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Hubris took on the law. And the law won. – politicalbetting.com

SystemSystem Posts: 11,014
edited December 2023 in General
imageHubris took on the law. And the law won. – politicalbetting.com

The judgment

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  • Options
    If only gender and prisons could be separated as issues. Reform on both is surely needed.
  • Options
    Ironic that Ncuti Gatwa, the new incarnation of Doctor Who introduced last night, came to Britain as a refugee from genocide in Rwanda.
  • Options

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    Or Sam Freedman, as it is correctly spelled.
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    nico679nico679 Posts: 4,772
    So will the spineless gimp cave in and accept amendments to the bill meaning it breaches international law ?

    Then the more sane Tories will have a problem supporting it .

    And if it scrapes through the Commons the HOL tends to take a dim view of breaking international law .

    At this point one wonders whether the right are willing to lose the election so that they can complete the takeover of the party .

    Installing another leader before the election would be insane , absolutely no way the vast majority of the public will accept another Tory PM with no electoral mandate .

    It’s not okay to say well this is our system and you vote for parties not leaders . That argument will be given short shrift by the public .



  • Options
    NigelbNigelb Posts: 62,477
    The difference in polling against Biden is quite remarkable.

    If Haley is the candidate, the Democrats have a real problem in what to do about Biden. He has, IMO, been a very good president, but he'd very likely lose to Haley now.

    Why Nikki Haley polls better against Joe Biden than Donald Trump does
    https://www.politico.com/news/2023/12/09/haley-electability-trump-biden-polls-00130926
  • Options

    If only gender and prisons could be separated as issues. Reform on both is surely needed.

    Yes, and how perverse that at a time when prisons are so overcrowded and in such decay that they can hardly house any more inmates, Government is obsessing over a gender issue that surely affects no more than a tiny minority.
  • Options
    Would I be right in suspecting that the SNP is likely to implode even more than the Tories at the next election.

    Starmer is indeed a lucky,lucky general, but he does need to sort Labour policy out on this one.
  • Options
    FoxyFoxy Posts: 44,578

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    As well as recommending some great books, that is a very thoughtful essay in itself. Thanks.
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    TazTaz Posts: 11,121

    Would I be right in suspecting that the SNP is likely to implode even more than the Tories at the next election.

    Starmer is indeed a lucky,lucky general, but he does need to sort Labour policy out on this one.

    He does but while others are stumbling over it why bother ?

    Just let your opponents keep making mistakes. The SNP after the next election will be interesting. Very much depends on how many seats they hold.
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    TazTaz Posts: 11,121

    Ironic that Ncuti Gatwa, the new incarnation of Doctor Who introduced last night, came to Britain as a refugee from genocide in Rwanda.

    Really quite excited to see him in the role. There’s something about the actor. Charismatic, suave, enigmatic.
  • Options
    FoxyFoxy Posts: 44,578

    Would I be right in suspecting that the SNP is likely to implode even more than the Tories at the next election.

    Starmer is indeed a lucky,lucky general, but he does need to sort Labour policy out on this one.

    I think the Nats are very sticky. While it's quite likely that SLAB may well be a majority again of Scottish Westminster seats, that looks less likely in Holyrood.

    The SNP is the only viable vehicle to Scottish Independence, so is a bit like Brexit in that it has to combine very disparate people and ideas that unite only around one idea, but agree on little else. It therefore has to choose being small and fairly united, or large and riven by internal conflict.

    I think it very likely to regenerate like Doctor Who under Starmerism. The main driver has always been resentment at foreign control, mattering little how benign or autocratic that control is.
  • Options
    StillWatersStillWaters Posts: 7,014
    edited December 2023
    Nigelb said:

    The difference in polling against Biden is quite remarkable.

    If Haley is the candidate, the Democrats have a real problem in what to do about Biden. He has, IMO, been a very good president, but he'd very likely lose to Haley now.

    Why Nikki Haley polls better against Joe Biden than Donald Trump does
    https://www.politico.com/news/2023/12/09/haley-electability-trump-biden-polls-00130926

    My obligatory Go Nikki!

    I’ve been a fan for years. Probably one of the few people on here who has actually read her book…

  • Options
    StillWatersStillWaters Posts: 7,014
    edited December 2023

    If only gender and prisons could be separated as issues. Reform on both is surely needed.

    Yes, and how perverse that at a time when prisons are so overcrowded and in such decay that they can hardly house any more inmates, Government is obsessing over a gender issue that surely affects no more than a tiny minority.
    And that’s the weird thing.

    It can’t be larger numbers. So put them on a separate wing and house them together. Can’t be beyond the wit of man (or women*)


    * that makes me feel like I’m part of the Life of Brian scene with Loretta
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    ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,181

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    Instrcutive that for a man who is supposedly an expert on education not a single one is actually about it.
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    OldKingColeOldKingCole Posts: 31,960

    If only gender and prisons could be separated as issues. Reform on both is surely needed.

    Yes, and how perverse that at a time when prisons are so overcrowded and in such decay that they can hardly house any more inmates, Government is obsessing over a gender issue that surely affects no more than a tiny minority.
    And that’s the weird thing.

    It can’t be larger numbers. So put them on a separate wing and house them together. Can’t be beyond the wit of man (or women*)


    * that makes me feel like I’m part of the Life of Brian scene with Loretta
    Good morning all.
    My thoughts exactly; how many people are there in Scottish prisons who are claiming to be what they are apparently not?
  • Options
    Yeah, don’t take on the law or lawyers, they are awesome.
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    Taz said:

    Ironic that Ncuti Gatwa, the new incarnation of Doctor Who introduced last night, came to Britain as a refugee from genocide in Rwanda.

    Really quite excited to see him in the role. There’s something about the actor. Charismatic, suave, enigmatic.
    Same.

    I absolutely loved him in Sex Education.
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    IanB2IanB2 Posts: 47,253
    edited December 2023
    ydoethur said:

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    Instrcutive that for a man who is supposedly an expert on education not a single one is actually about it.
    Nevertheless his forthcoming own book, trailed here, looks potentially interesting:

    https://www.thebookseller.com/rights/pan-mac-lands-freedmans-deep-dive-into-britains-broken-institutions-in-substantial-pre-empt

    And there is one he recommends about education specifically, in the article itself. And, as he says, politics is usually more interesting than policy, anyway.
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    Sean_FSean_F Posts: 35,800
    I agree. This, and Rwanda, are weird and stupid hills to die on, and demonstrate how parties can become obsessed with pandering to cranks.
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    OldKingColeOldKingCole Posts: 31,960
    edited December 2023
    Foxy said:

    Would I be right in suspecting that the SNP is likely to implode even more than the Tories at the next election.

    Starmer is indeed a lucky,lucky general, but he does need to sort Labour policy out on this one.

    I think the Nats are very sticky. While it's quite likely that SLAB may well be a majority again of Scottish Westminster seats, that looks less likely in Holyrood.

    The SNP is the only viable vehicle to Scottish Independence, so is a bit like Brexit in that it has to combine very disparate people and ideas that unite only around one idea, but agree on little else. It therefore has to choose being small and fairly united, or large and riven by internal conflict.

    I think it very likely to regenerate like Doctor Who under Starmerism. The main driver has always been resentment at foreign control, mattering little how benign or autocratic that control is.
    That’s the thing about a nationalist party, isn’t it? If your aim is independence from whoever you consider as the foreign ruling state, then it doesn’t matter very much whether you’re a libertarian, a liberal or socialist; you just want the oppressors is gone!
    You worry about the new government, when it happens!
  • Options
    ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,181
    IanB2 said:

    ydoethur said:

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    Instrcutive that for a man who is supposedly an expert on education not a single one is actually about it.
    Nevertheless his forthcoming own book, trailed here, looks potentially interesting:

    https://www.thebookseller.com/rights/pan-mac-lands-freedmans-deep-dive-into-britains-broken-institutions-in-substantial-pre-empt

    And there is one he recommends about education specifically, in the article itself. And, as he says, politics is usually more interesting than policy, anyway.
    If he finds politics more interesting than policy, he should stick to politics, and leave policy making to those who know what they're talking about.
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    OldKingColeOldKingCole Posts: 31,960
    edited December 2023
  • Options
    algarkirkalgarkirk Posts: 10,508

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    No Dorries?

    Jenkins's book on Asquith is also very good.

  • Options
    Ghastly, will nobody rid us of this cretin?

    Revealed: the homeopath in charge of the King’s health

    Michael Dixon, a champion of faith healing and herbalism with a questionable CV, has been quietly installed as head of the royal medical household


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/revealed-the-homeopath-in-charge-of-the-kings-health-tmx59q3bk
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    ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,181
    Well done to the Times for making that available for free.

    Although what bothers me is how much of the same attitude I see in many parts of our system of government. The comments Wilson made could easily be replicated about OFSTED, which spends much of its time covering up crimes by its inspectors to avoid discrediting their reports.
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    Pro_RataPro_Rata Posts: 4,806

    Ghastly, will nobody rid us of this cretin?

    Revealed: the homeopath in charge of the King’s health

    Michael Dixon, a champion of faith healing and herbalism with a questionable CV, has been quietly installed as head of the royal medical household


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/revealed-the-homeopath-in-charge-of-the-kings-health-tmx59q3bk

    Find the answer within?
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    LeonLeon Posts: 46,994

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    The unutterable tedium of that list says quite a lot, none of it good, about British politics

    He has also managed to miss out the one of the vanishingly few entertaining books about British politics. Viz: Alastair Campbell’s Diaries.

    Campbell the man is a cad and a bounder, but he writes well and the Dairies are compulsively readable. Unlike any of these worthy tomes
  • Options
    ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,181
    Leon said:

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    The unutterable tedium of that list says quite a lot, none of it good, about British politics

    He has also managed to miss out the one of the vanishingly few entertaining books about British politics. Viz: Alastair Campbell’s Diaries.

    Campbell the man is a cad and a bounder, but he writes well and the Dairies are compulsively readable. Unlike any of these worthy tomes
    Yes Minister and YPM are both good reads.

    In fact, you could make a case that they were better than the TV series, and that's not to say the TV series wasn't very good as well.
  • Options
    ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,181
    algarkirk said:

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    No Dorries?

    Jenkins's book on Asquith is also very good.

    His book on Dilke is better than either, although it's somewhat marred by his obsessive and totally implausible belief that Dilke was fitted up by Joseph Chamberlain as part of a conspiracy to destroy radicalism.
  • Options
    LeonLeon Posts: 46,994
    ydoethur said:

    Leon said:

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    The unutterable tedium of that list says quite a lot, none of it good, about British politics

    He has also managed to miss out the one of the vanishingly few entertaining books about British politics. Viz: Alastair Campbell’s Diaries.

    Campbell the man is a cad and a bounder, but he writes well and the Dairies are compulsively readable. Unlike any of these worthy tomes
    Yes Minister and YPM are both good reads.

    In fact, you could make a case that they were better than the TV series, and that's not to say the TV series wasn't very good as well.
    I find the TV series vastly overrated. Middlebrow radio 4 chortling, always slightly forced, like the laughter you so often get at Shakespeare comedies on stage

    I automatically mistrust anyone who likes Yes PM or who quotes it on here
  • Options
    ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,181
    Leon said:

    ydoethur said:

    Leon said:

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    The unutterable tedium of that list says quite a lot, none of it good, about British politics

    He has also managed to miss out the one of the vanishingly few entertaining books about British politics. Viz: Alastair Campbell’s Diaries.

    Campbell the man is a cad and a bounder, but he writes well and the Dairies are compulsively readable. Unlike any of these worthy tomes
    Yes Minister and YPM are both good reads.

    In fact, you could make a case that they were better than the TV series, and that's not to say the TV series wasn't very good as well.
    I find the TV series vastly overrated. Middlebrow radio 4 chortling, always slightly forced, like the laughter you so often get at Shakespeare comedies on stage

    I automatically mistrust anyone who likes Yes PM or who quotes it on here
    So you love them then?

    As you Never Believe Anything Until It's Been Officially Denied.
  • Options
    bondegezoubondegezou Posts: 7,586
    edited December 2023
    On topic… The Green Party (of England and Wales) has disaffiliated Green Party Women: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-67546751
  • Options
    MonksfieldMonksfield Posts: 2,203

    Ghastly, will nobody rid us of this cretin?

    Revealed: the homeopath in charge of the King’s health

    Michael Dixon, a champion of faith healing and herbalism with a questionable CV, has been quietly installed as head of the royal medical household


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/revealed-the-homeopath-in-charge-of-the-kings-health-tmx59q3bk

    Come on, don’t be so hard on Charles
  • Options
    bondegezoubondegezou Posts: 7,586
    ydoethur said:

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    Instrcutive that for a man who is supposedly an expert on education not a single one is actually about it.
    I don’t understand…? These are his top ten books on British politics, not his top ten books on education,
  • Options
    algarkirkalgarkirk Posts: 10,508
    Leon said:

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    The unutterable tedium of that list says quite a lot, none of it good, about British politics

    He has also managed to miss out the one of the vanishingly few entertaining books about British politics. Viz: Alastair Campbell’s Diaries.

    Campbell the man is a cad and a bounder, but he writes well and the Dairies are compulsively readable. Unlike any of these worthy tomes
    Terry Major-Ball's book, a memoir of John Major, 'Major Major' is pure Pooter and even funnier because it is not meant to be.
  • Options
    MonksfieldMonksfield Posts: 2,203
    algarkirk said:

    Leon said:

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    The unutterable tedium of that list says quite a lot, none of it good, about British politics

    He has also managed to miss out the one of the vanishingly few entertaining books about British politics. Viz: Alastair Campbell’s Diaries.

    Campbell the man is a cad and a bounder, but he writes well and the Dairies are compulsively readable. Unlike any of these worthy tomes
    Terry Major-Ball's book, a memoir of John Major, 'Major Major' is pure Pooter and even funnier because it is not meant to be.
    I know a chap whose first name is actually ‘Major’. For years I assumed he was a military man, but no….
  • Options
    ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,181

    ydoethur said:

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    Instrcutive that for a man who is supposedly an expert on education not a single one is actually about it.
    I don’t understand…? These are his top ten books on British politics, not his top ten books on education,
    A fair answer. But you would expect at least one to indicate some understanding of where his knowledge came from, especially as he's never worked in education and all of his knowledge of it came from books.

    There are a couple there with tangential links to it but otherwise it suggests he was making policy because he was interested in the politics of it. Which may explain why he was such an utter disaster.
  • Options
    bondegezoubondegezou Posts: 7,586
    Off topic… Elon Musk is letting Alex Jones back on Twitter. What will that do for antisemitic content on the platform? https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2016/10/26/13418304/alex-jones-jewish-mafia
  • Options

    Off topic… Elon Musk is letting Alex Jones back on Twitter. What will that do for antisemitic content on the platform? https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2016/10/26/13418304/alex-jones-jewish-mafia

    I am sure Leon will be posting non stop about the antisemitism of Alex Jones and Elon Musk as he has done with woke antisemitism.
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    ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,181
    Incidentally, just for Leon, I've received this blogpost this morning:

    https://www.twinkl.co.uk/blog/10-ways-to-make-the-most-of-ai-as-a-private-tutor

    There was also this story on it earlier this week:

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-67433036

    I actually tended to use it for marking - if there were straightforward quizzes with fairly clear answers it could mark most of them for me, then I could just quickly check and distribute the reports electronically.

    However, the DfE (despite their claims) are trying to make that more difficult by insisting on paper being retained at all times. They don't like technology in classrooms.
  • Options
    ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,181
    World's biggest head found in Dorset.

    No, not Jacob Rees-Mogg, and anyway he's Somerset.

    Pliosaur discovery: Huge sea monster emerges from Dorset cliffs
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-67650247
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    boulayboulay Posts: 3,909
    edited December 2023
    Leon said:

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    The unutterable tedium of that list says quite a lot, none of it good, about British politics

    He has also managed to miss out the one of the vanishingly few entertaining books about British politics. Viz: Alastair Campbell’s Diaries.

    Campbell the man is a cad and a bounder, but he writes well and the Dairies are compulsively readable. Unlike any of these worthy tomes
    When I first read your comment in my lurgy addled state I was very excited that Viz had done a pistake on Alastair Campbell’s diaries. I would have been happy to read that.
  • Options
    Scott_xPScott_xP Posts: 32,875
    ydoethur said:

    World's biggest head found in Dorset.

    No, not Jacob Rees-Mogg, and anyway he's Somerset.

    Did we miss the news this week that his investment firm is closing after losing its biggest clients?
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    Scott_xPScott_xP Posts: 32,875
    @matt_dathan

    The centrist One Nation group of Tory MPs will meet tomorrow to decide whether to back Rishi Sunak’s Rwanda bill, says Damian Green, one of its leading members.

    Green says they have yet to conclude whether the bill abides by rule of law and Britain’s international obligations.
  • Options
    ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,181

    Off topic… Elon Musk is letting Alex Jones back on Twitter. What will that do for antisemitic content on the platform? https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2016/10/26/13418304/alex-jones-jewish-mafia

    I am sure Leon will be posting non stop about the antisemitism of Alex Jones and Elon Musk as he has done with woke antisemitism.
    Are you asking him to X-plain himself?
  • Options
    ydoethur said:

    Off topic… Elon Musk is letting Alex Jones back on Twitter. What will that do for antisemitic content on the platform? https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2016/10/26/13418304/alex-jones-jewish-mafia

    I am sure Leon will be posting non stop about the antisemitism of Alex Jones and Elon Musk as he has done with woke antisemitism.
    Are you asking him to X-plain himself?
    I think he may be calling him a twit.
  • Options
    Scott_xPScott_xP Posts: 32,875
    Jenrick on TV putting the boot into Richi and pitching for the top job next time round
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    algarkirk said:

    Leon said:

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    The unutterable tedium of that list says quite a lot, none of it good, about British politics

    He has also managed to miss out the one of the vanishingly few entertaining books about British politics. Viz: Alastair Campbell’s Diaries.

    Campbell the man is a cad and a bounder, but he writes well and the Dairies are compulsively readable. Unlike any of these worthy tomes
    Terry Major-Ball's book, a memoir of John Major, 'Major Major' is pure Pooter and even funnier because it is not meant to be.
    I know a chap whose first name is actually ‘Major’. For years I assumed he was a military man, but no….
    A real person, or the famous fictional one in Catch 22?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Major_Major_Major_Major
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    CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 39,635
    edited December 2023

    Foxy said:

    Would I be right in suspecting that the SNP is likely to implode even more than the Tories at the next election.

    Starmer is indeed a lucky,lucky general, but he does need to sort Labour policy out on this one.

    I think the Nats are very sticky. While it's quite likely that SLAB may well be a majority again of Scottish Westminster seats, that looks less likely in Holyrood.

    The SNP is the only viable vehicle to Scottish Independence, so is a bit like Brexit in that it has to combine very disparate people and ideas that unite only around one idea, but agree on little else. It therefore has to choose being small and fairly united, or large and riven by internal conflict.

    I think it very likely to regenerate like Doctor Who under Starmerism. The main driver has always been resentment at foreign control, mattering little how benign or autocratic that control is.
    That’s the thing about a nationalist party, isn’t it? If your aim is independence from whoever you consider as the foreign ruling state, then it doesn’t matter very much whether you’re a libertarian, a liberal or socialist; you just want the oppressors is gone!
    You worry about the new government, when it happens!
    Being able to determine one's own policy is rather the point, after all.

    Edit: and good morning, nice to see you on here! Grey but at least dry here. but only for the moment.
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    Scott_xP said:

    ydoethur said:

    World's biggest head found in Dorset.

    No, not Jacob Rees-Mogg, and anyway he's Somerset.

    Did we miss the news this week that his investment firm is closing after losing its biggest clients?
    ..another victim of Brexit?....:)
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    FF43FF43 Posts: 15,708
    Lady Haldane determined that Alister Jack (who he?) could overturn the decision of parliament arrived at democratically with cross party support "just because". Haldane knows her law obviously. I'm not sure it's a great constitutional outcome, which is why no-one has triggered a Section 35 before.
  • Options

    Would I be right in suspecting that the SNP is likely to implode even more than the Tories at the next election.

    Starmer is indeed a lucky,lucky general, but he does need to sort Labour policy out on this one.

    They deserve to. As this thread points out, the GRR Bill rode roughshod over every concern. The SNP stick everything as "you're either for Scotland or you're against it" which is absurdist absolutism.

    The fascinating thing for me isn't what this does for gender politics (as the absolutist tide is already retreating), its what it does for nationalism. The SNP can't do what it likes. A short while ago this election was supposed to be an unofficial 2nd referendum. Now it has a tired and confused governing party in retreat unable even to pass laws in their own country.

    Just like the Tories with Rwanda, you can't do what you want and impose your ideas on others.
  • Options

    Off topic… Elon Musk is letting Alex Jones back on Twitter. What will that do for antisemitic content on the platform? https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2016/10/26/13418304/alex-jones-jewish-mafia

    I am convinced that Musk is bipolar or worse. We have the Musk who leads Tesla and SpaceX, and the lunatic who owns X. How can they possibly be the same person?
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    RobDRobD Posts: 58,961
    FF43 said:

    Lady Haldane determined that Alister Jack (who he?) could overturn the decision of parliament arrived at democratically with cross party support "just because". Haldane knows her law obviously. I'm not sure it's a great constitutional outcome, which is why no-one has triggered a Section 35 before.

    A 65-page ruling to say “just because”?
  • Options
    TazTaz Posts: 11,121

    On topic… The Green Party (of England and Wales) has disaffiliated Green Party Women: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-67546751

    Amazingly biased article there from the BBC. Taking claims from someone at face value and portraying the gender critical womens group as baddies.
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    Scott_xP said:

    @matt_dathan

    The centrist One Nation group of Tory MPs will meet tomorrow to decide whether to back Rishi Sunak’s Rwanda bill, says Damian Green, one of its leading members.

    Green says they have yet to conclude whether the bill abides by rule of law and Britain’s international obligations.

    It's absurd there are several caucuses inside the Conservative Party deciding whether to back official policy, or not.

    That goes for both One Nation as well as the ERG.
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    ydoethurydoethur Posts: 67,181

    Scott_xP said:

    @matt_dathan

    The centrist One Nation group of Tory MPs will meet tomorrow to decide whether to back Rishi Sunak’s Rwanda bill, says Damian Green, one of its leading members.

    Green says they have yet to conclude whether the bill abides by rule of law and Britain’s international obligations.

    It's absurd there are several caucuses inside the Conservative Party deciding whether to back official policy, or not.

    That goes for both One Nation as well as the ERG.
    Their decision might of course not be quite so difficult if official policy was less absurd.
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    algarkirk said:

    Leon said:

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    The unutterable tedium of that list says quite a lot, none of it good, about British politics

    He has also managed to miss out the one of the vanishingly few entertaining books about British politics. Viz: Alastair Campbell’s Diaries.

    Campbell the man is a cad and a bounder, but he writes well and the Dairies are compulsively readable. Unlike any of these worthy tomes
    Terry Major-Ball's book, a memoir of John Major, 'Major Major' is pure Pooter and even funnier because it is not meant to be.
    Dr Abdullah Abdullah in the first post-Taliban Afghan government.
  • Options
    FF43 said:

    Lady Haldane determined that Alister Jack (who he?) could overturn the decision of parliament arrived at democratically with cross party support "just because". Haldane knows her law obviously. I'm not sure it's a great constitutional outcome, which is why no-one has triggered a Section 35 before.

    Its a *terrible* constitutional outcome. Set aside the actual policy for a moment and talk about principles. Tories love talking about principled things like sovereignty, yet when it came to this all they talked about was the bill.

    Should Scotland be allowed to set laws in Scotland? Yes!

    But - and its the same big but that demolishes the Rwanda crayon drawing. Sovereignty applies to the sovereign body. That sovereign body can't impose its will on other sovereign bodies. Just as the Tories can't dictate to Rwanda what Rwanda does in Rwanda, Holyrood can't dictate laws outside of Scotland. And the GRR - regardless of your views on the policy - has been found to stamp on the toes south of the wall.

    As Cyclefree rightly labels it - hubris.
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    TazTaz Posts: 11,121
    It’s absolutely disgraceful. Peoples lives were destroyed to protect an institution and software that were fundamentally flawed and, to this day, neither has been fully held to account.
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    FF43FF43 Posts: 15,708
    RobD said:

    FF43 said:

    Lady Haldane determined that Alister Jack (who he?) could overturn the decision of parliament arrived at democratically with cross party support "just because". Haldane knows her law obviously. I'm not sure it's a great constitutional outcome, which is why no-one has triggered a Section 35 before.

    A 65-page ruling to say “just because”?
    Yup. It's the law.
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    MJWMJW Posts: 1,339
    On topic, I note that on a previous thread someone pointed out that even *The Greens* are divided on the 'gender debate'.

    All in all, this seems to be an example to progressives of the dangers of treating a very complex and nuanced issue without clear immediate answers as a simple 'liberation one' which wasn't up for debate.

    There are complexities and trade-offs, and science is far from settled, thanks to the difficulty in studying a small number of people who often have to self-refer. Even what you are talking about - is it those seeking full reassignment, those wanting to live as the other sex but not, those who do so for sexual reasons, or just those who just reject gender norms - adds to complexities before you even get on to how policies or even rhetoric should work, nor how it intersects with rights or protections previously accorded to women on the basis of sex.

    Ignoring that has got progressives into a mess, and actually divided one's own side and often allowed the right to exploit that by pitching their own answers as more practical. When if it had been viewed as a subject to be approached with both compassion but realism and nuanced, policies with better outcomes for everyone might have been achieved without the ugliness that has torn lots of people apart.

    The SNP have perhaps provided the worst example thanks to their own hubris. They've not only tied it to their big issue (independence) but sleepwalked into a position whose popularity and credibility are receding as even those who instinctively supported as on 'the right side' acknowledge there are complexities knee-jerk reactions had not fully considered.
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    algarkirk said:

    Leon said:

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    The unutterable tedium of that list says quite a lot, none of it good, about British politics

    He has also managed to miss out the one of the vanishingly few entertaining books about British politics. Viz: Alastair Campbell’s Diaries.

    Campbell the man is a cad and a bounder, but he writes well and the Dairies are compulsively readable. Unlike any of these worthy tomes
    Terry Major-Ball's book, a memoir of John Major, 'Major Major' is pure Pooter and even funnier because it is not meant to be.
    Dr Abdullah Abdullah in the first post-Taliban Afghan government.
    It would be bitterly disappointing if, in the long, distinguished history of England's public schools, there was not a single instance of two brothers known as Major Major and Major Minor.

    Or Morris...
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    MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 50,096
    RobD said:

    FF43 said:

    Lady Haldane determined that Alister Jack (who he?) could overturn the decision of parliament arrived at democratically with cross party support "just because". Haldane knows her law obviously. I'm not sure it's a great constitutional outcome, which is why no-one has triggered a Section 35 before.

    A 65-page ruling to say “just because”?
    65 pages were needed for the thickos in the SNP.
  • Options
    OmniumOmnium Posts: 9,767
    edited December 2023

    algarkirk said:

    Leon said:

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    The unutterable tedium of that list says quite a lot, none of it good, about British politics

    He has also managed to miss out the one of the vanishingly few entertaining books about British politics. Viz: Alastair Campbell’s Diaries.

    Campbell the man is a cad and a bounder, but he writes well and the Dairies are compulsively readable. Unlike any of these worthy tomes
    Terry Major-Ball's book, a memoir of John Major, 'Major Major' is pure Pooter and even funnier because it is not meant to be.
    Dr Abdullah Abdullah in the first post-Taliban Afghan government.
    It would be bitterly disappointing if, in the long, distinguished history of England's public schools, there was not a single instance of two brothers known as Major Major and Major Minor.

    Or Morris...
    There could also be Minor Major and Minor Minor.

    If the Major brothers went into the Army one may have been Major Major Major, and if the Minor brothers decided to follow a gold rush one of them may have been Miner Minor Minor!
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    FF43FF43 Posts: 15,708
    edited December 2023
    DavidL said:

    FF43 said:

    Lady Haldane determined that Alister Jack (who he?) could overturn the decision of parliament arrived at democratically with cross party support "just because". Haldane knows her law obviously. I'm not sure it's a great constitutional outcome, which is why no-one has triggered a Section 35 before.

    The problem with different Parliaments within the same country being able to legislate is fairly obvious and s35 is the answer to it. Ultimately, one Parliament has to have the final say and that is always going to be the Parliament that set up the Scottish Parliament in the first place. The reasons given by the Secretary of State was that the legislation had an effect on UK legislation which the Scottish Parliament is not entitled to do, specifically the Equality Act. Lady Haldane agreed, as she was inevitably going to after her own earlier decision on the effect of a GRC, as argued for by, err, the Scottish government.

    The utter incoherence of the Scottish government's position arguing completely contradictory positions in respect of the same legislation simply highlights the dishonesty and evasion that underlies this legislation. Given the substantial effect that a GRC has (Lady Haldane held that it meant the person was a woman "for all purposes", as per the 2004 Act) safeguards are essential. You simply cannot sweep them away.
    Such constitutional disputes between different governments in one sovereign state are bound to happen. It's messy but you need to manage it if you think the whole is more than fully independent parts. I don't dispute Lady Haldane's interpretation of the law obviously. Just because you can do something doesn't mean you should. It's good to have a bit of respect for the democratic institutions you deal with.

    I don't really agree with your second paragraph. I think the SG case on Section 35 is coherent even if it fails legally. UKG haven't been particularly coherent either. They certainly haven't acted in good faith, which is the key point I'm making here.
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    LeonLeon Posts: 46,994

    Off topic… Elon Musk is letting Alex Jones back on Twitter. What will that do for antisemitic content on the platform? https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2016/10/26/13418304/alex-jones-jewish-mafia

    I am convinced that Musk is bipolar or worse. We have the Musk who leads Tesla and SpaceX, and the lunatic who owns X. How can they possibly be the same person?
    He has admitted he is autistic - at the Aspie end of things. That is probably sufficient to explain his high intellect combined with intense social awkwardness and - often - weird prickliness. And a peculiar, sometimes maladroit sense of humour

    A high-IQ Aspie personality might be seen as ideal for creating and pushing techie companies like SpaceX and Tesla. Less so - to put it mildly - for owning a social media company. Indeed it is hard to think of a worse mix than Social Media plus Asperger's

    Musk should set some free speech ground rules for TwiX, then let someone else run the show, and let someone else audit his tweets first. I do believe he has good intentions, he's just incredibly clumsy and prone to tantrums

  • Options
    DavidLDavidL Posts: 51,197
    FF43 said:

    DavidL said:

    FF43 said:

    Lady Haldane determined that Alister Jack (who he?) could overturn the decision of parliament arrived at democratically with cross party support "just because". Haldane knows her law obviously. I'm not sure it's a great constitutional outcome, which is why no-one has triggered a Section 35 before.

    The problem with different Parliaments within the same country being able to legislate is fairly obvious and s35 is the answer to it. Ultimately, one Parliament has to have the final say and that is always going to be the Parliament that set up the Scottish Parliament in the first place. The reasons given by the Secretary of State was that the legislation had an effect on UK legislation which the Scottish Parliament is not entitled to do, specifically the Equality Act. Lady Haldane agreed, as she was inevitably going to after her own earlier decision on the effect of a GRC, as argued for by, err, the Scottish government.

    The utter incoherence of the Scottish government's position arguing completely contradictory positions in respect of the same legislation simply highlights the dishonesty and evasion that underlies this legislation. Given the substantial effect that a GRC has (Lady Haldane held that it meant the person was a woman "for all purposes", as per the 2004 Act) safeguards are essential. You simply cannot sweep them away.
    Such constitutional disputes between different governments in one sovereign state are bound to happen. It's messy but you need to manage it if you think the whole is more than fully independent parts. I don't dispute Lady Haldane's interpretation of the law obviously. Just because you can do something doesn't mean you should. It's good to have a bit of respect for the democratic institutions you deal with.

    I don't really agree with your second paragraph. I think the SG case on Section 35 is coherent even if it fails legally. UKG haven't been particularly coherent either. They certainly haven't acted in good faith, which is the key point I'm making here.
    The incoherence was that in the public board case, which requires a percentage of females on a board, the Scottish government successfully argued that a transgender woman was a woman for the purposes of the legislation because that was the effect of the 2004 Act, as applied by the Equality Act. A transgender woman was a woman. In this case, in contrast, they tried to argue that a GRC really didn't change the law and the rights given by the Equality Act at all. It was rightly rejected.
  • Options
    Omnium said:

    algarkirk said:

    Leon said:

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    The unutterable tedium of that list says quite a lot, none of it good, about British politics

    He has also managed to miss out the one of the vanishingly few entertaining books about British politics. Viz: Alastair Campbell’s Diaries.

    Campbell the man is a cad and a bounder, but he writes well and the Dairies are compulsively readable. Unlike any of these worthy tomes
    Terry Major-Ball's book, a memoir of John Major, 'Major Major' is pure Pooter and even funnier because it is not meant to be.
    Dr Abdullah Abdullah in the first post-Taliban Afghan government.
    It would be bitterly disappointing if, in the long, distinguished history of England's public schools, there was not a single instance of two brothers known as Major Major and Major Minor.

    Or Morris...
    There could also be Minor Major and Minor Minor.

    If the Major brothers went into the Army one may have been Major Major Major, and if the Minor brothers decided to follow a gold rush one of them may have been Miner Minor Minor!
    And if the brothers who went on the gold rush took a certain type of caged bird with them, then you could call it the Miner Minor Minor's Mynah...

    I'll get my coat..
  • Options
    geoffwgeoffw Posts: 8,141
     
    DavidL said:

    RobD said:

    FF43 said:

    Lady Haldane determined that Alister Jack (who he?) could overturn the decision of parliament arrived at democratically with cross party support "just because". Haldane knows her law obviously. I'm not sure it's a great constitutional outcome, which is why no-one has triggered a Section 35 before.

    A 65-page ruling to say “just because”?
    65 pages were needed for the thickos in the SNP.
    One of the things that I learned from much better advocates than me is that 1 good argument is worth infinitely more than 10 arguable ones. If you have a good argument you make it, you focus on it, you force the court and your opponent to focus on it and you win with it. The arguments presented by the Scottish government did not have that quality.
    cf Einstein:    “Why 100? If I were wrong, one would have been enough."
    Responding to the book Hundred Authors Against Einstein
  • Options
    DougSealDougSeal Posts: 11,133

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    I’m pretty amazed he gets to use Substack from Federal prison, and indeed that he reads about British politics. Or does he get special privileges ahead of his sentencing? Hopefully some of the Substack subscriptions will go some (small way) to compensating the victims of the FTX disaster.
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    FF43FF43 Posts: 15,708
    edited December 2023
    ..
  • Options
    FF43FF43 Posts: 15,708

    FF43 said:

    Lady Haldane determined that Alister Jack (who he?) could overturn the decision of parliament arrived at democratically with cross party support "just because". Haldane knows her law obviously. I'm not sure it's a great constitutional outcome, which is why no-one has triggered a Section 35 before.

    Its a *terrible* constitutional outcome. Set aside the actual policy for a moment and talk about principles. Tories love talking about principled things like sovereignty, yet when it came to this all they talked about was the bill.

    Should Scotland be allowed to set laws in Scotland? Yes!

    But - and its the same big but that demolishes the Rwanda crayon drawing. Sovereignty applies to the sovereign body. That sovereign body can't impose its will on other sovereign bodies. Just as the Tories can't dictate to Rwanda what Rwanda does in Rwanda, Holyrood can't dictate laws outside of Scotland. And the GRR - regardless of your views on the policy - has been found to stamp on the toes south of the wall.

    As Cyclefree rightly labels it - hubris.
    Clearly (to me at least) if the UKG has legitimate concerns about specific effects that a Scottish act might have on particular UK law the sensible thing is for the two governments to work together to resolve the specific issues. That has never been UKG's intention. Their aim is to kill democratically determined legislation through the use of an obscure constitutional override.
  • Options
    MJWMJW Posts: 1,339

    Off topic… Elon Musk is letting Alex Jones back on Twitter. What will that do for antisemitic content on the platform? https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2016/10/26/13418304/alex-jones-jewish-mafia

    I am convinced that Musk is bipolar or worse. We have the Musk who leads Tesla and SpaceX, and the lunatic who owns X. How can they possibly be the same person?
    I can see Tesla heading for a bad fall, like a lot of early market leaders. Its huge value relies on the fact EVs are a slam dunk growth market and it being to some extent synonymous with the quality end of products within it. Plus its battery technology - and in the US its charging network.

    That doesn't likely hold. Almost every carmaker is now producing or on the verge of producing EVs that frankly, are much better and more tailored to individual tastes than Tesla. Tesla is going all in on the crazy Cybertruck when soon you'll be able to buy a fully electric Land Rover. Or numerous high-performance EVs from upstarts. Or if your budget is more modest, all kinds of Toyotas, Hondas.

    Worryingly for Tesla too, the Chinese firm BYD is also hot on its heels and it looks inevitable it will overtake it. Others will surely supersede or match its battery tech with investment, while Biden is investing $7.5bn in charging infrastructure in the US that will remove its advantage there.

    All this while Musk has quite obviously taken his eye off the ball with his other ventures and when he is focused on Tesla seems to be focused on his own obsessions with what he and his fanboys think are cool rather than where the market might be going.

    It's surely a matter of time before one of its competitors finds its iPhone.
  • Options
    BenpointerBenpointer Posts: 31,636
    Nice header!
  • Options
    TazTaz Posts: 11,121
    DougSeal said:

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    I’m pretty amazed he gets to use Substack from Federal prison, and indeed that he reads about British politics. Or does he get special privileges ahead of his sentencing? Hopefully some of the Substack subscriptions will go some (small way) to compensating the victims of the FTX disaster.
    Different guy, you’re thinking of SBF.
  • Options
    DavidLDavidL Posts: 51,197
    FF43 said:

    ..

    There is nothing obscure about it. As you acknowledged it is an essential part of the set up.

    Otherwise I agree. The strongest point that the Lord Advocate made was that there was no attempt to engage with this legislation during its passage which, at the least, raises question marks about the motivation for the use of s35.
  • Options
    FairlieredFairliered Posts: 3,969

    Omnium said:

    algarkirk said:

    Leon said:

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    The unutterable tedium of that list says quite a lot, none of it good, about British politics

    He has also managed to miss out the one of the vanishingly few entertaining books about British politics. Viz: Alastair Campbell’s Diaries.

    Campbell the man is a cad and a bounder, but he writes well and the Dairies are compulsively readable. Unlike any of these worthy tomes
    Terry Major-Ball's book, a memoir of John Major, 'Major Major' is pure Pooter and even funnier because it is not meant to be.
    Dr Abdullah Abdullah in the first post-Taliban Afghan government.
    It would be bitterly disappointing if, in the long, distinguished history of England's public schools, there was not a single instance of two brothers known as Major Major and Major Minor.

    Or Morris...
    There could also be Minor Major and Minor Minor.

    If the Major brothers went into the Army one may have been Major Major Major, and if the Minor brothers decided to follow a gold rush one of them may have been Miner Minor Minor!
    And if the brothers who went on the gold rush took a certain type of caged bird with them, then you could call it the Miner Minor Minor's Mynah...

    I'll get my coat..
    They may also have had a sister called Minnie Minor.
  • Options
    viewcodeviewcode Posts: 18,698
    edited December 2023

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    In the (increasingly improbable) event I ever get enough money and free time to read properly, the Roy Jenkins Gladstone and the Kynaston series (Austerity Britain, Family Britain, Modernity Britain, etc) is on my TBR list. However I would like to suggest other books for a list of British politics 1900-date. In no particular order
    • Steve Richard's The Prime Ministers/The Prime Ministers We Never Had/Turning Points
    • Tim Shipman's "Out" series (third one published in Mar 2024)
    • Pogrund and Maguire's "Left Out" and Owen Jones's "This Land"
    • King and Crewe's "The Blunders of our Governments"
    • Marquand's "Britain Since 1918: The Strange Career Of British Democracy"
    • Edgerton's "The Rise and Fall of the British Nation"
    • Goodwin's "Values, Voice and Virtue"
    The list is limited to the ones I have read, explaining the absence of (say) Thatcher's "Statecraft" which is on my TBR list. No doubt others can recommend others


  • Options
    malcolmgmalcolmg Posts: 41,845

    Would I be right in suspecting that the SNP is likely to implode even more than the Tories at the next election.

    Starmer is indeed a lucky,lucky general, but he does need to sort Labour policy out on this one.

    They deserve to. As this thread points out, the GRR Bill rode roughshod over every concern. The SNP stick everything as "you're either for Scotland or you're against it" which is absurdist absolutism.

    The fascinating thing for me isn't what this does for gender politics (as the absolutist tide is already retreating), its what it does for nationalism. The SNP can't do what it likes. A short while ago this election was supposed to be an unofficial 2nd referendum. Now it has a tired and confused governing party in retreat unable even to pass laws in their own country.

    Just like the Tories with Rwanda, you can't do what you want and impose your ideas on others.
    England imposes their ideas on Scotland all the time.
  • Options
    viewcodeviewcode Posts: 18,698
    Leon said:

    ydoethur said:

    Leon said:

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    The unutterable tedium of that list says quite a lot, none of it good, about British politics

    He has also managed to miss out the one of the vanishingly few entertaining books about British politics. Viz: Alastair Campbell’s Diaries.

    Campbell the man is a cad and a bounder, but he writes well and the Dairies are compulsively readable. Unlike any of these worthy tomes
    Yes Minister and YPM are both good reads.

    In fact, you could make a case that they were better than the TV series, and that's not to say the TV series wasn't very good as well.
    I find the TV series vastly overrated. Middlebrow radio 4 chortling, always slightly forced, like the laughter you so often get at Shakespeare comedies on stage

    I automatically mistrust anyone who likes Yes PM or who quotes it on here
    "Middlebrow"
  • Options
    malcolmgmalcolmg Posts: 41,845
    FF43 said:

    FF43 said:

    Lady Haldane determined that Alister Jack (who he?) could overturn the decision of parliament arrived at democratically with cross party support "just because". Haldane knows her law obviously. I'm not sure it's a great constitutional outcome, which is why no-one has triggered a Section 35 before.

    Its a *terrible* constitutional outcome. Set aside the actual policy for a moment and talk about principles. Tories love talking about principled things like sovereignty, yet when it came to this all they talked about was the bill.

    Should Scotland be allowed to set laws in Scotland? Yes!

    But - and its the same big but that demolishes the Rwanda crayon drawing. Sovereignty applies to the sovereign body. That sovereign body can't impose its will on other sovereign bodies. Just as the Tories can't dictate to Rwanda what Rwanda does in Rwanda, Holyrood can't dictate laws outside of Scotland. And the GRR - regardless of your views on the policy - has been found to stamp on the toes south of the wall.

    As Cyclefree rightly labels it - hubris.
    Clearly (to me at least) if the UKG has legitimate concerns about specific effects that a Scottish act might have on particular UK law the sensible thing is for the two governments to work together to resolve the specific issues. That has never been UKG's intention. Their aim is to kill democratically determined legislation through the use of an obscure constitutional override.
    That is what happens when you are a colony. Your oppressor can do as they wish.
  • Options
    DougSealDougSeal Posts: 11,133
    Taz said:

    DougSeal said:

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    I’m pretty amazed he gets to use Substack from Federal prison, and indeed that he reads about British politics. Or does he get special privileges ahead of his sentencing? Hopefully some of the Substack subscriptions will go some (small way) to compensating the victims of the FTX disaster.
    Different guy, you’re thinking of SBF.
    No - that’s a French stock market index that, so far as I’m aware, still operates. FTX was a cryptocurrency exchange that collapsed in November 2022.
  • Options
    FF43FF43 Posts: 15,708
    DavidL said:

    FF43 said:

    ..

    There is nothing obscure about it. As you acknowledged it is an essential part of the set up.

    Otherwise I agree. The strongest point that the Lord Advocate made was that there was no attempt to engage with this legislation during its passage which, at the least, raises question marks about the motivation for the use of s35.
    Fair point. Maybe I should "last resort".
  • Options
    Leon said:

    Off topic… Elon Musk is letting Alex Jones back on Twitter. What will that do for antisemitic content on the platform? https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2016/10/26/13418304/alex-jones-jewish-mafia

    I am convinced that Musk is bipolar or worse. We have the Musk who leads Tesla and SpaceX, and the lunatic who owns X. How can they possibly be the same person?
    He has admitted he is autistic - at the Aspie end of things. That is probably sufficient to explain his high intellect combined with intense social awkwardness and - often - weird prickliness. And a peculiar, sometimes maladroit sense of humour

    A high-IQ Aspie personality might be seen as ideal for creating and pushing techie companies like SpaceX and Tesla. Less so - to put it mildly - for owning a social media company. Indeed it is hard to think of a worse mix than Social Media plus Asperger's

    Musk should set some free speech ground rules for TwiX, then let someone else run the show, and let someone else audit his tweets first. I do believe he has good intentions, he's just incredibly clumsy and prone to tantrums

    Its not autism driving his behaviour. Autism is in my family - I understand various autistic traits. Having two completely contrasting personalities is not autism.
  • Options
    FairlieredFairliered Posts: 3,969
    DavidL said:

    FF43 said:

    DavidL said:

    FF43 said:

    Lady Haldane determined that Alister Jack (who he?) could overturn the decision of parliament arrived at democratically with cross party support "just because". Haldane knows her law obviously. I'm not sure it's a great constitutional outcome, which is why no-one has triggered a Section 35 before.

    The problem with different Parliaments within the same country being able to legislate is fairly obvious and s35 is the answer to it. Ultimately, one Parliament has to have the final say and that is always going to be the Parliament that set up the Scottish Parliament in the first place. The reasons given by the Secretary of State was that the legislation had an effect on UK legislation which the Scottish Parliament is not entitled to do, specifically the Equality Act. Lady Haldane agreed, as she was inevitably going to after her own earlier decision on the effect of a GRC, as argued for by, err, the Scottish government.

    The utter incoherence of the Scottish government's position arguing completely contradictory positions in respect of the same legislation simply highlights the dishonesty and evasion that underlies this legislation. Given the substantial effect that a GRC has (Lady Haldane held that it meant the person was a woman "for all purposes", as per the 2004 Act) safeguards are essential. You simply cannot sweep them away.
    Such constitutional disputes between different governments in one sovereign state are bound to happen. It's messy but you need to manage it if you think the whole is more than fully independent parts. I don't dispute Lady Haldane's interpretation of the law obviously. Just because you can do something doesn't mean you should. It's good to have a bit of respect for the democratic institutions you deal with.

    I don't really agree with your second paragraph. I think the SG case on Section 35 is coherent even if it fails legally. UKG haven't been particularly coherent either. They certainly haven't acted in good faith, which is the key point I'm making here.
    The incoherence was that in the public board case, which requires a percentage of females on a board, the Scottish government successfully argued that a transgender woman was a woman for the purposes of the legislation because that was the effect of the 2004 Act, as applied by the Equality Act. A transgender woman was a woman. In this case, in contrast, they tried to argue that a GRC really didn't change the law and the rights given by the Equality Act at all. It was rightly rejected.
    In my opinion, the decision was the right decision, but for the wrong reason. The Scottish Government case was weak and inconsistent, but I have no reason to think that the UK Government were arguing because of their support for women’s rights, but just as a convenient subject to pick a fight with the Scottish Government.
    Alister Jack seems to be the only Scottish Secretary since the introduction of the Scottish Parliament that would prefer to see it abolished, and the 2019-2024 Conservative government the first UK government that would legislate to abolish it. Maybe abolition of the Scottish and Welsh parliaments will be in their GE manifesto.
  • Options
    eekeek Posts: 24,949
    So this morning I had to drop people off at the station so saw an advert I've not seen for a while.

    It said that Treasury North is bringing 1,500 well paid civil service jobs to Darlington. Given many of the jobs pay well below the market rate for the skills required (1 example I've seen is a job where the going rate is £60,000 (and that's hard to recruit at) and it's paying max £35,000) can I complain to Advertising Standards?
  • Options
    LeonLeon Posts: 46,994

    Leon said:

    Off topic… Elon Musk is letting Alex Jones back on Twitter. What will that do for antisemitic content on the platform? https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2016/10/26/13418304/alex-jones-jewish-mafia

    I am convinced that Musk is bipolar or worse. We have the Musk who leads Tesla and SpaceX, and the lunatic who owns X. How can they possibly be the same person?
    He has admitted he is autistic - at the Aspie end of things. That is probably sufficient to explain his high intellect combined with intense social awkwardness and - often - weird prickliness. And a peculiar, sometimes maladroit sense of humour

    A high-IQ Aspie personality might be seen as ideal for creating and pushing techie companies like SpaceX and Tesla. Less so - to put it mildly - for owning a social media company. Indeed it is hard to think of a worse mix than Social Media plus Asperger's

    Musk should set some free speech ground rules for TwiX, then let someone else run the show, and let someone else audit his tweets first. I do believe he has good intentions, he's just incredibly clumsy and prone to tantrums

    Its not autism driving his behaviour. Autism is in my family - I understand various autistic traits. Having two completely contrasting personalities is not autism.
    He hasn't got two personalities. He has one, and it is Aspie, and it is on show on Twitter, but in a particularly and cruelly exposed way. The medium really does not suit his style, he's obviously shy, for a start

    Did we ever see the Elon that ran Tesla or SpaceX? No, apart from a few Rogan interviews
  • Options
    TazTaz Posts: 11,121
    DougSeal said:

    Taz said:

    DougSeal said:

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    I’m pretty amazed he gets to use Substack from Federal prison, and indeed that he reads about British politics. Or does he get special privileges ahead of his sentencing? Hopefully some of the Substack subscriptions will go some (small way) to compensating the victims of the FTX disaster.
    Different guy, you’re thinking of SBF.
    No - that’s a French stock market index that, so far as I’m aware, still operates. FTX was a cryptocurrency exchange that collapsed in November 2022.
    SBF - Sam Bankman Fried. 😂😂😂😂😂
  • Options
    eekeek Posts: 24,949
    edited December 2023
    viewcode said:

    Leon said:

    ydoethur said:

    Leon said:

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    The unutterable tedium of that list says quite a lot, none of it good, about British politics

    He has also managed to miss out the one of the vanishingly few entertaining books about British politics. Viz: Alastair Campbell’s Diaries.

    Campbell the man is a cad and a bounder, but he writes well and the Dairies are compulsively readable. Unlike any of these worthy tomes
    Yes Minister and YPM are both good reads.

    In fact, you could make a case that they were better than the TV series, and that's not to say the TV series wasn't very good as well.
    I find the TV series vastly overrated. Middlebrow radio 4 chortling, always slightly forced, like the laughter you so often get at Shakespeare comedies on stage

    I automatically mistrust anyone who likes Yes PM or who quotes it on here
    "Middlebrow"
    Most old TV is vastly overrated when you compare it to more modern fare. A couple of years back I got a Blu ray version of Jeremy Brett's Sherlock Holmes (it was released in Germany with English and Germany sound tracks), what I remember it as and what I saw was a very different thing - to my modern ears it was incredibly slow moving...
  • Options
    MJWMJW Posts: 1,339
    FF43 said:

    FF43 said:

    Lady Haldane determined that Alister Jack (who he?) could overturn the decision of parliament arrived at democratically with cross party support "just because". Haldane knows her law obviously. I'm not sure it's a great constitutional outcome, which is why no-one has triggered a Section 35 before.

    Its a *terrible* constitutional outcome. Set aside the actual policy for a moment and talk about principles. Tories love talking about principled things like sovereignty, yet when it came to this all they talked about was the bill.

    Should Scotland be allowed to set laws in Scotland? Yes!

    But - and its the same big but that demolishes the Rwanda crayon drawing. Sovereignty applies to the sovereign body. That sovereign body can't impose its will on other sovereign bodies. Just as the Tories can't dictate to Rwanda what Rwanda does in Rwanda, Holyrood can't dictate laws outside of Scotland. And the GRR - regardless of your views on the policy - has been found to stamp on the toes south of the wall.

    As Cyclefree rightly labels it - hubris.
    Clearly (to me at least) if the UKG has legitimate concerns about specific effects that a Scottish act might have on particular UK law the sensible thing is for the two governments to work together to resolve the specific issues. That has never been UKG's intention. Their aim is to kill democratically determined legislation through the use of an obscure constitutional override.
    I'm not sure the Scottish government can either - otherwise they would have written the legislation with the necessary carve-outs to ensure it did not have an impact in England, even if it meant annoying absolutists. Both they and the Tories were spoiling for this fight, and the SNP lost.

    It's also very difficult for both to work together 'to resolve the specific issues' when the Tory (and therefore Westminster for now) position is that Self-ID is a terrible, rights-destroying, dangerous policy, and the SNP/Hollyrood position is that it's a necessary extension of important rights.

    The only work around I think would be to rewrite to ensure English orgs. didn't have to accept a Scottish GRC as evidence of their sex when applying equalities law. But that would still be fairly laborious and lead to weird situations whereby for several purposes whether you were a man or a woman changed as you crossed Hadrian's Wall.
  • Options
    bondegezoubondegezou Posts: 7,586
    Taz said:

    On topic… The Green Party (of England and Wales) has disaffiliated Green Party Women: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-67546751

    Amazingly biased article there from the BBC. Taking claims from someone at face value and portraying the gender critical womens group as baddies.
    ? The article I read rejected the Green Party’s claim that this was all over procedure and portrayed the women’s group quite positively.
  • Options
    LeonLeon Posts: 46,994
    viewcode said:

    Leon said:

    ydoethur said:

    Leon said:

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    The unutterable tedium of that list says quite a lot, none of it good, about British politics

    He has also managed to miss out the one of the vanishingly few entertaining books about British politics. Viz: Alastair Campbell’s Diaries.

    Campbell the man is a cad and a bounder, but he writes well and the Dairies are compulsively readable. Unlike any of these worthy tomes
    Yes Minister and YPM are both good reads.

    In fact, you could make a case that they were better than the TV series, and that's not to say the TV series wasn't very good as well.
    I find the TV series vastly overrated. Middlebrow radio 4 chortling, always slightly forced, like the laughter you so often get at Shakespeare comedies on stage

    I automatically mistrust anyone who likes Yes PM or who quotes it on here
    "Middlebrow"
    You demur? You find it lowbrow? Highbrow?!
  • Options
    eekeek Posts: 24,949
    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Off topic… Elon Musk is letting Alex Jones back on Twitter. What will that do for antisemitic content on the platform? https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2016/10/26/13418304/alex-jones-jewish-mafia

    I am convinced that Musk is bipolar or worse. We have the Musk who leads Tesla and SpaceX, and the lunatic who owns X. How can they possibly be the same person?
    He has admitted he is autistic - at the Aspie end of things. That is probably sufficient to explain his high intellect combined with intense social awkwardness and - often - weird prickliness. And a peculiar, sometimes maladroit sense of humour

    A high-IQ Aspie personality might be seen as ideal for creating and pushing techie companies like SpaceX and Tesla. Less so - to put it mildly - for owning a social media company. Indeed it is hard to think of a worse mix than Social Media plus Asperger's

    Musk should set some free speech ground rules for TwiX, then let someone else run the show, and let someone else audit his tweets first. I do believe he has good intentions, he's just incredibly clumsy and prone to tantrums

    Its not autism driving his behaviour. Autism is in my family - I understand various autistic traits. Having two completely contrasting personalities is not autism.
    He hasn't got two personalities. He has one, and it is Aspie, and it is on show on Twitter, but in a particularly and cruelly exposed way. The medium really does not suit his style, he's obviously shy, for a start

    Did we ever see the Elon that ran Tesla or SpaceX? No, apart from a few Rogan interviews
    Yes - when the video is about the areas he's interested in. so Sandy Munro's videos where he interviews Elon about Tesla are always interesting https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ky1Z2klPalw&t=6s as are the interviews Elon has done at SpaceX (don't have that to hand).
  • Options
    Andy_JSAndy_JS Posts: 26,531
    "And they’re off: Kemi Badenoch takes an early lead in the Tory leadership stakes
    It is a measure of Rishi Sunak’s weakness that the contest to replace him is in full swing, writes John Rentoul"

    https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/kemi-badenoch-tory-leadership-election-sunak-b2461313.html
  • Options
    DougSealDougSeal Posts: 11,133
    Taz said:

    DougSeal said:

    Taz said:

    DougSeal said:

    Off-topic already!

    Sam Friedman has listed his top ten books on British politics. You will have to read his substack for the list with his comments, reasons, and to see he cheats like mad with supplementary and multi-volume entries but the bare list is:-

    1. Gladstone by Roy Jenkins
    2. The Five Giants by Nick Timmins
    3. A Different Kind of Weather by William Waldegrave
    4. Tales of a New Jerusalem series by David Kynaston
    5. Diaries 1964-1976 by Barbara Castle
    6. The Anatomy of Thatcherism by Shirley Robin Letwin
    7. What Does Jeremy Think? by Suzanne Heywood
    8. Power Trip by Damian McBride
    9. Yes to Europe! by Robert Saunders
    10. The Complete Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister
    https://samf.substack.com/p/the-top-ten-books-on-british-politics
    I’m pretty amazed he gets to use Substack from Federal prison, and indeed that he reads about British politics. Or does he get special privileges ahead of his sentencing? Hopefully some of the Substack subscriptions will go some (small way) to compensating the victims of the FTX disaster.
    Different guy, you’re thinking of SBF.
    No - that’s a French stock market index that, so far as I’m aware, still operates. FTX was a cryptocurrency exchange that collapsed in November 2022.
    SBF - Sam Bankman Fried. 😂😂😂😂😂
    I think you’re getting confused with this -

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SBF_120?wprov=sfti1#

    Perfectly legit, although I guess FTX was considered the same…

    Wonder how the math nerd offspring of Stanford professors developed such an interest in the arcane minutiae of post-war British politics? Surprised he had the time. It’s like finding out Elon Musk wanted to be the TMS statistician
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