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Starmer has a net approval lead of 17% over Sunak – politicalbetting.com

SystemSystem Posts: 8,489
edited January 15 in General
imageStarmer has a net approval lead of 17% over Sunak – politicalbetting.com

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  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 9,214
    edited January 12
    First! First first first first firrrrrrrst

    And that’s not Best PM judgement of voters where Starmer is only 1% ahead having but just taken the lead.
    Downward direction of travel don’t look so great for Starmer either.
  • beinndeargbeinndearg Posts: 676
    SeCOOOOOOOOOOOOOND
  • NickPalmerNickPalmer Posts: 20,052
    Sunak's strategy seems to be voluble inactivity - not settling strikes or stopping boats or shortening waiting times, but explaining at length that he hopes to do so sometime. Starmer's strategy of occasional more heavyweight speeches without detail seems to be maintaining him at a steady level.
  • Starmer fans please explain!
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 9,214

    SeCOOOOOOOOOOOOOND

    It’s a bit like a pub lounge filling up for the first time of the evening isn’t it?
  • Andy_JSAndy_JS Posts: 20,423
    Sadly for Putin, only 9% of UK energy is currently being produced by gas-fired power stations.

    https://www.gridwatch.templar.co.uk
  • solarflaresolarflare Posts: 3,190
    Bland and blander.

    What's blandest's net approval rating, Ed Davey?
  • beinndeargbeinndearg Posts: 676

    SeCOOOOOOOOOOOOOND

    It’s a bit like a pub lounge filling up for the first time of the evening isn’t it?
    I am off to watch the rest of my film. Bullet head, on netflix, like reservoir dogs only with actual dogs in it. Scary pitbulls.
  • DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 17,949
    OT declassified US cold war civil defence films cut together.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r_ys6lGuPeI
  • noneoftheabovenoneoftheabove Posts: 16,322

    Sunak's strategy seems to be voluble inactivity - not settling strikes or stopping boats or shortening waiting times, but explaining at length that he hopes to do so sometime. Starmer's strategy of occasional more heavyweight speeches without detail seems to be maintaining him at a steady level.

    Sounds like a strange strategy for a 2024 campaign.....more like one trying to avoid a 2023 Tory leadership challenge.
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 9,214

    Sunak's strategy seems to be voluble inactivity - not settling strikes or stopping boats or shortening waiting times, but explaining at length that he hopes to do so sometime. Starmer's strategy of occasional more heavyweight speeches without detail seems to be maintaining him at a steady level.

    That Starmer’s approval is on the slide in NHS crisis suggest voters demand more from him?

    Maybe he should predict some things and get it right? Sunak was dire in campaign against Truss, but one exchange where he said go ahead with that and the markets will react against you seems to have got him the top job.
  • williamglennwilliamglenn Posts: 43,344
    Andy_JS said:

    Sadly for Putin, only 9% of UK energy is currently being produced by gas-fired power stations.

    https://www.gridwatch.templar.co.uk

    That's a bit misleading because it doesn't take account of the millions of gas boilers in people's homes.
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 49,002
    edited January 12
    I just made a Spanish omelet, only using potato chips rather than sliced potatoes. The consequence is that total time to table was about 20 minutes, rather than the more normal 70 to 90 minutes. (Disclaimer: I also cooked at a lot higher heat that I normally do, and used the grill to make sure the top was set before flipping it.)

    The process was -

    * Olive oil in 7 inch frying pan
    * Chopped a couple of shallots* and chucked the in the pan on a medium high heat
    * While this is cooking, beat five eggs. Add pepper. Add salt and vinegar crisps.
    * Stir the egg and potato mix into the shallots
    * Cook on medium high for ten minutes
    * Chuck under the grill for two minutes to make sure the top is set
    * Flip omelet
    * Cook for a further four minutes

    Serve

    Verdict: not as good as my slow cooked Spanish omelet. But, on the other hand, I was able to rustle up something 85% as good in one fifth of the time. It may well become a weekend staple.

    * I didn't have onions.
  • Cut the state pension. Abandon the triple lock.
  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 43,682
    Nevertheless, the lying clown has clearly made enough enemies, many of whom know stuff, to make sure that his chances of a return are now approaching zero.
  • RobDRobD Posts: 58,110

    Cut the state pension. Abandon the triple lock.

    That would just massively increase pensioner poverty for those with nothing but the state pension. There are better ways to redistribute wealth from the wealthiest pensioners that don't involve leaving thousands destitute.
  • DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 17,949
    Europe's largest deposit of rare earths - which are used from mobile phones to missiles - has been found in Sweden.
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-64253708
  • turbotubbsturbotubbs Posts: 11,576

    Cut the state pension. Abandon the triple lock.

    Triple lock I can see. Cutting the pitiful state pension? That would be insanity.
  • DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 17,949
    IanB2 said:

    Nevertheless, the lying clown has clearly made enough enemies, many of whom know stuff, to make sure that his chances of a return are now approaching zero.

    Yes, except that at some point in the next year or two, unless their party recovers in the polls, Conservative MPs will panic, and panic does not always lead to rational decision-making.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 82,567
    PM approval tends to move broadly in one direction, it ain't going to get much better for him.
  • MexicanpeteMexicanpete Posts: 19,093
    ...
    RobD said:

    Cut the state pension. Abandon the triple lock.

    That would just massively increase pensioner poverty for those with nothing but the state pension. There are better ways to redistribute wealth from the wealthiest pensioners that don't involve leaving thousands destitute.
    Destitute pensioners don't vote Conservative. Wealthier pensioners do. So you are best off going after the poor ones and keeping the wealthier one's content. Saga holidays don't come cheap you know.
  • DJ41DJ41 Posts: 792
    edited January 12
    FPT: those who would like there to be betting markets on the survival or demise of the monarchy, or on the current king being or not being on the throne on specific future dates, should make appropriate requests of Smarkets and of that other company with a name that starts with B.

    It'll give journos a nice focus too. More interesting than writing about Harry's thoughts on his knob.

    PS. Now I come to think of it, the B company merged with Paddy Power...so creating such markets might not exactly stick in their throats and could be a case of Tiocfaidh ár lá and "FTK" :-) @Dura_Ace
  • This society is so unbalanced, old people get everything and young people get screwed over. Time to even the playing field.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 73,473
    edited January 12
    Foxy said:

    Foxy said:

    ohnotnow said:

    ohnotnow said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    ChatGPT’s ability to turn borderline Total Gibberish into highly plausible, literate English is actually one of its most profound yet undiscussed attributes. It is incredible, and utterly ominous for education

    Not really. It will change education. More oral assessment is a possibility, particularly if an algorithm implementation is capable enough to do the assessment.
    NARRATOR: education as we know it is fucked
    Didn't pick you as someone scared of a little change. Switching from essays to oral presentations is hardly the end times.
    I was chatting to a lecturer friend about 'the ChatGPT problem'. One of his first-year classes has 400 students. Doing oral presentations with them all would be problematic.
    Yes, but so is marking 400 essays.
    Marking essays is - just about - doable for the course. But if every student even has to give a five minute presentation, even with just a couple of minutes faff on either side then it becomes a real problem. As WillG says - hire more people to do them. But between there and here - it's a problem.

    Edit: meant to say that one saving grace is that OpenAI will probably start charging for use sometime soon and that might be enough of a barrier for a while until there's a 'good enough' open source tool.
    There is already an App to signal which pieces are written by AI:

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/chatgpt-princeton-student-gptzero-app-edward-tian/

    Then the Lecturer just needs to call a few for vivas, and chuck out the ones who cannot answer questions that an author could.

    Another giveaway is the lack of references and citations.
    That's very naïve. People will simply chain together tools (its already happening).
    No doubt detection software will become more sophisticated too.

    It is a bit like studying past papers though. Study enough and you know the subject. If you use AI then need to fact check it, cite references and restructure sentences, surely you know the subject?
    Interestingly in the field of image and video processing, many SOTA of models can be fooled by even single pixel changes which are imperceptible to human eyes....Object detection is a much simpler problem and one that has been thought of as "solved" for nearly 10 years now (in that they can detect objects more accuracy than humans), if the humans aren't trying an adversarial attack.

    I think we are going to see exactly the same in the area of LLMs, but unlike training an object classifier, you can't just retrain models revolving around this in a day or two.

    Also, not sure I agree that studying all the past papers (knowing there are limited variations) for the test means you know the subject...it means you know how to pass the test, which I would argue isn't the same thing.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 82,567
    edited January 12

    HYUFD said:

    Fuck the royals.

    Take back control from our unelected rulers.

    Adulterers should be stoned.

    We have control, we are a parliamentary democracy with a constitutional monarch.
    So we can vote Charles out then? Since we have control...
    Yes, we can - vote for a party which advocates a republic, we have a few of them, albeit not very successful at present.

    If a King stepped out of line and refused to abdicate, Parliament would switch en masse to republicanism overnight.

    No, that's not a dodge either, we vote for MPs then trust them to do things for us, and if they don't we vote against them, that's how it works unless you think we've done everything by referendum before.
  • turbotubbsturbotubbs Posts: 11,576

    This society is so unbalanced, old people get everything and young people get screwed over. Time to even the playing field.

    Do you know how much the state pension is?
  • DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 17,949
    DJ41 said:

    FPT: those who would like there to be betting markets on the survival or demise of the monarchy, or on the current king being or not being on the throne on specific future dates, should make appropriate requests of Smarkets and that other company with a name that starts with B..

    It'll give journos a nice focus too. More interesting than writing about Harry's thoughts about his knob.

    You won't get a market on the death of anyone.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 82,567
    edited January 12

    Completely OT but for those of you interested in history and particularly old maps.

    Someone has just rebuilt the defunct Rootsweb Genmaps website under the name of Cartophilia

    4,500 old maps of England arranged by Shire

    https://freepages.rootsweb.com/~genmaps/genealogy/cartophilia

    So more people see this link. It's great.
  • This society is so unbalanced, old people get everything and young people get screwed over. Time to even the playing field.

    Do you know how much the state pension is?
    Too much, they've had everything handed to them.
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 49,002

    Andy_JS said:

    Sadly for Putin, only 9% of UK energy is currently being produced by gas-fired power stations.

    https://www.gridwatch.templar.co.uk

    That's a bit misleading because it doesn't take account of the millions of gas boilers in people's homes.
    While that's a fair point, it is worth noting that (a) the UK still produces a reasonable amount of gas, so not using it (much) for power generation has a very big impact on our import dependency ratio, and (b) we've actually meaningfully increased production this year:


  • DJ41DJ41 Posts: 792
    edited January 12

    DJ41 said:

    FPT: those who would like there to be betting markets on the survival or demise of the monarchy, or on the current king being or not being on the throne on specific future dates, should make appropriate requests of Smarkets and that other company with a name that starts with B..

    It'll give journos a nice focus too. More interesting than writing about Harry's thoughts about his knob.

    You won't get a market on the death of anyone.
    I think you misinterpreted what I wrote. I wouldn't request or support the existence of a market on anyone's death. The markets would be on whether or not he will still be on the throne. There are other ways of him stopping being on the throne. The throne is an office. It would be like betting on whether Rishi Sunak will still be prime minister on such and such a date.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 73,473
    I would add to my early point that if people say well we have plagiarism detectors now and they do a decent job. The difference is with a LLM I can automate the process of trying to fool it, easily being able to try all sort of ideas in an automated way as the prose can be instantly generated. Rather at the moment, nobody can keep trying millions of variations on a theme very easily.
  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 43,682

    This society is so unbalanced, old people get everything and young people get screwed over. Time to even the playing field.

    Do you know how much the state pension is?
    The money that levying NI on pension, investment and property income would bring in would more than cover a decent pay rise for nurses and other key workers, with £££ to spare
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 49,020
    My penis is oscillating between extremely sensitive, and borderline traumatised.
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 28,836

    This society is so unbalanced, old people get everything and young people get screwed over. Time to even the playing field.

    Do you know how much the state pension is?
    Too much, they've had everything handed to them.
    Hmm. For £141.85 pw you need to have paid NI for 30 years (or get equivalent credits if unemployed etc.)
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 82,567
    edited January 12

    Sunak's strategy seems to be voluble inactivity - not settling strikes or stopping boats or shortening waiting times, but explaining at length that he hopes to do so sometime. Starmer's strategy of occasional more heavyweight speeches without detail seems to be maintaining him at a steady level.

    That Starmer’s approval is on the slide in NHS crisis suggest voters demand more from him?

    Maybe he should predict some things and get it right? Sunak was dire in campaign against Truss, but one exchange where he said go ahead with that and the markets will react against you seems to have got him the top job.
    He got the job as the alternative post Truss option was Boris and a majority of MPs (though not Members) felt strongly enough that chucking a guy out as unsuitable for being PM, then putting him straight back in, was just not going to work.

    Funnily enough it's the sort of thing Rishi probably would have supported were he not a candidate himself, given his belief that appointing someone who resigned/sacked days earlier is totally fine.
  • GallowgateGallowgate Posts: 18,696
    The state pension is fine, as is the triple lock.

    Just tax wealth and consolidate NI and income tax.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 82,567

    This society is so unbalanced, old people get everything and young people get screwed over. Time to even the playing field.

    Do you know how much the state pension is?
    Too much, they've had everything handed to them.
    I'm a firm believer that the elderly are overly focused on in this country, but the state pension really is not very much and whilst we might think many of them have had everything handed to them, there would be too many who have not had that affected by cutting the state pension.

    The intent to balance things out is a good one, but doing so in this way would cause harm to those who cannot take it, as well as those who could. More targeted options are needed.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 56,756

    My penis is oscillating between extremely sensitive, and borderline traumatised.

    Did you suss sex?
  • DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 17,949
    DJ41 said:

    DJ41 said:

    FPT: those who would like there to be betting markets on the survival or demise of the monarchy, or on the current king being or not being on the throne on specific future dates, should make appropriate requests of Smarkets and that other company with a name that starts with B..

    It'll give journos a nice focus too. More interesting than writing about Harry's thoughts about his knob.

    You won't get a market on the death of anyone.
    I think you misinterpreted what I wrote. I wouldn't request or support the existence of a market on anyone's death. The markets would be on whether or not he will still be on the throne. There are other ways of him stopping being on the throne. The throne is an office. It would be like betting on whether Rishi Sunak will still be prime minister on such and such a date.
    Good luck but you still won't get a market predicated on the death of the king (or anyone else) even if there is a miniscule chance of abdication, but by all means try it.
  • pigeonpigeon Posts: 3,232

    This society is so unbalanced, old people get everything and young people get screwed over. Time to even the playing field.

    Do you know how much the state pension is?
    Many old people are poor. A greater proportion of younger people are poor. After housing costs, the average pensioner has a higher disposable income than the average working person - a gap that will keep on increasing continually so long as the triple lock is maintained, because it guarantees increases in pensioner incomes that end up being paid for by other people through ever-steeper taxation of earned incomes. There's also the not-so-small matter of who coughs up for the immense costs of elderly health and social care provision, as well as pensions, as the population continues to age inexorably.

    "Cut the state pension" is an angry response to a desperate situation, which is that the young are being suffocated by the accumulated financial burden of astronomical housing costs and the care of the old. I don't think it's the right solution - that, of course, is taxing homeowners, including well-to-do pensioners, a lot more, so that we can start to tackle the immense problems of housing-as-investment-opportunity and looking after old people at the same time - but you can see where the frustration comes from.
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 9,214
    pigeon said:

    Sunak's strategy seems to be voluble inactivity - not settling strikes or stopping boats or shortening waiting times, but explaining at length that he hopes to do so sometime. Starmer's strategy of occasional more heavyweight speeches without detail seems to be maintaining him at a steady level.

    That Starmer’s approval is on the slide in NHS crisis suggest voters demand more from him?

    Maybe he should predict some things and get it right? Sunak was dire in campaign against Truss, but one exchange where he said go ahead with that and the markets will react against you seems to have got him the top job.
    The voters want an end to austerity and a country that actually works. Starmer can't plausibly promise that because he and Reeves seem to have decided that there is no money left *AND* they aren't willing to raise any more, except by tokenistic means like scrapping tax exemptions for private education. Therefore, all they can promise is to manage austerity better than the Tories. An inspiring prospectus for a brighter future it most certainly fucking ain't.

    Of course, the root problem is actually the same one that the Conservatives have. A vast proportion of the nation's wealth is now locked up in property, there's no way to address income inequalities, lack of opportunity for the young and the enormous burden of elderly health and social care without extracting some of that wealth - and voters (especially the vast and growing legion of pensioners) will scream blue murder the nanosecond that a politician suggests that they be parted from some of the value of their house. Exhibit A: the Dementia Tax.

    People want nice stuff (such as ambulances that aren't so catastrophically late that they don't turn up until after the patient's funeral,) but they expect someone else to pay for it. It was ever thus.
    That’s a good post. Very strong. Add to the list of root problems ageing population we both can’t afford but also causes inflation, as will not only constrain production possibilities, but also increase aggregate demand – both of which will drive up inflation by saving rates falling, and real wages increasing. Brexit might get the blame for making Britain poorer, certainly in minds that thought UK would be wealthier after Brexit, but the truth was we were destined to get poorer and poorer over the coming decades anyway, with new generations having to live with continued high inflation and what that does to borrowing rates, whilst trying to help the aged.
  • solarflaresolarflare Posts: 3,190

    My penis is oscillating between extremely sensitive, and borderline traumatised.

    Sort of like my mood when I post here.
  • SeaShantyIrish2SeaShantyIrish2 Posts: 11,082

    My penis is oscillating between extremely sensitive, and borderline traumatised.

    The Half-Human Condition. That is, condition of share of population that's putting the Man into Mankind.
  • kjhkjh Posts: 8,345

    This society is so unbalanced, old people get everything and young people get screwed over. Time to even the playing field.

    Do you know how much the state pension is?
    Too much, they've had everything handed to them.
    £141.85 per week provided they have contributed towards it for almost their entire working life (otherwise they get less).

    You think that is too much for 35 odd years contributions to it?
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 49,002
    rcs1000 said:

    I just made a Spanish omelet, only using potato chips rather than sliced potatoes. The consequence is that total time to table was about 20 minutes, rather than the more normal 70 to 90 minutes. (Disclaimer: I also cooked at a lot higher heat that I normally do, and used the grill to make sure the top was set before flipping it.)

    The process was -

    * Olive oil in 7 inch frying pan
    * Chopped a couple of shallots* and chucked the in the pan on a medium high heat
    * While this is cooking, beat five eggs. Add pepper. Add salt and vinegar crisps.
    * Stir the egg and potato mix into the shallots
    * Cook on medium high for ten minutes
    * Chuck under the grill for two minutes to make sure the top is set
    * Flip omelet
    * Cook for a further four minutes

    Serve

    Verdict: not as good as my slow cooked Spanish omelet. But, on the other hand, I was able to rustle up something 85% as good in one fifth of the time. It may well become a weekend staple.

    * I didn't have onions.

    With picture:


  • DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 17,949

    I would add to my early point that if people say well we have plagiarism detectors now and they do a decent job. The difference is with a LLM I can automate the process of trying to fool it, easily being able to try all sort of ideas in an automated way as the prose can be instantly generated. Rather at the moment, nobody can keep trying millions of variations on a theme very easily.

    True but so what? For exam purposes, it's irrelevant. For Oxbridge humanities courses that rely on reading out essays to tutors, who really cares? For school pupils doing homework, well, can ChatGPT pitch the level right for Year 11 vs Year 9?
  • ohnotnowohnotnow Posts: 896

    My penis is oscillating between extremely sensitive, and borderline traumatised.

    Are you Leon looking at a picture of Liz Truss wearing THE NECKLACE?
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 42,503
    DJ41 said:

    DJ41 said:

    FPT: those who would like there to be betting markets on the survival or demise of the monarchy, or on the current king being or not being on the throne on specific future dates, should make appropriate requests of Smarkets and that other company with a name that starts with B..

    It'll give journos a nice focus too. More interesting than writing about Harry's thoughts about his knob.

    You won't get a market on the death of anyone.
    I think you misinterpreted what I wrote. I wouldn't request or support the existence of a market on anyone's death. The markets would be on whether or not he will still be on the throne. There are other ways of him stopping being on the throne. The throne is an office. It would be like betting on whether Rishi Sunak will still be prime minister on such and such a date.
    Bookies don’t work like that though. If you’re asking for something very specific, such as the UK to become a republic, or the King to abdicate before the coronation, then you’ll get probably good odds. But you won’t get a bet on him not being ‘in office’ on a certain date, that wouldn’t be void in the event of his death.

    The king is due to hold the office until he passes, unlike a politician who is subject to the whims of his constituents and party for the office he holds.
  • Scott_xPScott_xP Posts: 29,264
    In the #WestminsterAccounts database, the MP with the most donations was Keir Starmer at £740k.

    Boris Johnson just beat that in a SINGLE donation 🤯

    https://twitter.com/TomLarkinSky/status/1613615157636173835
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 49,002

    My penis is oscillating between extremely sensitive, and borderline traumatised.

    I've never heard masturbation described that way before. Did ChatGPT come up with that?
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 82,567
    Scott_xP said:

    In the #WestminsterAccounts database, the MP with the most donations was Keir Starmer at £740k.

    Boris Johnson just beat that in a SINGLE donation 🤯

    https://twitter.com/TomLarkinSky/status/1613615157636173835

    The system is f*cked. No one should be able to donate so much, how could it not improperly influence somone holding public office, or legitimately lead a reasonable person to conclude that it had?
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 9,214
    rcs1000 said:

    rcs1000 said:

    I just made a Spanish omelet, only using potato chips rather than sliced potatoes. The consequence is that total time to table was about 20 minutes, rather than the more normal 70 to 90 minutes. (Disclaimer: I also cooked at a lot higher heat that I normally do, and used the grill to make sure the top was set before flipping it.)

    The process was -

    * Olive oil in 7 inch frying pan
    * Chopped a couple of shallots* and chucked the in the pan on a medium high heat
    * While this is cooking, beat five eggs. Add pepper. Add salt and vinegar crisps.
    * Stir the egg and potato mix into the shallots
    * Cook on medium high for ten minutes
    * Chuck under the grill for two minutes to make sure the top is set
    * Flip omelet
    * Cook for a further four minutes

    Serve

    Verdict: not as good as my slow cooked Spanish omelet. But, on the other hand, I was able to rustle up something 85% as good in one fifth of the time. It may well become a weekend staple.

    * I didn't have onions.

    With picture:


    Do the floods rise to where you are?
  • kjh said:

    This society is so unbalanced, old people get everything and young people get screwed over. Time to even the playing field.

    Do you know how much the state pension is?
    Too much, they've had everything handed to them.
    £141.85 per week provided they have contributed towards it for almost their entire working life (otherwise they get less).

    You think that is too much for 35 odd years contributions to it?
    Depends on the size of the contributions, I would have thought.

    And whilst I wouldn't want to go too far with this, there is something awkward about the way that a generation who have tended to vote for low taxes and frugal services and benefits through their working lives are now shocked and appalled at the frugality of pensions and creakyness of health and social care now they are using them more.
  • ohnotnowohnotnow Posts: 896
    rcs1000 said:

    I just made a Spanish omelet, only using potato chips rather than sliced potatoes. The consequence is that total time to table was about 20 minutes, rather than the more normal 70 to 90 minutes. (Disclaimer: I also cooked at a lot higher heat that I normally do, and used the grill to make sure the top was set before flipping it.)

    The process was -

    * Olive oil in 7 inch frying pan
    * Chopped a couple of shallots* and chucked the in the pan on a medium high heat
    * While this is cooking, beat five eggs. Add pepper. Add salt and vinegar crisps.
    * Stir the egg and potato mix into the shallots
    * Cook on medium high for ten minutes
    * Chuck under the grill for two minutes to make sure the top is set
    * Flip omelet
    * Cook for a further four minutes

    Serve

    Verdict: not as good as my slow cooked Spanish omelet. But, on the other hand, I was able to rustle up something 85% as good in one fifth of the time. It may well become a weekend staple.

    * I didn't have onions.

    I've recently discovered that blitzed-up crisps make an excellent 'breaded' coating in the air fryer. Like ready-seasoned/oiled 'panko'.
  • glwglw Posts: 8,876

    I would add to my early point that if people say well we have plagiarism detectors now and they do a decent job. The difference is with a LLM I can automate the process of trying to fool it, easily being able to try all sort of ideas in an automated way as the prose can be instantly generated. Rather at the moment, nobody can keep trying millions of variations on a theme very easily.

    Economics will probably determine the winners, what's going to make the most money? Defeating or defending the tests? I would think the former.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 36,825
    kjh said:

    This society is so unbalanced, old people get everything and young people get screwed over. Time to even the playing field.

    Do you know how much the state pension is?
    Too much, they've had everything handed to them.
    £141.85 per week provided they have contributed towards it for almost their entire working life (otherwise they get less).

    You think that is too much for 35 odd years contributions to it?
    If it were lower, there would need to be more other benefits to keep people out of poverty.

    Better to just equalise taxation in retirement when earning by getting pensioners to pay NI.
  • stodgestodge Posts: 11,244

    pigeon said:

    Sunak's strategy seems to be voluble inactivity - not settling strikes or stopping boats or shortening waiting times, but explaining at length that he hopes to do so sometime. Starmer's strategy of occasional more heavyweight speeches without detail seems to be maintaining him at a steady level.

    That Starmer’s approval is on the slide in NHS crisis suggest voters demand more from him?

    Maybe he should predict some things and get it right? Sunak was dire in campaign against Truss, but one exchange where he said go ahead with that and the markets will react against you seems to have got him the top job.
    The voters want an end to austerity and a country that actually works. Starmer can't plausibly promise that because he and Reeves seem to have decided that there is no money left *AND* they aren't willing to raise any more, except by tokenistic means like scrapping tax exemptions for private education. Therefore, all they can promise is to manage austerity better than the Tories. An inspiring prospectus for a brighter future it most certainly fucking ain't.

    Of course, the root problem is actually the same one that the Conservatives have. A vast proportion of the nation's wealth is now locked up in property, there's no way to address income inequalities, lack of opportunity for the young and the enormous burden of elderly health and social care without extracting some of that wealth - and voters (especially the vast and growing legion of pensioners) will scream blue murder the nanosecond that a politician suggests that they be parted from some of the value of their house. Exhibit A: the Dementia Tax.

    People want nice stuff (such as ambulances that aren't so catastrophically late that they don't turn up until after the patient's funeral,) but they expect someone else to pay for it. It was ever thus.
    That’s a good post. Very strong. Add to the list of root problems ageing population we both can’t afford but also causes inflation, as will not only constrain production possibilities, but also increase aggregate demand – both of which will drive up inflation by saving rates falling, and real wages increasing. Brexit might get the blame for making Britain poorer, certainly in minds that thought UK would be wealthier after Brexit, but the truth was we were destined to get poorer and poorer over the coming decades anyway, with new generations having to live with continued high inflation and what that does to borrowing rates, whilst trying to help the aged.
    Plenty to chew over in @pigeon's post. One could argue creating a cohort of home owners through RTB and other measures in the 1980s helped manifest the concentration of wealth in property. The political motivation was the realisation home owners voted Conservative.

    Another aspect was the GFC and the introduction of ultra-low interest rates in 2009. As I've said here before, Mrs Stodge and I found ourselves paying 0.99% interest on the mortgage so paying it off became easy and indeed we've funded home improvements (accentuating the wealth of the property) based on being able to borrow against that mortgage.

    The old days of moving up the property and career ladder living in more expensive houses but being able to afford the mortgage as the career progressed are over for a generation. With the mortgage clear, sell the house and it's all profit - downsize to a smaller venue without a mortgage and if you can afford to, it's a decent lifestyle. Indeed, it's the Dream for many but for those on the ladder now, probably unachievable.
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 9,214
    kle4 said:

    Scott_xP said:

    In the #WestminsterAccounts database, the MP with the most donations was Keir Starmer at £740k.

    Boris Johnson just beat that in a SINGLE donation 🤯

    https://twitter.com/TomLarkinSky/status/1613615157636173835

    The system is f*cked. No one should be able to donate so much, how could it not improperly influence somone holding public office, or legitimately lead a reasonable person to conclude that it had?
    Starmer got £720K of that from someone who wants everybody to be registered with an NHS GP. I reckon it influenced this weeks PMQs.
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 49,020
    rcs1000 said:

    rcs1000 said:

    I just made a Spanish omelet, only using potato chips rather than sliced potatoes. The consequence is that total time to table was about 20 minutes, rather than the more normal 70 to 90 minutes. (Disclaimer: I also cooked at a lot higher heat that I normally do, and used the grill to make sure the top was set before flipping it.)

    The process was -

    * Olive oil in 7 inch frying pan
    * Chopped a couple of shallots* and chucked the in the pan on a medium high heat
    * While this is cooking, beat five eggs. Add pepper. Add salt and vinegar crisps.
    * Stir the egg and potato mix into the shallots
    * Cook on medium high for ten minutes
    * Chuck under the grill for two minutes to make sure the top is set
    * Flip omelet
    * Cook for a further four minutes

    Serve

    Verdict: not as good as my slow cooked Spanish omelet. But, on the other hand, I was able to rustle up something 85% as good in one fifth of the time. It may well become a weekend staple.

    * I didn't have onions.

    With picture:


    Delia does Pac-Man.
  • Richard_TyndallRichard_Tyndall Posts: 28,188

    This society is so unbalanced, old people get everything and young people get screwed over. Time to even the playing field.

    Without necessarily disagreeing with you I should point out that it is worth remembering that young people do (hopefully) become old people. You seem to think that the young and the old are separate species and never the twain shall meet.
  • glwglw Posts: 8,876

    True but so what? For exam purposes, it's irrelevant. For Oxbridge humanities courses that rely on reading out essays to tutors, who really cares? For school pupils doing homework, well, can ChatGPT pitch the level right for Year 11 vs Year 9?

    If ChatGPT can't something else will. This is precisely what training lets you do.

    If you wanted a money making essay writer you would offer such options. Tune for age, tune for dialect, tune for ability, allow the users to incrementally improve rather than show sudden jumps in performance. And you would definitely do adversarial training against the best detectors, to get your input to produce false negatives.
  • williamglennwilliamglenn Posts: 43,344
    kle4 said:

    Scott_xP said:

    In the #WestminsterAccounts database, the MP with the most donations was Keir Starmer at £740k.

    Boris Johnson just beat that in a SINGLE donation 🤯

    https://twitter.com/TomLarkinSky/status/1613615157636173835

    The system is f*cked. No one should be able to donate so much, how could it not improperly influence somone holding public office, or legitimately lead a reasonable person to conclude that it had?
    If a billionaire were reading this forum and came to the conclusion that you were the answer to the country's problems, and offered you big money to dedicate yourself to politics, what would be the problem?
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 9,214
    stodge said:

    pigeon said:

    Sunak's strategy seems to be voluble inactivity - not settling strikes or stopping boats or shortening waiting times, but explaining at length that he hopes to do so sometime. Starmer's strategy of occasional more heavyweight speeches without detail seems to be maintaining him at a steady level.

    That Starmer’s approval is on the slide in NHS crisis suggest voters demand more from him?

    Maybe he should predict some things and get it right? Sunak was dire in campaign against Truss, but one exchange where he said go ahead with that and the markets will react against you seems to have got him the top job.
    The voters want an end to austerity and a country that actually works. Starmer can't plausibly promise that because he and Reeves seem to have decided that there is no money left *AND* they aren't willing to raise any more, except by tokenistic means like scrapping tax exemptions for private education. Therefore, all they can promise is to manage austerity better than the Tories. An inspiring prospectus for a brighter future it most certainly fucking ain't.

    Of course, the root problem is actually the same one that the Conservatives have. A vast proportion of the nation's wealth is now locked up in property, there's no way to address income inequalities, lack of opportunity for the young and the enormous burden of elderly health and social care without extracting some of that wealth - and voters (especially the vast and growing legion of pensioners) will scream blue murder the nanosecond that a politician suggests that they be parted from some of the value of their house. Exhibit A: the Dementia Tax.

    People want nice stuff (such as ambulances that aren't so catastrophically late that they don't turn up until after the patient's funeral,) but they expect someone else to pay for it. It was ever thus.
    That’s a good post. Very strong. Add to the list of root problems ageing population we both can’t afford but also causes inflation, as will not only constrain production possibilities, but also increase aggregate demand – both of which will drive up inflation by saving rates falling, and real wages increasing. Brexit might get the blame for making Britain poorer, certainly in minds that thought UK would be wealthier after Brexit, but the truth was we were destined to get poorer and poorer over the coming decades anyway, with new generations having to live with continued high inflation and what that does to borrowing rates, whilst trying to help the aged.
    Plenty to chew over in @pigeon's post. One could argue creating a cohort of home owners through RTB and other measures in the 1980s helped manifest the concentration of wealth in property. The political motivation was the realisation home owners voted Conservative.

    Another aspect was the GFC and the introduction of ultra-low interest rates in 2009. As I've said here before, Mrs Stodge and I found ourselves paying 0.99% interest on the mortgage so paying it off became easy and indeed we've funded home improvements (accentuating the wealth of the property) based on being able to borrow against that mortgage.

    The old days of moving up the property and career ladder living in more expensive houses but being able to afford the mortgage as the career progressed are over for a generation. With the mortgage clear, sell the house and it's all profit - downsize to a smaller venue without a mortgage and if you can afford to, it's a decent lifestyle. Indeed, it's the Dream for many but for those on the ladder now, probably unachievable.
    Yes. But what about MY POST?
  • turbotubbsturbotubbs Posts: 11,576
    Scott_xP said:

    In the #WestminsterAccounts database, the MP with the most donations was Keir Starmer at £740k.

    Boris Johnson just beat that in a SINGLE donation 🤯

    https://twitter.com/TomLarkinSky/status/1613615157636173835

    Same question to any mp receiving donations - What does the donor want in return?
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 49,020
    Pb Tories ballot pencil is oscillating between extremely Rishi, and borderline Starmer.
  • Luckyguy1983Luckyguy1983 Posts: 20,506
    rcs1000 said:

    rcs1000 said:

    I just made a Spanish omelet, only using potato chips rather than sliced potatoes. The consequence is that total time to table was about 20 minutes, rather than the more normal 70 to 90 minutes. (Disclaimer: I also cooked at a lot higher heat that I normally do, and used the grill to make sure the top was set before flipping it.)

    The process was -

    * Olive oil in 7 inch frying pan
    * Chopped a couple of shallots* and chucked the in the pan on a medium high heat
    * While this is cooking, beat five eggs. Add pepper. Add salt and vinegar crisps.
    * Stir the egg and potato mix into the shallots
    * Cook on medium high for ten minutes
    * Chuck under the grill for two minutes to make sure the top is set
    * Flip omelet
    * Cook for a further four minutes

    Serve

    Verdict: not as good as my slow cooked Spanish omelet. But, on the other hand, I was able to rustle up something 85% as good in one fifth of the time. It may well become a weekend staple.

    * I didn't have onions.

    With picture:


    It is very clever and looks delicious - slow-cooked at a low temperature is better for your insides though.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 36,825

    kle4 said:

    Scott_xP said:

    In the #WestminsterAccounts database, the MP with the most donations was Keir Starmer at £740k.

    Boris Johnson just beat that in a SINGLE donation 🤯

    https://twitter.com/TomLarkinSky/status/1613615157636173835

    The system is f*cked. No one should be able to donate so much, how could it not improperly influence somone holding public office, or legitimately lead a reasonable person to conclude that it had?
    Starmer got £720K of that from someone who wants everybody to be registered with an NHS GP. I reckon it influenced this weeks PMQs.
    It isn't a legal requirement to be registered with a NHS GP, but nearly everybody is, even if they never see them and use private medicine. I see everyone up to millionaires and Life Peers, and they all have NHS GPs, even if only as central points for their medical records, and prescriptions.
  • FeersumEnjineeyaFeersumEnjineeya Posts: 3,121
    edited January 12
    rcs1000 said:

    Andy_JS said:

    Sadly for Putin, only 9% of UK energy is currently being produced by gas-fired power stations.

    https://www.gridwatch.templar.co.uk

    That's a bit misleading because it doesn't take account of the millions of gas boilers in people's homes.
    While that's a fair point, it is worth noting that (a) the UK still produces a reasonable amount of gas, so not using it (much) for power generation has a very big impact on our import dependency ratio, and (b) we've actually meaningfully increased production this year:


    I'm surprised that wind, solar and hydro is less than nuclear for Q3 2022. It certainly doesn't appear to be when you look at the graphs on Gridwatch.

    Edit: Or maybe not when I look at the correct months! Q3 was a particularly low wind quarter.
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 25,298

    kle4 said:

    Scott_xP said:

    In the #WestminsterAccounts database, the MP with the most donations was Keir Starmer at £740k.

    Boris Johnson just beat that in a SINGLE donation 🤯

    https://twitter.com/TomLarkinSky/status/1613615157636173835

    The system is f*cked. No one should be able to donate so much, how could it not improperly influence somone holding public office, or legitimately lead a reasonable person to conclude that it had?
    If a billionaire were reading this forum and came to the conclusion that you were the answer to the country's problems, and offered you big money to dedicate yourself to politics, what would be the problem?
    The billionaire?
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 36,825

    stodge said:

    pigeon said:

    Sunak's strategy seems to be voluble inactivity - not settling strikes or stopping boats or shortening waiting times, but explaining at length that he hopes to do so sometime. Starmer's strategy of occasional more heavyweight speeches without detail seems to be maintaining him at a steady level.

    That Starmer’s approval is on the slide in NHS crisis suggest voters demand more from him?

    Maybe he should predict some things and get it right? Sunak was dire in campaign against Truss, but one exchange where he said go ahead with that and the markets will react against you seems to have got him the top job.
    The voters want an end to austerity and a country that actually works. Starmer can't plausibly promise that because he and Reeves seem to have decided that there is no money left *AND* they aren't willing to raise any more, except by tokenistic means like scrapping tax exemptions for private education. Therefore, all they can promise is to manage austerity better than the Tories. An inspiring prospectus for a brighter future it most certainly fucking ain't.

    Of course, the root problem is actually the same one that the Conservatives have. A vast proportion of the nation's wealth is now locked up in property, there's no way to address income inequalities, lack of opportunity for the young and the enormous burden of elderly health and social care without extracting some of that wealth - and voters (especially the vast and growing legion of pensioners) will scream blue murder the nanosecond that a politician suggests that they be parted from some of the value of their house. Exhibit A: the Dementia Tax.

    People want nice stuff (such as ambulances that aren't so catastrophically late that they don't turn up until after the patient's funeral,) but they expect someone else to pay for it. It was ever thus.
    That’s a good post. Very strong. Add to the list of root problems ageing population we both can’t afford but also causes inflation, as will not only constrain production possibilities, but also increase aggregate demand – both of which will drive up inflation by saving rates falling, and real wages increasing. Brexit might get the blame for making Britain poorer, certainly in minds that thought UK would be wealthier after Brexit, but the truth was we were destined to get poorer and poorer over the coming decades anyway, with new generations having to live with continued high inflation and what that does to borrowing rates, whilst trying to help the aged.
    Plenty to chew over in @pigeon's post. One could argue creating a cohort of home owners through RTB and other measures in the 1980s helped manifest the concentration of wealth in property. The political motivation was the realisation home owners voted Conservative.

    Another aspect was the GFC and the introduction of ultra-low interest rates in 2009. As I've said here before, Mrs Stodge and I found ourselves paying 0.99% interest on the mortgage so paying it off became easy and indeed we've funded home improvements (accentuating the wealth of the property) based on being able to borrow against that mortgage.

    The old days of moving up the property and career ladder living in more expensive houses but being able to afford the mortgage as the career progressed are over for a generation. With the mortgage clear, sell the house and it's all profit - downsize to a smaller venue without a mortgage and if you can afford to, it's a decent lifestyle. Indeed, it's the Dream for many but for those on the ladder now, probably unachievable.
    It is also worth pointing out though that one of the reasons property and downsizing became so popular as a means of paying for ones retirement is that successive Governments decided to screw over the pension system. People seeing housing as an investment rather than a place to live is, at least in part, a direct result of Government policy by both parties
    As a result a fall in house prices can easily blight peoples retirements, particularly outside the over inflated SE of England.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 56,756
    edited January 12
    dixiedean said:

    kle4 said:

    Scott_xP said:

    In the #WestminsterAccounts database, the MP with the most donations was Keir Starmer at £740k.

    Boris Johnson just beat that in a SINGLE donation 🤯

    https://twitter.com/TomLarkinSky/status/1613615157636173835

    The system is f*cked. No one should be able to donate so much, how could it not improperly influence somone holding public office, or legitimately lead a reasonable person to conclude that it had?
    If a billionaire were reading this forum and came to the conclusion that you were the answer to the country's problems, and offered you big money to dedicate yourself to politics, what would be the problem?
    The billionaire?
    Now come on. If Elon Musk decided to augment his philanthropic activities recently shown in the destruction of Twitter by paying me $20 million to sort out education, surely that would be money well spent. Even if it was from a dick.
  • solarflaresolarflare Posts: 3,190
    Foxy said:

    kle4 said:

    Scott_xP said:

    In the #WestminsterAccounts database, the MP with the most donations was Keir Starmer at £740k.

    Boris Johnson just beat that in a SINGLE donation 🤯

    https://twitter.com/TomLarkinSky/status/1613615157636173835

    The system is f*cked. No one should be able to donate so much, how could it not improperly influence somone holding public office, or legitimately lead a reasonable person to conclude that it had?
    Starmer got £720K of that from someone who wants everybody to be registered with an NHS GP. I reckon it influenced this weeks PMQs.
    It isn't a legal requirement to be registered with a NHS GP, but nearly everybody is, even if they never see them and use private medicine. I see everyone up to millionaires and Life Peers, and they all have NHS GPs, even if only as central points for their medical records, and prescriptions.
    I sort of got the impression Rishi dodged answering the question long enough for some lucky local NHS practice to complete the paperwork on his completely coincidental registration.
  • pingping Posts: 3,297
    edited January 12
    Evening all.

    I've just finished the audible audiobook version of "Spare" by Prince Harry.

    Whatever your opinion of Harry, Meg and the monarchy, whatever "side" you're on, its a profoundly important historical document.

    Thoughts;

    1. Small point, i know, but important - the audiobook version is really excellent. Harry has a gift for narration, probably borne of his public speaking training/experience. Absolutely fantastic narration.

    2. Right at the end, it all makes sense. Why he's published the book. It really is laid out in black and white. He needs security. It costs loads (he was quoted $6m/yr). He feels entitled to it because he had no choice about his profile. Prince Andrew gets security, despite his shameful behaviour. Given what happened to his mum, it should be his right.

    The family chose to withdraw his security. They must suffer the consequences.

    What else is a man to do, but to wash his dirty linen in public in exchange for a hefty paycheque, in such a scenario?

    It does start to sound a bit like borderline blackmail. That is clearly how the institution works. Both Harry and the institution were playing the game. The institution assumed he would fall back into line. Harry called their bluff. It's all got out of hand. That is, basically, the reason why we are reading this extraordinary book.

    3. His early life stuff reaffirms every stereotype us state school kids had/have about public school pricks. I've met lots of people who are some degree of Harry, in their mannerisms, outlook, biases etc. We all have. After reading Spare, I' be embarrassed to send my kid to one of the posher private schools. It doesn't produce normal people, Eton. All the other "top" schools ape it. Why? I get the impression Harry left a lot out about his school days, but from what he did include... well...

    4. Drug use. He's pretty open about this and it, frankly, should be shocking. It's blindingly obvious people knew, including his taxpayer funded security - and probably the police. It really is one rule for them, one for the rest of us. I know this is a fairly liberal site where a lot of posters either don't care, or actively abuse drugs, but it's an issue I personally care a lot about. Andrew Sullivan's most recent podcast on Fentanyl is just shocking. This shit is poision, and it's coming our way. I'm probably even further to the right than Priti Patel on drugs, in stark contrast to most of the rest of my politics. The fact Harry is able to be completely open about his hard drug use indicates how much of a non-issue it is in mainstream culture. I think our society is heading in a disasterous directon and few seem to care.

    Anyway, that's all for now. I have a few other thoughts, but those are my main takeaways that haven't been majored on by the media. Yet.

    What do PB'ers recon? I've been away from PB for a couple of weeks, so have missed the threads where posters chewed the fat on "Spare"
  • LostPasswordLostPassword Posts: 11,240
    rcs1000 said:

    rcs1000 said:

    I just made a Spanish omelet, only using potato chips rather than sliced potatoes. The consequence is that total time to table was about 20 minutes, rather than the more normal 70 to 90 minutes. (Disclaimer: I also cooked at a lot higher heat that I normally do, and used the grill to make sure the top was set before flipping it.)

    The process was -

    * Olive oil in 7 inch frying pan
    * Chopped a couple of shallots* and chucked the in the pan on a medium high heat
    * While this is cooking, beat five eggs. Add pepper. Add salt and vinegar crisps.
    * Stir the egg and potato mix into the shallots
    * Cook on medium high for ten minutes
    * Chuck under the grill for two minutes to make sure the top is set
    * Flip omelet
    * Cook for a further four minutes

    Serve

    Verdict: not as good as my slow cooked Spanish omelet. But, on the other hand, I was able to rustle up something 85% as good in one fifth of the time. It may well become a weekend staple.

    * I didn't have onions.

    With picture:


    One way to speed up Spanish omelette is to have leftover cooked potatoes from a previous meal. This is where a bit of planning ahead can really pay dividends.
  • Richard_TyndallRichard_Tyndall Posts: 28,188

    kjh said:

    This society is so unbalanced, old people get everything and young people get screwed over. Time to even the playing field.

    Do you know how much the state pension is?
    Too much, they've had everything handed to them.
    £141.85 per week provided they have contributed towards it for almost their entire working life (otherwise they get less).

    You think that is too much for 35 odd years contributions to it?
    Depends on the size of the contributions, I would have thought.

    And whilst I wouldn't want to go too far with this, there is something awkward about the way that a generation who have tended to vote for low taxes and frugal services and benefits through their working lives are now shocked and appalled at the frugality of pensions and creakyness of health and social care now they are using them more.
    Just on the basic split of Labour/Tory I don't think that is as stark as you claim.

    a 75 year old today would first have been eligible to vote in an election in 1965

    Since then the country has voted 5 times for Labour, 7 times for the Tories and 3 times for a minority or coalition.

    And in how many of those elections were people voting for or against taxes. Certainly not in 1979 (winter of Discontent). Nor 1997 (Tory sleaze and ineptitude) or 2019 (Brexit), which are three of the most obvious examples. Indeed the only one I could say for sure where people were voting specifically on a tax policy was May in 2017 where she freaked people out with her 'Death tax'.



  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 32,148
    kjh said:

    This society is so unbalanced, old people get everything and young people get screwed over. Time to even the playing field.

    Do you know how much the state pension is?
    Too much, they've had everything handed to them.
    £141.85 per week provided they have contributed towards it for almost their entire working life (otherwise they get less).

    You think that is too much for 35 odd years contributions to it?
    I’m a Neon Fascist Imperialist Enslaver Of The Oppressed. My only interest in the poor is to chop them up for same as Collateralised Body Part Obligations in an unregulated, OTC market.

    The state pension isn’t much. Not is the other forgotten bit of of the Triple Lock - benefits.

    It’s altruism - If the poor are all starving, I won’t get much for selling them for spare parts.
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 49,002

    rcs1000 said:

    rcs1000 said:

    I just made a Spanish omelet, only using potato chips rather than sliced potatoes. The consequence is that total time to table was about 20 minutes, rather than the more normal 70 to 90 minutes. (Disclaimer: I also cooked at a lot higher heat that I normally do, and used the grill to make sure the top was set before flipping it.)

    The process was -

    * Olive oil in 7 inch frying pan
    * Chopped a couple of shallots* and chucked the in the pan on a medium high heat
    * While this is cooking, beat five eggs. Add pepper. Add salt and vinegar crisps.
    * Stir the egg and potato mix into the shallots
    * Cook on medium high for ten minutes
    * Chuck under the grill for two minutes to make sure the top is set
    * Flip omelet
    * Cook for a further four minutes

    Serve

    Verdict: not as good as my slow cooked Spanish omelet. But, on the other hand, I was able to rustle up something 85% as good in one fifth of the time. It may well become a weekend staple.

    * I didn't have onions.

    With picture:


    Do the floods rise to where you are?
    Nope, my part of West LA (Brentwood) has been largely unaffected.
  • LeonLeon Posts: 30,637

    pigeon said:

    Sunak's strategy seems to be voluble inactivity - not settling strikes or stopping boats or shortening waiting times, but explaining at length that he hopes to do so sometime. Starmer's strategy of occasional more heavyweight speeches without detail seems to be maintaining him at a steady level.

    That Starmer’s approval is on the slide in NHS crisis suggest voters demand more from him?

    Maybe he should predict some things and get it right? Sunak was dire in campaign against Truss, but one exchange where he said go ahead with that and the markets will react against you seems to have got him the top job.
    The voters want an end to austerity and a country that actually works. Starmer can't plausibly promise that because he and Reeves seem to have decided that there is no money left *AND* they aren't willing to raise any more, except by tokenistic means like scrapping tax exemptions for private education. Therefore, all they can promise is to manage austerity better than the Tories. An inspiring prospectus for a brighter future it most certainly fucking ain't.

    Of course, the root problem is actually the same one that the Conservatives have. A vast proportion of the nation's wealth is now locked up in property, there's no way to address income inequalities, lack of opportunity for the young and the enormous burden of elderly health and social care without extracting some of that wealth - and voters (especially the vast and growing legion of pensioners) will scream blue murder the nanosecond that a politician suggests that they be parted from some of the value of their house. Exhibit A: the Dementia Tax.

    People want nice stuff (such as ambulances that aren't so catastrophically late that they don't turn up until after the patient's funeral,) but they expect someone else to pay for it. It was ever thus.
    That’s a good post. Very strong. Add to the list of root problems ageing population we both can’t afford but also causes inflation, as will not only constrain production possibilities, but also increase aggregate demand – both of which will drive up inflation by saving rates falling, and real wages increasing. Brexit might get the blame for making Britain poorer, certainly in minds that thought UK would be wealthier after Brexit, but the truth was we were destined to get poorer and poorer over the coming decades anyway, with new generations having to live with continued high inflation and what that does to borrowing rates, whilst trying to help the aged.
    It’s time to let the old fucks die

    I’m perfectly serious. A “let the old fucks die” party might easily win an election. No more help from the state after the age of 80. Nothing. Just a big jug of morphine sulphate and a church hall to sleep in

    We simply can’t afford to look after zillions of old people any more. And trying to do that is ruining the future of the young

    And I speak as someone much nearer old age than youth
  • pingping Posts: 3,297
    ping said:

    Evening all.

    I've just finished the audible audiobook version of "Spare" by Prince Harry.
    Whatever your opinion of Harry, Meg and the monarchy, whatever "side" you're on, its a profoundly important historical document.

    Thoughts;

    1. Small point, i know, but important - the audiobook version is really excellent. Harry has a gift for narration, probably borne of his public speaking training/experience. Absolutely fantastic narration.

    2. Right at the end, it all makes sense. Why he's published the book. It really is laid out in black and white. He needs security. It costs loads (he was quoted $6m/yr). He feels entitled to it because he had no choice about his profile. Prince Andrew gets security, despite his shameful behaviour. Given what happened to his mum, it should be his right.

    The family chose to withdraw his security. They must suffer the consequences.
    What else is a man to do, but to wash his dirty linen in public in exchange for a hefty paycheque, in such a scenario?

    It does start to sound a bit like borderline blackmail. That is clearly how the institution works. Both Harry and the institution were playing the game. The institution assumed he would fall back into line. Harry called their bluff. It's all got out of hand. That is, basically, the reason why we are reading this extraordinary book.

    3. His early life stuff reaffirms every stereotype us state school kids had/have about public school pricks. I've met lots of people who are some degree of Harry, in their mannerisms, outlook, biases etc. We all have. After reading Spare, I' be embarrassed to send my kid to one of the posher private schools. It doesn't produce normal people, Eton. All the other "top" schools ape it. Why? I get the impression Harry left a lot out about his school days, but from what he did include... well...

    4. Drug use. He's pretty open about this and it, frankly, should be shocking. It's blindingly obvious people knew, including his taxpayer funded security - and probably the police. It really is one rule for them, one for the rest of us. I know this is a fairly liberal site where a lot of posters either don't care, or actively abuse drugs, but it's an issue I personally care a lot about. Andrew Sullivan's most recent podcast on Fentanyl is just shocking. This shit is poision, and it's coming our way. I'm probably even further to the right than Priti Patel on drugs, in stark contrast to most of the rest of my politics. The fact Harry is able to be completely open about his hard drug use indicates how much of a non-issue it is in mainstream culture. I think our society is heading in a disasterous directon and few seem to care.

    Anyway, that's all for now. I have a few other thoughts, but those are my main takeaways that haven't been majored on by the media. Yet.

    What do PB'ers recon? I've been away from PB for a couple of weeks, so have missed the threads where posters chewed the fat on "Spare"

    ooh, i missed this;

    5. He REALLY hates the media. Doesn't pull his punches on Murdoch and Rothermere. In his own narrative of his life, he's in a constant battle with these people. I do wonder if they've sent him slightly mad. At times it seems like he's fighting ghosts. "Ignore them, dear boy" seems to be his father's advice. Charles is probably right.
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 32,148

    rcs1000 said:

    rcs1000 said:

    I just made a Spanish omelet, only using potato chips rather than sliced potatoes. The consequence is that total time to table was about 20 minutes, rather than the more normal 70 to 90 minutes. (Disclaimer: I also cooked at a lot higher heat that I normally do, and used the grill to make sure the top was set before flipping it.)

    The process was -

    * Olive oil in 7 inch frying pan
    * Chopped a couple of shallots* and chucked the in the pan on a medium high heat
    * While this is cooking, beat five eggs. Add pepper. Add salt and vinegar crisps.
    * Stir the egg and potato mix into the shallots
    * Cook on medium high for ten minutes
    * Chuck under the grill for two minutes to make sure the top is set
    * Flip omelet
    * Cook for a further four minutes

    Serve

    Verdict: not as good as my slow cooked Spanish omelet. But, on the other hand, I was able to rustle up something 85% as good in one fifth of the time. It may well become a weekend staple.

    * I didn't have onions.

    With picture:


    It is very clever and looks delicious - slow-cooked at a low temperature is better for your insides though.
    I really do like these cheats for faster, simpler cooking. So many people get out off coming with the whole from-first-principles thing

  • pigeonpigeon Posts: 3,232

    This society is so unbalanced, old people get everything and young people get screwed over. Time to even the playing field.

    Without necessarily disagreeing with you I should point out that it is worth remembering that young people do (hopefully) become old people. You seem to think that the young and the old are separate species and never the twain shall meet.
    The travails of younger people labouring under the current system are greatly relieved if one is a beneficiary of handouts of familial wealth and/or an expectant heir. Young people in already well-off families may be able to avoid a working life of toil and impoverishment by tapping the Bank of Mum and Dad for a healthy deposit for a house, rather than being stuck renting permanently or somehow scraping together just enough to get an enormously expensive, near-100% mortgage. Middle-aged people with parents living in vastly overpriced houses might look forward to a comfortable retirement through receipt of a fat inheritance.

    Social mobility, however, is largely a thing of the past in such a system. The bulk of people from less well-off families - those who don't manage to get a toehold in casino banking or professional football - are totally stuffed. If you're poor in your youth you'll probably be poor in mid-life and poor in your old age as well.
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 49,002

    rcs1000 said:

    rcs1000 said:

    I just made a Spanish omelet, only using potato chips rather than sliced potatoes. The consequence is that total time to table was about 20 minutes, rather than the more normal 70 to 90 minutes. (Disclaimer: I also cooked at a lot higher heat that I normally do, and used the grill to make sure the top was set before flipping it.)

    The process was -

    * Olive oil in 7 inch frying pan
    * Chopped a couple of shallots* and chucked the in the pan on a medium high heat
    * While this is cooking, beat five eggs. Add pepper. Add salt and vinegar crisps.
    * Stir the egg and potato mix into the shallots
    * Cook on medium high for ten minutes
    * Chuck under the grill for two minutes to make sure the top is set
    * Flip omelet
    * Cook for a further four minutes

    Serve

    Verdict: not as good as my slow cooked Spanish omelet. But, on the other hand, I was able to rustle up something 85% as good in one fifth of the time. It may well become a weekend staple.

    * I didn't have onions.

    With picture:


    It is very clever and looks delicious - slow-cooked at a low temperature is better for your insides though.
    Oh, I love slow cooked Spanish omelette, and this won't replace it. What it means, though, is that I can make an 85% there version on Saturday morning for the kids, or as a weekday lunch.

    My wife - fwiw - just pronounced it "delicious".
  • turbotubbsturbotubbs Posts: 11,576
    ping said:

    Evening all.

    I've just finished the audible audiobook version of "Spare" by Prince Harry.
    Whatever your opinion of Harry, Meg and the monarchy, whatever "side" you're on, its a profoundly important historical document.

    Thoughts;

    1. Small point, i know, but important - the audiobook version is really excellent. Harry has a gift for narration, probably borne of his public speaking training/experience. Absolutely fantastic narration.

    2. Right at the end, it all makes sense. Why he's published the book. It really is laid out in black and white. He needs security. It costs loads (he was quoted $6m/yr). He feels entitled to it because he had no choice about his profile. Prince Andrew gets security, despite his shameful behaviour. Given what happened to his mum, it should be his right.

    The family chose to withdraw his security. They must suffer the consequences.
    What else is a man to do, but to wash his dirty linen in public in exchange for a hefty paycheque, in such a scenario?

    It does start to sound a bit like borderline blackmail. That is clearly how the institution works. Both Harry and the institution were playing the game. The institution assumed he would fall back into line. Harry called their bluff. It's all got out of hand. That is, basically, the reason why we are reading this extraordinary book.

    3. His early life stuff reaffirms every stereotype us state school kids had/have about public school pricks. I've met lots of people who are some degree of Harry, in their mannerisms, outlook, biases etc. We all have. After reading Spare, I' be embarrassed to send my kid to one of the posher private schools. It doesn't produce normal people, Eton. All the other "top" schools ape it. Why? I get the impression Harry left a lot out about his school days, but from what he did include... well...

    4. Drug use. He's pretty open about this and it, frankly, should be shocking. It's blindingly obvious people knew, including his taxpayer funded security - and probably the police. It really is one rule for them, one for the rest of us. I know this is a fairly liberal site where a lot of posters either don't care, or actively abuse drugs, but it's an issue I personally care a lot about. Andrew Sullivan's most recent podcast on Fentanyl is just shocking. This shit is poision, and it's coming our way. I'm probably even further to the right than Priti Patel on drugs, in stark contrast to most of the rest of my politics. The fact Harry is able to be completely open about his hard drug use indicates how much of a non-issue it is in mainstream culture. I think our society is heading in a disasterous directon and few seem to care.

    Anyway, that's all for now. I have a few other thoughts, but those are my main takeaways that haven't been majored on by the media. Yet.

    What do PB'ers recon? I've been away from PB for a couple of weeks, so have missed the threads where posters chewed the fat on "Spare"

    AIUI security was withdrawn when they stopped being full, card carrying Royals. You are in, or you are out. Of course the book, the interviews, the TV series is about money. I asked before what their income source is. Her career seemed to have stalled, and he didn’t want to be a royal anymore.
  • solarflaresolarflare Posts: 3,190
    Any truth in the correlation between Britain's economic progress and the quality of the candidates on The Apprentice in recent years?
  • turbotubbsturbotubbs Posts: 11,576
    ping said:

    ping said:

    Evening all.

    I've just finished the audible audiobook version of "Spare" by Prince Harry.
    Whatever your opinion of Harry, Meg and the monarchy, whatever "side" you're on, its a profoundly important historical document.

    Thoughts;

    1. Small point, i know, but important - the audiobook version is really excellent. Harry has a gift for narration, probably borne of his public speaking training/experience. Absolutely fantastic narration.

    2. Right at the end, it all makes sense. Why he's published the book. It really is laid out in black and white. He needs security. It costs loads (he was quoted $6m/yr). He feels entitled to it because he had no choice about his profile. Prince Andrew gets security, despite his shameful behaviour. Given what happened to his mum, it should be his right.

    The family chose to withdraw his security. They must suffer the consequences.
    What else is a man to do, but to wash his dirty linen in public in exchange for a hefty paycheque, in such a scenario?

    It does start to sound a bit like borderline blackmail. That is clearly how the institution works. Both Harry and the institution were playing the game. The institution assumed he would fall back into line. Harry called their bluff. It's all got out of hand. That is, basically, the reason why we are reading this extraordinary book.

    3. His early life stuff reaffirms every stereotype us state school kids had/have about public school pricks. I've met lots of people who are some degree of Harry, in their mannerisms, outlook, biases etc. We all have. After reading Spare, I' be embarrassed to send my kid to one of the posher private schools. It doesn't produce normal people, Eton. All the other "top" schools ape it. Why? I get the impression Harry left a lot out about his school days, but from what he did include... well...

    4. Drug use. He's pretty open about this and it, frankly, should be shocking. It's blindingly obvious people knew, including his taxpayer funded security - and probably the police. It really is one rule for them, one for the rest of us. I know this is a fairly liberal site where a lot of posters either don't care, or actively abuse drugs, but it's an issue I personally care a lot about. Andrew Sullivan's most recent podcast on Fentanyl is just shocking. This shit is poision, and it's coming our way. I'm probably even further to the right than Priti Patel on drugs, in stark contrast to most of the rest of my politics. The fact Harry is able to be completely open about his hard drug use indicates how much of a non-issue it is in mainstream culture. I think our society is heading in a disasterous directon and few seem to care.

    Anyway, that's all for now. I have a few other thoughts, but those are my main takeaways that haven't been majored on by the media. Yet.

    What do PB'ers recon? I've been away from PB for a couple of weeks, so have missed the threads where posters chewed the fat on "Spare"

    ooh, i missed this;

    5. He REALLY hates the media. Doesn't pull his punches on Murdoch and Rothermere. In his own narrative of his life, he's in a constant battle with these people. I do wonder if they've sent him slightly mad. At times it seems like he's fighting ghosts. "Ignore them, dear boy" seems to be his father's advice. Charles is probably right.
    Streisand effect seems apt at this point.
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 49,002

    rcs1000 said:

    rcs1000 said:

    I just made a Spanish omelet, only using potato chips rather than sliced potatoes. The consequence is that total time to table was about 20 minutes, rather than the more normal 70 to 90 minutes. (Disclaimer: I also cooked at a lot higher heat that I normally do, and used the grill to make sure the top was set before flipping it.)

    The process was -

    * Olive oil in 7 inch frying pan
    * Chopped a couple of shallots* and chucked the in the pan on a medium high heat
    * While this is cooking, beat five eggs. Add pepper. Add salt and vinegar crisps.
    * Stir the egg and potato mix into the shallots
    * Cook on medium high for ten minutes
    * Chuck under the grill for two minutes to make sure the top is set
    * Flip omelet
    * Cook for a further four minutes

    Serve

    Verdict: not as good as my slow cooked Spanish omelet. But, on the other hand, I was able to rustle up something 85% as good in one fifth of the time. It may well become a weekend staple.

    * I didn't have onions.

    With picture:


    One way to speed up Spanish omelette is to have leftover cooked potatoes from a previous meal. This is where a bit of planning ahead can really pay dividends.
    If you have potatoes left over, then they were insufficiently delicious.
  • LostPasswordLostPassword Posts: 11,240

    kjh said:

    This society is so unbalanced, old people get everything and young people get screwed over. Time to even the playing field.

    Do you know how much the state pension is?
    Too much, they've had everything handed to them.
    £141.85 per week provided they have contributed towards it for almost their entire working life (otherwise they get less).

    You think that is too much for 35 odd years contributions to it?
    Depends on the size of the contributions, I would have thought.

    And whilst I wouldn't want to go too far with this, there is something awkward about the way that a generation who have tended to vote for low taxes and frugal services and benefits through their working lives are now shocked and appalled at the frugality of pensions and creakyness of health and social care now they are using them more.
    Just on the basic split of Labour/Tory I don't think that is as stark as you claim.

    a 75 year old today would first have been eligible to vote in an election in 1965

    Since then the country has voted 5 times for Labour, 7 times for the Tories and 3 times for a minority or coalition.

    And in how many of those elections were people voting for or against taxes. Certainly not in 1979 (winter of Discontent). Nor 1997 (Tory sleaze and ineptitude) or 2019 (Brexit), which are three of the most obvious examples. Indeed the only one I could say for sure where people were voting specifically on a tax policy was May in 2017 where she freaked people out with her 'Death tax'.
    I would have said 1992 was a tax election, and the memory of the tax bombshell posters affected Labour's thinking the entire time they were subsequently in office under Blair and Brown.
  • Richard_TyndallRichard_Tyndall Posts: 28,188
    rcs1000 said:

    Andy_JS said:

    Sadly for Putin, only 9% of UK energy is currently being produced by gas-fired power stations.

    https://www.gridwatch.templar.co.uk

    That's a bit misleading because it doesn't take account of the millions of gas boilers in people's homes.
    While that's a fair point, it is worth noting that (a) the UK still produces a reasonable amount of gas, so not using it (much) for power generation has a very big impact on our import dependency ratio, and (b) we've actually meaningfully increased production this year:


    Sadly that is set to be reversed as companies are abandoning plans for extending field life and giving up on seeking new near field exploration targets.
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 107,356

    This society is so unbalanced, old people get everything and young people get screwed over. Time to even the playing field.

    Do you know how much the state pension is?
    Too much, they've had everything handed to them.
    The state pension is less than minimum wage and for pensioners with no private pension their main income
  • LostPasswordLostPassword Posts: 11,240
    edited January 12
    rcs1000 said:

    rcs1000 said:

    rcs1000 said:

    I just made a Spanish omelet, only using potato chips rather than sliced potatoes. The consequence is that total time to table was about 20 minutes, rather than the more normal 70 to 90 minutes. (Disclaimer: I also cooked at a lot higher heat that I normally do, and used the grill to make sure the top was set before flipping it.)

    The process was -

    * Olive oil in 7 inch frying pan
    * Chopped a couple of shallots* and chucked the in the pan on a medium high heat
    * While this is cooking, beat five eggs. Add pepper. Add salt and vinegar crisps.
    * Stir the egg and potato mix into the shallots
    * Cook on medium high for ten minutes
    * Chuck under the grill for two minutes to make sure the top is set
    * Flip omelet
    * Cook for a further four minutes

    Serve

    Verdict: not as good as my slow cooked Spanish omelet. But, on the other hand, I was able to rustle up something 85% as good in one fifth of the time. It may well become a weekend staple.

    * I didn't have onions.

    With picture:


    One way to speed up Spanish omelette is to have leftover cooked potatoes from a previous meal. This is where a bit of planning ahead can really pay dividends.
    If you have potatoes left over, then they were insufficiently delicious.
    Trust me when I say I know of what I speak on this subject. I've recently moved to Ireland, I married into an Irish family eight years ago, Irish potatoes simply taste a lot better than British potatoes.

    If you don't have leftover potatoes it's because you didn't cook enough potatoes.
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 49,002

    rcs1000 said:

    Andy_JS said:

    Sadly for Putin, only 9% of UK energy is currently being produced by gas-fired power stations.

    https://www.gridwatch.templar.co.uk

    That's a bit misleading because it doesn't take account of the millions of gas boilers in people's homes.
    While that's a fair point, it is worth noting that (a) the UK still produces a reasonable amount of gas, so not using it (much) for power generation has a very big impact on our import dependency ratio, and (b) we've actually meaningfully increased production this year:


    Sadly that is set to be reversed as companies are abandoning plans for extending field life and giving up on seeking new near field exploration targets.
    I'm guessing the Q3 move in oil (down) and gas (up) was the consequence of reduced reinjection of natural gas into oil wells. And, indeed, in my old life this is something I would have known.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 56,756
    edited January 12

    kjh said:

    This society is so unbalanced, old people get everything and young people get screwed over. Time to even the playing field.

    Do you know how much the state pension is?
    Too much, they've had everything handed to them.
    £141.85 per week provided they have contributed towards it for almost their entire working life (otherwise they get less).

    You think that is too much for 35 odd years contributions to it?
    Depends on the size of the contributions, I would have thought.

    And whilst I wouldn't want to go too far with this, there is something awkward about the way that a generation who have tended to vote for low taxes and frugal services and benefits through their working lives are now shocked and appalled at the frugality of pensions and creakyness of health and social care now they are using them more.
    Just on the basic split of Labour/Tory I don't think that is as stark as you claim.

    a 75 year old today would first have been eligible to vote in an election in 1965

    Since then the country has voted 5 times for Labour, 7 times for the Tories and 3 times for a minority or coalition.

    And in how many of those elections were people voting for or against taxes. Certainly not in 1979 (winter of Discontent). Nor 1997 (Tory sleaze and ineptitude) or 2019 (Brexit), which are three of the most obvious examples. Indeed the only one I could say for sure where people were voting specifically on a tax policy was May in 2017 where she freaked people out with her 'Death tax'.
    Somebody born in 1947 would have been eligible to vote from 1968. The voting age wasn't lowered to 18 until 1969.*

    *discounting the 1918 election where all ex-servicemen regardless of age were enfranchised.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 36,825
    edited January 12
    ping said:

    ping said:

    Evening all.

    I've just finished the audible audiobook version of "Spare" by Prince Harry.
    Whatever your opinion of Harry, Meg and the monarchy, whatever "side" you're on, its a profoundly important historical document.

    Thoughts;

    1. Small point, i know, but important - the audiobook version is really excellent. Harry has a gift for narration, probably borne of his public speaking training/experience. Absolutely fantastic narration.

    2. Right at the end, it all makes sense. Why he's published the book. It really is laid out in black and white. He needs security. It costs loads (he was quoted $6m/yr). He feels entitled to it because he had no choice about his profile. Prince Andrew gets security, despite his shameful behaviour. Given what happened to his mum, it should be his right.

    The family chose to withdraw his security. They must suffer the consequences.
    What else is a man to do, but to wash his dirty linen in public in exchange for a hefty paycheque, in such a scenario?

    It does start to sound a bit like borderline blackmail. That is clearly how the institution works. Both Harry and the institution were playing the game. The institution assumed he would fall back into line. Harry called their bluff. It's all got out of hand. That is, basically, the reason why we are reading this extraordinary book.

    3. His early life stuff reaffirms every stereotype us state school kids had/have about public school pricks. I've met lots of people who are some degree of Harry, in their mannerisms, outlook, biases etc. We all have. After reading Spare, I' be embarrassed to send my kid to one of the posher private schools. It doesn't produce normal people, Eton. All the other "top" schools ape it. Why? I get the impression Harry left a lot out about his school days, but from what he did include... well...

    4. Drug use. He's pretty open about this and it, frankly, should be shocking. It's blindingly obvious people knew, including his taxpayer funded security - and probably the police. It really is one rule for them, one for the rest of us. I know this is a fairly liberal site where a lot of posters either don't care, or actively abuse drugs, but it's an issue I personally care a lot about. Andrew Sullivan's most recent podcast on Fentanyl is just shocking. This shit is poision, and it's coming our way. I'm probably even further to the right than Priti Patel on drugs, in stark contrast to most of the rest of my politics. The fact Harry is able to be completely open about his hard drug use indicates how much of a non-issue it is in mainstream culture. I think our society is heading in a disasterous directon and few seem to care.

    Anyway, that's all for now. I have a few other thoughts, but those are my main takeaways that haven't been majored on by the media. Yet.

    What do PB'ers recon? I've been away from PB for a couple of weeks, so have missed the threads where posters chewed the fat on "Spare"

    ooh, i missed this;

    5. He REALLY hates the media. Doesn't pull his punches on Murdoch and Rothermere. In his own narrative of his life, he's in a constant battle with these people. I do wonder if they've sent him slightly mad. At times it seems like he's fighting ghosts. "Ignore them, dear boy" seems to be his father's advice. Charles is probably right.
    I am a half dozen chapters in, and I agree Harry is an excellent narrator, and though ghost-written is very much his own work.

    Rather self centered certainly, and he very much has his mother on a pedestal, but it is a good production on Audible.
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 107,356
    kle4 said:

    HYUFD said:

    Fuck the royals.

    Take back control from our unelected rulers.

    Adulterers should be stoned.

    We have control, we are a parliamentary democracy with a constitutional monarch.
    So we can vote Charles out then? Since we have control...
    Yes, we can - vote for a party which advocates a republic, we have a few of them, albeit not very successful at present.

    If a King stepped out of line and refused to abdicate, Parliament would switch en masse to republicanism overnight.

    No, that's not a dodge either, we vote for MPs then trust them to do things for us, and if they don't we vote against them, that's how it works unless you think we've done everything by referendum before.
    If a King stepped out of line and refused to abdicate, Parliament would just replace him by next in line of succession
  • Richard_TyndallRichard_Tyndall Posts: 28,188
    edited January 12
    ping said:

    Evening all.

    I've just finished the audible audiobook version of "Spare" by Prince Harry.

    Whatever your opinion of Harry, Meg and the monarchy, whatever "side" you're on, its a profoundly important historical document.

    Thoughts;

    1. Small point, i know, but important - the audiobook version is really excellent. Harry has a gift for narration, probably borne of his public speaking training/experience. Absolutely fantastic narration.

    2. Right at the end, it all makes sense. Why he's published the book. It really is laid out in black and white. He needs security. It costs loads (he was quoted $6m/yr). He feels entitled to it because he had no choice about his profile. Prince Andrew gets security, despite his shameful behaviour. Given what happened to his mum, it should be his right.

    The family chose to withdraw his security. They must suffer the consequences.

    What else is a man to do, but to wash his dirty linen in public in exchange for a hefty paycheque, in such a scenario?

    It does start to sound a bit like borderline blackmail. That is clearly how the institution works. Both Harry and the institution were playing the game. The institution assumed he would fall back into line. Harry called their bluff. It's all got out of hand. That is, basically, the reason why we are reading this extraordinary book.

    3. His early life stuff reaffirms every stereotype us state school kids had/have about public school pricks. I've met lots of people who are some degree of Harry, in their mannerisms, outlook, biases etc. We all have. After reading Spare, I' be embarrassed to send my kid to one of the posher private schools. It doesn't produce normal people, Eton. All the other "top" schools ape it. Why? I get the impression Harry left a lot out about his school days, but from what he did include... well...

    4. Drug use. He's pretty open about this and it, frankly, should be shocking. It's blindingly obvious people knew, including his taxpayer funded security - and probably the police. It really is one rule for them, one for the rest of us. I know this is a fairly liberal site where a lot of posters either don't care, or actively abuse drugs, but it's an issue I personally care a lot about. Andrew Sullivan's most recent podcast on Fentanyl is just shocking. This shit is poision, and it's coming our way. I'm probably even further to the right than Priti Patel on drugs, in stark contrast to most of the rest of my politics. The fact Harry is able to be completely open about his hard drug use indicates how much of a non-issue it is in mainstream culture. I think our society is heading in a disasterous directon and few seem to care.

    Anyway, that's all for now. I have a few other thoughts, but those are my main takeaways that haven't been majored on by the media. Yet.

    What do PB'ers recon? I've been away from PB for a couple of weeks, so have missed the threads where posters chewed the fat on "Spare"

    A Brexit analogy. Just to stir up some dissent :)

    If we choose to leave the EU because we no longer wish to suffer the restrictions, burdens and responsibilities that membership places upon us then we cannot expect to continue to receive the associated benefits - especially when they are paid for by the taxpayers of the member countries.

    Harry and Meghan chose to leave the family business. They did not have to. No one in the family kicked them out. They left of their own free will. Why therefore should they expect to continue to receive the benefits of being members of the Royal Family - especially when those benefits are being paid for by the British taxpayer?
  • Richard_TyndallRichard_Tyndall Posts: 28,188
    HYUFD said:

    kle4 said:

    HYUFD said:

    Fuck the royals.

    Take back control from our unelected rulers.

    Adulterers should be stoned.

    We have control, we are a parliamentary democracy with a constitutional monarch.
    So we can vote Charles out then? Since we have control...
    Yes, we can - vote for a party which advocates a republic, we have a few of them, albeit not very successful at present.

    If a King stepped out of line and refused to abdicate, Parliament would switch en masse to republicanism overnight.

    No, that's not a dodge either, we vote for MPs then trust them to do things for us, and if they don't we vote against them, that's how it works unless you think we've done everything by referendum before.
    If a King stepped out of line and refused to abdicate, Parliament would just replace him by next in line of succession
    As I have mentioned on here before, there is whole tabletop games system called A Very British Civil War based entirely on this premise with Edward VIII refusing to abdicate and Mosely becoming his PM. .
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 36,825

    Any truth in the correlation between Britain's economic progress and the quality of the candidates on The Apprentice in recent years?

    It is just like other reality shows, each successive series is dominated by more extreme characters to up the ante. Eventually makes it unwatchable.
This discussion has been closed.