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The voters do not salute Galloway’s courage, strength, and indefatigability – politicalbetting.com

SystemSystem Posts: 11,736
edited March 12 in General
The voters do not salute Galloway’s courage, strength, and indefatigability – politicalbetting.com

Do you have a favourable or unfavourable opinion of George Galloway?Favourable: 11%Unfavourable: 46%Don't know: 42%https://t.co/JsbQUslaOZ pic.twitter.com/pFyJ64iwWF

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  • Options
    TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 114,789
    First like Surena at Carrhae.
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    Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 61,053
    Good morning, everyone.

    Mr. Eagles, he was rather helped by Crassus. Ironic the Parthians didn't end up surviving all that much longer.

    F1: first race not a classic. The Alonso bet, tipped in the blog, failed, but the early Perez each way bet did come off, so marginally green if you backed both.
  • Options
    tlg86tlg86 Posts: 25,223
    And yet he won on Thursday. Some people clearly do like him.
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    squareroot2squareroot2 Posts: 6,401
    tlg86 said:

    And yet he won on Thursday. Some people clearly do like him.

    Wrong. They didn't like the others.
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    Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 61,053
    Betting Post

    F1: Backed Perez at 11 (12 with boost) on Ladbrokes to win each way in Saudi Arabia. He has a strong record there and the Red Bull remains the fastest car, plus Mercedes and Ferrari both had reliability concerns last time out (and higher temperatures may compromise Mercedes-powered cars even more).
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    OldKingColeOldKingCole Posts: 32,170
    tlg86 said:

    And yet he won on Thursday. Some people clearly do like him.

    It was, I think, significant that the independent Rochdale businessman was second. And good morning everybody!
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    Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 55,869
    Sandpit said:

    Sunak has an easy way of getting rid of Galloway from Parliament if he wants. One call to the king, and we all get to vote on May 2nd.

    There won't be an election in May.
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    ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,655

    tlg86 said:

    And yet he won on Thursday. Some people clearly do like him.

    It was, I think, significant that the independent Rochdale businessman was second. And good morning everybody!
    If only he'd won. An epic slap in the face to all established parties and a rabid apologist for mass murder would have been a very good result.
  • Options
    ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,655
    edited March 3

    Sandpit said:

    Sunak has an easy way of getting rid of Galloway from Parliament if he wants. One call to the king, and we all get to vote on May 2nd.

    There won't be an election in May.
    What about in Truss?

    Oh, 'eLection...'
  • Options
    bondegezoubondegezou Posts: 8,089

    Sandpit said:

    Sunak has an easy way of getting rid of Galloway from Parliament if he wants. One call to the king, and we all get to vote on May 2nd.

    There won't be an election in May.
    There will be lots of elections in May, from the London Assembly to the North Macedonia Parliament. There won’t be a general election in the UK.
  • Options
    FoxyFoxy Posts: 45,054

    Sandpit said:

    Sunak has an easy way of getting rid of Galloway from Parliament if he wants. One call to the king, and we all get to vote on May 2nd.

    There won't be an election in May.
    It's needed but won't happen. Sunak will leave it as long as possible. It will be a winter election. I think Jan 2025 most likely now.

    I don't think such delay will benefit the Tories. They have severely overstayed their welcome, and the consequences for them just get worse.
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    Scott_xPScott_xP Posts: 33,329
    Foxy said:

    Sandpit said:

    Sunak has an easy way of getting rid of Galloway from Parliament if he wants. One call to the king, and we all get to vote on May 2nd.

    There won't be an election in May.
    It's needed but won't happen. Sunak will leave it as long as possible.
    Sunak will not be in post long after May
  • Options
    FoxyFoxy Posts: 45,054
    Scott_xP said:

    Foxy said:

    Sandpit said:

    Sunak has an easy way of getting rid of Galloway from Parliament if he wants. One call to the king, and we all get to vote on May 2nd.

    There won't be an election in May.
    It's needed but won't happen. Sunak will leave it as long as possible.
    Sunak will not be in post long after May
    I agree that there is likely to be a VONC after the May locals, but he will survive. Only Truss wants the poisoned chalice, and even the Tories are not that daft.
  • Options
    Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 55,869
    Foxy said:

    Sandpit said:

    Sunak has an easy way of getting rid of Galloway from Parliament if he wants. One call to the king, and we all get to vote on May 2nd.

    There won't be an election in May.
    It's needed but won't happen. Sunak will leave it as long as possible. It will be a winter election. I think Jan 2025 most likely now.

    I don't think such delay will benefit the Tories. They have severely overstayed their welcome, and the consequences for them just get worse.
    I don't think it will make much difference.
  • Options
    bondegezoubondegezou Posts: 8,089
    edited March 3
    The polling is looking good for the conservatives in North Macedonia, above 40% in both of this year’s opinion polls.

    Conservatives are also polling well when it comes to Panama’s May Presidential election.
  • Options
    Luckyguy1983Luckyguy1983 Posts: 25,707
    Foxy said:

    Scott_xP said:

    Foxy said:

    Sandpit said:

    Sunak has an easy way of getting rid of Galloway from Parliament if he wants. One call to the king, and we all get to vote on May 2nd.

    There won't be an election in May.
    It's needed but won't happen. Sunak will leave it as long as possible.
    Sunak will not be in post long after May
    I agree that there is likely to be a VONC after the May locals, but he will survive. Only Truss wants the poisoned chalice, and even the Tories are not that daft.
    Where have you read that Truss wishes to resume her role as leader?
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    sbjme19sbjme19 Posts: 149
    I wonder now if it might be May because if they announce tax cuts it gives Labour little time to respond and say if they'd keep them, whereas delaying gives Labour more time to evolve a plan plus time for more things to go wrong.
    On a practical level if combined with the locals, does anyone remember the snail count of 2015 especially in London and the Mets?. Final result Friday lunchtime.
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    algarkirkalgarkirk Posts: 10,753
    Foxy said:

    Sandpit said:

    Sunak has an easy way of getting rid of Galloway from Parliament if he wants. One call to the king, and we all get to vote on May 2nd.

    There won't be an election in May.
    It's needed but won't happen. Sunak will leave it as long as possible. It will be a winter election. I think Jan 2025 most likely now.

    I don't think such delay will benefit the Tories. They have severely overstayed their welcome, and the consequences for them just get worse.
    I think January must be ruled out. The legal dissolution timetable makes it impossible to have a January election without the campaign running over Christmas. This won't happen.
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    OldKingColeOldKingCole Posts: 32,170
    The record of this government in repealing some of the laws from the Coalition, such as the Fixed Terms Act and trying to to ‘fiddle’ voting means it’ll be thrown, and will thoroughly deserve its fate.
    I thought the last days of Brown’s government were a shambles but the current lot are worse.
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    SandpitSandpit Posts: 50,174

    Betting Post

    F1: Backed Perez at 11 (12 with boost) on Ladbrokes to win each way in Saudi Arabia. He has a strong record there and the Red Bull remains the fastest car, plus Mercedes and Ferrari both had reliability concerns last time out (and higher temperatures may compromise Mercedes-powered cars even more).

    Perez e/w is a good bet. It looks like that car is a second a lap faster than the rest of them. I suspect that the e/w option is going to get shut down if he keeps finishing second.
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    Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 55,869
    sbjme19 said:

    I wonder now if it might be May because if they announce tax cuts it gives Labour little time to respond and say if they'd keep them, whereas delaying gives Labour more time to evolve a plan plus time for more things to go wrong.
    On a practical level if combined with the locals, does anyone remember the snail count of 2015 especially in London and the Mets?. Final result Friday lunchtime.

    It's wishful thinking that leads people to think it will be held in May, by those want to be rid of the Tories as soon as possible.

    It's also why they try the gentle goading: the argument being that if you go sooner you might lose fewer seats, which I think is essentially nonsense.
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    StuartinromfordStuartinromford Posts: 14,745
    Foxy said:

    Scott_xP said:

    Foxy said:

    Sandpit said:

    Sunak has an easy way of getting rid of Galloway from Parliament if he wants. One call to the king, and we all get to vote on May 2nd.

    There won't be an election in May.
    It's needed but won't happen. Sunak will leave it as long as possible.
    Sunak will not be in post long after May
    I agree that there is likely to be a VONC after the May locals, but he will survive. Only Truss wants the poisoned chalice, and even the Tories are not that daft.
    If there were a widely-tolerable alternative, it might be different, but there isn't.

    One chunk of the party will hold on to Nurse Rishi for fear of Braverman, another for fear of Truss (or a Trussalike), and so on. In a VONC, they all add up to save Sunak.
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    Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 61,053
    Mr. Sandpit, perhaps. There's no each way option for the title, although there is a market on winner without Verstappen.
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    SandpitSandpit Posts: 50,174

    sbjme19 said:

    I wonder now if it might be May because if they announce tax cuts it gives Labour little time to respond and say if they'd keep them, whereas delaying gives Labour more time to evolve a plan plus time for more things to go wrong.
    On a practical level if combined with the locals, does anyone remember the snail count of 2015 especially in London and the Mets?. Final result Friday lunchtime.

    It's wishful thinking that leads people to think it will be held in May, by those want to be rid of the Tories as soon as possible.

    It's also why they try the gentle goading: the argument being that if you go sooner you might lose fewer seats, which I think is essentially nonsense.
    You reckon he goes for October, or that it ends up in January by default because he can’t take a decision?
  • Options
    TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 114,789
    I didn't think there was much in the Angela Rayner story but now I do.

    The Angela Rayner council house case, explained by a tax expert

    Ignorance about tax is not new, but contradictions in the deputy Labour leader’s accounts are concerning, says Dan Neidle


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/the-angela-rayner-council-house-case-explained-by-a-tax-expert-8klnvzp0m
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    BarnesianBarnesian Posts: 8,022
    Sandpit said:

    sbjme19 said:

    I wonder now if it might be May because if they announce tax cuts it gives Labour little time to respond and say if they'd keep them, whereas delaying gives Labour more time to evolve a plan plus time for more things to go wrong.
    On a practical level if combined with the locals, does anyone remember the snail count of 2015 especially in London and the Mets?. Final result Friday lunchtime.

    It's wishful thinking that leads people to think it will be held in May, by those want to be rid of the Tories as soon as possible.

    It's also why they try the gentle goading: the argument being that if you go sooner you might lose fewer seats, which I think is essentially nonsense.
    You reckon he goes for October, or that it ends up in January by default because he can’t take a decision?
    November 14th. Announced at Tory conference
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    ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,655

    I didn't think there was much in the Angela Rayner story but now I do.

    The Angela Rayner council house case, explained by a tax expert

    Ignorance about tax is not new, but contradictions in the deputy Labour leader’s accounts are concerning, says Dan Neidle


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/the-angela-rayner-council-house-case-explained-by-a-tax-expert-8klnvzp0m

    Although that said, given the truly labyrinthine rules on capital gains tax on property, I'm not sure even if she's broken the letter of the law it would gain much traction. All she will have to do is plead ignorance, which would be the case for most people who are not trained accountants (including not a few solicitors).

    If she needed to turn it around, she could start by pointing out our tax system is a shambles and committing Labour to simplifying it.
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    IanB2IanB2 Posts: 47,620
    Looks like the traditional Sunday Rawnsley came out early this week, anyhow....

    The police chiefs themselves have been strikingly reluctant to endorse Mr Sunak’s contention that Britain is descending into “mob rule”. This sounds like the kind of thing a rent-a-gob reactionary backbencher might spit out in the hope of being quoted by the Daily Mail. You don’t expect to hear that kind of nonsense coming out of the mouth of the prime minister.

    There’s a need for a reasoned debate about the conduct and management of demonstrations. But that was not what the Tory leader was seeking to stimulate with those headline-hunting remarks [of last week]. He was conflating democratic protest with “mob rule” in a way that disdained and undermined Britain’s proud traditions of free assembly and free expression. This wild outburst did him no credit.

    [This week's] was one of his better crafted speeches, even if the cynic in me wondered whether a deeply unpopular prime minister was trying to gain public favour by presentinging himself as the steady leader of the nation manning the thin line between stability and chaos. There is also a big underlying issue: the jarring discordance between Mr Sunak’s advocations of unity and mutual respect with the conduct of elements of his own party.

    The Tory leader...has been flabby about policing extremism within his own ranks and this feebleness is sourced in a fear that they represent constituencies within his party that could make trouble for him. The Tory party’s hard right is the mob he feels most menaced by. He has not repudiated Ms Truss’s love-ins with the Trumpites. He sacked Ms Braverman as home secretary for an incendiary provocation about “hate marches” last November, but she was only in that profile-enhancing post in the first place because Mr Sunak struck a Faustian bargain with her when he thought he needed hard-right support to secure the premiership. He handed a louder mic to Lee Anderson by promoting him to deputy chair of the Tory party, a role he exploited to platform his noxious prejudices, until he quit over Rwanda.

    Only extremists will disagree with the prime minister when he says we should not allow them to hijack our politics. More’s the pity that he has too often behaved like a hostage of the hate-mongers within his own party.
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    geoffwgeoffw Posts: 8,197
    Barnesian said:

    Sandpit said:

    sbjme19 said:

    I wonder now if it might be May because if they announce tax cuts it gives Labour little time to respond and say if they'd keep them, whereas delaying gives Labour more time to evolve a plan plus time for more things to go wrong.
    On a practical level if combined with the locals, does anyone remember the snail count of 2015 especially in London and the Mets?. Final result Friday lunchtime.

    It's wishful thinking that leads people to think it will be held in May, by those want to be rid of the Tories as soon as possible.

    It's also why they try the gentle goading: the argument being that if you go sooner you might lose fewer seats, which I think is essentially nonsense.
    You reckon he goes for October, or that it ends up in January by default because he can’t take a decision?
    November 14th. Announced at Tory conference
    That's my guess too

  • Options
    EabhalEabhal Posts: 6,118

    The polling is looking good for the conservatives in North Macedonia, above 40% in both of this year’s opinion polls.

    Conservatives are also polling well when it comes to Panama’s May Presidential election.

    Talk about silver linings
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    Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 55,869
    Sandpit said:

    sbjme19 said:

    I wonder now if it might be May because if they announce tax cuts it gives Labour little time to respond and say if they'd keep them, whereas delaying gives Labour more time to evolve a plan plus time for more things to go wrong.
    On a practical level if combined with the locals, does anyone remember the snail count of 2015 especially in London and the Mets?. Final result Friday lunchtime.

    It's wishful thinking that leads people to think it will be held in May, by those want to be rid of the Tories as soon as possible.

    It's also why they try the gentle goading: the argument being that if you go sooner you might lose fewer seats, which I think is essentially nonsense.
    You reckon he goes for October, or that it ends up in January by default because he can’t take a decision?
    October or November.

    I doubt January.
  • Options
    ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,655
    geoffw said:

    Barnesian said:

    Sandpit said:

    sbjme19 said:

    I wonder now if it might be May because if they announce tax cuts it gives Labour little time to respond and say if they'd keep them, whereas delaying gives Labour more time to evolve a plan plus time for more things to go wrong.
    On a practical level if combined with the locals, does anyone remember the snail count of 2015 especially in London and the Mets?. Final result Friday lunchtime.

    It's wishful thinking that leads people to think it will be held in May, by those want to be rid of the Tories as soon as possible.

    It's also why they try the gentle goading: the argument being that if you go sooner you might lose fewer seats, which I think is essentially nonsense.
    You reckon he goes for October, or that it ends up in January by default because he can’t take a decision?
    November 14th. Announced at Tory conference
    That's my guess too

    Of course, we had all assumed that with the King away for most of October that month would be ruled out.

    However, with his cancer diagnosis I wonder if his itinerary will change.

    Seems a bit ghoulish to speculate that Sunak's options may have been increased by one man's illness, but...
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    EabhalEabhal Posts: 6,118
    Sunak could probably go for massive tax cuts and shunning the OBR at the moment - everyone expects a Labour victory, so it might have very little impact on the financial markets.
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    TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 114,789
    edited March 3
    Well.

    Jos Verstappen: Red Bull could be torn apart if Christian Horner stays

    Team principal said Formula 1 should ‘move on’ after Max Verstappen won Bahrain Grand Prix on Saturday, but star driver’s father disagrees


    Max Verstappen’s father believes Red Bull will be torn apart if Christian Horner remains as their team principal.

    Verstappen, the reigning world champion, won the 2024 season opener in Bahrain on Saturday despite the controversy surrounding his British team principal....

    ....Now, however, Jos has publicly questioned Horner’s position. “There is tension here while he remains in position,” he told the Daily Mail. “The team is in danger of being torn apart. It can’t go on the way it is. It will explode. He is playing the victim when he is the one causing the problems.”

    Verstappen Sr has denied being involved in the attempts to unsettle Horner in both his personal and professional life. “That wouldn’t make sense,” he said. “Why would I do that when Max is doing so well here?” However, his latest comments have the potential to do so.


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/jos-verstappen-red-bull-could-be-torn-apart-if-christian-horner-stays-8j7c5kfht
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    SandyRentoolSandyRentool Posts: 20,816
    Good morning.

    Amusing to note that a very familiar debate is ongoing over on Rail Forums on the thread about the Swanage Railway going cashless.

    Has anyone given up cash/contactless for Lent?
  • Options
    FoxyFoxy Posts: 45,054
    Barnesian said:

    Sandpit said:

    sbjme19 said:

    I wonder now if it might be May because if they announce tax cuts it gives Labour little time to respond and say if they'd keep them, whereas delaying gives Labour more time to evolve a plan plus time for more things to go wrong.
    On a practical level if combined with the locals, does anyone remember the snail count of 2015 especially in London and the Mets?. Final result Friday lunchtime.

    It's wishful thinking that leads people to think it will be held in May, by those want to be rid of the Tories as soon as possible.

    It's also why they try the gentle goading: the argument being that if you go sooner you might lose fewer seats, which I think is essentially nonsense.
    You reckon he goes for October, or that it ends up in January by default because he can’t take a decision?
    November 14th. Announced at Tory conference
    In the predictions contest I went for the 28th November as the 14th would mean the last weekend of campaigning will be Remembrance Weekend. It also causes issues for the Commonwealth Conference in Samoa which Sunak will want as his swansong.
  • Options
    TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 114,789

    Good morning.

    Amusing to note that a very familiar debate is ongoing over on Rail Forums on the thread about the Swanage Railway going cashless.

    Has anyone given up cash/contactless for Lent?

    I've given up subtlety for Lent.
  • Options
    FoxyFoxy Posts: 45,054

    Good morning.

    Amusing to note that a very familiar debate is ongoing over on Rail Forums on the thread about the Swanage Railway going cashless.

    Has anyone given up cash/contactless for Lent?

    I've given up subtlety for Lent.
    Just don't give up modesty. That would be too much.
  • Options
    SandpitSandpit Posts: 50,174
    Barnesian said:

    Sandpit said:

    sbjme19 said:

    I wonder now if it might be May because if they announce tax cuts it gives Labour little time to respond and say if they'd keep them, whereas delaying gives Labour more time to evolve a plan plus time for more things to go wrong.
    On a practical level if combined with the locals, does anyone remember the snail count of 2015 especially in London and the Mets?. Final result Friday lunchtime.

    It's wishful thinking that leads people to think it will be held in May, by those want to be rid of the Tories as soon as possible.

    It's also why they try the gentle goading: the argument being that if you go sooner you might lose fewer seats, which I think is essentially nonsense.
    You reckon he goes for October, or that it ends up in January by default because he can’t take a decision?
    November 14th. Announced at Tory conference
    Is that not the worst possible date? A couple of weeks after the clocks go back, winter setting in making people generally miserable.

    Meanwhile, in the six months since May, another million households have faced remortgage at much higher interest rates, and see themselves as much worse off than they were in 2019…
  • Options
    ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,655

    Good morning.

    Amusing to note that a very familiar debate is ongoing over on Rail Forums on the thread about the Swanage Railway going cashless.

    Has anyone given up cash/contactless for Lent?

    I've given up subtlety for Lent.
    :hushed:
  • Options
    Dura_AceDura_Ace Posts: 13,126
    edited March 3
    Foxy said:

    Scott_xP said:

    Foxy said:

    Sandpit said:

    Sunak has an easy way of getting rid of Galloway from Parliament if he wants. One call to the king, and we all get to vote on May 2nd.

    There won't be an election in May.
    It's needed but won't happen. Sunak will leave it as long as possible.
    Sunak will not be in post long after May
    I agree that there is likely to be a VONC after the May locals, but he will survive. Only Truss wants the poisoned chalice, and even the Tories are not that daft.
    The compelling features of a hypothetical Truss challenge is the tory members are addled enough to vote for her again and she's psychotic enough to believe she can win the subsequent GE.
  • Options
    FoxyFoxy Posts: 45,054
    Dura_Ace said:

    Foxy said:

    Scott_xP said:

    Foxy said:

    Sandpit said:

    Sunak has an easy way of getting rid of Galloway from Parliament if he wants. One call to the king, and we all get to vote on May 2nd.

    There won't be an election in May.
    It's needed but won't happen. Sunak will leave it as long as possible.
    Sunak will not be in post long after May
    I agree that there is likely to be a VONC after the May locals, but he will survive. Only Truss wants the poisoned chalice, and even the Tories are not that daft.
    The compelling features of a hypothetical Truss challenge is the tory members are addled enough to vote for her again and she's psychotic enough to believe she can win the subsequent GE.
    So, odds on?
  • Options
    TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 114,789
    ydoethur said:

    I didn't think there was much in the Angela Rayner story but now I do.

    The Angela Rayner council house case, explained by a tax expert

    Ignorance about tax is not new, but contradictions in the deputy Labour leader’s accounts are concerning, says Dan Neidle


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/the-angela-rayner-council-house-case-explained-by-a-tax-expert-8klnvzp0m

    Although that said, given the truly labyrinthine rules on capital gains tax on property, I'm not sure even if she's broken the letter of the law it would gain much traction. All she will have to do is plead ignorance, which would be the case for most people who are not trained accountants (including not a few solicitors).

    If she needed to turn it around, she could start by pointing out our tax system is a shambles and committing Labour to simplifying it.
    This is annoying Mr Neidle.

    Rayner said in a statement last week: “As with the majority of ordinary people who sell their own homes, I was not liable for capital gains tax because it was my home and the only one I owned.”

    But the rules don’t work like that. We are exempt from capital gains tax (CGT) on our main residence, but married couples can only have one main residence between them.

    So Rayner’s initial statement, that she wasn’t liable for capital gains tax because Vicarage Road was her home, was wrong. It’s understandable that she didn’t understand the position in 2015; it would have been a good idea to have taken advice, but many people don’t (and Rayner wasn’t an MP at the time). It’s less understandable that she doesn’t appear to have taken advice before putting out her statement nine years later.

    After I and others identified the problem, Rayner failed to correct her original statement, and is now saying simply that “no capital gains tax was payable”. How could that be?
  • Options
    SandpitSandpit Posts: 50,174

    Well.

    Jos Verstappen: Red Bull could be torn apart if Christian Horner stays

    Team principal said Formula 1 should ‘move on’ after Max Verstappen won Bahrain Grand Prix on Saturday, but star driver’s father disagrees


    Max Verstappen’s father believes Red Bull will be torn apart if Christian Horner remains as their team principal.

    Verstappen, the reigning world champion, won the 2024 season opener in Bahrain on Saturday despite the controversy surrounding his British team principal....

    ....Now, however, Jos has publicly questioned Horner’s position. “There is tension here while he remains in position,” he told the Daily Mail. “The team is in danger of being torn apart. It can’t go on the way it is. It will explode. He is playing the victim when he is the one causing the problems.”

    Verstappen Sr has denied being involved in the attempts to unsettle Horner in both his personal and professional life. “That wouldn’t make sense,” he said. “Why would I do that when Max is doing so well here?” However, his latest comments have the potential to do so.


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/jos-verstappen-red-bull-could-be-torn-apart-if-christian-horner-stays-8j7c5kfht

    There’s a full-on civil war going on behind the scenes.

    There’s a lot of rumours online about the relationships between Horny, Jos V, and the woman who made the complaint.
  • Options
    FoxyFoxy Posts: 45,054
    Sandpit said:

    Barnesian said:

    Sandpit said:

    sbjme19 said:

    I wonder now if it might be May because if they announce tax cuts it gives Labour little time to respond and say if they'd keep them, whereas delaying gives Labour more time to evolve a plan plus time for more things to go wrong.
    On a practical level if combined with the locals, does anyone remember the snail count of 2015 especially in London and the Mets?. Final result Friday lunchtime.

    It's wishful thinking that leads people to think it will be held in May, by those want to be rid of the Tories as soon as possible.

    It's also why they try the gentle goading: the argument being that if you go sooner you might lose fewer seats, which I think is essentially nonsense.
    You reckon he goes for October, or that it ends up in January by default because he can’t take a decision?
    November 14th. Announced at Tory conference
    Is that not the worst possible date? A couple of weeks after the clocks go back, winter setting in making people generally miserable.

    Meanwhile, in the six months since May, another million households have faced remortgage at much higher interest rates, and see themselves as much worse off than they were in 2019…
    It's why Jan 25 starts to look likely. There is always a reason to procrastinate.
  • Options
    ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,655

    ydoethur said:

    I didn't think there was much in the Angela Rayner story but now I do.

    The Angela Rayner council house case, explained by a tax expert

    Ignorance about tax is not new, but contradictions in the deputy Labour leader’s accounts are concerning, says Dan Neidle


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/the-angela-rayner-council-house-case-explained-by-a-tax-expert-8klnvzp0m

    Although that said, given the truly labyrinthine rules on capital gains tax on property, I'm not sure even if she's broken the letter of the law it would gain much traction. All she will have to do is plead ignorance, which would be the case for most people who are not trained accountants (including not a few solicitors).

    If she needed to turn it around, she could start by pointing out our tax system is a shambles and committing Labour to simplifying it.
    This is annoying Mr Neidle.

    Rayner said in a statement last week: “As with the majority of ordinary people who sell their own homes, I was not liable for capital gains tax because it was my home and the only one I owned.”

    But the rules don’t work like that. We are exempt from capital gains tax (CGT) on our main residence, but married couples can only have one main residence between them.

    So Rayner’s initial statement, that she wasn’t liable for capital gains tax because Vicarage Road was her home, was wrong. It’s understandable that she didn’t understand the position in 2015; it would have been a good idea to have taken advice, but many people don’t (and Rayner wasn’t an MP at the time). It’s less understandable that she doesn’t appear to have taken advice before putting out her statement nine years later.

    After I and others identified the problem, Rayner failed to correct her original statement, and is now saying simply that “no capital gains tax was payable”. How could that be?
    Well, I'm not surprised he's Neidled, but the fact is the rules are bad and that's the fundamental problem. Similarly, an issue with buy to let sales is many solicitors appear to be unaware any CGT must be paid within 60 days and is levied at a different rate.

    Sorting these issues out would be beneficial, although I won't hold my breath.
  • Options
    DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 24,754
    algarkirk said:

    Foxy said:

    Sandpit said:

    Sunak has an easy way of getting rid of Galloway from Parliament if he wants. One call to the king, and we all get to vote on May 2nd.

    There won't be an election in May.
    It's needed but won't happen. Sunak will leave it as long as possible. It will be a winter election. I think Jan 2025 most likely now.

    I don't think such delay will benefit the Tories. They have severely overstayed their welcome, and the consequences for them just get worse.
    I think January must be ruled out. The legal dissolution timetable makes it impossible to have a January election without the campaign running over Christmas. This won't happen.
    For a cynical CCHQ staffer, the campaign running over the holidays is a feature, not a bug, because as you say, it will need to be a phoney war. This will nullify opposition parties' advantage in the ground game because they will not be able to send out their activists to canvass, leaflet or otherwise harass voters. And if it disadvantages Labour, LibDems and ScotNats, that helps the blue team.

    January 2025. It buggers up the opposition ground game, Conservative voters are thought more likely to turn out in bad weather, and wintry seas will stop the small boats.
  • Options
    TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 114,789
    Foxy said:

    Good morning.

    Amusing to note that a very familiar debate is ongoing over on Rail Forums on the thread about the Swanage Railway going cashless.

    Has anyone given up cash/contactless for Lent?

    I've given up subtlety for Lent.
    Just don't give up modesty. That would be too much.
    Funny you mention that.

    I have a work meeting with external parties in a fortnight, I have been told one of the external parties absolutely hates brashness.

    To quote my bosses

    'For the love of God, please rein that shit in at the meeting'
  • Options
    ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,655

    Foxy said:

    Good morning.

    Amusing to note that a very familiar debate is ongoing over on Rail Forums on the thread about the Swanage Railway going cashless.

    Has anyone given up cash/contactless for Lent?

    I've given up subtlety for Lent.
    Just don't give up modesty. That would be too much.
    Funny you mention that.

    I have a work meeting with external parties in a fortnight, I have been told one of the external parties absolutely hates brashness.

    To quote my bosses

    'For the love of God, please rein that shit in at the meeting'
    By 'that shit,' did he mean your legendary modesty, or the external party?
  • Options
    CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 40,193
    edited March 3

    algarkirk said:

    Foxy said:

    Sandpit said:

    Sunak has an easy way of getting rid of Galloway from Parliament if he wants. One call to the king, and we all get to vote on May 2nd.

    There won't be an election in May.
    It's needed but won't happen. Sunak will leave it as long as possible. It will be a winter election. I think Jan 2025 most likely now.

    I don't think such delay will benefit the Tories. They have severely overstayed their welcome, and the consequences for them just get worse.
    I think January must be ruled out. The legal dissolution timetable makes it impossible to have a January election without the campaign running over Christmas. This won't happen.
    For a cynical CCHQ staffer, the campaign running over the holidays is a feature, not a bug, because as you say, it will need to be a phoney war. This will nullify opposition parties' advantage in the ground game because they will not be able to send out their activists to canvass, leaflet or otherwise harass voters. And if it disadvantages Labour, LibDems and ScotNats, that helps the blue team.

    January 2025. It buggers up the opposition ground game, Conservative voters are thought more likely to turn out in bad weather, and wintry seas will stop the small boats.
    And, of course, postal votes favour the Cons.

    OTOH the Christmas bills will have kicked in - depending on timing.
  • Options
    TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 114,789
    Sandpit said:

    Well.

    Jos Verstappen: Red Bull could be torn apart if Christian Horner stays

    Team principal said Formula 1 should ‘move on’ after Max Verstappen won Bahrain Grand Prix on Saturday, but star driver’s father disagrees


    Max Verstappen’s father believes Red Bull will be torn apart if Christian Horner remains as their team principal.

    Verstappen, the reigning world champion, won the 2024 season opener in Bahrain on Saturday despite the controversy surrounding his British team principal....

    ....Now, however, Jos has publicly questioned Horner’s position. “There is tension here while he remains in position,” he told the Daily Mail. “The team is in danger of being torn apart. It can’t go on the way it is. It will explode. He is playing the victim when he is the one causing the problems.”

    Verstappen Sr has denied being involved in the attempts to unsettle Horner in both his personal and professional life. “That wouldn’t make sense,” he said. “Why would I do that when Max is doing so well here?” However, his latest comments have the potential to do so.


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/jos-verstappen-red-bull-could-be-torn-apart-if-christian-horner-stays-8j7c5kfht

    There’s a full-on civil war going on behind the scenes.

    There’s a lot of rumours online about the relationships between Horny, Jos V, and the woman who made the complaint.
    If Horner was sensible, he'd sack Max Verstappen and replace him with Sir Lewis Hamilton this season.

    Truly sad thing is, Horneygate is likely to be the most exciting thing to happen in F1 this season.
  • Options
    ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,655
    Carnyx said:

    algarkirk said:

    Foxy said:

    Sandpit said:

    Sunak has an easy way of getting rid of Galloway from Parliament if he wants. One call to the king, and we all get to vote on May 2nd.

    There won't be an election in May.
    It's needed but won't happen. Sunak will leave it as long as possible. It will be a winter election. I think Jan 2025 most likely now.

    I don't think such delay will benefit the Tories. They have severely overstayed their welcome, and the consequences for them just get worse.
    I think January must be ruled out. The legal dissolution timetable makes it impossible to have a January election without the campaign running over Christmas. This won't happen.
    For a cynical CCHQ staffer, the campaign running over the holidays is a feature, not a bug, because as you say, it will need to be a phoney war. This will nullify opposition parties' advantage in the ground game because they will not be able to send out their activists to canvass, leaflet or otherwise harass voters. And if it disadvantages Labour, LibDems and ScotNats, that helps the blue team.

    January 2025. It buggers up the opposition ground game, Conservative voters are thought more likely to turn out in bad weather, and wintry seas will stop the small boats.
    And, of course, postal votes favour the Cons.
    With apologies to @BlancheLivermore I'm not sure that relying on postal votes at Christmas time would give quite the advantage you suggest.
  • Options
    TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 114,789
    ydoethur said:

    Foxy said:

    Good morning.

    Amusing to note that a very familiar debate is ongoing over on Rail Forums on the thread about the Swanage Railway going cashless.

    Has anyone given up cash/contactless for Lent?

    I've given up subtlety for Lent.
    Just don't give up modesty. That would be too much.
    Funny you mention that.

    I have a work meeting with external parties in a fortnight, I have been told one of the external parties absolutely hates brashness.

    To quote my bosses

    'For the love of God, please rein that shit in at the meeting'
    By 'that shit,' did he mean your legendary modesty, or the external party?
    My brashness.
  • Options
    Scott_xPScott_xP Posts: 33,329
    Foxy said:

    even the Tories are not that daft.

    As we used to say around these parts, "link" ?

    Current evidence suggests the Tories are very much that daft...
  • Options
    FoxyFoxy Posts: 45,054
    Sandpit said:

    Barnesian said:

    Sandpit said:

    sbjme19 said:

    I wonder now if it might be May because if they announce tax cuts it gives Labour little time to respond and say if they'd keep them, whereas delaying gives Labour more time to evolve a plan plus time for more things to go wrong.
    On a practical level if combined with the locals, does anyone remember the snail count of 2015 especially in London and the Mets?. Final result Friday lunchtime.

    It's wishful thinking that leads people to think it will be held in May, by those want to be rid of the Tories as soon as possible.

    It's also why they try the gentle goading: the argument being that if you go sooner you might lose fewer seats, which I think is essentially nonsense.
    You reckon he goes for October, or that it ends up in January by default because he can’t take a decision?
    November 14th. Announced at Tory conference
    Is that not the worst possible date? A couple of weeks after the clocks go back, winter setting in making people generally miserable.

    Meanwhile, in the six months since May, another million households have faced remortgage at much higher interest rates, and see themselves as much worse off than they were in 2019…

    algarkirk said:

    Foxy said:

    Sandpit said:

    Sunak has an easy way of getting rid of Galloway from Parliament if he wants. One call to the king, and we all get to vote on May 2nd.

    There won't be an election in May.
    It's needed but won't happen. Sunak will leave it as long as possible. It will be a winter election. I think Jan 2025 most likely now.

    I don't think such delay will benefit the Tories. They have severely overstayed their welcome, and the consequences for them just get worse.
    I think January must be ruled out. The legal dissolution timetable makes it impossible to have a January election without the campaign running over Christmas. This won't happen.
    For a cynical CCHQ staffer, the campaign running over the holidays is a feature, not a bug, because as you say, it will need to be a phoney war. This will nullify opposition parties' advantage in the ground game because they will not be able to send out their activists to canvass, leaflet or otherwise harass voters. And if it disadvantages Labour, LibDems and ScotNats, that helps the blue team.

    January 2025. It buggers up the opposition ground game, Conservative voters are thought more likely to turn out in bad weather, and wintry seas will stop the small boats.
    On the other hand January is always NHS crisis time.
  • Options
    FoxyFoxy Posts: 45,054
    ydoethur said:

    Carnyx said:

    algarkirk said:

    Foxy said:

    Sandpit said:

    Sunak has an easy way of getting rid of Galloway from Parliament if he wants. One call to the king, and we all get to vote on May 2nd.

    There won't be an election in May.
    It's needed but won't happen. Sunak will leave it as long as possible. It will be a winter election. I think Jan 2025 most likely now.

    I don't think such delay will benefit the Tories. They have severely overstayed their welcome, and the consequences for them just get worse.
    I think January must be ruled out. The legal dissolution timetable makes it impossible to have a January election without the campaign running over Christmas. This won't happen.
    For a cynical CCHQ staffer, the campaign running over the holidays is a feature, not a bug, because as you say, it will need to be a phoney war. This will nullify opposition parties' advantage in the ground game because they will not be able to send out their activists to canvass, leaflet or otherwise harass voters. And if it disadvantages Labour, LibDems and ScotNats, that helps the blue team.

    January 2025. It buggers up the opposition ground game, Conservative voters are thought more likely to turn out in bad weather, and wintry seas will stop the small boats.
    And, of course, postal votes favour the Cons.
    With apologies to @BlancheLivermore I'm not sure that relying on postal votes at Christmas time would give quite the advantage you suggest.
    Indeed! The postal system is increasingly erratic to the point where I wonder if they will get through at all!
  • Options
    Luckyguy1983Luckyguy1983 Posts: 25,707
    Foxy said:

    Dura_Ace said:

    Foxy said:

    Scott_xP said:

    Foxy said:

    Sandpit said:

    Sunak has an easy way of getting rid of Galloway from Parliament if he wants. One call to the king, and we all get to vote on May 2nd.

    There won't be an election in May.
    It's needed but won't happen. Sunak will leave it as long as possible.
    Sunak will not be in post long after May
    I agree that there is likely to be a VONC after the May locals, but he will survive. Only Truss wants the poisoned chalice, and even the Tories are not that daft.
    The compelling features of a hypothetical Truss challenge is the tory members are addled enough to vote for her again and she's psychotic enough to believe she can win the subsequent GE.
    So, odds on?
    Again, not prepared to share where you gained this valuable insight?
  • Options
    SandpitSandpit Posts: 50,174

    Sandpit said:

    Well.

    Jos Verstappen: Red Bull could be torn apart if Christian Horner stays

    Team principal said Formula 1 should ‘move on’ after Max Verstappen won Bahrain Grand Prix on Saturday, but star driver’s father disagrees


    Max Verstappen’s father believes Red Bull will be torn apart if Christian Horner remains as their team principal.

    Verstappen, the reigning world champion, won the 2024 season opener in Bahrain on Saturday despite the controversy surrounding his British team principal....

    ....Now, however, Jos has publicly questioned Horner’s position. “There is tension here while he remains in position,” he told the Daily Mail. “The team is in danger of being torn apart. It can’t go on the way it is. It will explode. He is playing the victim when he is the one causing the problems.”

    Verstappen Sr has denied being involved in the attempts to unsettle Horner in both his personal and professional life. “That wouldn’t make sense,” he said. “Why would I do that when Max is doing so well here?” However, his latest comments have the potential to do so.


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/jos-verstappen-red-bull-could-be-torn-apart-if-christian-horner-stays-8j7c5kfht

    There’s a full-on civil war going on behind the scenes.

    There’s a lot of rumours online about the relationships between Horny, Jos V, and the woman who made the complaint.
    If Horner was sensible, he'd sack Max Verstappen and replace him with Sir Lewis Hamilton this season.

    Truly sad thing is, Horneygate is likely to be the most exciting thing to happen in F1 this season.
    Well last night’s race was a total borefest, and if the budget cap cheating has entrenched an advantage over yet another year, there’s going to be little TV audience left by the summer in established markets.
  • Options
    CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 40,193
    edited March 3

    ydoethur said:

    I didn't think there was much in the Angela Rayner story but now I do.

    The Angela Rayner council house case, explained by a tax expert

    Ignorance about tax is not new, but contradictions in the deputy Labour leader’s accounts are concerning, says Dan Neidle


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/the-angela-rayner-council-house-case-explained-by-a-tax-expert-8klnvzp0m

    Although that said, given the truly labyrinthine rules on capital gains tax on property, I'm not sure even if she's broken the letter of the law it would gain much traction. All she will have to do is plead ignorance, which would be the case for most people who are not trained accountants (including not a few solicitors).

    If she needed to turn it around, she could start by pointing out our tax system is a shambles and committing Labour to simplifying it.
    This is annoying Mr Neidle.

    Rayner said in a statement last week: “As with the majority of ordinary people who sell their own homes, I was not liable for capital gains tax because it was my home and the only one I owned.”

    But the rules don’t work like that. We are exempt from capital gains tax (CGT) on our main residence, but married couples can only have one main residence between them.

    So Rayner’s initial statement, that she wasn’t liable for capital gains tax because Vicarage Road was her home, was wrong. It’s understandable that she didn’t understand the position in 2015; it would have been a good idea to have taken advice, but many people don’t (and Rayner wasn’t an MP at the time). It’s less understandable that she doesn’t appear to have taken advice before putting out her statement nine years later.

    After I and others identified the problem, Rayner failed to correct her original statement, and is now saying simply that “no capital gains tax was payable”. How could that be?
    But if you get married, then you've got a period to dispose of one house without incurring CGT because you were living in it. So her statement doesn't sound implausible. (Times piece paywalled, so I have no idea ifd this is disposed of therein.)
  • Options
    MexicanpeteMexicanpete Posts: 25,553
    ...
    Carnyx said:

    algarkirk said:

    Foxy said:

    Sandpit said:

    Sunak has an easy way of getting rid of Galloway from Parliament if he wants. One call to the king, and we all get to vote on May 2nd.

    There won't be an election in May.
    It's needed but won't happen. Sunak will leave it as long as possible. It will be a winter election. I think Jan 2025 most likely now.

    I don't think such delay will benefit the Tories. They have severely overstayed their welcome, and the consequences for them just get worse.
    I think January must be ruled out. The legal dissolution timetable makes it impossible to have a January election without the campaign running over Christmas. This won't happen.
    For a cynical CCHQ staffer, the campaign running over the holidays is a feature, not a bug, because as you say, it will need to be a phoney war. This will nullify opposition parties' advantage in the ground game because they will not be able to send out their activists to canvass, leaflet or otherwise harass voters. And if it disadvantages Labour, LibDems and ScotNats, that helps the blue team.

    January 2025. It buggers up the opposition ground game, Conservative voters are thought more likely to turn out in bad weather, and wintry seas will stop the small boats.
    And, of course, postal votes favour the Cons.

    ...and Galloway.

    January 23rd? Around the same time we complete our tax return and pay the outstanding amount.

    I'm not sure it helps the Conservatives but it takes PM Rishi as far as he can go if a defeat remains on the cards.
  • Options
    FoxyFoxy Posts: 45,054
    On topic, Galloway is a cynical opportunist, but also a one man band. I don't see him having much impact, and likely won't hold Rochdale.

    Though whichever party signs up the Rochdale Independent as their candidate may do well.
  • Options
    TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 114,789
    Carnyx said:

    ydoethur said:

    I didn't think there was much in the Angela Rayner story but now I do.

    The Angela Rayner council house case, explained by a tax expert

    Ignorance about tax is not new, but contradictions in the deputy Labour leader’s accounts are concerning, says Dan Neidle


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/the-angela-rayner-council-house-case-explained-by-a-tax-expert-8klnvzp0m

    Although that said, given the truly labyrinthine rules on capital gains tax on property, I'm not sure even if she's broken the letter of the law it would gain much traction. All she will have to do is plead ignorance, which would be the case for most people who are not trained accountants (including not a few solicitors).

    If she needed to turn it around, she could start by pointing out our tax system is a shambles and committing Labour to simplifying it.
    This is annoying Mr Neidle.

    Rayner said in a statement last week: “As with the majority of ordinary people who sell their own homes, I was not liable for capital gains tax because it was my home and the only one I owned.”

    But the rules don’t work like that. We are exempt from capital gains tax (CGT) on our main residence, but married couples can only have one main residence between them.

    So Rayner’s initial statement, that she wasn’t liable for capital gains tax because Vicarage Road was her home, was wrong. It’s understandable that she didn’t understand the position in 2015; it would have been a good idea to have taken advice, but many people don’t (and Rayner wasn’t an MP at the time). It’s less understandable that she doesn’t appear to have taken advice before putting out her statement nine years later.

    After I and others identified the problem, Rayner failed to correct her original statement, and is now saying simply that “no capital gains tax was payable”. How could that be?
    But if you get married, then you've got a period to dispose of one house without incurring CGT because you were living in it. So her statement doesn't sound implausible. (Times piece paywalled, so I have no idea ifd this is disposed of therein.)
    It is mentioned.
  • Options
    DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 24,754
    ydoethur said:

    I didn't think there was much in the Angela Rayner story but now I do.

    The Angela Rayner council house case, explained by a tax expert

    Ignorance about tax is not new, but contradictions in the deputy Labour leader’s accounts are concerning, says Dan Neidle


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/the-angela-rayner-council-house-case-explained-by-a-tax-expert-8klnvzp0m

    Although that said, given the truly labyrinthine rules on capital gains tax on property, I'm not sure even if she's broken the letter of the law it would gain much traction. All she will have to do is plead ignorance, which would be the case for most people who are not trained accountants (including not a few solicitors).

    If she needed to turn it around, she could start by pointing out our tax system is a shambles and committing Labour to simplifying it.
    I've not (so far) heard anyone talk about Angela Rayner's tax affairs. If anything, the two homes part might have more resonance. The danger is if Keir Starmer sees this as an opportunity to demote her, which he tried once before.
  • Options
    CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 40,193
    Foxy said:

    ydoethur said:

    Carnyx said:

    algarkirk said:

    Foxy said:

    Sandpit said:

    Sunak has an easy way of getting rid of Galloway from Parliament if he wants. One call to the king, and we all get to vote on May 2nd.

    There won't be an election in May.
    It's needed but won't happen. Sunak will leave it as long as possible. It will be a winter election. I think Jan 2025 most likely now.

    I don't think such delay will benefit the Tories. They have severely overstayed their welcome, and the consequences for them just get worse.
    I think January must be ruled out. The legal dissolution timetable makes it impossible to have a January election without the campaign running over Christmas. This won't happen.
    For a cynical CCHQ staffer, the campaign running over the holidays is a feature, not a bug, because as you say, it will need to be a phoney war. This will nullify opposition parties' advantage in the ground game because they will not be able to send out their activists to canvass, leaflet or otherwise harass voters. And if it disadvantages Labour, LibDems and ScotNats, that helps the blue team.

    January 2025. It buggers up the opposition ground game, Conservative voters are thought more likely to turn out in bad weather, and wintry seas will stop the small boats.
    And, of course, postal votes favour the Cons.
    With apologies to @BlancheLivermore I'm not sure that relying on postal votes at Christmas time would give quite the advantage you suggest.
    Indeed! The postal system is increasingly erratic to the point where I wonder if they will get through at all!
    Oh, they'll just change the law to make it a criminal offence to down tools at Christmas, or allow people to vote in advance of elections with a standing order-type mandate "for established parties with more than 50 seats", you know, or something.
  • Options
    FoxyFoxy Posts: 45,054
    Carnyx said:

    ydoethur said:

    I didn't think there was much in the Angela Rayner story but now I do.

    The Angela Rayner council house case, explained by a tax expert

    Ignorance about tax is not new, but contradictions in the deputy Labour leader’s accounts are concerning, says Dan Neidle


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/the-angela-rayner-council-house-case-explained-by-a-tax-expert-8klnvzp0m

    Although that said, given the truly labyrinthine rules on capital gains tax on property, I'm not sure even if she's broken the letter of the law it would gain much traction. All she will have to do is plead ignorance, which would be the case for most people who are not trained accountants (including not a few solicitors).

    If she needed to turn it around, she could start by pointing out our tax system is a shambles and committing Labour to simplifying it.
    This is annoying Mr Neidle.

    Rayner said in a statement last week: “As with the majority of ordinary people who sell their own homes, I was not liable for capital gains tax because it was my home and the only one I owned.”

    But the rules don’t work like that. We are exempt from capital gains tax (CGT) on our main residence, but married couples can only have one main residence between them.

    So Rayner’s initial statement, that she wasn’t liable for capital gains tax because Vicarage Road was her home, was wrong. It’s understandable that she didn’t understand the position in 2015; it would have been a good idea to have taken advice, but many people don’t (and Rayner wasn’t an MP at the time). It’s less understandable that she doesn’t appear to have taken advice before putting out her statement nine years later.

    After I and others identified the problem, Rayner failed to correct her original statement, and is now saying simply that “no capital gains tax was payable”. How could that be?
    But if you get married, then you've got a period to dispose of one house without incurring CGT because you were living in it. So her statement doesn't sound implausible. (Times piece paywalled, so I have no idea ifd this is disposed of therein.)
    Also a married couple can change their main residence to the second property before selling it, though need to be able to back that up with evidence.
  • Options
    SandpitSandpit Posts: 50,174

    ydoethur said:

    I didn't think there was much in the Angela Rayner story but now I do.

    The Angela Rayner council house case, explained by a tax expert

    Ignorance about tax is not new, but contradictions in the deputy Labour leader’s accounts are concerning, says Dan Neidle


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/the-angela-rayner-council-house-case-explained-by-a-tax-expert-8klnvzp0m

    Although that said, given the truly labyrinthine rules on capital gains tax on property, I'm not sure even if she's broken the letter of the law it would gain much traction. All she will have to do is plead ignorance, which would be the case for most people who are not trained accountants (including not a few solicitors).

    If she needed to turn it around, she could start by pointing out our tax system is a shambles and committing Labour to simplifying it.
    I've not (so far) heard anyone talk about Angela Rayner's tax affairs. If anything, the two homes part might have more resonance. The danger is if Keir Starmer sees this as an opportunity to demote her, which he tried once before.
    Isn’t the issue that she was *elected* as deputy leader, so SKS has to live with her?
  • Options
    FoxyFoxy Posts: 45,054

    Foxy said:

    Dura_Ace said:

    Foxy said:

    Scott_xP said:

    Foxy said:

    Sandpit said:

    Sunak has an easy way of getting rid of Galloway from Parliament if he wants. One call to the king, and we all get to vote on May 2nd.

    There won't be an election in May.
    It's needed but won't happen. Sunak will leave it as long as possible.
    Sunak will not be in post long after May
    I agree that there is likely to be a VONC after the May locals, but he will survive. Only Truss wants the poisoned chalice, and even the Tories are not that daft.
    The compelling features of a hypothetical Truss challenge is the tory members are addled enough to vote for her again and she's psychotic enough to believe she can win the subsequent GE.
    So, odds on?
    Again, not prepared to share where you gained this valuable insight?
    My fevered imagination and the tip from @DougSeal!
  • Options
    TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 114,789
    edited March 3
    Sandpit said:

    Sandpit said:

    Well.

    Jos Verstappen: Red Bull could be torn apart if Christian Horner stays

    Team principal said Formula 1 should ‘move on’ after Max Verstappen won Bahrain Grand Prix on Saturday, but star driver’s father disagrees


    Max Verstappen’s father believes Red Bull will be torn apart if Christian Horner remains as their team principal.

    Verstappen, the reigning world champion, won the 2024 season opener in Bahrain on Saturday despite the controversy surrounding his British team principal....

    ....Now, however, Jos has publicly questioned Horner’s position. “There is tension here while he remains in position,” he told the Daily Mail. “The team is in danger of being torn apart. It can’t go on the way it is. It will explode. He is playing the victim when he is the one causing the problems.”

    Verstappen Sr has denied being involved in the attempts to unsettle Horner in both his personal and professional life. “That wouldn’t make sense,” he said. “Why would I do that when Max is doing so well here?” However, his latest comments have the potential to do so.


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/jos-verstappen-red-bull-could-be-torn-apart-if-christian-horner-stays-8j7c5kfht

    There’s a full-on civil war going on behind the scenes.

    There’s a lot of rumours online about the relationships between Horny, Jos V, and the woman who made the complaint.
    If Horner was sensible, he'd sack Max Verstappen and replace him with Sir Lewis Hamilton this season.

    Truly sad thing is, Horneygate is likely to be the most exciting thing to happen in F1 this season.
    Well last night’s race was a total borefest, and if the budget cap cheating has entrenched an advantage over yet another year, there’s going to be little TV audience left by the summer in established markets.
    Indeed, another sad thing is if there were no Red Bull we would have a really exciting season just like last season with 34 points separating third to seventh in drivers' championship.
  • Options
    CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 40,193

    ydoethur said:

    I didn't think there was much in the Angela Rayner story but now I do.

    The Angela Rayner council house case, explained by a tax expert

    Ignorance about tax is not new, but contradictions in the deputy Labour leader’s accounts are concerning, says Dan Neidle


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/the-angela-rayner-council-house-case-explained-by-a-tax-expert-8klnvzp0m

    Although that said, given the truly labyrinthine rules on capital gains tax on property, I'm not sure even if she's broken the letter of the law it would gain much traction. All she will have to do is plead ignorance, which would be the case for most people who are not trained accountants (including not a few solicitors).

    If she needed to turn it around, she could start by pointing out our tax system is a shambles and committing Labour to simplifying it.
    I've not (so far) heard anyone talk about Angela Rayner's tax affairs. If anything, the two homes part might have more resonance. The danger is if Keir Starmer sees this as an opportunity to demote her, which he tried once before.
    Two homes? Plenty of relationships are in that position - and many married couples have had that as an evolutionary stage of their lives for obvious practical reasons.
  • Options
    ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,655

    Sandpit said:

    Sandpit said:

    Well.

    Jos Verstappen: Red Bull could be torn apart if Christian Horner stays

    Team principal said Formula 1 should ‘move on’ after Max Verstappen won Bahrain Grand Prix on Saturday, but star driver’s father disagrees


    Max Verstappen’s father believes Red Bull will be torn apart if Christian Horner remains as their team principal.

    Verstappen, the reigning world champion, won the 2024 season opener in Bahrain on Saturday despite the controversy surrounding his British team principal....

    ....Now, however, Jos has publicly questioned Horner’s position. “There is tension here while he remains in position,” he told the Daily Mail. “The team is in danger of being torn apart. It can’t go on the way it is. It will explode. He is playing the victim when he is the one causing the problems.”

    Verstappen Sr has denied being involved in the attempts to unsettle Horner in both his personal and professional life. “That wouldn’t make sense,” he said. “Why would I do that when Max is doing so well here?” However, his latest comments have the potential to do so.


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/jos-verstappen-red-bull-could-be-torn-apart-if-christian-horner-stays-8j7c5kfht

    There’s a full-on civil war going on behind the scenes.

    There’s a lot of rumours online about the relationships between Horny, Jos V, and the woman who made the complaint.
    If Horner was sensible, he'd sack Max Verstappen and replace him with Sir Lewis Hamilton this season.

    Truly sad thing is, Horneygate is likely to be the most exciting thing to happen in F1 this season.
    Well last night’s race was a total borefest, and if the budget cap cheating has entrenched an advantage over yet another year, there’s going to be little TV audience left by the summer in established markets.
    Indeed, another sad thing is if there were no Red Bull we would have a really exciting season just like last season with 34 points separating third to seventh in drivers' championship.
    Bring back Bernie to blow up Red Bull's engines.
  • Options
    Sunil_PrasannanSunil_Prasannan Posts: 49,653
    @TheScreamingEagles

    George won the Rochdale by-election fair and square!
  • Options
    DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 24,754
    edited March 3
    Sandpit said:

    ydoethur said:

    I didn't think there was much in the Angela Rayner story but now I do.

    The Angela Rayner council house case, explained by a tax expert

    Ignorance about tax is not new, but contradictions in the deputy Labour leader’s accounts are concerning, says Dan Neidle


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/the-angela-rayner-council-house-case-explained-by-a-tax-expert-8klnvzp0m

    Although that said, given the truly labyrinthine rules on capital gains tax on property, I'm not sure even if she's broken the letter of the law it would gain much traction. All she will have to do is plead ignorance, which would be the case for most people who are not trained accountants (including not a few solicitors).

    If she needed to turn it around, she could start by pointing out our tax system is a shambles and committing Labour to simplifying it.
    I've not (so far) heard anyone talk about Angela Rayner's tax affairs. If anything, the two homes part might have more resonance. The danger is if Keir Starmer sees this as an opportunity to demote her, which he tried once before.
    Isn’t the issue that she was *elected* as deputy leader, so SKS has to live with her?
    Yes but there are other jobs that can be removed, either now or after the election. She shadows Michael Gove at Levelling Up, for instance.
  • Options
    PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 76,054
    Carnyx said:

    ydoethur said:

    I didn't think there was much in the Angela Rayner story but now I do.

    The Angela Rayner council house case, explained by a tax expert

    Ignorance about tax is not new, but contradictions in the deputy Labour leader’s accounts are concerning, says Dan Neidle


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/the-angela-rayner-council-house-case-explained-by-a-tax-expert-8klnvzp0m

    Although that said, given the truly labyrinthine rules on capital gains tax on property, I'm not sure even if she's broken the letter of the law it would gain much traction. All she will have to do is plead ignorance, which would be the case for most people who are not trained accountants (including not a few solicitors).

    If she needed to turn it around, she could start by pointing out our tax system is a shambles and committing Labour to simplifying it.
    I've not (so far) heard anyone talk about Angela Rayner's tax affairs. If anything, the two homes part might have more resonance. The danger is if Keir Starmer sees this as an opportunity to demote her, which he tried once before.
    Two homes? Plenty of relationships are in that position - and many married couples have had that as an evolutionary stage of their lives for obvious practical reasons.
    Two houses for "obvious practical reasons" ? Married couples ?!

    Go on, do explain.
  • Options
    BenpointerBenpointer Posts: 31,967
    Barnesian said:

    Sandpit said:

    sbjme19 said:

    I wonder now if it might be May because if they announce tax cuts it gives Labour little time to respond and say if they'd keep them, whereas delaying gives Labour more time to evolve a plan plus time for more things to go wrong.
    On a practical level if combined with the locals, does anyone remember the snail count of 2015 especially in London and the Mets?. Final result Friday lunchtime.

    It's wishful thinking that leads people to think it will be held in May, by those want to be rid of the Tories as soon as possible.

    It's also why they try the gentle goading: the argument being that if you go sooner you might lose fewer seats, which I think is essentially nonsense.
    You reckon he goes for October, or that it ends up in January by default because he can’t take a decision?
    November 14th. Announced at Tory conference
    I still have a hunch it will be May. Leaving it to the autumn effectively means Sunak has no control over the timing (given October v November makes not much difference). The only way he can control the narrative is go for May when the consensus is the autumn.

    Advantages of May:
    - Avoids fall-out from the locals.
    - Forestalls any further major division or a leadership challenge.
    - Energy prices will fall in April.
    - Any tax cuts will have appeared in April payslips.
    - Boat numbers will be yet to rise.
    - Inflation probably back at target (temporarily).
    - Mortgage rates falling and fewer will have switched to higher fixed rate (than will have by the autumn).

    Advantages of Oct/Nov:
    - Something might turn up.
    - Sunak spends more time as PM.
  • Options
    StuartinromfordStuartinromford Posts: 14,745
    Foxy said:

    On topic, Galloway is a cynical opportunist, but also a one man band. I don't see him having much impact, and likely won't hold Rochdale.

    Though whichever party signs up the Rochdale Independent as their candidate may do well.

    Didn't Dead Ringers portray him as a fast talking hypnotist? There's clearly something about his stick that works face to face, but not via mass media, or for very long.

    Thank goodness.
  • Options
    malcolmgmalcolmg Posts: 42,266

    IanB2 said:

    Looks like the traditional Sunday Rawnsley came out early this week, anyhow....

    The police chiefs themselves have been strikingly reluctant to endorse Mr Sunak’s contention that Britain is descending into “mob rule”. This sounds like the kind of thing a rent-a-gob reactionary backbencher might spit out in the hope of being quoted by the Daily Mail. You don’t expect to hear that kind of nonsense coming out of the mouth of the prime minister.

    There’s a need for a reasoned debate about the conduct and management of demonstrations. But that was not what the Tory leader was seeking to stimulate with those headline-hunting remarks [of last week]. He was conflating democratic protest with “mob rule” in a way that disdained and undermined Britain’s proud traditions of free assembly and free expression. This wild outburst did him no credit.

    [This week's] was one of his better crafted speeches, even if the cynic in me wondered whether a deeply unpopular prime minister was trying to gain public favour by presentinging himself as the steady leader of the nation manning the thin line between stability and chaos. There is also a big underlying issue: the jarring discordance between Mr Sunak’s advocations of unity and mutual respect with the conduct of elements of his own party.

    The Tory leader...has been flabby about policing extremism within his own ranks and this feebleness is sourced in a fear that they represent constituencies within his party that could make trouble for him. The Tory party’s hard right is the mob he feels most menaced by. He has not repudiated Ms Truss’s love-ins with the Trumpites. He sacked Ms Braverman as home secretary for an incendiary provocation about “hate marches” last November, but she was only in that profile-enhancing post in the first place because Mr Sunak struck a Faustian bargain with her when he thought he needed hard-right support to secure the premiership. He handed a louder mic to Lee Anderson by promoting him to deputy chair of the Tory party, a role he exploited to platform his noxious prejudices, until he quit over Rwanda.

    Only extremists will disagree with the prime minister when he says we should not allow them to hijack our politics. More’s the pity that he has too often behaved like a hostage of the hate-mongers within his own party.
    Something to remember.

    How many MPs have we had since, 1980 say? A few thousand?

    We’ve had 5 murders, innumerable assaults and a barrage of vile threats. For example, women MPs get sexual threats on a daily basis.

    A number of MPs carry guns to protect themselves against terrorist threats, as assessed as real and probable by the intelligence services.

    A larger number wear stab vests when dealing with the public.

    Every MP (pretty much) has had occasions when the stalking/threats have risen to the point the police start individually guarding them and their families.

    Talk about a minority under siege.

    Makes you wonder about the effect on attitude, doesn’t it?
    Does not condone the crapiness, greed or uselessness of politicians.
  • Options
    bondegezoubondegezou Posts: 8,089

    IanB2 said:

    Looks like the traditional Sunday Rawnsley came out early this week, anyhow....

    The police chiefs themselves have been strikingly reluctant to endorse Mr Sunak’s contention that Britain is descending into “mob rule”. This sounds like the kind of thing a rent-a-gob reactionary backbencher might spit out in the hope of being quoted by the Daily Mail. You don’t expect to hear that kind of nonsense coming out of the mouth of the prime minister.

    There’s a need for a reasoned debate about the conduct and management of demonstrations. But that was not what the Tory leader was seeking to stimulate with those headline-hunting remarks [of last week]. He was conflating democratic protest with “mob rule” in a way that disdained and undermined Britain’s proud traditions of free assembly and free expression. This wild outburst did him no credit.

    [This week's] was one of his better crafted speeches, even if the cynic in me wondered whether a deeply unpopular prime minister was trying to gain public favour by presentinging himself as the steady leader of the nation manning the thin line between stability and chaos. There is also a big underlying issue: the jarring discordance between Mr Sunak’s advocations of unity and mutual respect with the conduct of elements of his own party.

    The Tory leader...has been flabby about policing extremism within his own ranks and this feebleness is sourced in a fear that they represent constituencies within his party that could make trouble for him. The Tory party’s hard right is the mob he feels most menaced by. He has not repudiated Ms Truss’s love-ins with the Trumpites. He sacked Ms Braverman as home secretary for an incendiary provocation about “hate marches” last November, but she was only in that profile-enhancing post in the first place because Mr Sunak struck a Faustian bargain with her when he thought he needed hard-right support to secure the premiership. He handed a louder mic to Lee Anderson by promoting him to deputy chair of the Tory party, a role he exploited to platform his noxious prejudices, until he quit over Rwanda.

    Only extremists will disagree with the prime minister when he says we should not allow them to hijack our politics. More’s the pity that he has too often behaved like a hostage of the hate-mongers within his own party.
    Something to remember.

    How many MPs have we had since, 1980 say? A few thousand?

    We’ve had 5 murders, innumerable assaults and a barrage of vile threats. For example, women MPs get sexual threats on a daily basis.

    A number of MPs carry guns to protect themselves against terrorist threats, as assessed as real and probable by the intelligence services.

    A larger number wear stab vests when dealing with the public.

    Every MP (pretty much) has had occasions when the stalking/threats have risen to the point the police start individually guarding them and their families.

    Talk about a minority under siege.

    Makes you wonder about the effect on attitude, doesn’t it?
    6 murdered MPs since 1979.
  • Options
    TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 114,789

    IanB2 said:

    Looks like the traditional Sunday Rawnsley came out early this week, anyhow....

    The police chiefs themselves have been strikingly reluctant to endorse Mr Sunak’s contention that Britain is descending into “mob rule”. This sounds like the kind of thing a rent-a-gob reactionary backbencher might spit out in the hope of being quoted by the Daily Mail. You don’t expect to hear that kind of nonsense coming out of the mouth of the prime minister.

    There’s a need for a reasoned debate about the conduct and management of demonstrations. But that was not what the Tory leader was seeking to stimulate with those headline-hunting remarks [of last week]. He was conflating democratic protest with “mob rule” in a way that disdained and undermined Britain’s proud traditions of free assembly and free expression. This wild outburst did him no credit.

    [This week's] was one of his better crafted speeches, even if the cynic in me wondered whether a deeply unpopular prime minister was trying to gain public favour by presentinging himself as the steady leader of the nation manning the thin line between stability and chaos. There is also a big underlying issue: the jarring discordance between Mr Sunak’s advocations of unity and mutual respect with the conduct of elements of his own party.

    The Tory leader...has been flabby about policing extremism within his own ranks and this feebleness is sourced in a fear that they represent constituencies within his party that could make trouble for him. The Tory party’s hard right is the mob he feels most menaced by. He has not repudiated Ms Truss’s love-ins with the Trumpites. He sacked Ms Braverman as home secretary for an incendiary provocation about “hate marches” last November, but she was only in that profile-enhancing post in the first place because Mr Sunak struck a Faustian bargain with her when he thought he needed hard-right support to secure the premiership. He handed a louder mic to Lee Anderson by promoting him to deputy chair of the Tory party, a role he exploited to platform his noxious prejudices, until he quit over Rwanda.

    Only extremists will disagree with the prime minister when he says we should not allow them to hijack our politics. More’s the pity that he has too often behaved like a hostage of the hate-mongers within his own party.
    Something to remember.

    How many MPs have we had since, 1980 say? A few thousand?

    We’ve had 5 murders, innumerable assaults and a barrage of vile threats. For example, women MPs get sexual threats on a daily basis.

    A number of MPs carry guns to protect themselves against terrorist threats, as assessed as real and probable by the intelligence services.

    A larger number wear stab vests when dealing with the public.

    Every MP (pretty much) has had occasions when the stalking/threats have risen to the point the police start individually guarding them and their families.

    Talk about a minority under siege.

    Makes you wonder about the effect on attitude, doesn’t it?
    Would it be gauche to point out 60% of those 5 MPs were murdered by Christian terrorists/freedom fighters?
  • Options
    MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 44,975
    edited March 3
    malcolmg said:

    IanB2 said:

    Looks like the traditional Sunday Rawnsley came out early this week, anyhow....

    The police chiefs themselves have been strikingly reluctant to endorse Mr Sunak’s contention that Britain is descending into “mob rule”. This sounds like the kind of thing a rent-a-gob reactionary backbencher might spit out in the hope of being quoted by the Daily Mail. You don’t expect to hear that kind of nonsense coming out of the mouth of the prime minister.

    There’s a need for a reasoned debate about the conduct and management of demonstrations. But that was not what the Tory leader was seeking to stimulate with those headline-hunting remarks [of last week]. He was conflating democratic protest with “mob rule” in a way that disdained and undermined Britain’s proud traditions of free assembly and free expression. This wild outburst did him no credit.

    [This week's] was one of his better crafted speeches, even if the cynic in me wondered whether a deeply unpopular prime minister was trying to gain public favour by presentinging himself as the steady leader of the nation manning the thin line between stability and chaos. There is also a big underlying issue: the jarring discordance between Mr Sunak’s advocations of unity and mutual respect with the conduct of elements of his own party.

    The Tory leader...has been flabby about policing extremism within his own ranks and this feebleness is sourced in a fear that they represent constituencies within his party that could make trouble for him. The Tory party’s hard right is the mob he feels most menaced by. He has not repudiated Ms Truss’s love-ins with the Trumpites. He sacked Ms Braverman as home secretary for an incendiary provocation about “hate marches” last November, but she was only in that profile-enhancing post in the first place because Mr Sunak struck a Faustian bargain with her when he thought he needed hard-right support to secure the premiership. He handed a louder mic to Lee Anderson by promoting him to deputy chair of the Tory party, a role he exploited to platform his noxious prejudices, until he quit over Rwanda.

    Only extremists will disagree with the prime minister when he says we should not allow them to hijack our politics. More’s the pity that he has too often behaved like a hostage of the hate-mongers within his own party.
    Something to remember.

    How many MPs have we had since, 1980 say? A few thousand?

    We’ve had 5 murders, innumerable assaults and a barrage of vile threats. For example, women MPs get sexual threats on a daily basis.

    A number of MPs carry guns to protect themselves against terrorist threats, as assessed as real and probable by the intelligence services.

    A larger number wear stab vests when dealing with the public.

    Every MP (pretty much) has had occasions when the stalking/threats have risen to the point the police start individually guarding them and their families.

    Talk about a minority under siege.

    Makes you wonder about the effect on attitude, doesn’t it?
    Does not condone the crapiness, greed or uselessness of politicians.
    No, it doesn’t.

    But it explains why some of them feel “under siege”

    And remember, this isn’t just for Them’uns, it goes for the MPs of *your* political party. No matter what that is.

    EDIT: and I’m quite sure MSPs etc get a measure of the same shit.
  • Options
    BenpointerBenpointer Posts: 31,967
    Eabhal said:

    Sunak could probably go for massive tax cuts and shunning the OBR at the moment - everyone expects a Labour victory, so it might have very little impact on the financial markets.

    No, that would be suicidal. The markets would react because a GE outcome is never guaranteed.
  • Options
    NigelbNigelb Posts: 63,344
    tlg86 said:

    And yet he won on Thursday. Some people clearly do like him.

    Let's see how they feel about him at the next general election.
  • Options
    RochdalePioneersRochdalePioneers Posts: 27,479

    @TheScreamingEagles

    George won the Rochdale by-election fair and square!

    There are allegations about block votes in the large number of postals submitted. That’s hardly unique to Rochdale but is dodgy.

    Ultimately Galloway won because his vote was motivated and nobody else’s was. He is legally elected, but that doesn’t make it right, in the exact same way that Rochdale electing a Britain First MP wouldn’t have been right.
  • Options
    AverageNinjaAverageNinja Posts: 1,169

    Sandpit said:

    Sunak has an easy way of getting rid of Galloway from Parliament if he wants. One call to the king, and we all get to vote on May 2nd.

    There won't be an election in May.
    I still think there’s a chance albeit it’s reducing. I’ve bet on May anyhow.
  • Options
    BenpointerBenpointer Posts: 31,967
    edited March 3
    Foxy said:

    Scott_xP said:

    Foxy said:

    Sandpit said:

    Sunak has an easy way of getting rid of Galloway from Parliament if he wants. One call to the king, and we all get to vote on May 2nd.

    There won't be an election in May.
    It's needed but won't happen. Sunak will leave it as long as possible.
    Sunak will not be in post long after May
    I agree that there is likely to be a VONC after the May locals, but he will survive. Only Truss wants the poisoned chalice, and even the Tories are not that daft.
    I genuinely don't buy this 'no one will want the poisoned chalice' line.

    Say you're Penny Mordaunt for example (other candidates are available)...

    You stand and somehow win the leadership from Sunak in June/July. Call an election at the earliest sensible opportunity (end of September?). Lose to a Labour landslide by say 10-15%. You can rightly say 'well that was 20-25% when I took over, so you need to stick with me as LOTO because I can close that gap in one term'. Then, with the economy shafted and multiple other issues facing the country, you have five years of bashing Starmer to get back to at least parity for the 2029 GE.

    The flaw with my argument is the Tory members will choose a loon rather than Mordaunt but that won't put off candidates who think they might win a leadership contest. No lack of candidates in may opinion.
  • Options
    NigelbNigelb Posts: 63,344

    Well.

    Jos Verstappen: Red Bull could be torn apart if Christian Horner stays

    Team principal said Formula 1 should ‘move on’ after Max Verstappen won Bahrain Grand Prix on Saturday, but star driver’s father disagrees


    Max Verstappen’s father believes Red Bull will be torn apart if Christian Horner remains as their team principal.

    Verstappen, the reigning world champion, won the 2024 season opener in Bahrain on Saturday despite the controversy surrounding his British team principal....

    ....Now, however, Jos has publicly questioned Horner’s position. “There is tension here while he remains in position,” he told the Daily Mail. “The team is in danger of being torn apart. It can’t go on the way it is. It will explode. He is playing the victim when he is the one causing the problems.”

    Verstappen Sr has denied being involved in the attempts to unsettle Horner in both his personal and professional life. “That wouldn’t make sense,” he said. “Why would I do that when Max is doing so well here?” However, his latest comments have the potential to do so.


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/jos-verstappen-red-bull-could-be-torn-apart-if-christian-horner-stays-8j7c5kfht

    Because you're Joss Verstappen ?

    Difficult to work out whom to have least sympathy for.
  • Options
    MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 44,975

    IanB2 said:

    Looks like the traditional Sunday Rawnsley came out early this week, anyhow....

    The police chiefs themselves have been strikingly reluctant to endorse Mr Sunak’s contention that Britain is descending into “mob rule”. This sounds like the kind of thing a rent-a-gob reactionary backbencher might spit out in the hope of being quoted by the Daily Mail. You don’t expect to hear that kind of nonsense coming out of the mouth of the prime minister.

    There’s a need for a reasoned debate about the conduct and management of demonstrations. But that was not what the Tory leader was seeking to stimulate with those headline-hunting remarks [of last week]. He was conflating democratic protest with “mob rule” in a way that disdained and undermined Britain’s proud traditions of free assembly and free expression. This wild outburst did him no credit.

    [This week's] was one of his better crafted speeches, even if the cynic in me wondered whether a deeply unpopular prime minister was trying to gain public favour by presentinging himself as the steady leader of the nation manning the thin line between stability and chaos. There is also a big underlying issue: the jarring discordance between Mr Sunak’s advocations of unity and mutual respect with the conduct of elements of his own party.

    The Tory leader...has been flabby about policing extremism within his own ranks and this feebleness is sourced in a fear that they represent constituencies within his party that could make trouble for him. The Tory party’s hard right is the mob he feels most menaced by. He has not repudiated Ms Truss’s love-ins with the Trumpites. He sacked Ms Braverman as home secretary for an incendiary provocation about “hate marches” last November, but she was only in that profile-enhancing post in the first place because Mr Sunak struck a Faustian bargain with her when he thought he needed hard-right support to secure the premiership. He handed a louder mic to Lee Anderson by promoting him to deputy chair of the Tory party, a role he exploited to platform his noxious prejudices, until he quit over Rwanda.

    Only extremists will disagree with the prime minister when he says we should not allow them to hijack our politics. More’s the pity that he has too often behaved like a hostage of the hate-mongers within his own party.
    Something to remember.

    How many MPs have we had since, 1980 say? A few thousand?

    We’ve had 5 murders, innumerable assaults and a barrage of vile threats. For example, women MPs get sexual threats on a daily basis.

    A number of MPs carry guns to protect themselves against terrorist threats, as assessed as real and probable by the intelligence services.

    A larger number wear stab vests when dealing with the public.

    Every MP (pretty much) has had occasions when the stalking/threats have risen to the point the police start individually guarding them and their families.

    Talk about a minority under siege.

    Makes you wonder about the effect on attitude, doesn’t it?
    Would it be gauche to point out 60% of those 5 MPs were murdered by Christian terrorists/freedom fighters?
    Yes, it would. I award you the Grand Cross Of The Order Of Whatabouterry, Third Class.

    Incidentally most members of the PIRA weren’t church going, some were actually Protestant (yup!) and their idealogy was Republicanism, via 1798

    I understand it burns some people, but terrorists get labelled according to their professed ideology and actions.

    So in Northern Ireland you have Republican terrorists, and the Loyalist terrorists. The Loyalists are sometimes referred to as “Protestant” - this is because they profess specific, anti-Catholic ideology.

    If you shout “Allan’s Snackbar!”, while stabbing/exploding etc, then that’s what your cause is.
  • Options
    TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 114,789

    IanB2 said:

    Looks like the traditional Sunday Rawnsley came out early this week, anyhow....

    The police chiefs themselves have been strikingly reluctant to endorse Mr Sunak’s contention that Britain is descending into “mob rule”. This sounds like the kind of thing a rent-a-gob reactionary backbencher might spit out in the hope of being quoted by the Daily Mail. You don’t expect to hear that kind of nonsense coming out of the mouth of the prime minister.

    There’s a need for a reasoned debate about the conduct and management of demonstrations. But that was not what the Tory leader was seeking to stimulate with those headline-hunting remarks [of last week]. He was conflating democratic protest with “mob rule” in a way that disdained and undermined Britain’s proud traditions of free assembly and free expression. This wild outburst did him no credit.

    [This week's] was one of his better crafted speeches, even if the cynic in me wondered whether a deeply unpopular prime minister was trying to gain public favour by presentinging himself as the steady leader of the nation manning the thin line between stability and chaos. There is also a big underlying issue: the jarring discordance between Mr Sunak’s advocations of unity and mutual respect with the conduct of elements of his own party.

    The Tory leader...has been flabby about policing extremism within his own ranks and this feebleness is sourced in a fear that they represent constituencies within his party that could make trouble for him. The Tory party’s hard right is the mob he feels most menaced by. He has not repudiated Ms Truss’s love-ins with the Trumpites. He sacked Ms Braverman as home secretary for an incendiary provocation about “hate marches” last November, but she was only in that profile-enhancing post in the first place because Mr Sunak struck a Faustian bargain with her when he thought he needed hard-right support to secure the premiership. He handed a louder mic to Lee Anderson by promoting him to deputy chair of the Tory party, a role he exploited to platform his noxious prejudices, until he quit over Rwanda.

    Only extremists will disagree with the prime minister when he says we should not allow them to hijack our politics. More’s the pity that he has too often behaved like a hostage of the hate-mongers within his own party.
    Something to remember.

    How many MPs have we had since, 1980 say? A few thousand?

    We’ve had 5 murders, innumerable assaults and a barrage of vile threats. For example, women MPs get sexual threats on a daily basis.

    A number of MPs carry guns to protect themselves against terrorist threats, as assessed as real and probable by the intelligence services.

    A larger number wear stab vests when dealing with the public.

    Every MP (pretty much) has had occasions when the stalking/threats have risen to the point the police start individually guarding them and their families.

    Talk about a minority under siege.

    Makes you wonder about the effect on attitude, doesn’t it?
    Would it be gauche to point out 60% of those 5 MPs were murdered by Christian terrorists/freedom fighters?
    Yes, it would. I award you the Grand Cross Of The Order Of Whatabouterry, Third Class.

    Incidentally most members of the PIRA weren’t church going, some were actually Protestant (yup!) and their idealogy was Republicanism, via 1798

    I understand it burns some people, but terrorists get labelled according to their professed ideology and actions.

    So in Northern Ireland you have Republican terrorists, and the Loyalist terrorists. The Loyalists are sometimes referred to as “Protestant” - this is because they profess specific, anti-Catholic ideology.

    If you shout “Allan’s Snackbar!”, while stabbing/exploding etc, then that’s what your cause is.
    One thing that always cracked me up was that some Norn Iron terrorists were hesitant in going for peace was that it would have a negative impact on their non terrorist criminal activities which brought them in a lot of money.
  • Options
    MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 44,975

    IanB2 said:

    Looks like the traditional Sunday Rawnsley came out early this week, anyhow....

    The police chiefs themselves have been strikingly reluctant to endorse Mr Sunak’s contention that Britain is descending into “mob rule”. This sounds like the kind of thing a rent-a-gob reactionary backbencher might spit out in the hope of being quoted by the Daily Mail. You don’t expect to hear that kind of nonsense coming out of the mouth of the prime minister.

    There’s a need for a reasoned debate about the conduct and management of demonstrations. But that was not what the Tory leader was seeking to stimulate with those headline-hunting remarks [of last week]. He was conflating democratic protest with “mob rule” in a way that disdained and undermined Britain’s proud traditions of free assembly and free expression. This wild outburst did him no credit.

    [This week's] was one of his better crafted speeches, even if the cynic in me wondered whether a deeply unpopular prime minister was trying to gain public favour by presentinging himself as the steady leader of the nation manning the thin line between stability and chaos. There is also a big underlying issue: the jarring discordance between Mr Sunak’s advocations of unity and mutual respect with the conduct of elements of his own party.

    The Tory leader...has been flabby about policing extremism within his own ranks and this feebleness is sourced in a fear that they represent constituencies within his party that could make trouble for him. The Tory party’s hard right is the mob he feels most menaced by. He has not repudiated Ms Truss’s love-ins with the Trumpites. He sacked Ms Braverman as home secretary for an incendiary provocation about “hate marches” last November, but she was only in that profile-enhancing post in the first place because Mr Sunak struck a Faustian bargain with her when he thought he needed hard-right support to secure the premiership. He handed a louder mic to Lee Anderson by promoting him to deputy chair of the Tory party, a role he exploited to platform his noxious prejudices, until he quit over Rwanda.

    Only extremists will disagree with the prime minister when he says we should not allow them to hijack our politics. More’s the pity that he has too often behaved like a hostage of the hate-mongers within his own party.
    Something to remember.

    How many MPs have we had since, 1980 say? A few thousand?

    We’ve had 5 murders, innumerable assaults and a barrage of vile threats. For example, women MPs get sexual threats on a daily basis.

    A number of MPs carry guns to protect themselves against terrorist threats, as assessed as real and probable by the intelligence services.

    A larger number wear stab vests when dealing with the public.

    Every MP (pretty much) has had occasions when the stalking/threats have risen to the point the police start individually guarding them and their families.

    Talk about a minority under siege.

    Makes you wonder about the effect on attitude, doesn’t it?
    Would it be gauche to point out 60% of those 5 MPs were murdered by Christian terrorists/freedom fighters?
    Yes, it would. I award you the Grand Cross Of The Order Of Whatabouterry, Third Class.

    Incidentally most members of the PIRA weren’t church going, some were actually Protestant (yup!) and their idealogy was Republicanism, via 1798

    I understand it burns some people, but terrorists get labelled according to their professed ideology and actions.

    So in Northern Ireland you have Republican terrorists, and the Loyalist terrorists. The Loyalists are sometimes referred to as “Protestant” - this is because they profess specific, anti-Catholic ideology.

    If you shout “Allan’s Snackbar!”, while stabbing/exploding etc, then that’s what your cause is.
    One thing that always cracked me up was that some Norn Iron terrorists were hesitant in going for peace was that it would have a negative impact on their non terrorist criminal activities which brought them in a lot of money.
    They all were worried. Which is why the peace process included huge payouts for everyone at every level. And the Police Service was told, quite sharply, to *not* catch The Wrong Kind Of Criminaks.

    Plus, the smart ones explained to the thick ones, that this meant a steady source of *legal* money at no risk. Crime, especially drug dealing, is far from a steady payer.

    The real fun one is this - in all the years of conflict, very few senior people from either side were killed by the other side. Everyone knew where everyone lived - NI is a small place - where they worked. Taxi drivers would tell you when they passed Gerry’s house….
  • Options
    BenpointerBenpointer Posts: 31,967
    'Abject humiliation for the Conservatives' - she's not wrong.

    @SkyNews

    The Chancellor may be considering implementing Labour's signature policy of scrapping non-dom status.

    'It would be an abject humiliation for the Conservatives' after 'years of rubbishing the idea', says
    @bphillipsonMP


    https://x.com/SkyNews/status/1764216449944399914?s=20
  • Options
    Northern_AlNorthern_Al Posts: 7,666
    Sandpit said:

    ydoethur said:

    I didn't think there was much in the Angela Rayner story but now I do.

    The Angela Rayner council house case, explained by a tax expert

    Ignorance about tax is not new, but contradictions in the deputy Labour leader’s accounts are concerning, says Dan Neidle


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/the-angela-rayner-council-house-case-explained-by-a-tax-expert-8klnvzp0m

    Although that said, given the truly labyrinthine rules on capital gains tax on property, I'm not sure even if she's broken the letter of the law it would gain much traction. All she will have to do is plead ignorance, which would be the case for most people who are not trained accountants (including not a few solicitors).

    If she needed to turn it around, she could start by pointing out our tax system is a shambles and committing Labour to simplifying it.
    I've not (so far) heard anyone talk about Angela Rayner's tax affairs. If anything, the two homes part might have more resonance. The danger is if Keir Starmer sees this as an opportunity to demote her, which he tried once before.
    Isn’t the issue that she was *elected* as deputy leader, so SKS has to live with her?
    I don't think Mrs Starmer would countenance that arrangement.
  • Options
    NigelbNigelb Posts: 63,344
    edited March 3
    Newsom positioning himself for 2028.

    ‘Everyone is terrified of King Gavin’: Newsom’s
    unchallenged anti-homelessness gambit
    https://www.politico.com/news/2024/03/02/prop-1-ballot-measure-mental-health-battle-00144530
    ..Prop 1 will make changes to the Mental Health Services Act, a tax on incomes over a million dollars that was groundbreaking when approved by voters in 2004. It gave counties fairly wide latitude to spend the money on whatever mental health programs they saw fit, with limited coverage for substance use disorders. Newsom has been itching to rewrite the law for years. When he devoted his entire State of the State Address in 2020 to the problem of homelessness, he excoriated counties for hoarding MHSA funds instead of using them to address the crisis.

    After being sidetracked by the pandemic, Newsom finally had the chance to tackle the issue last year. Proposition 1 began its path to the ballot as two separate bills. One directed counties to change the way they spend and report their mental health budgets, requiring they spend more on housing and treatment for people in encampments. A companion bond issue committed $6.4 billion to fund new residential mental health and addiction treatment, and housing for veterans. Because voters approved the MHSA in 2004, they would now be required to weigh in on the dense new policy, rechristened the Behavioral Health Services Act...
  • Options
    bondegezoubondegezou Posts: 8,089

    Sandpit said:

    ydoethur said:

    I didn't think there was much in the Angela Rayner story but now I do.

    The Angela Rayner council house case, explained by a tax expert

    Ignorance about tax is not new, but contradictions in the deputy Labour leader’s accounts are concerning, says Dan Neidle


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/the-angela-rayner-council-house-case-explained-by-a-tax-expert-8klnvzp0m

    Although that said, given the truly labyrinthine rules on capital gains tax on property, I'm not sure even if she's broken the letter of the law it would gain much traction. All she will have to do is plead ignorance, which would be the case for most people who are not trained accountants (including not a few solicitors).

    If she needed to turn it around, she could start by pointing out our tax system is a shambles and committing Labour to simplifying it.
    I've not (so far) heard anyone talk about Angela Rayner's tax affairs. If anything, the two homes part might have more resonance. The danger is if Keir Starmer sees this as an opportunity to demote her, which he tried once before.
    Isn’t the issue that she was *elected* as deputy leader, so SKS has to live with her?
    I don't think Mrs Starmer would countenance that arrangement.
    Tough. That’s democracy.
  • Options
    DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 24,754
    Nigelb said:

    Newsom positioning himself for 2028.

    ‘Everyone is terrified of King Gavin’: Newsom’s
    unchallenged anti-homelessness gambit
    https://www.politico.com/news/2024/03/02/prop-1-ballot-measure-mental-health-battle-00144530
    ..Prop 1 will make changes to the Mental Health Services Act, a tax on incomes over a million dollars that was groundbreaking when approved by voters in 2004. It gave counties fairly wide latitude to spend the money on whatever mental health programs they saw fit, with limited coverage for substance use disorders. Newsom has been itching to rewrite the law for years. When he devoted his entire State of the State Address in 2020 to the problem of homelessness, he excoriated counties for hoarding MHSA funds instead of using them to address the crisis.

    After being sidetracked by the pandemic, Newsom finally had the chance to tackle the issue last year. Proposition 1 began its path to the ballot as two separate bills. One directed counties to change the way they spend and report their mental health budgets, requiring they spend more on housing and treatment for people in encampments. A companion bond issue committed $6.4 billion to fund new residential mental health and addiction treatment, and housing for veterans. Because voters approved the MHSA in 2004, they would now be required to weigh in on the dense new policy, rechristened the Behavioral Health Services Act...

    Using mental health funds to pay for housing. That's what I don't like about American politics: nothing does what it says on the tin.
  • Options
    DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 24,754

    'Abject humiliation for the Conservatives' - she's not wrong.

    @SkyNews

    The Chancellor may be considering implementing Labour's signature policy of scrapping non-dom status.

    'It would be an abject humiliation for the Conservatives' after 'years of rubbishing the idea', says
    @bphillipsonMP


    https://x.com/SkyNews/status/1764216449944399914?s=20

    She's not wrong but she is wrong that anyone outside the bubble would care, or even has more than the faintest idea what non-dom status means.
This discussion has been closed.