Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. Sign in or register to get started.

Meet the parents – politicalbetting.com

SystemSystem Posts: 11,002
edited March 23 in General
Meet the parents – politicalbetting.com

Two groups of Con 2019 voters who put chance of voting Con now < 5/10, in E Thanet & Portsmouth N (Penny Mordaunt’s seat)

Read the full story here

«134

Comments

  • Sunil_PrasannanSunil_Prasannan Posts: 49,185
    First
  • Daveyboy1961Daveyboy1961 Posts: 3,377
    Test
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 51,102
    Of course Aunty is a sociopath but you can't have everything.
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 44,167
    No googling - who is this, and why is he interesting?


  • AnabobazinaAnabobazina Posts: 19,872
    What the Lord giveth, the Lord taketh away.
  • jamesdoylejamesdoyle Posts: 635
    FPT:
    carnforth said:

    Stocky said:

    Leon said:

    I can see hummingbirds as I sip my morning cafe con leche

    Life should always be like this

    BREAKFAST WITH HUMMINGBIRDS

    Is there any other animal which brings such immediate innocent delight to humans? Dolphins, perhaps. Lemurs maybe

    Bumblebees, hedgehogs, dormice.

    The one that tops it for me, along with hummingbirds, is the sea horse I saw many years ago off the coast of Kenya.
    I saw a tortoise in the wild in Athens last year. I had only thought of them as pets and not really paid attention to which countries they were native to - I had assumed North Africa or Asia. Made my day.

    Domestically, you can’t beat an unexpected owl sighting. Or seeing a family of weasels or stoats trotting across the road in a line, half upright.
    Or deer crashing through trees onto the path you're walking on the downs, and then crashing off the other side.
  • AnabobazinaAnabobazina Posts: 19,872
    edited March 23
    The smart move would be for Penny to cross the floor, and stand in Pompey under the red rosette. She’d win easily, and would no doubt get a better cabinet post than the derisory Leader of the House.

    Will the Penny drop?
  • Richard_TyndallRichard_Tyndall Posts: 30,909

    No googling - who is this, and why is he interesting?


    Spanish bloke from Waterloo. I read about him a few years ago but can't remember his name. Not sure why he is interesting though, beyond general historical interest
  • TazTaz Posts: 11,017

    No googling - who is this, and why is he interesting?


    Great mutton chopper sideburns, not a guess at his name. More an observation.
  • StuartinromfordStuartinromford Posts: 14,335

    The smart move would be for Penny to cross the floor, and stand in Pompey under the red rosette. She’d win easily, and would no doubt get a better cabinet post than the derisory Leader of the House.

    Will the Penny drop?

    That would be the biggest floor-crossing... ever?

    But what do I know? I thought the picture quiz was Fred Harris from Play School and The Burkiss Way.
  • Scott_xPScott_xP Posts: 32,829

    No googling - who is this, and why is he interesting?


    His hand was painted by AI...
  • Sunil_PrasannanSunil_Prasannan Posts: 49,185

    No googling - who is this, and why is he interesting?


    Spanish bloke from Waterloo. I read about him a few years ago but can't remember his name. Not sure why he is interesting though, beyond general historical interest
    Miguel Ricardo de Alava. He fought against The Brits at Trafalgar, and alongside The Brits at Waterloo.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 51,102

    No googling - who is this, and why is he interesting?


    Wearing what looks like the Order of the Garter but looks vaguely foreign.
  • WillGWillG Posts: 2,063
    kinabalu said:

    Will a Labour government want to rejoin an EU with Le Pen as President of France?

    Her niece describes it as a failed project that has left Europe a digital colony of America, an economic colony of China, and on the way to becoming a demographic colony of Africa and religious and cultural colony of Islam.

    https://x.com/marionmarechal/status/1770894693481537884

    Mmm, let's take it back to how it was in the 1930s. All those proud independent sovereign states looking out for their own proud independent people.
    It was proud independent states like the UK and the USA that defeated Nazi Germany, while internationalist Lord Halifax types wanted to make accommodations.
  • bondegezoubondegezou Posts: 7,493

    The smart move would be for Penny to cross the floor, and stand in Pompey under the red rosette. She’d win easily, and would no doubt get a better cabinet post than the derisory Leader of the House.

    Will the Penny drop?

    That would be the biggest floor-crossing... ever?

    But what do I know? I thought the picture quiz was Fred Harris from Play School and The Burkiss Way.
    There have been bigger floor-crossings. The Gang of Four creating the SDP, for example.
  • bondegezoubondegezou Posts: 7,493
    WillG said:

    kinabalu said:

    Will a Labour government want to rejoin an EU with Le Pen as President of France?

    Her niece describes it as a failed project that has left Europe a digital colony of America, an economic colony of China, and on the way to becoming a demographic colony of Africa and religious and cultural colony of Islam.

    https://x.com/marionmarechal/status/1770894693481537884

    Mmm, let's take it back to how it was in the 1930s. All those proud independent sovereign states looking out for their own proud independent people.
    It was proud independent states like the UK and the USA that defeated Nazi Germany, while internationalist Lord Halifax types wanted to make accommodations.
    What was the role of Canada, Australia and India?
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 51,102

    The smart move would be for Penny to cross the floor, and stand in Pompey under the red rosette. She’d win easily, and would no doubt get a better cabinet post than the derisory Leader of the House.

    Will the Penny drop?

    That would be the biggest floor-crossing... ever?

    But what do I know? I thought the picture quiz was Fred Harris from Play School and The Burkiss Way.
    There have been bigger floor-crossings. The Gang of Four creating the SDP, for example.
    Winston Churchill. Twice.
  • SeaShantyIrish2SeaShantyIrish2 Posts: 15,465
    DavidL said:

    The smart move would be for Penny to cross the floor, and stand in Pompey under the red rosette. She’d win easily, and would no doubt get a better cabinet post than the derisory Leader of the House.

    Will the Penny drop?

    That would be the biggest floor-crossing... ever?

    But what do I know? I thought the picture quiz was Fred Harris from Play School and The Burkiss Way.
    There have been bigger floor-crossings. The Gang of Four creating the SDP, for example.
    Winston Churchill. Twice.
    IIRC, WSC did NOT "cross the floor" a 2nd time.

    From his wiki bio:

    "In the [1922] general election, Churchill lost his Dundee seat [won in 1918 as a Coalition Liberal], to Edwin Scrymgeour, a prohibitionist candidate. Later, he wrote that he was "without an office, without a seat, without a party, and without an appendix".

    After the 1923 general election was called, seven Liberal associations asked Churchill to stand as their candidate, and he selected Leicester West, but he did not win the seat. . . .

    On 19 March 1924, alienated by Liberal support for Labour, Churchill stood as an independent anti-socialist candidate in the Westminster Abbey by-election but was defeated. In May, he addressed a Conservative meeting in Liverpool and declared that there was no longer a place for the Liberal Party in British politics. . . .

    In July, he agreed with Conservative leader Stanley Baldwin that he would be selected as a Conservative candidate in the next general election, which was held on 29 October. Churchill stood at Epping, but he described himself as a "Constitutionalist".

    The Conservatives [including "Constitutionalist" Churchill] were victorious, and Baldwin formed the new government. Although Churchill had no background in finance or economics, Baldwin appointed him as Chancellor of the Exchequer.
  • LeonLeon Posts: 46,662
    @Stocky FPT

    That is indeed a lovely hummingbird photo. 9/10

    I would maybe add cranes to our list of entrancing creatures. Not quite up there with hummingbirds and dolphins - but they have something about them. You can see why the Chinese are always writing poetry about them

    Also sea horses, agreed

    I would likewise add the nudibranchs for their outrageous colours. I remember seeing my first - I thought it was a multicoloured rubber toy


  • Richard_TyndallRichard_Tyndall Posts: 30,909

    No googling - who is this, and why is he interesting?


    Spanish bloke from Waterloo. I read about him a few years ago but can't remember his name. Not sure why he is interesting though, beyond general historical interest
    Miguel Ricvardo de Alaa. He fought against The Brits at Trafalgar, and alongside The Brits at Waterloo.
    Hard to top this introduction -

    "This is my friend, and as long as I have any money with your house, let him have it to any amount he thinks proper to draw for"
    I love going down some of the rabbit holes that appear when looking up people or events on the internet.

    From your ID of Miguel Ricardo de Alava I foillowed a link to Cape Finisterre where I found this little gem:

    "Additionally, laws governing the colonies of the British Empire (including the 1766 amendment to the Sugar Act of 1764) used the latitude of Cape Finisterre as the latitude past which certain goods could not be shipped north directly between British colonies. For instance, it was forbidden to ship sugar cane directly from Jamaica to Nova Scotia, as such a transaction crossed through this latitude. Instead, the laws required that the sugar cane be shipped first from Jamaica to Britain, where it would be re-exported to Nova Scotia."

    Not exactly what we would call 'free trade'.
  • LeonLeon Posts: 46,662
    Little known fact, more Brits died fighting for the independence of Colombia than actual Colombians. The “British Legion” was hugely important; Bolivar thought them possibly his best soldiers, and doubted he would have achieved South American independence without British troops (and British money)

    He was almost certainly right

    We really are THE GREATEST COUNTRY EVER DESPITE THE WEATHER

    I have now had three strong coffees
  • mwadamsmwadams Posts: 3,134
    DavidL said:

    No googling - who is this, and why is he interesting?


    Wearing what looks like the Order of the Garter but looks vaguely foreign.
    It's the Rev Richard Coles on "Cosplay Wednesday".
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 44,167

    No googling - who is this, and why is he interesting?


    Spanish bloke from Waterloo. I read about him a few years ago but can't remember his name. Not sure why he is interesting though, beyond general historical interest
    Miguel Ricvardo de Alaa. He fought against The Brits at Trafalgar, and alongside The Brits at Waterloo.
    Hard to top this introduction -

    "This is my friend, and as long as I have any money with your house, let him have it to any amount he thinks proper to draw for"
    I love going down some of the rabbit holes that appear when looking up people or events on the internet.

    From your ID of Miguel Ricardo de Alava I foillowed a link to Cape Finisterre where I found this little gem:

    "Additionally, laws governing the colonies of the British Empire (including the 1766 amendment to the Sugar Act of 1764) used the latitude of Cape Finisterre as the latitude past which certain goods could not be shipped north directly between British colonies. For instance, it was forbidden to ship sugar cane directly from Jamaica to Nova Scotia, as such a transaction crossed through this latitude. Instead, the laws required that the sugar cane be shipped first from Jamaica to Britain, where it would be re-exported to Nova Scotia."

    Not exactly what we would call 'free trade'.
    Free trade was a novel, crazy idea in the 18th cent. The whole point of empires was monopolies on trade that were handed out as literal possesions.

    The idea that you could sell goods to anyone, anywhere at a price you chose was considered anarchy. Yes, bits worked like that, but on the whole, trying (and failing) to control trade was how it was.
  • StuartinromfordStuartinromford Posts: 14,335
    DavidL said:

    The smart move would be for Penny to cross the floor, and stand in Pompey under the red rosette. She’d win easily, and would no doubt get a better cabinet post than the derisory Leader of the House.

    Will the Penny drop?

    That would be the biggest floor-crossing... ever?

    But what do I know? I thought the picture quiz was Fred Harris from Play School and The Burkiss Way.
    There have been bigger floor-crossings. The Gang of Four creating the SDP, for example.
    Winston Churchill. Twice.
    But the first time, he was a backbencher, and the second time he was out of Parliament. He was only important in the context of the future.

    Same with the Gang of Four- only Rogers was in the Shadow Cabinet at the time.

    Mordaunt is a long standing Cabinet minister.
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 44,167
    A
    Leon said:

    Little known fact, more Brits died fighting for the independence of Colombia than actual Colombians. The “British Legion” was hugely important; Bolivar thought them possibly his best soldiers, and doubted he would have achieved South American independence without British troops (and British money)

    He was almost certainly right

    We really are THE GREATEST COUNTRY EVER DESPITE THE WEATHER

    I have now had three strong coffees

    As a coincidence, my sister in law, in Peru, has just sent me a picture of a basket of coca leaves that you could have an afternoon nap in.

    Are you sure your coffee is not… reinforced?
  • viewcodeviewcode Posts: 18,597

    No googling - who is this, and why is he interesting?


    Spanish bloke from Waterloo. I read about him a few years ago but can't remember his name. Not sure why he is interesting though, beyond general historical interest
    Miguel Ricardo de Alava. He fought against The Brits at Trafalgar, and alongside The Brits at Waterloo.
    Hard to top this introduction -

    "This is my friend, and as long as I have any money with your house, let him have it to any amount he thinks proper to draw for"
    "By my order, and for the good of the state, the bearer has done what has been done."
  • TopDogTopDog Posts: 7

    No googling - who is this, and why is he interesting?


    Blackadder
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 44,167
    TopDog said:

    No googling - who is this, and why is he interesting?


    Blackadder
    No, it’s the pilot of the plane who crashed on the Ukraine/Republic of China border.
  • gettingbettergettingbetter Posts: 476
    Leon said:

    Little known fact, more Brits died fighting for the independence of Colombia than actual Colombians. The “British Legion” was hugely important; Bolivar thought them possibly his best soldiers, and doubted he would have achieved South American independence without British troops (and British money)

    He was almost certainly right

    We really are THE GREATEST COUNTRY EVER DESPITE THE WEATHER

    I have now had three strong coffees

    Certainly British troops were very important in the Battle of Boyaca, and the previous smaller battle of Vargas Marsh. Although most were probably in fact of Irish origin, such as James Rooke who has memorials at the Battle of Boyaca and in the main square at Paipa.
  • Pineapple pizza for dinner. Yum
  • ajbajb Posts: 118
    Since we seem to be going for a historical theme - and in keeping with the topic of alcoholism: Tomorrow is the anniversary of the Battle of Margate, in which an English fleet spotted a poorly defended French-Castillian-Flemish fleet and mugged it for 8 million litres of wine.
  • algarkirkalgarkirk Posts: 10,473

    No googling - who is this, and why is he interesting?


    Spanish bloke from Waterloo. I read about him a few years ago but can't remember his name. Not sure why he is interesting though, beyond general historical interest
    Miguel Ricvardo de Alaa. He fought against The Brits at Trafalgar, and alongside The Brits at Waterloo.
    Hard to top this introduction -

    "This is my friend, and as long as I have any money with your house, let him have it to any amount he thinks proper to draw for"
    I love going down some of the rabbit holes that appear when looking up people or events on the internet.

    From your ID of Miguel Ricardo de Alava I foillowed a link to Cape Finisterre where I found this little gem:

    "Additionally, laws governing the colonies of the British Empire (including the 1766 amendment to the Sugar Act of 1764) used the latitude of Cape Finisterre as the latitude past which certain goods could not be shipped north directly between British colonies. For instance, it was forbidden to ship sugar cane directly from Jamaica to Nova Scotia, as such a transaction crossed through this latitude. Instead, the laws required that the sugar cane be shipped first from Jamaica to Britain, where it would be re-exported to Nova Scotia."

    Not exactly what we would call 'free trade'.
    Free trade was a novel, crazy idea in the 18th cent. The whole point of empires was monopolies on trade that were handed out as literal possesions.

    The idea that you could sell goods to anyone, anywhere at a price you chose was considered anarchy. Yes, bits worked like that, but on the whole, trying (and failing) to control trade was how it was.
    Free trade was and is a fantastic idea - Adam Smith and David Ricardo, its philosophical and mathematical fathers, are geniuses.
    The two great simple ideas: there isn't a fixed size cake, and prosperous nations make good customers are mind blowing in their importance - along with the law of comparative advantage.

    This all developed in a world less complex. While the principle remains, it isn't possible to apply it strictly(ask Rachel Reeves) to issues touching national security, and many other things too. And you reach a point where the globalisation is so great that countries (UK a good example) start feeling they have been bought up by others. This was not the same issue in the 18th century.
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 44,167
    algarkirk said:

    No googling - who is this, and why is he interesting?


    Spanish bloke from Waterloo. I read about him a few years ago but can't remember his name. Not sure why he is interesting though, beyond general historical interest
    Miguel Ricvardo de Alaa. He fought against The Brits at Trafalgar, and alongside The Brits at Waterloo.
    Hard to top this introduction -

    "This is my friend, and as long as I have any money with your house, let him have it to any amount he thinks proper to draw for"
    I love going down some of the rabbit holes that appear when looking up people or events on the internet.

    From your ID of Miguel Ricardo de Alava I foillowed a link to Cape Finisterre where I found this little gem:

    "Additionally, laws governing the colonies of the British Empire (including the 1766 amendment to the Sugar Act of 1764) used the latitude of Cape Finisterre as the latitude past which certain goods could not be shipped north directly between British colonies. For instance, it was forbidden to ship sugar cane directly from Jamaica to Nova Scotia, as such a transaction crossed through this latitude. Instead, the laws required that the sugar cane be shipped first from Jamaica to Britain, where it would be re-exported to Nova Scotia."

    Not exactly what we would call 'free trade'.
    Free trade was a novel, crazy idea in the 18th cent. The whole point of empires was monopolies on trade that were handed out as literal possesions.

    The idea that you could sell goods to anyone, anywhere at a price you chose was considered anarchy. Yes, bits worked like that, but on the whole, trying (and failing) to control trade was how it was.
    Free trade was and is a fantastic idea - Adam Smith and David Ricardo, its philosophical and mathematical fathers, are geniuses.
    The two great simple ideas: there isn't a fixed size cake, and prosperous nations make good customers are mind blowing in their importance - along with the law of comparative advantage.

    This all developed in a world less complex. While the principle remains, it isn't possible to apply it strictly(ask Rachel Reeves) to issues touching national security, and many other things too. And you reach a point where the globalisation is so great that countries (UK a good example) start feeling they have been bought up by others. This was not the same issue in the 18th century.
    The other problem is that free trade is very much “I want free trade in X and not in Y”. And everyone has different lists for X and Y.
  • OldKingColeOldKingCole Posts: 31,898
    Guardian running a story that a September or October election will effectively disenfranchise thousands of students who won’t have time to re-register, or perhaps register for the first time.
    The consequence would be a fall in the Labour in constituencies like Canterbury.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,090

    Pineapple pizza for dinner. Yum

    Blimey, talk about asking for the ban hammer.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,090

    Guardian running a story that a September or October election will effectively disenfranchise thousands of students who won’t have time to re-register, or perhaps register for the first time.
    The consequence would be a fall in the Labour in constituencies like Canterbury.

    I think that most unlikely, frankly. It doesn't take long to register and most uni political groupings are very well organised to mark it happen.
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 39,557

    Guardian running a story that a September or October election will effectively disenfranchise thousands of students who won’t have time to re-register, or perhaps register for the first time.
    The consequence would be a fall in the Labour in constituencies like Canterbury.

    And LD. One thinks of St Andrews and Edinburgh (though in the latter Mr Cole-Hamilton is doing his best to trash his rep with the youngsters by going all out backless gloved petrolhead).
  • algarkirkalgarkirk Posts: 10,473

    algarkirk said:

    No googling - who is this, and why is he interesting?


    Spanish bloke from Waterloo. I read about him a few years ago but can't remember his name. Not sure why he is interesting though, beyond general historical interest
    Miguel Ricvardo de Alaa. He fought against The Brits at Trafalgar, and alongside The Brits at Waterloo.
    Hard to top this introduction -

    "This is my friend, and as long as I have any money with your house, let him have it to any amount he thinks proper to draw for"
    I love going down some of the rabbit holes that appear when looking up people or events on the internet.

    From your ID of Miguel Ricardo de Alava I foillowed a link to Cape Finisterre where I found this little gem:

    "Additionally, laws governing the colonies of the British Empire (including the 1766 amendment to the Sugar Act of 1764) used the latitude of Cape Finisterre as the latitude past which certain goods could not be shipped north directly between British colonies. For instance, it was forbidden to ship sugar cane directly from Jamaica to Nova Scotia, as such a transaction crossed through this latitude. Instead, the laws required that the sugar cane be shipped first from Jamaica to Britain, where it would be re-exported to Nova Scotia."

    Not exactly what we would call 'free trade'.
    Free trade was a novel, crazy idea in the 18th cent. The whole point of empires was monopolies on trade that were handed out as literal possesions.

    The idea that you could sell goods to anyone, anywhere at a price you chose was considered anarchy. Yes, bits worked like that, but on the whole, trying (and failing) to control trade was how it was.
    Free trade was and is a fantastic idea - Adam Smith and David Ricardo, its philosophical and mathematical fathers, are geniuses.
    The two great simple ideas: there isn't a fixed size cake, and prosperous nations make good customers are mind blowing in their importance - along with the law of comparative advantage.

    This all developed in a world less complex. While the principle remains, it isn't possible to apply it strictly(ask Rachel Reeves) to issues touching national security, and many other things too. And you reach a point where the globalisation is so great that countries (UK a good example) start feeling they have been bought up by others. This was not the same issue in the 18th century.
    The other problem is that free trade is very much “I want free trade in X and not in Y”. And everyone has different lists for X and Y.
    Yes. It faces massive issues. Military stuff is obvious, but also if the UK did not have hidden and also obvious protectionism agriculture would be unrecognisable. Also the scale and importance of particular areas - so in free trade theory we are good at exporting pop songs and the products of hedge funds and sociology degrees, the Chinese are good at making nuclear power stations and gadgets with hidden surveillance capability in it, so that's all fine. The model is not going to work. And I think rachel reeves may have said so;

    https://archive.is/yEuA7
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 39,557

    WillG said:

    kinabalu said:

    Will a Labour government want to rejoin an EU with Le Pen as President of France?

    Her niece describes it as a failed project that has left Europe a digital colony of America, an economic colony of China, and on the way to becoming a demographic colony of Africa and religious and cultural colony of Islam.

    https://x.com/marionmarechal/status/1770894693481537884

    Mmm, let's take it back to how it was in the 1930s. All those proud independent sovereign states looking out for their own proud independent people.
    It was proud independent states like the UK and the USA that defeated Nazi Germany, while internationalist Lord Halifax types wanted to make accommodations.
    What was the role of Canada, Australia and India?
    And the Poles and Norwegians and quite a few French and Africans and Australians and ...

    Indeed FDR and WSC were quite big on internationalism even during the war.
  • BenpointerBenpointer Posts: 31,537

    Guardian running a story that a September or October election will effectively disenfranchise thousands of students who won’t have time to re-register, or perhaps register for the first time.
    The consequence would be a fall in the Labour in constituencies like Canterbury.

    I could see that backfiring on the Tories - the publicity it gets might well encourage more young people to vote.
  • Wulfrun_PhilWulfrun_Phil Posts: 4,594
    edited March 23

    Guardian running a story that a September or October election will effectively disenfranchise thousands of students who won’t have time to re-register, or perhaps register for the first time.
    The consequence would be a fall in the Labour in constituencies like Canterbury.

    That's the Conservative plan all right. Use a dodgy electoral register to help them get reelected in the Autumn or even Winter.

    It's not just students at risk though - local authorities conduct their annual canvass to update the register updating exercise each Autumn and only issue a comprehensive new register based on the results after the turn of the year.

    So an October or even November register will be based on records of who was living at a property at least 1 year earlier at the time of the annual canvass (or even earlier if the canvass form wasn't returned which is very common), unless the person bothered to register online themselves on moving (i.e. without being prompted by the local authority.) Some universities try to get around that by using their enrolment process as a prompt to immediate electoral registration, what the Guardian article is pointing out that a September or October election won't allow time for that.

    Owner occupiers who move very rarely won't be much affected, especially pensioners who don't need to move for work reasons. The more transient younger population of renters will though be hugely affected.
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 39,557

    No googling - who is this, and why is he interesting?


    Higgins?
  • BenpointerBenpointer Posts: 31,537

    TopDog said:

    No googling - who is this, and why is he interesting?


    Blackadder
    No, it’s the pilot of the plane who crashed on the Ukraine/Republic of China border.
    C'mon! Give him a chance.
  • algarkirkalgarkirk Posts: 10,473
    ydoethur said:

    Guardian running a story that a September or October election will effectively disenfranchise thousands of students who won’t have time to re-register, or perhaps register for the first time.
    The consequence would be a fall in the Labour in constituencies like Canterbury.

    I think that most unlikely, frankly. It doesn't take long to register and most uni political groupings are very well organised to mark it happen.
    Yes there are consequences but people can quite properly register to vote at home as well as at university etc, so long as they only vote once, and postal votes are easier than voting in person.

    It should not be taken as read (even though I want Labour to win) that students have a constitutional right to vote as a bloc at uni (Labour of course), to Labour's advantage when they can vote at home - where I should think a plurality come from Tory seats. (In this election this is where their Labour votes in Tory seats are most needed!).

    This is classic Guardian. There is a moan to be had, but it's massively exaggerated, isn't really true, and they should mostly vote at home anyway.
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 39,557
    edited March 23
    ydoethur said:

    Guardian running a story that a September or October election will effectively disenfranchise thousands of students who won’t have time to re-register, or perhaps register for the first time.
    The consequence would be a fall in the Labour in constituencies like Canterbury.

    I think that most unlikely, frankly. It doesn't take long to register and most uni political groupings are very well organised to mark it happen.
    Didn't the Tories change the rules to make it much harder for unis to do things in an organised way?

    While doing completely the opposite to make it easy for their activisits to fill in the forms so they can do the voting for foreign immigrants? Nothing dodgy there, oh no bless my heart.

    (What's that you say? Yes, I dam' well mean "immigrants" - the ones who ahave immigrated into *other* countries.)
  • algarkirkalgarkirk Posts: 10,473
    ydoethur said:

    Guardian running a story that a September or October election will effectively disenfranchise thousands of students who won’t have time to re-register, or perhaps register for the first time.
    The consequence would be a fall in the Labour in constituencies like Canterbury.

    I think that most unlikely, frankly. It doesn't take long to register and most uni political groupings are very well organised to mark it happen.
    Their Labour/LD votes are needed much more in their home seats, where they can join their usually but not this time Tory parents in voting them out.
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 44,167

    TopDog said:

    No googling - who is this, and why is he interesting?


    Blackadder
    No, it’s the pilot of the plane who crashed on the Ukraine/Republic of China border.
    C'mon! Give him a chance.
    Shhhhh


  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 39,557

    TopDog said:

    No googling - who is this, and why is he interesting?


    Blackadder
    No, it’s the pilot of the plane who crashed on the Ukraine/Republic of China border.
    C'mon! Give him a chance.
    Shhhhh


    Aww.
  • kinabalukinabalu Posts: 39,052
    WillG said:

    kinabalu said:

    Will a Labour government want to rejoin an EU with Le Pen as President of France?

    Her niece describes it as a failed project that has left Europe a digital colony of America, an economic colony of China, and on the way to becoming a demographic colony of Africa and religious and cultural colony of Islam.

    https://x.com/marionmarechal/status/1770894693481537884

    Mmm, let's take it back to how it was in the 1930s. All those proud independent sovereign states looking out for their own proud independent people.
    It was proud independent states like the UK and the USA that defeated Nazi Germany, while internationalist Lord Halifax types wanted to make accommodations.
    Well the question was, would we want to rejoin the EU if it veered strongly to the populist right? To which the answer is No. However it's a flawed question. If lots of countries in Europe embrace national populism, elect parties espousing that mindset into government, there won't be an EU to rejoin. And that would be a tragedy.
  • kinabalu said:

    WillG said:

    kinabalu said:

    Will a Labour government want to rejoin an EU with Le Pen as President of France?

    Her niece describes it as a failed project that has left Europe a digital colony of America, an economic colony of China, and on the way to becoming a demographic colony of Africa and religious and cultural colony of Islam.

    https://x.com/marionmarechal/status/1770894693481537884

    Mmm, let's take it back to how it was in the 1930s. All those proud independent sovereign states looking out for their own proud independent people.
    It was proud independent states like the UK and the USA that defeated Nazi Germany, while internationalist Lord Halifax types wanted to make accommodations.
    Well the question was, would we want to rejoin the EU if it veered strongly to the populist right? To which the answer is No. However it's a flawed question. If lots of countries in Europe embrace national populism, elect parties espousing that mindset into government, there won't be an EU to rejoin. And that would be a tragedy.
    An alliance of nation states is far superior to having a single critical control point.

    Trump should be proof of that.

    Would you want Europe led by a European Trump? Better only one nation is, than a whole continent is.
  • Sunil_PrasannanSunil_Prasannan Posts: 49,185

    TopDog said:

    No googling - who is this, and why is he interesting?


    Blackadder
    No, it’s the pilot of the plane who crashed on the Ukraine/Republic of China border.
    C'mon! Give him a chance.
    Shhhhh


    Actually, it's oft forgotten that Princess Leia shouted "It's a trap!" to Luke Skywalker not once, but TWICE, in the previous film, The Empire Strikes Back.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EjONM1919rQ&t=1s
  • BartholomewRobertsBartholomewRoberts Posts: 18,604
    edited March 23

    TopDog said:

    No googling - who is this, and why is he interesting?


    Blackadder
    No, it’s the pilot of the plane who crashed on the Ukraine/Republic of China border.
    C'mon! Give him a chance.
    Shhhhh


    Actually, it's oft forgotten that Princess Leia shouted "It's a trap!" to Luke Skywalker not once, but TWICE, in the previous film, The Empire Strikes Back.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EjONM1919rQ&t=1s
    Yeah but she didn't have a squid head.

    Didn't Han say it in A New Hope from memory? Along with "I've got a bad feeling about this", wasn't it an oft-used phrase?
  • viewcodeviewcode Posts: 18,597
    It was a good day. The sun came out, I shopped well, I had a nice relaxing lunch in the pub, I walked to the bus stop courtesy of bus times.org and got on to a clean friendly bus with no nutters, sat down and relaxed...

    ...as the bus turned in the wrong direction. Wrong bus.

    In a kerfuffle I dinged the bell, got off, ran back but could not get back in time for the right bus. And then realised I had left half the shopping on the bus.

    True story.

    👿
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,090
    viewcode said:

    It was a good day. The sun came out, I shopped well, I had a nice relaxing lunch in the pub, I walked to the bus stop courtesy of bus times.org and got on to a clean friendly bus with no nutters, sat down and relaxed...

    ...as the bus turned in the wrong direction. Wrong bus.

    In a kerfuffle I dinged the bell, got off, ran back but could not get back in time for the right bus. And then realised I had left half the shopping on the bus.

    True story.

    👿

    Ok.

    So you bussed wide open?

    (Sorry, couldn't resist...)
  • BenpointerBenpointer Posts: 31,537
    viewcode said:

    It was a good day. The sun came out, I shopped well, I had a nice relaxing lunch in the pub, I walked to the bus stop courtesy of bus times.org and got on to a clean friendly bus with no nutters, sat down and relaxed...

    ...as the bus turned in the wrong direction. Wrong bus.

    In a kerfuffle I dinged the bell, got off, ran back but could not get back in time for the right bus. And then realised I had left half the shopping on the bus.

    True story.

    👿

    Sympathies. Sounds like the start of an interesting novel!
  • No_Offence_AlanNo_Offence_Alan Posts: 3,796
    kinabalu said:

    WillG said:

    kinabalu said:

    Will a Labour government want to rejoin an EU with Le Pen as President of France?

    Her niece describes it as a failed project that has left Europe a digital colony of America, an economic colony of China, and on the way to becoming a demographic colony of Africa and religious and cultural colony of Islam.

    https://x.com/marionmarechal/status/1770894693481537884

    Mmm, let's take it back to how it was in the 1930s. All those proud independent sovereign states looking out for their own proud independent people.
    It was proud independent states like the UK and the USA that defeated Nazi Germany, while internationalist Lord Halifax types wanted to make accommodations.
    Well the question was, would we want to rejoin the EU if it veered strongly to the populist right? To which the answer is No. However it's a flawed question. If lots of countries in Europe embrace national populism, elect parties espousing that mindset into government, there won't be an EU to rejoin. And that would be a tragedy.
    I would have the UK rejoin the Single Market, to boost growth, but I would reserve judgement on re-joining the EU until after seeing its first post-Covid, post-Ukraine budget.
  • ChrisChris Posts: 11,081
    I don't think it's really a very good analogy at all, considering how much most people don't love the Tories now.
  • david_herdsondavid_herdson Posts: 17,419

    Guardian running a story that a September or October election will effectively disenfranchise thousands of students who won’t have time to re-register, or perhaps register for the first time.
    The consequence would be a fall in the Labour in constituencies like Canterbury.

    I could see that backfiring on the Tories - the publicity it gets might well encourage more young people to vote.
    They could still vote in their home constituencies and get a postal vote.

    Also, there can't be a September election unless it's called in August, which is unlikely given the recess dates.
  • WillGWillG Posts: 2,063

    kinabalu said:

    WillG said:

    kinabalu said:

    Will a Labour government want to rejoin an EU with Le Pen as President of France?

    Her niece describes it as a failed project that has left Europe a digital colony of America, an economic colony of China, and on the way to becoming a demographic colony of Africa and religious and cultural colony of Islam.

    https://x.com/marionmarechal/status/1770894693481537884

    Mmm, let's take it back to how it was in the 1930s. All those proud independent sovereign states looking out for their own proud independent people.
    It was proud independent states like the UK and the USA that defeated Nazi Germany, while internationalist Lord Halifax types wanted to make accommodations.
    Well the question was, would we want to rejoin the EU if it veered strongly to the populist right? To which the answer is No. However it's a flawed question. If lots of countries in Europe embrace national populism, elect parties espousing that mindset into government, there won't be an EU to rejoin. And that would be a tragedy.
    I would have the UK rejoin the Single Market, to boost growth, but I would reserve judgement on re-joining the EU until after seeing its first post-Covid, post-Ukraine budget.
    I would rejoin if it didn't mean Freedom of Movement.
  • nico679nico679 Posts: 4,711
    The Tories will hope their voter suppression efforts will save them some seats .

    With their ridiculous voter ID rules and attempts to stop students from voting I wonder what will be next .

  • viewcodeviewcode Posts: 18,597

    viewcode said:

    It was a good day. The sun came out, I shopped well, I had a nice relaxing lunch in the pub, I walked to the bus stop courtesy of bus times.org and got on to a clean friendly bus with no nutters, sat down and relaxed...

    ...as the bus turned in the wrong direction. Wrong bus.

    In a kerfuffle I dinged the bell, got off, ran back but could not get back in time for the right bus. And then realised I had left half the shopping on the bus.

    True story.

    👿

    Sympathies. Sounds like the start of an interesting novel!
    Honestly? Could be worse. I've lost about £40 of various stuff from Boots and I do feel sorry for the faithful shampoo and toothpaste stuck on a bus waiting for their owner to return (I can be unbearably sentimental), but if I grit my teeth and be rational about it it's not so bad. Although bear in mind I apologise to socks when I throw them out and tell them that they were good socks and shouldn't feel bad. Plus I was bought up on the it's a sin to waste good food principle, so leaving shopping behind does not sit well.

    Damn

    I'll phone the company.
  • Jim_MillerJim_Miller Posts: 2,469
    (Copied from prevous thread:)
    On topic: One advantage Sherrod Brown has in Ohio is that he is anti-free trade.
    "Brown has criticized free trade with China and other countries. In a 2006 Washington Post article, Brown argued against free trade on the grounds that labor activism was responsible for the growth of the U.S. middle class, and that the U.S. economy is harmed by trade relations with countries that lack the kind of labor regulations that have resulted from that activism.[131]

    In 2011, the Columbus Dispatch noted that Brown "loves to rail against international trade agreements."[132] Brown's book Myths of Free Trade argues that "an unregulated global economy is a threat to all of us."[133] In the book he recommends measures that would allow for emergency tariffs, protect Buy America laws, including those that give preference to minority and women-owned businesses, and hold foreign producers to American labor and environmental standards.[134] Brown was the co-author and sponsor of a bill that would officially declare China a currency manipulator and require the Department of Commerce to impose countervailing duties on Chinese imports."
    source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sherrod_Brown#Political_positions

    Most economists may love free trade -- but many voters in the US don't.

    (My own view: I think NAFTA has been a solid success, good for all three nations -- but I recognize that it is not especially popular in any of the three. Incidentally, it is a bipartisan success: RR proposed it, GHWB negotiated it, and BC got it ratified.

    Trade with China, on the other hand, has been a mixed bag. For example, I think we here in the US are going to have to think very hard about their technology thefts. I have seen estimates of a trillion dollars stolen.)
  • WillGWillG Posts: 2,063
    Carnyx said:

    WillG said:

    kinabalu said:

    Will a Labour government want to rejoin an EU with Le Pen as President of France?

    Her niece describes it as a failed project that has left Europe a digital colony of America, an economic colony of China, and on the way to becoming a demographic colony of Africa and religious and cultural colony of Islam.

    https://x.com/marionmarechal/status/1770894693481537884

    Mmm, let's take it back to how it was in the 1930s. All those proud independent sovereign states looking out for their own proud independent people.
    It was proud independent states like the UK and the USA that defeated Nazi Germany, while internationalist Lord Halifax types wanted to make accommodations.
    What was the role of Canada, Australia and India?
    And the Poles and Norwegians and quite a few French and Africans and Australians and ...

    Indeed FDR and WSC were quite big on internationalism even during the war.
    Poland, Norway etc were proud independent states.
  • WillGWillG Posts: 2,063
    Leon said:

    Little known fact, more Brits died fighting for the independence of Colombia than actual Colombians. The “British Legion” was hugely important; Bolivar thought them possibly his best soldiers, and doubted he would have achieved South American independence without British troops (and British money)

    He was almost certainly right

    We really are THE GREATEST COUNTRY EVER DESPITE THE WEATHER

    I have now had three strong coffees

    Spanish just deserts for backing American independence.
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 39,557
    WillG said:

    Carnyx said:

    WillG said:

    kinabalu said:

    Will a Labour government want to rejoin an EU with Le Pen as President of France?

    Her niece describes it as a failed project that has left Europe a digital colony of America, an economic colony of China, and on the way to becoming a demographic colony of Africa and religious and cultural colony of Islam.

    https://x.com/marionmarechal/status/1770894693481537884

    Mmm, let's take it back to how it was in the 1930s. All those proud independent sovereign states looking out for their own proud independent people.
    It was proud independent states like the UK and the USA that defeated Nazi Germany, while internationalist Lord Halifax types wanted to make accommodations.
    What was the role of Canada, Australia and India?
    And the Poles and Norwegians and quite a few French and Africans and Australians and ...

    Indeed FDR and WSC were quite big on internationalism even during the war.
    Poland, Norway etc were proud independent states.
    And remained them, with governments in exile and armed forces embodied.
  • WillGWillG Posts: 2,063


    As long as the Israeli government backs the settlers, no-one can credibly claim Israel wants peace. They are a purely imperialist power.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2024/03/22/israel-largest-west-bank-settlement-blinken-visit/
  • kinabalukinabalu Posts: 39,052

    kinabalu said:

    WillG said:

    kinabalu said:

    Will a Labour government want to rejoin an EU with Le Pen as President of France?

    Her niece describes it as a failed project that has left Europe a digital colony of America, an economic colony of China, and on the way to becoming a demographic colony of Africa and religious and cultural colony of Islam.

    https://x.com/marionmarechal/status/1770894693481537884

    Mmm, let's take it back to how it was in the 1930s. All those proud independent sovereign states looking out for their own proud independent people.
    It was proud independent states like the UK and the USA that defeated Nazi Germany, while internationalist Lord Halifax types wanted to make accommodations.
    Well the question was, would we want to rejoin the EU if it veered strongly to the populist right? To which the answer is No. However it's a flawed question. If lots of countries in Europe embrace national populism, elect parties espousing that mindset into government, there won't be an EU to rejoin. And that would be a tragedy.
    An alliance of nation states is far superior to having a single critical control point.

    Trump should be proof of that.

    Would you want Europe led by a European Trump? Better only one nation is, than a whole continent is.
    I was considering the impact on the EU (which is an alliance of nation states) of its members succumbing to right wing national populism.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 44,482
    kinabalu said:

    kinabalu said:

    WillG said:

    kinabalu said:

    Will a Labour government want to rejoin an EU with Le Pen as President of France?

    Her niece describes it as a failed project that has left Europe a digital colony of America, an economic colony of China, and on the way to becoming a demographic colony of Africa and religious and cultural colony of Islam.

    https://x.com/marionmarechal/status/1770894693481537884

    Mmm, let's take it back to how it was in the 1930s. All those proud independent sovereign states looking out for their own proud independent people.
    It was proud independent states like the UK and the USA that defeated Nazi Germany, while internationalist Lord Halifax types wanted to make accommodations.
    Well the question was, would we want to rejoin the EU if it veered strongly to the populist right? To which the answer is No. However it's a flawed question. If lots of countries in Europe embrace national populism, elect parties espousing that mindset into government, there won't be an EU to rejoin. And that would be a tragedy.
    An alliance of nation states is far superior to having a single critical control point.

    Trump should be proof of that.

    Would you want Europe led by a European Trump? Better only one nation is, than a whole continent is.
    I was considering the impact on the EU (which is an alliance of nation states) of its members succumbing to right wing national populism.
    Though even Le Pen no longer advocates leaving the EU, so unlikely to break it up.

    Indeed having more nationalist leaders may lead to a more variable federation, with quite different local rules, but free trade and movement.

    It might well be more to our taste when we Rejoin.
  • Sunil_PrasannanSunil_Prasannan Posts: 49,185

    TopDog said:

    No googling - who is this, and why is he interesting?


    Blackadder
    No, it’s the pilot of the plane who crashed on the Ukraine/Republic of China border.
    C'mon! Give him a chance.
    Shhhhh


    Actually, it's oft forgotten that Princess Leia shouted "It's a trap!" to Luke Skywalker not once, but TWICE, in the previous film, The Empire Strikes Back.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EjONM1919rQ&t=1s
    Yeah but she didn't have a squid head.

    Didn't Han say it in A New Hope from memory? Along with "I've got a bad feeling about this", wasn't it an oft-used phrase?
    Not "it's a trap", but "I have a bad feeling about this" is in all six of the original and prequel trilogy films.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 44,482
    WillG said:

    Carnyx said:

    WillG said:

    kinabalu said:

    Will a Labour government want to rejoin an EU with Le Pen as President of France?

    Her niece describes it as a failed project that has left Europe a digital colony of America, an economic colony of China, and on the way to becoming a demographic colony of Africa and religious and cultural colony of Islam.

    https://x.com/marionmarechal/status/1770894693481537884

    Mmm, let's take it back to how it was in the 1930s. All those proud independent sovereign states looking out for their own proud independent people.
    It was proud independent states like the UK and the USA that defeated Nazi Germany, while internationalist Lord Halifax types wanted to make accommodations.
    What was the role of Canada, Australia and India?
    And the Poles and Norwegians and quite a few French and Africans and Australians and ...

    Indeed FDR and WSC were quite big on internationalism even during the war.
    Poland, Norway etc were proud independent states.
    It was the internationalists in the USA that overcame the resistance of the America First isolationism.

    If it wasn't for US sanctions on Japan they wouldn't have attacked Pearl Harbour, and if it weren't for the internationalism of FDR no Lend Lease before 1942.
  • williamglennwilliamglenn Posts: 47,979
    Foxy said:

    kinabalu said:

    kinabalu said:

    WillG said:

    kinabalu said:

    Will a Labour government want to rejoin an EU with Le Pen as President of France?

    Her niece describes it as a failed project that has left Europe a digital colony of America, an economic colony of China, and on the way to becoming a demographic colony of Africa and religious and cultural colony of Islam.

    https://x.com/marionmarechal/status/1770894693481537884

    Mmm, let's take it back to how it was in the 1930s. All those proud independent sovereign states looking out for their own proud independent people.
    It was proud independent states like the UK and the USA that defeated Nazi Germany, while internationalist Lord Halifax types wanted to make accommodations.
    Well the question was, would we want to rejoin the EU if it veered strongly to the populist right? To which the answer is No. However it's a flawed question. If lots of countries in Europe embrace national populism, elect parties espousing that mindset into government, there won't be an EU to rejoin. And that would be a tragedy.
    An alliance of nation states is far superior to having a single critical control point.

    Trump should be proof of that.

    Would you want Europe led by a European Trump? Better only one nation is, than a whole continent is.
    I was considering the impact on the EU (which is an alliance of nation states) of its members succumbing to right wing national populism.
    Though even Le Pen no longer advocates leaving the EU, so unlikely to break it up.

    Indeed having more nationalist leaders may lead to a more variable federation, with quite different local rules, but free trade and movement.

    It might well be more to our taste when we Rejoin.
    You’re a “states’ rights” man in American terms?
  • BenpointerBenpointer Posts: 31,537
    viewcode said:

    viewcode said:

    It was a good day. The sun came out, I shopped well, I had a nice relaxing lunch in the pub, I walked to the bus stop courtesy of bus times.org and got on to a clean friendly bus with no nutters, sat down and relaxed...

    ...as the bus turned in the wrong direction. Wrong bus.

    In a kerfuffle I dinged the bell, got off, ran back but could not get back in time for the right bus. And then realised I had left half the shopping on the bus.

    True story.

    👿

    Sympathies. Sounds like the start of an interesting novel!
    Honestly? Could be worse. I've lost about £40 of various stuff from Boots and I do feel sorry for the faithful shampoo and toothpaste stuck on a bus waiting for their owner to return (I can be unbearably sentimental), but if I grit my teeth and be rational about it it's not so bad. Although bear in mind I apologise to socks when I throw them out and tell them that they were good socks and shouldn't feel bad. Plus I was bought up on the it's a sin to waste good food principle, so leaving shopping behind does not sit well.

    Damn

    I'll phone the company.
    No sorry, that won't do.

    Your shopping needed to be picked up by a mysterious loner, who soon after calls the police from a public phone box saying he has knowledge of a planned assassination attempt on a leading public figure... The police quickly track the stranger down but he flees leaving the shopping bag with a receipt for your shopping in it, which the police trace back to you. Since you bear a passing resemblance to the stranger, and have no alibi for the time of the call or the near capture of the stranger, it takes you 24 hours in police custody to convince them they're mistaken.

    Meanwhile, a leading public figure (not the one the stranger identified, but similar) is assassinated...

    ..and so on.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 51,102
    WillG said:



    As long as the Israeli government backs the settlers, no-one can credibly claim Israel wants peace. They are a purely imperialist power.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2024/03/22/israel-largest-west-bank-settlement-blinken-visit/

    I was brought up on the novels/propaganda of Leon Uris. I was immensely and deeply supportive of Israel . I cannot forget the horrors of October 7th either. But this is sickening me. Enough. Enough. Stop. Stop.
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 39,557
    Foxy said:

    WillG said:

    Carnyx said:

    WillG said:

    kinabalu said:

    Will a Labour government want to rejoin an EU with Le Pen as President of France?

    Her niece describes it as a failed project that has left Europe a digital colony of America, an economic colony of China, and on the way to becoming a demographic colony of Africa and religious and cultural colony of Islam.

    https://x.com/marionmarechal/status/1770894693481537884

    Mmm, let's take it back to how it was in the 1930s. All those proud independent sovereign states looking out for their own proud independent people.
    It was proud independent states like the UK and the USA that defeated Nazi Germany, while internationalist Lord Halifax types wanted to make accommodations.
    What was the role of Canada, Australia and India?
    And the Poles and Norwegians and quite a few French and Africans and Australians and ...

    Indeed FDR and WSC were quite big on internationalism even during the war.
    Poland, Norway etc were proud independent states.
    It was the internationalists in the USA that overcame the resistance of the America First isolationism.

    If it wasn't for US sanctions on Japan they wouldn't have attacked Pearl Harbour, and if it weren't for the internationalism of FDR no Lend Lease before 1942.
    Or United Nations, a little later.
  • Luckyguy1983Luckyguy1983 Posts: 25,299
    ...

    viewcode said:

    viewcode said:

    It was a good day. The sun came out, I shopped well, I had a nice relaxing lunch in the pub, I walked to the bus stop courtesy of bus times.org and got on to a clean friendly bus with no nutters, sat down and relaxed...

    ...as the bus turned in the wrong direction. Wrong bus.

    In a kerfuffle I dinged the bell, got off, ran back but could not get back in time for the right bus. And then realised I had left half the shopping on the bus.

    True story.

    👿

    Sympathies. Sounds like the start of an interesting novel!
    Honestly? Could be worse. I've lost about £40 of various stuff from Boots and I do feel sorry for the faithful shampoo and toothpaste stuck on a bus waiting for their owner to return (I can be unbearably sentimental), but if I grit my teeth and be rational about it it's not so bad. Although bear in mind I apologise to socks when I throw them out and tell them that they were good socks and shouldn't feel bad. Plus I was bought up on the it's a sin to waste good food principle, so leaving shopping behind does not sit well.

    Damn

    I'll phone the company.
    No sorry, that won't do.

    Your shopping needed to be picked up by a mysterious loner, who soon after calls the police from a public phone box saying he has knowledge of a planned assassination attempt on a leading public figure... The police quickly track the stranger down but he flees leaving the shopping bag with a receipt for your shopping in it, which the police trace back to you. Since you bear a passing resemblance to the stranger, and have no alibi for the time of the call or the near capture of the stranger, it takes you 24 hours in police custody to convince them they're mistaken.

    Meanwhile, a leading public figure (not the one the stranger identified, but similar) is assassinated...

    ..and so on.
    You may find someone on social media is trying to find you to give it back. It can restore your faith in human nature sometimes.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 44,482

    Foxy said:

    kinabalu said:

    kinabalu said:

    WillG said:

    kinabalu said:

    Will a Labour government want to rejoin an EU with Le Pen as President of France?

    Her niece describes it as a failed project that has left Europe a digital colony of America, an economic colony of China, and on the way to becoming a demographic colony of Africa and religious and cultural colony of Islam.

    https://x.com/marionmarechal/status/1770894693481537884

    Mmm, let's take it back to how it was in the 1930s. All those proud independent sovereign states looking out for their own proud independent people.
    It was proud independent states like the UK and the USA that defeated Nazi Germany, while internationalist Lord Halifax types wanted to make accommodations.
    Well the question was, would we want to rejoin the EU if it veered strongly to the populist right? To which the answer is No. However it's a flawed question. If lots of countries in Europe embrace national populism, elect parties espousing that mindset into government, there won't be an EU to rejoin. And that would be a tragedy.
    An alliance of nation states is far superior to having a single critical control point.

    Trump should be proof of that.

    Would you want Europe led by a European Trump? Better only one nation is, than a whole continent is.
    I was considering the impact on the EU (which is an alliance of nation states) of its members succumbing to right wing national populism.
    Though even Le Pen no longer advocates leaving the EU, so unlikely to break it up.

    Indeed having more nationalist leaders may lead to a more variable federation, with quite different local rules, but free trade and movement.

    It might well be more to our taste when we Rejoin.
    You’re a “states’ rights” man in American terms?
    British people do not understand Federalism, so see federal countries through the prism of Central control.

    The whole point of Federalism is local variations in law, or "states rights". So yes I do support States Rights as long as they do not impinge on the powers reserved to the central government.
  • bondegezoubondegezou Posts: 7,493

    DavidL said:

    The smart move would be for Penny to cross the floor, and stand in Pompey under the red rosette. She’d win easily, and would no doubt get a better cabinet post than the derisory Leader of the House.

    Will the Penny drop?

    That would be the biggest floor-crossing... ever?

    But what do I know? I thought the picture quiz was Fred Harris from Play School and The Burkiss Way.
    There have been bigger floor-crossings. The Gang of Four creating the SDP, for example.
    Winston Churchill. Twice.
    But the first time, he was a backbencher, and the second time he was out of Parliament. He was only important in the context of the future.

    Same with the Gang of Four- only Rogers was in the Shadow Cabinet at the time.

    Mordaunt is a long standing Cabinet minister.
    But Jenkins had had a very significant career, multiple senior Cabinet posts, far more illustrious than Mordaunt. Owen had been Foreign Secretary. Williams had been Education Secretary.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 44,482
    The Tories now viewed as worse than the Trussocalypse:

    WOW. Worst favourability ratings for the Conservatives since the 2019 election.

    58% unfavourable towards Conservatives. 19% favourable. Net -39.

    Previous worst was -36 in Oct 2022. @IpsosUK @Keiranpedley

    https://twitter.com/BestForBritain/status/1771592769082970253?t=QNMD5OQUvYuN1V3rWZvcQw&s=19
  • algarkirkalgarkirk Posts: 10,473

    Guardian running a story that a September or October election will effectively disenfranchise thousands of students who won’t have time to re-register, or perhaps register for the first time.
    The consequence would be a fall in the Labour in constituencies like Canterbury.

    I could see that backfiring on the Tories - the publicity it gets might well encourage more young people to vote.
    They could still vote in their home constituencies and get a postal vote.

    Also, there can't be a September election unless it's called in August, which is unlikely given the recess dates.
    WRT a September election, which I think is possible. What would be wrong with this plan (accepting that all those not in the know will be cross):

    The election is announced in good time before the 23rd July (summer recess), time for washing up etc, with a dissolution during recess on 21st August, election on 26th September. Campaign starts in full 1st September.

    Takes everyone by surprise and avoids the party conference - which would be greatly desired by the Tories.
  • viewcodeviewcode Posts: 18,597

    viewcode said:

    viewcode said:

    It was a good day. The sun came out, I shopped well, I had a nice relaxing lunch in the pub, I walked to the bus stop courtesy of bus times.org and got on to a clean friendly bus with no nutters, sat down and relaxed...

    ...as the bus turned in the wrong direction. Wrong bus.

    In a kerfuffle I dinged the bell, got off, ran back but could not get back in time for the right bus. And then realised I had left half the shopping on the bus.

    True story.

    👿

    Sympathies. Sounds like the start of an interesting novel!
    Honestly? Could be worse. I've lost about £40 of various stuff from Boots and I do feel sorry for the faithful shampoo and toothpaste stuck on a bus waiting for their owner to return (I can be unbearably sentimental), but if I grit my teeth and be rational about it it's not so bad. Although bear in mind I apologise to socks when I throw them out and tell them that they were good socks and shouldn't feel bad. Plus I was bought up on the it's a sin to waste good food principle, so leaving shopping behind does not sit well.

    Damn

    I'll phone the company.
    No sorry, that won't do.

    Your shopping needed to be picked up by a mysterious loner, who soon after calls the police from a public phone box saying he has knowledge of a planned assassination attempt on a leading public figure... The police quickly track the stranger down but he flees leaving the shopping bag with a receipt for your shopping in it, which the police trace back to you. Since you bear a passing resemblance to the stranger, and have no alibi for the time of the call or the near capture of the stranger, it takes you 24 hours in police custody to convince them they're mistaken.

    Meanwhile, a leading public figure (not the one the stranger identified, but similar) is assassinated...

    ..and so on.
    ...and then escape from the cops to try to prevent the next assassination, and am pursued by a dogged police officer. During his investigation he becomes increasingly suspicious and in the final confrontation he makes me realise that I was the assassin all along and the innocent persona was a postraumatic overlay imposed by the guilt over the lost toothpaste. I put down the snipers rifle and, reunited with the bag, am led away sobbing.
  • viewcodeviewcode Posts: 18,597

    ...

    viewcode said:

    viewcode said:

    It was a good day. The sun came out, I shopped well, I had a nice relaxing lunch in the pub, I walked to the bus stop courtesy of bus times.org and got on to a clean friendly bus with no nutters, sat down and relaxed...

    ...as the bus turned in the wrong direction. Wrong bus.

    In a kerfuffle I dinged the bell, got off, ran back but could not get back in time for the right bus. And then realised I had left half the shopping on the bus.

    True story.

    👿

    Sympathies. Sounds like the start of an interesting novel!
    Honestly? Could be worse. I've lost about £40 of various stuff from Boots and I do feel sorry for the faithful shampoo and toothpaste stuck on a bus waiting for their owner to return (I can be unbearably sentimental), but if I grit my teeth and be rational about it it's not so bad. Although bear in mind I apologise to socks when I throw them out and tell them that they were good socks and shouldn't feel bad. Plus I was bought up on the it's a sin to waste good food principle, so leaving shopping behind does not sit well.

    Damn

    I'll phone the company.
    No sorry, that won't do.

    Your shopping needed to be picked up by a mysterious loner, who soon after calls the police from a public phone box saying he has knowledge of a planned assassination attempt on a leading public figure... The police quickly track the stranger down but he flees leaving the shopping bag with a receipt for your shopping in it, which the police trace back to you. Since you bear a passing resemblance to the stranger, and have no alibi for the time of the call or the near capture of the stranger, it takes you 24 hours in police custody to convince them they're mistaken.

    Meanwhile, a leading public figure (not the one the stranger identified, but similar) is assassinated...

    ..and so on.
    You may find someone on social media is trying to find you to give it back. It can restore your faith in human nature sometimes.
    I've emailed the bus company.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,090

    DavidL said:

    The smart move would be for Penny to cross the floor, and stand in Pompey under the red rosette. She’d win easily, and would no doubt get a better cabinet post than the derisory Leader of the House.

    Will the Penny drop?

    That would be the biggest floor-crossing... ever?

    But what do I know? I thought the picture quiz was Fred Harris from Play School and The Burkiss Way.
    There have been bigger floor-crossings. The Gang of Four creating the SDP, for example.
    Winston Churchill. Twice.
    But the first time, he was a backbencher, and the second time he was out of Parliament. He was only important in the context of the future.

    Same with the Gang of Four- only Rogers was in the Shadow Cabinet at the time.

    Mordaunt is a long standing Cabinet minister.
    But Jenkins had had a very significant career, multiple senior Cabinet posts, far more illustrious than Mordaunt. Owen had been Foreign Secretary. Williams had been Education Secretary.
    The latter causing an awkward moment for the great Tom Baker:

    https://youtu.be/KUeOKo85K8k?feature=shared&t=427
  • RogerRoger Posts: 18,891

    No googling - who is this, and why is he interesting?


    Looks like Graham Goulman songwriter who played with 10CC (and friend)
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,090
    viewcode said:

    viewcode said:

    viewcode said:

    It was a good day. The sun came out, I shopped well, I had a nice relaxing lunch in the pub, I walked to the bus stop courtesy of bus times.org and got on to a clean friendly bus with no nutters, sat down and relaxed...

    ...as the bus turned in the wrong direction. Wrong bus.

    In a kerfuffle I dinged the bell, got off, ran back but could not get back in time for the right bus. And then realised I had left half the shopping on the bus.

    True story.

    👿

    Sympathies. Sounds like the start of an interesting novel!
    Honestly? Could be worse. I've lost about £40 of various stuff from Boots and I do feel sorry for the faithful shampoo and toothpaste stuck on a bus waiting for their owner to return (I can be unbearably sentimental), but if I grit my teeth and be rational about it it's not so bad. Although bear in mind I apologise to socks when I throw them out and tell them that they were good socks and shouldn't feel bad. Plus I was bought up on the it's a sin to waste good food principle, so leaving shopping behind does not sit well.

    Damn

    I'll phone the company.
    No sorry, that won't do.

    Your shopping needed to be picked up by a mysterious loner, who soon after calls the police from a public phone box saying he has knowledge of a planned assassination attempt on a leading public figure... The police quickly track the stranger down but he flees leaving the shopping bag with a receipt for your shopping in it, which the police trace back to you. Since you bear a passing resemblance to the stranger, and have no alibi for the time of the call or the near capture of the stranger, it takes you 24 hours in police custody to convince them they're mistaken.

    Meanwhile, a leading public figure (not the one the stranger identified, but similar) is assassinated...

    ..and so on.
    ...and then escape from the cops to try to prevent the next assassination, and am pursued by a dogged police officer. During his investigation he becomes increasingly suspicious and in the final confrontation he makes me realise that I was the assassin all along and the innocent persona was a postraumatic overlay imposed by the guilt over the lost toothpaste. I put down the snipers rifle and, reunited with the bag, am led away sobbing.
    The only things missing are the awesome puns.
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 39,557
    Foxy said:

    Foxy said:

    kinabalu said:

    kinabalu said:

    WillG said:

    kinabalu said:

    Will a Labour government want to rejoin an EU with Le Pen as President of France?

    Her niece describes it as a failed project that has left Europe a digital colony of America, an economic colony of China, and on the way to becoming a demographic colony of Africa and religious and cultural colony of Islam.

    https://x.com/marionmarechal/status/1770894693481537884

    Mmm, let's take it back to how it was in the 1930s. All those proud independent sovereign states looking out for their own proud independent people.
    It was proud independent states like the UK and the USA that defeated Nazi Germany, while internationalist Lord Halifax types wanted to make accommodations.
    Well the question was, would we want to rejoin the EU if it veered strongly to the populist right? To which the answer is No. However it's a flawed question. If lots of countries in Europe embrace national populism, elect parties espousing that mindset into government, there won't be an EU to rejoin. And that would be a tragedy.
    An alliance of nation states is far superior to having a single critical control point.

    Trump should be proof of that.

    Would you want Europe led by a European Trump? Better only one nation is, than a whole continent is.
    I was considering the impact on the EU (which is an alliance of nation states) of its members succumbing to right wing national populism.
    Though even Le Pen no longer advocates leaving the EU, so unlikely to break it up.

    Indeed having more nationalist leaders may lead to a more variable federation, with quite different local rules, but free trade and movement.

    It might well be more to our taste when we Rejoin.
    You’re a “states’ rights” man in American terms?
    British people do not understand Federalism, so see federal countries through the prism of Central control.

    The whole point of Federalism is local variations in law, or "states rights". So yes I do support States Rights as long as they do not impinge on the powers reserved to the central government.
    It's a very familiar issue in Scotland, where 'devolution' is pretended to be comparable to federation, despite all powers ultimately residing in Westminster and returnable the instant they decide.
  • Sunil_PrasannanSunil_Prasannan Posts: 49,185
    Carnyx said:

    WillG said:

    Carnyx said:

    WillG said:

    kinabalu said:

    Will a Labour government want to rejoin an EU with Le Pen as President of France?

    Her niece describes it as a failed project that has left Europe a digital colony of America, an economic colony of China, and on the way to becoming a demographic colony of Africa and religious and cultural colony of Islam.

    https://x.com/marionmarechal/status/1770894693481537884

    Mmm, let's take it back to how it was in the 1930s. All those proud independent sovereign states looking out for their own proud independent people.
    It was proud independent states like the UK and the USA that defeated Nazi Germany, while internationalist Lord Halifax types wanted to make accommodations.
    What was the role of Canada, Australia and India?
    And the Poles and Norwegians and quite a few French and Africans and Australians and ...

    Indeed FDR and WSC were quite big on internationalism even during the war.
    Poland, Norway etc were proud independent states.
    And remained them, with governments in exile and armed forces embodied.
    Currently, the world's longest serving Government-in-exile is from which country?
  • algarkirkalgarkirk Posts: 10,473
    Foxy said:

    Foxy said:

    kinabalu said:

    kinabalu said:

    WillG said:

    kinabalu said:

    Will a Labour government want to rejoin an EU with Le Pen as President of France?

    Her niece describes it as a failed project that has left Europe a digital colony of America, an economic colony of China, and on the way to becoming a demographic colony of Africa and religious and cultural colony of Islam.

    https://x.com/marionmarechal/status/1770894693481537884

    Mmm, let's take it back to how it was in the 1930s. All those proud independent sovereign states looking out for their own proud independent people.
    It was proud independent states like the UK and the USA that defeated Nazi Germany, while internationalist Lord Halifax types wanted to make accommodations.
    Well the question was, would we want to rejoin the EU if it veered strongly to the populist right? To which the answer is No. However it's a flawed question. If lots of countries in Europe embrace national populism, elect parties espousing that mindset into government, there won't be an EU to rejoin. And that would be a tragedy.
    An alliance of nation states is far superior to having a single critical control point.

    Trump should be proof of that.

    Would you want Europe led by a European Trump? Better only one nation is, than a whole continent is.
    I was considering the impact on the EU (which is an alliance of nation states) of its members succumbing to right wing national populism.
    Though even Le Pen no longer advocates leaving the EU, so unlikely to break it up.

    Indeed having more nationalist leaders may lead to a more variable federation, with quite different local rules, but free trade and movement.

    It might well be more to our taste when we Rejoin.
    You’re a “states’ rights” man in American terms?
    British people do not understand Federalism, so see federal countries through the prism of Central control.

    The whole point of Federalism is local variations in law, or "states rights". So yes I do support States Rights as long as they do not impinge on the powers reserved to the central government.
    There is no special reason why the people of a unitary state should understand federalism. There are lots of unitary states and they work in many cases more or less.

    In the case of the UK, it is clear to most people that there are 4 distinct units, 3 of which have the right to choose self determination while the largest in practice does not. As long as the UK and NI is held together by a desire to be a UK and NI, then given our history most people accept that there should be one supreme body, the House of Commons, elected by all, in whom ultimate legislative power rests including the power to delegate but not irrevocably transfer power and authority downwards.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 51,102

    Carnyx said:

    WillG said:

    Carnyx said:

    WillG said:

    kinabalu said:

    Will a Labour government want to rejoin an EU with Le Pen as President of France?

    Her niece describes it as a failed project that has left Europe a digital colony of America, an economic colony of China, and on the way to becoming a demographic colony of Africa and religious and cultural colony of Islam.

    https://x.com/marionmarechal/status/1770894693481537884

    Mmm, let's take it back to how it was in the 1930s. All those proud independent sovereign states looking out for their own proud independent people.
    It was proud independent states like the UK and the USA that defeated Nazi Germany, while internationalist Lord Halifax types wanted to make accommodations.
    What was the role of Canada, Australia and India?
    And the Poles and Norwegians and quite a few French and Africans and Australians and ...

    Indeed FDR and WSC were quite big on internationalism even during the war.
    Poland, Norway etc were proud independent states.
    And remained them, with governments in exile and armed forces embodied.
    Currently, the world's longest serving Government-in-exile is from which country?
    Myanmar?
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,090
    Carnyx said:

    Foxy said:

    Foxy said:

    kinabalu said:

    kinabalu said:

    WillG said:

    kinabalu said:

    Will a Labour government want to rejoin an EU with Le Pen as President of France?

    Her niece describes it as a failed project that has left Europe a digital colony of America, an economic colony of China, and on the way to becoming a demographic colony of Africa and religious and cultural colony of Islam.

    https://x.com/marionmarechal/status/1770894693481537884

    Mmm, let's take it back to how it was in the 1930s. All those proud independent sovereign states looking out for their own proud independent people.
    It was proud independent states like the UK and the USA that defeated Nazi Germany, while internationalist Lord Halifax types wanted to make accommodations.
    Well the question was, would we want to rejoin the EU if it veered strongly to the populist right? To which the answer is No. However it's a flawed question. If lots of countries in Europe embrace national populism, elect parties espousing that mindset into government, there won't be an EU to rejoin. And that would be a tragedy.
    An alliance of nation states is far superior to having a single critical control point.

    Trump should be proof of that.

    Would you want Europe led by a European Trump? Better only one nation is, than a whole continent is.
    I was considering the impact on the EU (which is an alliance of nation states) of its members succumbing to right wing national populism.
    Though even Le Pen no longer advocates leaving the EU, so unlikely to break it up.

    Indeed having more nationalist leaders may lead to a more variable federation, with quite different local rules, but free trade and movement.

    It might well be more to our taste when we Rejoin.
    You’re a “states’ rights” man in American terms?
    British people do not understand Federalism, so see federal countries through the prism of Central control.

    The whole point of Federalism is local variations in law, or "states rights". So yes I do support States Rights as long as they do not impinge on the powers reserved to the central government.
    It's a very familiar issue in Scotland, where 'devolution' is pretended to be comparable to federation, despite all powers ultimately residing in Westminster and returnable the instant they decide.
    I expend quite a lot of effort in A-level politics in explaining how the fact powers a devolved from the sovereign down in this country and passed from the people via the states to a federal government in the US is a very important difference even though superficially the outcome looks similar.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,090
    TopDog said:

    TopDog said:

    No googling - who is this, and why is he interesting?


    Blackadder
    No, it’s the pilot of the plane who crashed on the Ukraine/Republic of China border.
    C'mon! Give him a chance.
    Well, I thought my first-ever post was quite witty, but now I can see that I have been ‘outed’ within minutes as a reincarnation of Truman or one of the other suspicious Russophiles who turn up on PB from time to time. (Though was Truman really Leon? Or am I really Sean T etc? Only Leon and I know the answer to that.)

    I can understand why, in our world of aliases, suspicions arise. So here’s the truth (promise!). I am a long-time reader of PB (a lurker, perhaps, though that sounds a bit seedy) and a true fan of the well-informed political debate that takes place here. I pay tribute to Mike Smithson for having created this site and am sorry that he is stepping back.

    I do not live in Moscow or on a never-ending tour of the world’s most glamorous hotels and restaurants, but in a pleasant house deep in the West Country, with a partner (female), three dogs, a garden and a Manchester United supporters badge (sorry, TSE and others, about last Sunday). I am an ex-Fleet St journalist (physically as well as metaphorically, if that gives you a clue), past retirement age, who still dabbles in publishing/editing etc with a few other harmless pastimes. I am a political centrist, a former Tory who left the party when Boris became leader, a monarchist, pro-Europe, pro-Ukraine, anti-Trump who believes that it will probably be good for democracy to put Labour in charge for a bit.

    So that’s my story (well-crafted by my handler comrades, I am sure you will agree). If anyone doubts it, let me offer a phone or zoom call to the doubter whenever convenient - I can indeed be verified (it's programmed into my algorithm). I am unlikely to be a frequent poster, but now that the ice has been broken, who knows? So, thank you @Benpointer for seeking to give me a chance.

    Sorry for the lengthy post - next one will be much shorter and pithier.
    When you say 'West Country,' is that Belarus?

    (More seriously, welcome to the bear pit.)
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,090
    DavidL said:

    Carnyx said:

    WillG said:

    Carnyx said:

    WillG said:

    kinabalu said:

    Will a Labour government want to rejoin an EU with Le Pen as President of France?

    Her niece describes it as a failed project that has left Europe a digital colony of America, an economic colony of China, and on the way to becoming a demographic colony of Africa and religious and cultural colony of Islam.

    https://x.com/marionmarechal/status/1770894693481537884

    Mmm, let's take it back to how it was in the 1930s. All those proud independent sovereign states looking out for their own proud independent people.
    It was proud independent states like the UK and the USA that defeated Nazi Germany, while internationalist Lord Halifax types wanted to make accommodations.
    What was the role of Canada, Australia and India?
    And the Poles and Norwegians and quite a few French and Africans and Australians and ...

    Indeed FDR and WSC were quite big on internationalism even during the war.
    Poland, Norway etc were proud independent states.
    And remained them, with governments in exile and armed forces embodied.
    Currently, the world's longest serving Government-in-exile is from which country?
    Myanmar?
    Wales.
  • CatManCatMan Posts: 2,758
    Carnyx said:

    Foxy said:

    Foxy said:

    kinabalu said:

    kinabalu said:

    WillG said:

    kinabalu said:

    Will a Labour government want to rejoin an EU with Le Pen as President of France?

    Her niece describes it as a failed project that has left Europe a digital colony of America, an economic colony of China, and on the way to becoming a demographic colony of Africa and religious and cultural colony of Islam.

    https://x.com/marionmarechal/status/1770894693481537884

    Mmm, let's take it back to how it was in the 1930s. All those proud independent sovereign states looking out for their own proud independent people.
    It was proud independent states like the UK and the USA that defeated Nazi Germany, while internationalist Lord Halifax types wanted to make accommodations.
    Well the question was, would we want to rejoin the EU if it veered strongly to the populist right? To which the answer is No. However it's a flawed question. If lots of countries in Europe embrace national populism, elect parties espousing that mindset into government, there won't be an EU to rejoin. And that would be a tragedy.
    An alliance of nation states is far superior to having a single critical control point.

    Trump should be proof of that.

    Would you want Europe led by a European Trump? Better only one nation is, than a whole continent is.
    I was considering the impact on the EU (which is an alliance of nation states) of its members succumbing to right wing national populism.
    Though even Le Pen no longer advocates leaving the EU, so unlikely to break it up.

    Indeed having more nationalist leaders may lead to a more variable federation, with quite different local rules, but free trade and movement.

    It might well be more to our taste when we Rejoin.
    You’re a “states’ rights” man in American terms?
    British people do not understand Federalism, so see federal countries through the prism of Central control.

    The whole point of Federalism is local variations in law, or "states rights". So yes I do support States Rights as long as they do not impinge on the powers reserved to the central government.
    It's a very familiar issue in Scotland, where 'devolution' is pretended to be comparable to federation, despite all powers ultimately residing in Westminster and returnable the instant they decide.
    See also the Tories trying to scrap the ULEZ extension in London
  • LostPasswordLostPassword Posts: 15,019
    The Opinium poll tonight is interesting. Two weeks since the last and no change in the major party shares, unlike in polls from many other firms recently.
  • JosiasJessopJosiasJessop Posts: 38,841
    viewcode said:

    viewcode said:

    viewcode said:

    It was a good day. The sun came out, I shopped well, I had a nice relaxing lunch in the pub, I walked to the bus stop courtesy of bus times.org and got on to a clean friendly bus with no nutters, sat down and relaxed...

    ...as the bus turned in the wrong direction. Wrong bus.

    In a kerfuffle I dinged the bell, got off, ran back but could not get back in time for the right bus. And then realised I had left half the shopping on the bus.

    True story.

    👿

    Sympathies. Sounds like the start of an interesting novel!
    Honestly? Could be worse. I've lost about £40 of various stuff from Boots and I do feel sorry for the faithful shampoo and toothpaste stuck on a bus waiting for their owner to return (I can be unbearably sentimental), but if I grit my teeth and be rational about it it's not so bad. Although bear in mind I apologise to socks when I throw them out and tell them that they were good socks and shouldn't feel bad. Plus I was bought up on the it's a sin to waste good food principle, so leaving shopping behind does not sit well.

    Damn

    I'll phone the company.
    No sorry, that won't do.

    Your shopping needed to be picked up by a mysterious loner, who soon after calls the police from a public phone box saying he has knowledge of a planned assassination attempt on a leading public figure... The police quickly track the stranger down but he flees leaving the shopping bag with a receipt for your shopping in it, which the police trace back to you. Since you bear a passing resemblance to the stranger, and have no alibi for the time of the call or the near capture of the stranger, it takes you 24 hours in police custody to convince them they're mistaken.

    Meanwhile, a leading public figure (not the one the stranger identified, but similar) is assassinated...

    ..and so on.
    ...and then escape from the cops to try to prevent the next assassination, and am pursued by a dogged police officer. During his investigation he becomes increasingly suspicious and in the final confrontation he makes me realise that I was the assassin all along and the innocent persona was a postraumatic overlay imposed by the guilt over the lost toothpaste. I put down the snipers rifle and, reunited with the bag, am led away sobbing.
    :)

    An acquaintance left his favourite toy on a bus during the war. It was a simple toy (as most were back then...), but its loss still resonates with him to this day. I'm guessing it was because it was given to him by his father, who was away serving the country. A loss on top of a loss. The loss still gets mentioned occasionally eighty years later as a sad regret.

    I find it quite poignant.
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 62,236
    edited March 23
    TopDog said:

    TopDog said:

    No googling - who is this, and why is he interesting?


    Blackadder
    No, it’s the pilot of the plane who crashed on the Ukraine/Republic of China border.
    C'mon! Give him a chance.
    Well, I thought my first-ever post was quite witty, but now I can see that I have been ‘outed’ within minutes as a reincarnation of Truman or one of the other suspicious Russophiles who turn up on PB from time to time. (Though was Truman really Leon? Or am I really Sean T etc? Only Leon and I know the answer to that.)

    I can understand why, in our world of aliases, suspicions arise. So here’s the truth (promise!). I am a long-time reader of PB (a lurker, perhaps, though that sounds a bit seedy) and a true fan of the well-informed political debate that takes place here. I pay tribute to Mike Smithson for having created this site and am sorry that he is stepping back.

    I do not live in Moscow or on a never-ending tour of the world’s most glamorous hotels and restaurants, but in a pleasant house deep in the West Country, with a partner (female), three dogs, a garden and a Manchester United supporters badge (sorry, TSE and others, about last Sunday). I am an ex-Fleet St journalist (physically as well as metaphorically, if that gives you a clue), past retirement age, who still dabbles in publishing/editing etc with a few other harmless pastimes. I am a political centrist, a former Tory who left the party when Boris became leader, a monarchist, pro-Europe, pro-Ukraine, anti-Trump who believes that it will probably be good for democracy to put Labour in charge for a bit.

    So that’s my story (well-crafted by my handler comrades, I am sure you will agree). If anyone doubts it, let me offer a phone or zoom call to the doubter whenever convenient - I can indeed be verified (it's programmed into my algorithm). I am unlikely to be a frequent poster, but now that the ice has been broken, who knows? So, thank you @Benpointer for seeking to give me a chance.

    Sorry for the lengthy post - next one will be much shorter and pithier.
    So you're saying you're a fake Russian troll ? 😊

    Welcome.
  • turbotubbsturbotubbs Posts: 15,079

    Guardian running a story that a September or October election will effectively disenfranchise thousands of students who won’t have time to re-register, or perhaps register for the first time.
    The consequence would be a fall in the Labour in constituencies like Canterbury.

    Just get a postal vote at home.
  • FrankBoothFrankBooth Posts: 9,044
    Really insightful piece by Danny Finkelstein on Israel/Palestine.

    'Aware that Israel’s supporters and its critics have been talking past each other, I decided to write an article for The Times in which I set out some of the things critics had been saying that I had heard, understood and might be willing to accept.

    I restated my belief in the need for Israel to exist and be secure, I repeated that it was unthinkable that Hamas be allowed to continue governing territory adjacent to Israel, I admitted that my view wasn’t the same as that of every Jew. And then I made my list of concessions.

    I won’t repeat everything I wrote, but the thrust was that I accepted that there had been an emerging Palestinian nationalism at the same time as Zionist migration. I understood why Palestinian Arabs hadn’t wanted to share the land, even though I regretted it. I acknowledged that in the war they then launched, some Palestinians had been driven from their homes and still felt a sense of injustice.

    And I agreed they needed still to have their own state, an outcome which settlements and the attitude of the Israeli government impedes. And here is what happened when I wrote this.

    Nothing. Nothing happened. I had written that I was trying to establish a dialogue in which all of us showed we were listening to each other, that while some issues were ones that were about right and wrong (the horrific Hamas attack, the need for half the world’s Jews to feel secure), others were about competing rights.

    But I didn’t get the dialogue I had been asking for. Not from one person. Not in a single email. Not in a single letter. Not in a single tweet. Not one person matched my concessions with concessions of their own. The only replies I got were to tell me I was right to concede and demand more.

    I tried again. I wrote another column and repeated the arguments I had heard the critics make. I was even more explicit this time about seeking a response. But still, I got nothing.'

    https://www.thejc.com/lets-talk/so-how-did-a-hamas-apologist-get-an-invitation-to-parliament-jbkk0e9c
Sign In or Register to comment.