to warn the cross-party committee that it will effectively be ripping up parliamentary precedent should it sanction Johnson, who, the document will say, gave his honest views at the time and corrected the record when he learned of wrongdoing.


    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2023/mar/18/boris-johnson-makes-last-ditch-bid-to-discredit-partygate-probe

    Genuine LOL.

    If he did do that, it would be the first time he ever had.
  • eekeek Posts: 24,875
    ydoethur said:

    A defiant Boris Johnson is preparing an extraordinary televised defence of his actions during the Partygate scandal, as his allies this weekend accused the parliamentary inquiry into the affair of relying on weak evidence compiled by a former civil servant recruited by the Labour party.

    With a potentially explosive appearance at the Commons privileges committee due on Wednesday, the Observer can reveal that the former PM’s legal team intends to publish written evidence, including new witness statements, supporting Johnson’s claim that he did not knowingly mislead MPs over lockdown parties – as well as examples of the advice he was given at the time.

    The document, overseen by his lead counsel David Pannick, is set to be published before Wednesday’s five-hour hearing. It is expected to warn the cross-party committee that it will effectively be ripping up parliamentary precedent should it sanction Johnson, who, the document will say, gave his honest views at the time and corrected the record when he learned of wrongdoing.


    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2023/mar/18/boris-johnson-makes-last-ditch-bid-to-discredit-partygate-probe

    Genuine LOL.

    If he did do that, it would be the first time he ever had.
    I know I’ve already given 3 different variations of what happened that night but this version is the true one..
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 91,526
    ydoethur said:

    A defiant Boris Johnson is preparing an extraordinary televised defence of his actions during the Partygate scandal, as his allies this weekend accused the parliamentary inquiry into the affair of relying on weak evidence compiled by a former civil servant recruited by the Labour party.

    With a potentially explosive appearance at the Commons privileges committee due on Wednesday, the Observer can reveal that the former PM’s legal team intends to publish written evidence, including new witness statements, supporting Johnson’s claim that he did not knowingly mislead MPs over lockdown parties – as well as examples of the advice he was given at the time.

    The document, overseen by his lead counsel David Pannick, is set to be published before Wednesday’s five-hour hearing. It is expected to warn the cross-party committee that it will effectively be ripping up parliamentary precedent should it sanction Johnson, who, the document will say, gave his honest views at the time and corrected the record when he learned of wrongdoing.


    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2023/mar/18/boris-johnson-makes-last-ditch-bid-to-discredit-partygate-probe

    Genuine LOL.

    If he did do that, it would be the first time he ever had.
    It's all very confusing, since half the time his people insist he did no wrong at all, but the other half he's saying he took responsibility for wrongdoing (including by himself).
  • I've found my favourite Saint

    Saint Amand(us)

    Patron Saint of wine makers, beer brewers, merchants, innkeepers and bartenders
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,053
    eek said:

    ydoethur said:

    A defiant Boris Johnson is preparing an extraordinary televised defence of his actions during the Partygate scandal, as his allies this weekend accused the parliamentary inquiry into the affair of relying on weak evidence compiled by a former civil servant recruited by the Labour party.

    With a potentially explosive appearance at the Commons privileges committee due on Wednesday, the Observer can reveal that the former PM’s legal team intends to publish written evidence, including new witness statements, supporting Johnson’s claim that he did not knowingly mislead MPs over lockdown parties – as well as examples of the advice he was given at the time.

    The document, overseen by his lead counsel David Pannick, is set to be published before Wednesday’s five-hour hearing. It is expected to warn the cross-party committee that it will effectively be ripping up parliamentary precedent should it sanction Johnson, who, the document will say, gave his honest views at the time and corrected the record when he learned of wrongdoing.


    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2023/mar/18/boris-johnson-makes-last-ditch-bid-to-discredit-partygate-probe

    Genuine LOL.

    If he did do that, it would be the first time he ever had.
    I know I’ve already given 3 different variations of what happened that night but this version is the true one..
    Cummings has taught him fairly well...
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 44,068
    kle4 said:

    Reed said:

    kle4 said:

    Reed said:

    kle4 said:

    Speaking of things which are cuckoo, whilst Youtube can do what it likes it may be the first time I've thought Bridgen had a point in having a grievance. For one thing, the speech was probably a laugh riot of idiocy and many people are now denied that through the main platform.

    @YouTube have taken down the speech I gave in Parliament today. I am an elected member of the UK Parliament. The speech was given in the Chamber of the House of Commons and responded to by a Government Minister, what chance has anyone else got of putting their views on YouTube?
    https://twitter.com/ABridgen/status/1636824545330905117

    Whatever else you think of him hes a brave man.
    Er, no. Where does the 'brave' come into it? He's a crank, and he should be allowed to be a crank, but people are not being brave just because they get ridiculed for what they say.

    Is Erich von Daniken 'brave' because people mock him?
    Yes but i imagine hes widely shunned in westminster now and persona non grata.
    That's not being brave, it's facing consequences. I imagine he still has some friends in Westminster, they just tell him not to talk politics with them and focus on the local football match/hunt/ballet/whatever they are into.
    “But the fact that some geniuses were laughed at does not imply that all who are laughed at are geniuses. They laughed at Columbus, they laughed at Fulton, they laughed at the Wright brothers. But they also laughed at Bozo the Clown.”
  • StuartinromfordStuartinromford Posts: 14,281
    ydoethur said:

    eek said:

    ydoethur said:

    A defiant Boris Johnson is preparing an extraordinary televised defence of his actions during the Partygate scandal, as his allies this weekend accused the parliamentary inquiry into the affair of relying on weak evidence compiled by a former civil servant recruited by the Labour party.

    With a potentially explosive appearance at the Commons privileges committee due on Wednesday, the Observer can reveal that the former PM’s legal team intends to publish written evidence, including new witness statements, supporting Johnson’s claim that he did not knowingly mislead MPs over lockdown parties – as well as examples of the advice he was given at the time.

    The document, overseen by his lead counsel David Pannick, is set to be published before Wednesday’s five-hour hearing. It is expected to warn the cross-party committee that it will effectively be ripping up parliamentary precedent should it sanction Johnson, who, the document will say, gave his honest views at the time and corrected the record when he learned of wrongdoing.


    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2023/mar/18/boris-johnson-makes-last-ditch-bid-to-discredit-partygate-probe

    Genuine LOL.

    If he did do that, it would be the first time he ever had.
    I know I’ve already given 3 different variations of what happened that night but this version is the true one..
    Cummings has taught him fairly well...
    I suspect the master-pupil relationship goes the other way here.

    But just imagine Boris is, for once in his life, innocent. And this is the thing that destroys his career and reputation.

    Wouldn't that just he so so funny?
  • Clutch_BromptonClutch_Brompton Posts: 410
    edited March 2023
    kle4 said:

    Speaking of things which are cuckoo, whilst Youtube can do what it likes it may be the first time I've thought Bridgen had a point in having a grievance. For one thing, the speech was probably a laugh riot of idiocy and many people are now denied that through the main platform.

    @YouTube have taken down the speech I gave in Parliament today. I am an elected member of the UK Parliament. The speech was given in the Chamber of the House of Commons and responded to by a Government Minister, what chance has anyone else got of putting their views on YouTube?
    https://twitter.com/ABridgen/status/1636824545330905117

    They can read it in Hansard if they are that bothered. Letting a bunch of grifters make money on it is no bueno.
  • ReedReed Posts: 152

    kle4 said:

    Speaking of things which are cuckoo, whilst Youtube can do what it likes it may be the first time I've thought Bridgen had a point in having a grievance. For one thing, the speech was probably a laugh riot of idiocy and many people are now denied that through the main platform.

    @YouTube have taken down the speech I gave in Parliament today. I am an elected member of the UK Parliament. The speech was given in the Chamber of the House of Commons and responded to by a Government Minister, what chance has anyone else got of putting their views on YouTube?
    https://twitter.com/ABridgen/status/1636824545330905117

    They can read it in Hansard if they are that bothered. Letting a bunch of grifters make money on it is no bueno.
    The speech has been reinstated on youtube now.
  • TresTres Posts: 2,194
    kle4 said:

    For the best part of a century, Switzerland’s financial USP was discretion, carefully protected by banking secrecy laws. Or, more bluntly, Swiss banks were where you hid your money, few questions asked. That ended as a result of US fury on discovering how UBS and others had helped US taxpayers evade tax. So the new USP became expertise: put your money in Switzerland not to hide it but because Swiss bankers know how to manage it well.

    Shows how behand the times I am. Where do people now go to hide their money? I guess they just invent incrediblty complex and opaque corproate structures to move things about or something.

    Even for some enthusiastic capitalists I can see the final paragraph striking a chord. Big global institutions, when they go wrong, seem to go really wrong.

    Crypto.
  • ReedReed Posts: 152
    Conspiracy theorists getting ludicrous now. Matt Le Tissier now implying Andrew Mitchell ushered MPs out of the chamber before the Bridgen speech on the orders of Bill Gates.

    https://twitter.com/mattletiss7/status/1637173283308052480?s=20
  • I think I might have been put on this earth to turn pilgrimages into pub crawls
  • CarlottaVanceCarlottaVance Posts: 59,540

    A defiant Boris Johnson is preparing an extraordinary televised defence of his actions during the Partygate scandal, as his allies this weekend accused the parliamentary inquiry into the affair of relying on weak evidence compiled by a former civil servant recruited by the Labour party.

    With a potentially explosive appearance at the Commons privileges committee due on Wednesday, the Observer can reveal that the former PM’s legal team intends to publish written evidence, including new witness statements, supporting Johnson’s claim that he did not knowingly mislead MPs over lockdown parties – as well as examples of the advice he was given at the time.

    The document, overseen by his lead counsel David Pannick, is set to be published before Wednesday’s five-hour hearing. It is expected to warn the cross-party committee that it will effectively be ripping up parliamentary precedent should it sanction Johnson, who, the document will say, gave his honest views at the time and corrected the record when he learned of wrongdoing.


    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2023/mar/18/boris-johnson-makes-last-ditch-bid-to-discredit-partygate-probe

    When the laws against you pound the facts
    When the facts are against you pound the law
    When both are against you pound the table.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 91,526

    A defiant Boris Johnson is preparing an extraordinary televised defence of his actions during the Partygate scandal, as his allies this weekend accused the parliamentary inquiry into the affair of relying on weak evidence compiled by a former civil servant recruited by the Labour party.

    With a potentially explosive appearance at the Commons privileges committee due on Wednesday, the Observer can reveal that the former PM’s legal team intends to publish written evidence, including new witness statements, supporting Johnson’s claim that he did not knowingly mislead MPs over lockdown parties – as well as examples of the advice he was given at the time.

    The document, overseen by his lead counsel David Pannick, is set to be published before Wednesday’s five-hour hearing. It is expected to warn the cross-party committee that it will effectively be ripping up parliamentary precedent should it sanction Johnson, who, the document will say, gave his honest views at the time and corrected the record when he learned of wrongdoing.


    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2023/mar/18/boris-johnson-makes-last-ditch-bid-to-discredit-partygate-probe

    When the laws against you pound the facts
    When the facts are against you pound the law
    When both are against you pound the table.
    Pounding some things is part of what gets him into trouble.

    Beers for example.
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 44,068
    Reed said:

    Conspiracy theorists getting ludicrous now. Matt Le Tissier now implying Andrew Mitchell ushered MPs out of the chamber before the Bridgen speech on the orders of Bill Gates.

    https://twitter.com/mattletiss7/status/1637173283308052480?s=20

    I ordered them out. Mind you I was told to do so by the Grand Council that control the Illuminati who control the Zeta Reticulans who control the Lizard Men.

    I think this reporting chain needs work to be honest.
  • Morning thread headline contains an awesome and subtle pun in the headline. I'm really proud of it.
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 44,068

    I think I might have been put on this earth to turn pilgrimages into pub crawls

    A mighty task.

    As I keep on pointing out to my wife, first thing Jesus did, when he rocked up at the party, was fix the booze problem.

    Indicative.
  • ChrisChris Posts: 11,066

    A defiant Boris Johnson is preparing an extraordinary televised defence of his actions during the Partygate scandal ...

    Rumour has it that he will be depicted chasing a group of scantily clad young women down Uxbridge High Street to the strains of 'Yakety Sax'.

  • BlancheLivermoreBlancheLivermore Posts: 5,181
    edited March 2023
    I'm quite disappointed that the English idiom is 'drink like a fish'

    It should be 'drink like a sink'
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 44,068

    I'm quite disappointed that the English idiom is 'drink like a fish'

    I should be 'drink like a sink'

    I do not have a "drinking problem"

    I have absolutely no problem with drinking.
  • I'm quite disappointed that the English idiom is 'drink like a fish'

    I should be 'drink like a sink'

    I do not have a "drinking problem"

    I have absolutely no problem with drinking.
    My friend says he has a drink problem, two hands and just one mouth.
  • CarlottaVanceCarlottaVance Posts: 59,540
    Nothing to see here…..

    EXC: Senior execs at @Circ_Scotland, the firm in charge of Scotland’s under-fire deposit return scheme, are receiving £670,000 a year in salaries & fees, confidential documents leaked to @TheScotsman show. Its CEO, David Harris, has a salary of £300k. scotsman.com/business/depos…

    https://twitter.com/martynmcl/status/1637151843913441280

  • I'm quite disappointed that the English idiom is 'drink like a fish'

    I should be 'drink like a sink'

    I do not have a "drinking problem"

    I have absolutely no problem with drinking.
    I only have a problem drinking when I run out
  • geoffwgeoffw Posts: 8,117
    edited March 2023
    Nice to see Cyclefree opining back here, and much to agree with too. Also with the invention of a new punctuation style: the " ?—? " combo. What should it be called? The provisional interrogative perhaps?
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 44,068

    I'm quite disappointed that the English idiom is 'drink like a fish'

    I should be 'drink like a sink'

    I do not have a "drinking problem"

    I have absolutely no problem with drinking.
    My friend says he has a drink problem, two hands and just one mouth.
    One hand for the bottle, one for the glass.

    Your friend need training and practise. Lots of practise.
  • FairlieredFairliered Posts: 3,936

    Morning thread headline contains an awesome and subtle pun in the headline. I'm really proud of it.

    Did @ydoethur write the thread?
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 44,068

    I'm quite disappointed that the English idiom is 'drink like a fish'

    I should be 'drink like a sink'

    I do not have a "drinking problem"

    I have absolutely no problem with drinking.
    I only have a problem drinking when I run out
    Some say the glass is half empty.
    Some say the glass is half full.

    I say, “Is it my round?”
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 91,526

    Morning thread headline contains an awesome and subtle pun in the headline. I'm really proud of it.

    Did @ydoethur write the thread?
    He said subtle pun...
  • MikeLMikeL Posts: 7,286
    LATEST
    @OpiniumResearch
    /
    @ObserverUK
    poll

    No budget bounce for the Conservatives as Labour’s lead holds at 15 points. (Changes are vs. last week rather than our last published Observer poll)

    Con 29% (nc)
    Lab 44% (nc)
    Lib Dems 8% (nc)
    Green 6% (+1)
    ReformUK 7% (-1)

    https://twitter.com/OpiniumResearch
  • Morning thread headline contains an awesome and subtle pun in the headline. I'm really proud of it.

    Did @ydoethur write the thread?
    He wishes he could come up with a pun so awesome as mine.
  • LOL


  • geoffwgeoffw Posts: 8,117

    Morning thread headline contains an awesome and subtle pun in the headline. I'm really proud of it.

    Did @ydoethur write the thread?
    He wishes he could come up with a pun so awesome as mine.
    His grammar is likely to be better nonetheless.
  • MikeLMikeL Posts: 7,286
    Opinium:

    Best PM:
    Sunak 28
    Starmer 26

    Best to handle economy:
    Sunak & Hunt 29
    Starmer & Reeves 27
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 44,068

    Morning thread headline contains an awesome and subtle pun in the headline. I'm really proud of it.

    Did @ydoethur write the thread?
    He wishes he could come up with a pun so awesome as mine.
    Talk about laying down the gage…

    That’s Brian Blessed chucking a plate armour gauntlet on a marble floor….
  • RazedabodeRazedabode Posts: 2,976

    LOL


    Who are the Tories “focus grouping”. Unless they’ve given up and trying to shore up their core vote. Extremely core
  • MikeLMikeL Posts: 7,286
    Opinium:

    Budget:
    Good 18
    Bad 33

    But of eight individual budget measures asked about - seven rate as more good than bad (only one seen as more bad is scrapping pension cap).
  • carnforthcarnforth Posts: 3,156
    edited March 2023
    eek said:

    If you have an android phone and use Google’s Markdown screenshot editing software find someone else’s

    https://twitter.com/ItsSimonTime/status/1636857478263750656

    This one is actually quite amateur. Cropping the PNG, but writing it back to the same buffer, but then not changing the length of the buffer, on the theory than it must be smaller if cropped. A premature optimization (reusing the buffer) combined with a lack of testing (not noticing that cropping an image should result in a smaller file size).
  • geoffwgeoffw Posts: 8,117
    MikeL said:

    Opinium:

    Budget:
    Good 18
    Bad 33

    But of eight individual budget measures asked about - seven rate as more good than bad (only one seen as more bad is scrapping pension cap).

    So, good in parts…

  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,053

    Morning thread headline contains an awesome and subtle pun in the headline. I'm really proud of it.

    Did @ydoethur write the thread?
    He wishes he could come up with a pun so awesome as mine.
    My last two puns were so subtle nobody noticed them.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 91,526
    ydoethur said:

    Morning thread headline contains an awesome and subtle pun in the headline. I'm really proud of it.

    Did @ydoethur write the thread?
    He wishes he could come up with a pun so awesome as mine.
    My last two puns were so subtle nobody noticed them.
    I figured that was more the way someone might miss an individual tree within a forest.
  • geoffwgeoffw Posts: 8,117
    ydoethur said:

    Morning thread headline contains an awesome and subtle pun in the headline. I'm really proud of it.

    Did @ydoethur write the thread?
    He wishes he could come up with a pun so awesome as mine.
    My last two puns were so subtle nobody noticed them.
    You sometimes have to reach down to us

  • .
    ydoethur said:

    Morning thread headline contains an awesome and subtle pun in the headline. I'm really proud of it.

    Did @ydoethur write the thread?
    He wishes he could come up with a pun so awesome as mine.
    My last two puns were so subtle nobody noticed them.
    A bit like my 'I know it's a longshot, but do any PBers know what a trebuchet is?'

    The went over the heads of so many.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,053
    geoffw said:

    ydoethur said:

    Morning thread headline contains an awesome and subtle pun in the headline. I'm really proud of it.

    Did @ydoethur write the thread?
    He wishes he could come up with a pun so awesome as mine.
    My last two puns were so subtle nobody noticed them.
    You sometimes have to reach down to us

    I was quite pleased with the one about moths. I thought that was rather clever.
  • StuartinromfordStuartinromford Posts: 14,281
    MikeL said:

    Opinium:

    Budget:
    Good 18
    Bad 33

    But of eight individual budget measures asked about - seven rate as more good than bad (only one seen as more bad is scrapping pension cap).

    Sign of a party in trouble. Labour's individual policies were popular in 2019- it was the package and the people that were disliked. Same for the Conservatives in 2005.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,053

    .

    ydoethur said:

    Morning thread headline contains an awesome and subtle pun in the headline. I'm really proud of it.

    Did @ydoethur write the thread?
    He wishes he could come up with a pun so awesome as mine.
    My last two puns were so subtle nobody noticed them.
    A bit like my 'I know it's a longshot, but do any PBers know what a trebuchet is?'

    The went over the heads of so many.
    You should have been cast out for that.
  • I really want to visit Paimpont Forest

    It claims to be where Merlin is buried

    My home town makes the same claim
  • geoffwgeoffw Posts: 8,117
    ydoethur said:

    geoffw said:

    ydoethur said:

    Morning thread headline contains an awesome and subtle pun in the headline. I'm really proud of it.

    Did @ydoethur write the thread?
    He wishes he could come up with a pun so awesome as mine.
    My last two puns were so subtle nobody noticed them.
    You sometimes have to reach down to us

    I was quite pleased with the one about moths. I thought that was rather clever.
    Didn't see it. Must have been the mother of moth puns.

  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 44,068

    .

    ydoethur said:

    Morning thread headline contains an awesome and subtle pun in the headline. I'm really proud of it.

    Did @ydoethur write the thread?
    He wishes he could come up with a pun so awesome as mine.
    My last two puns were so subtle nobody noticed them.
    A bit like my 'I know it's a longshot, but do any PBers know what a trebuchet is?'

    The went over the heads of so many.
    Hoisted by your own petard.
  • ReedReed Posts: 152
    This from the telegraph regarding credit suisse.

    Thousands of jobs are set to be lost in the City as regulators race to rescue one of the world's biggest banks before markets open on Monday morning.

    The government of Switzerland held an extraordinary meeting on Saturday evening to seal a shotgun takeover of troubled Credit Suisse by its Swiss rival UBS amid rising fears of a new international financial crisis.

    Any deal is expected to result in thousands of job losses in London, where the two banks employ around 10,000 people between them at large offices in the City and Canary Wharf.

  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 44,068

    MikeL said:

    Opinium:

    Budget:
    Good 18
    Bad 33

    But of eight individual budget measures asked about - seven rate as more good than bad (only one seen as more bad is scrapping pension cap).

    Sign of a party in trouble. Labour's individual policies were popular in 2019- it was the package and the people that were disliked. Same for the Conservatives in 2005.
    Exactly this. Also 1997.
  • Morning thread headline contains an awesome and subtle pun in the headline. I'm really proud of it.

    Did @ydoethur write the thread?
    He wishes he could come up with a pun so awesome as mine.
    Talk about laying down the gage…

    That’s Brian Blessed chucking a plate armour gauntlet on a marble floor….
    It's up there with my 'transitory blip' pun on Sturgeon's problems with the Gender Recognition Reform bill.
  • Sunil_PrasannanSunil_Prasannan Posts: 49,121
    MikeL said:

    LATEST
    @OpiniumResearch
    /
    @ObserverUK
    poll

    No budget bounce for the Conservatives as Labour’s lead holds at 15 points. (Changes are vs. last week rather than our last published Observer poll)

    Con 29% (nc)
    Lab 44% (nc)
    Lib Dems 8% (nc)
    Green 6% (+1)
    ReformUK 7% (-1)

    https://twitter.com/OpiniumResearch

    Broken, sleazy Reform on the slide!
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 44,068
    ydoethur said:

    geoffw said:

    ydoethur said:

    Morning thread headline contains an awesome and subtle pun in the headline. I'm really proud of it.

    Did @ydoethur write the thread?
    He wishes he could come up with a pun so awesome as mine.
    My last two puns were so subtle nobody noticed them.
    You sometimes have to reach down to us

    I was quite pleased with the one about moths. I thought that was rather clever.
    We can’t hold a candle to you
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,053

    Morning thread headline contains an awesome and subtle pun in the headline. I'm really proud of it.

    Did @ydoethur write the thread?
    He wishes he could come up with a pun so awesome as mine.
    Talk about laying down the gage…

    That’s Brian Blessed chucking a plate armour gauntlet on a marble floor….
    It's up there with my 'transitory blip' pun on Sturgeon's problems with the Gender Recognition Reform bill.
    I thought you said it was awesome and subtle?
  • LOL


    Who are the Tories “focus grouping”. Unless they’ve given up and trying to shore up their core vote. Extremely core
    Their ultra right wing flank who if they stay at home or vote Reform in 2024 means the Tories get absolutely gubbed at the next election.
  • ydoethur said:

    Morning thread headline contains an awesome and subtle pun in the headline. I'm really proud of it.

    Did @ydoethur write the thread?
    He wishes he could come up with a pun so awesome as mine.
    Talk about laying down the gage…

    That’s Brian Blessed chucking a plate armour gauntlet on a marble floor….
    It's up there with my 'transitory blip' pun on Sturgeon's problems with the Gender Recognition Reform bill.
    I thought you said it was awesome and subtle?
    It is.
  • geoffwgeoffw Posts: 8,117
    Reed said:

    This from the telegraph regarding credit suisse.

    Thousands of jobs are set to be lost in the City as regulators race to rescue one of the world's biggest banks before markets open on Monday morning.

    The government of Switzerland held an extraordinary meeting on Saturday evening to seal a shotgun takeover of troubled Credit Suisse by its Swiss rival UBS amid rising fears of a new international financial crisis.

    Any deal is expected to result in thousands of job losses in London, where the two banks employ around 10,000 people between them at large offices in the City and Canary Wharf.

    Must be even worse at the more significant financial centres in Europe - Paris and Frankfurt.
    … oh, wait …

  • StuartinromfordStuartinromford Posts: 14,281

    LOL


    Who are the Tories “focus grouping”. Unless they’ve given up and trying to shore up their core vote. Extremely core
    Intrigued by the 23% who think the Braverman plan will make the boat situation worse. I'm not sure they're wrong, but I'm intrigued at the logic.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 44,395

    LOL


    Who are the Tories “focus grouping”. Unless they’ve given up and trying to shore up their core vote. Extremely core
    Intrigued by the 23% who think the Braverman plan will make the boat situation worse. I'm not sure they're wrong, but I'm intrigued at the logic.
    I suppose the permanent detention of tens of thousands in hotels, without hearing cases or allowing them to work might be a recipie for trouble.
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 55,171

    .

    ydoethur said:

    Morning thread headline contains an awesome and subtle pun in the headline. I'm really proud of it.

    Did @ydoethur write the thread?
    He wishes he could come up with a pun so awesome as mine.
    My last two puns were so subtle nobody noticed them.
    A bit like my 'I know it's a longshot, but do any PBers know what a trebuchet is?'

    The went over the heads of so many.
    You came within a stone's throw of landing it though.
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 44,068
    geoffw said:

    Reed said:

    This from the telegraph regarding credit suisse.

    Thousands of jobs are set to be lost in the City as regulators race to rescue one of the world's biggest banks before markets open on Monday morning.

    The government of Switzerland held an extraordinary meeting on Saturday evening to seal a shotgun takeover of troubled Credit Suisse by its Swiss rival UBS amid rising fears of a new international financial crisis.

    Any deal is expected to result in thousands of job losses in London, where the two banks employ around 10,000 people between them at large offices in the City and Canary Wharf.

    Must be even worse at the more significant financial centres in Europe - Paris and Frankfurt.
    … oh, wait …

    The job losses will be in middle management and traders.

    They will be generating decades of work for integrating systems. Nomura still has things labelled Lehman on the network.
  • MikeLMikeL Posts: 7,286

    MikeL said:

    Opinium:

    Budget:
    Good 18
    Bad 33

    But of eight individual budget measures asked about - seven rate as more good than bad (only one seen as more bad is scrapping pension cap).

    Sign of a party in trouble. Labour's individual policies were popular in 2019- it was the package and the people that were disliked. Same for the Conservatives in 2005.
    Yes, on the face of it I would agree.

    However paradox is that in the same poll Sunak beats Starmer and Sunak/Hunt beat Starmer/Reeves.

    So a conflicting message, at least to some extent.
  • geoffw said:

    Reed said:

    This from the telegraph regarding credit suisse.

    Thousands of jobs are set to be lost in the City as regulators race to rescue one of the world's biggest banks before markets open on Monday morning.

    The government of Switzerland held an extraordinary meeting on Saturday evening to seal a shotgun takeover of troubled Credit Suisse by its Swiss rival UBS amid rising fears of a new international financial crisis.

    Any deal is expected to result in thousands of job losses in London, where the two banks employ around 10,000 people between them at large offices in the City and Canary Wharf.

    Must be even worse at the more significant financial centres in Europe - Paris and Frankfurt.
    … oh, wait …

    Tell me you know nothing about banking and financial services without telling me you know nothing banking and financial services.
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 39,481
    edited March 2023
    kle4 said:

    WillG said:

    kle4 said:

    For the best part of a century, Switzerland’s financial USP was discretion, carefully protected by banking secrecy laws. Or, more bluntly, Swiss banks were where you hid your money, few questions asked. That ended as a result of US fury on discovering how UBS and others had helped US taxpayers evade tax. So the new USP became expertise: put your money in Switzerland not to hide it but because Swiss bankers know how to manage it well.

    Shows how behand the times I am. Where do people now go to hide their money? I guess they just invent incrediblty complex and opaque corproate structures to move things about or something.

    Even for some enthusiastic capitalists I can see the final paragraph striking a chord. Big global institutions, when they go wrong, seem to go really wrong.

    British dependencies.
    Makes me proud to be British.
    If we can hold on to nothing else but our ability to wash dirty money and loot cultural artifacts, then that is still something.
    And preserve slavers' statues from having baths, too. Edit: as opposed to dodgy money.
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 44,068
    MikeL said:

    MikeL said:

    Opinium:

    Budget:
    Good 18
    Bad 33

    But of eight individual budget measures asked about - seven rate as more good than bad (only one seen as more bad is scrapping pension cap).

    Sign of a party in trouble. Labour's individual policies were popular in 2019- it was the package and the people that were disliked. Same for the Conservatives in 2005.
    Yes, on the face of it I would agree.

    However paradox is that in the same poll Sunak beats Starmer and Sunak/Hunt beat Starmer/Reeves.

    So a conflicting message, at least to some extent.
    Without parties, Sunak beats Starmer.

    The public has turned against the Conservative Party.
  • TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 114,150
    edited March 2023
    MikeL said:

    MikeL said:

    Opinium:

    Budget:
    Good 18
    Bad 33

    But of eight individual budget measures asked about - seven rate as more good than bad (only one seen as more bad is scrapping pension cap).

    Sign of a party in trouble. Labour's individual policies were popular in 2019- it was the package and the people that were disliked. Same for the Conservatives in 2005.
    Yes, on the face of it I would agree.

    However paradox is that in the same poll Sunak beats Starmer and Sunak/Hunt beat Starmer/Reeves.

    So a conflicting message, at least to some extent.
    Nah, there's always a incumbency bias in best PM questions and even in 1997 Major & Clarke were preferred to run the economy over Blair & Brown for all the good it did them.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 91,526
    Carnyx said:

    kle4 said:

    WillG said:

    kle4 said:

    For the best part of a century, Switzerland’s financial USP was discretion, carefully protected by banking secrecy laws. Or, more bluntly, Swiss banks were where you hid your money, few questions asked. That ended as a result of US fury on discovering how UBS and others had helped US taxpayers evade tax. So the new USP became expertise: put your money in Switzerland not to hide it but because Swiss bankers know how to manage it well.

    Shows how behand the times I am. Where do people now go to hide their money? I guess they just invent incrediblty complex and opaque corproate structures to move things about or something.

    Even for some enthusiastic capitalists I can see the final paragraph striking a chord. Big global institutions, when they go wrong, seem to go really wrong.

    British dependencies.
    Makes me proud to be British.
    If we can hold on to nothing else but our ability to wash dirty money and loot cultural artifacts, then that is still something.
    And preserve slavers' statues from having baths, too.
    The important stuff, exactly.
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 39,481
    kle4 said:

    Carnyx said:

    kle4 said:

    WillG said:

    kle4 said:

    For the best part of a century, Switzerland’s financial USP was discretion, carefully protected by banking secrecy laws. Or, more bluntly, Swiss banks were where you hid your money, few questions asked. That ended as a result of US fury on discovering how UBS and others had helped US taxpayers evade tax. So the new USP became expertise: put your money in Switzerland not to hide it but because Swiss bankers know how to manage it well.

    Shows how behand the times I am. Where do people now go to hide their money? I guess they just invent incrediblty complex and opaque corproate structures to move things about or something.

    Even for some enthusiastic capitalists I can see the final paragraph striking a chord. Big global institutions, when they go wrong, seem to go really wrong.

    British dependencies.
    Makes me proud to be British.
    If we can hold on to nothing else but our ability to wash dirty money and loot cultural artifacts, then that is still something.
    And preserve slavers' statues from having baths, too.
    The important stuff, exactly.
    Oh yes, and dogs' names in histories of RAF heroism of the most self-sacrificial kind (somehow the most important bit of all, though I can't see why).
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,053
    Carnyx said:

    kle4 said:

    WillG said:

    kle4 said:

    For the best part of a century, Switzerland’s financial USP was discretion, carefully protected by banking secrecy laws. Or, more bluntly, Swiss banks were where you hid your money, few questions asked. That ended as a result of US fury on discovering how UBS and others had helped US taxpayers evade tax. So the new USP became expertise: put your money in Switzerland not to hide it but because Swiss bankers know how to manage it well.

    Shows how behand the times I am. Where do people now go to hide their money? I guess they just invent incrediblty complex and opaque corproate structures to move things about or something.

    Even for some enthusiastic capitalists I can see the final paragraph striking a chord. Big global institutions, when they go wrong, seem to go really wrong.

    British dependencies.
    Makes me proud to be British.
    If we can hold on to nothing else but our ability to wash dirty money and loot cultural artifacts, then that is still something.
    And preserve slavers' statues from having baths, too. Edit: as opposed to dodgy money.
    Perhaps we could combine the two? Protect statues of George Washington for cash?
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 39,481
    ydoethur said:

    Carnyx said:

    kle4 said:

    WillG said:

    kle4 said:

    For the best part of a century, Switzerland’s financial USP was discretion, carefully protected by banking secrecy laws. Or, more bluntly, Swiss banks were where you hid your money, few questions asked. That ended as a result of US fury on discovering how UBS and others had helped US taxpayers evade tax. So the new USP became expertise: put your money in Switzerland not to hide it but because Swiss bankers know how to manage it well.

    Shows how behand the times I am. Where do people now go to hide their money? I guess they just invent incrediblty complex and opaque corproate structures to move things about or something.

    Even for some enthusiastic capitalists I can see the final paragraph striking a chord. Big global institutions, when they go wrong, seem to go really wrong.

    British dependencies.
    Makes me proud to be British.
    If we can hold on to nothing else but our ability to wash dirty money and loot cultural artifacts, then that is still something.
    And preserve slavers' statues from having baths, too. Edit: as opposed to dodgy money.
    Perhaps we could combine the two? Protect statues of George Washington for cash?
    Not aware that Mr Washington was a slaver, as opposed to Mr Jefferson?
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,053
    Carnyx said:

    kle4 said:

    Carnyx said:

    kle4 said:

    WillG said:

    kle4 said:

    For the best part of a century, Switzerland’s financial USP was discretion, carefully protected by banking secrecy laws. Or, more bluntly, Swiss banks were where you hid your money, few questions asked. That ended as a result of US fury on discovering how UBS and others had helped US taxpayers evade tax. So the new USP became expertise: put your money in Switzerland not to hide it but because Swiss bankers know how to manage it well.

    Shows how behand the times I am. Where do people now go to hide their money? I guess they just invent incrediblty complex and opaque corproate structures to move things about or something.

    Even for some enthusiastic capitalists I can see the final paragraph striking a chord. Big global institutions, when they go wrong, seem to go really wrong.

    British dependencies.
    Makes me proud to be British.
    If we can hold on to nothing else but our ability to wash dirty money and loot cultural artifacts, then that is still something.
    And preserve slavers' statues from having baths, too.
    The important stuff, exactly.
    Oh yes, and dogs' names in histories of RAF heroism of the most self-sacrificial kind (somehow the most important bit of all, though I can't see why).
    Does that include Guy Gibson's dog?
  • Sean_FSean_F Posts: 35,789

    There is also speculation this weekend that Johnson may be using his resignation honours list to reward those who have helped him through the inquiry – an allegation his team rejects as “completely untrue”. The Observer has been told that several figures who have featured in the inquiry also appeared in the draft version of Johnson’s honours list.

    Well, he wants to give his father a knighthood for his championing of women’s’ rights.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,053
    Carnyx said:

    ydoethur said:

    Carnyx said:

    kle4 said:

    WillG said:

    kle4 said:

    For the best part of a century, Switzerland’s financial USP was discretion, carefully protected by banking secrecy laws. Or, more bluntly, Swiss banks were where you hid your money, few questions asked. That ended as a result of US fury on discovering how UBS and others had helped US taxpayers evade tax. So the new USP became expertise: put your money in Switzerland not to hide it but because Swiss bankers know how to manage it well.

    Shows how behand the times I am. Where do people now go to hide their money? I guess they just invent incrediblty complex and opaque corproate structures to move things about or something.

    Even for some enthusiastic capitalists I can see the final paragraph striking a chord. Big global institutions, when they go wrong, seem to go really wrong.

    British dependencies.
    Makes me proud to be British.
    If we can hold on to nothing else but our ability to wash dirty money and loot cultural artifacts, then that is still something.
    And preserve slavers' statues from having baths, too. Edit: as opposed to dodgy money.
    Perhaps we could combine the two? Protect statues of George Washington for cash?
    Not aware that Mr Washington was a slaver, as opposed to Mr Jefferson?
    Slave owner, anyway.
  • tlg86tlg86 Posts: 25,184
    Thanks @Cyclefree - very interesting read.
  • Pro_RataPro_Rata Posts: 4,793
    Off topic (which I will read), but continuing to buzz in my bonnet

    MEN voodoo poll, but a 📌 this big should stick. Should Transpennine Express be stripped of their franchise?:

    Yes - 92%
    No - 6%
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,053
    edited March 2023
    Pro_Rata said:

    Off topic (which I will read), but continuing to buzz in my bonnet

    MEN voodoo poll, but a 📌 this big should stick. Should Transpennine Express be stripped of their franchise?:

    Yes - 92%
    No - 6%

    Who are the 6%?!

    Edit - reminds me of the time the TES ran a voodoo poll on how much confidence teachers had in the DfE. In over 3000 responses, not a single one had complete confidence in the DfE. Only a handful (about 30) had even some confidence in it.
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 39,481
    tlg86 said:

    Thanks @Cyclefree - very interesting read.

    Hear hear.
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 55,171

    geoffw said:

    Reed said:

    This from the telegraph regarding credit suisse.

    Thousands of jobs are set to be lost in the City as regulators race to rescue one of the world's biggest banks before markets open on Monday morning.

    The government of Switzerland held an extraordinary meeting on Saturday evening to seal a shotgun takeover of troubled Credit Suisse by its Swiss rival UBS amid rising fears of a new international financial crisis.

    Any deal is expected to result in thousands of job losses in London, where the two banks employ around 10,000 people between them at large offices in the City and Canary Wharf.

    Must be even worse at the more significant financial centres in Europe - Paris and Frankfurt.
    … oh, wait …

    Tell me you know nothing about banking and financial services without telling me you know nothing banking and financial services.
    Tell you what.. Tell you what.. it's nine-and-a-half thousand pouunds..

    Let's all sing it.
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