Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. Sign in or register to get started.

5 days before becoming PM Brown faced a tough BBC grilling – politicalbetting.com

1235»

Comments

  • JohnLilburneJohnLilburne Posts: 5,778
    Leon said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    Leon said:

    kjh said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Quick question:

    Off to Paris for the weekend late September. Anyone got any restaurant/brasserie recommendations. Maxish 130 euros per person.

    I'd love small eatery somewhere quiet, very French, candles etc... Any ideas?

    In my experience, Parisian food is really hit and miss, and all the places that are like you describe: quiet, candles, French - are either horribly twee and touristy or very expensive, or both, and the food is STILL variable

    Sorry not to be more help

    The most reliable good food in Paris is the big old fashioned brasseries with the red banquettes (which are undergoing a revival). Stick to the classics: oysters, foie gras and gingerbread, turbot and veg. Yummy

    But they are noisy and boozy
    Gingerbread?!?
    Yeah, I know, but it's an ancien regime brasserie classic, and when you have it you see why. Sweetness works with foie gras - cf Sauternes

    https://www.laclassedecuisine.com/recipes/appetizers/foie-gras-and-gingerbread-canapes/
    New one on me tbf. I was wondering if it was a recipe created by Stable Diffusion.

    Anyway, I am looking forward to seeing if the Brittany Ferries on-ship restaurant is still any good as we head to France on Thursday night - it's been about 10 years since we were regulars on the Portsmouth-St Malo crossing.

    Then driving down to the Italian Lakes with a few stops either way in France for the next fortnight. Looking to settle the age-old question of whether French or Italian food is best (well, not 'settle', just do a lot of sampling tbh).
    I would normally say Italian food is significantly better, but my recent trip to Florence and Rome was disappointing. I have honestly had better Italian food in London, easily. Indeed my daughter remarked: "you can get a better tiramisu in Sainsburys". And she's right

    Maybe the food has not declined it's just that Brits are now spoiled with great food, especially in supermarkets - which are so diverse and competitive here. So we are less easily impressed

    We have discussed the stagnation in French food several times. I'll be interested to hear your verdict
    Generally in the UK you get what you pay for. In France and Italy I have had some average meals, but then every so often you get a humdinger for a reasonable price. I got a fantastic meal at a workman's cafe in France. No choice. In Florence, we were in a hotel on the outskirts and asked for a recommendation. We ate there every night for the 3 nights we were there it was so good. In France a back street cafe served me a simple duck and salad, but it was beautiful. All these meals were dirt cheap. Spent lots more on really average meals in both countries.
    In Italy the iron law is: the poorer the region, the better the food

    The best food of all is probably in Calabria. If you go to high end Calabrian places you pay mid-range Roman prices and get sublime food. The Ndrangheta like to be well fed

    Behind Calabria come Sicily, Naples, and so on. Yummy

    In the richer areas it is not so good. The super touristy places can be severely disappointing. Florence, Venice, Capri. Milan can be mediocre, too

    The exception to this law is the far north and Trentino, Friuli etc. Quite wealthy, or very wealthy, and the food is great
    Too far North and you get into all that awful Alpine bacony cheesy lardy kinda stuff

    Contemplating popping over to Calabria next week. Will report.
    The mountain food can be hearty, yes, but generally delicious. A lot of speck, to be sure

    But Bolzano has brilliant food. And they have this fabulous street market in the middle. Mmmmmmmmm

    And the food on the Slovenian border is fascinating. And don't forget Trieste with its boiled testicles! And James Joyce's favourite cafes!
    I ate fighting bulls' bollocks in Ciudad Rodrigo and excellent they were too.

    Off to Riga next week, there
    Leon said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    Leon said:

    kjh said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Quick question:

    Off to Paris for the weekend late September. Anyone got any restaurant/brasserie recommendations. Maxish 130 euros per person.

    I'd love small eatery somewhere quiet, very French, candles etc... Any ideas?

    In my experience, Parisian food is really hit and miss, and all the places that are like you describe: quiet, candles, French - are either horribly twee and touristy or very expensive, or both, and the food is STILL variable

    Sorry not to be more help

    The most reliable good food in Paris is the big old fashioned brasseries with the red banquettes (which are undergoing a revival). Stick to the classics: oysters, foie gras and gingerbread, turbot and veg. Yummy

    But they are noisy and boozy
    Gingerbread?!?
    Yeah, I know, but it's an ancien regime brasserie classic, and when you have it you see why. Sweetness works with foie gras - cf Sauternes

    https://www.laclassedecuisine.com/recipes/appetizers/foie-gras-and-gingerbread-canapes/
    New one on me tbf. I was wondering if it was a recipe created by Stable Diffusion.

    Anyway, I am looking forward to seeing if the Brittany Ferries on-ship restaurant is still any good as we head to France on Thursday night - it's been about 10 years since we were regulars on the Portsmouth-St Malo crossing.

    Then driving down to the Italian Lakes with a few stops either way in France for the next fortnight. Looking to settle the age-old question of whether French or Italian food is best (well, not 'settle', just do a lot of sampling tbh).
    I would normally say Italian food is significantly better, but my recent trip to Florence and Rome was disappointing. I have honestly had better Italian food in London, easily. Indeed my daughter remarked: "you can get a better tiramisu in Sainsburys". And she's right

    Maybe the food has not declined it's just that Brits are now spoiled with great food, especially in supermarkets - which are so diverse and competitive here. So we are less easily impressed

    We have discussed the stagnation in French food several times. I'll be interested to hear your verdict
    Generally in the UK you get what you pay for. In France and Italy I have had some average meals, but then every so often you get a humdinger for a reasonable price. I got a fantastic meal at a workman's cafe in France. No choice. In Florence, we were in a hotel on the outskirts and asked for a recommendation. We ate there every night for the 3 nights we were there it was so good. In France a back street cafe served me a simple duck and salad, but it was beautiful. All these meals were dirt cheap. Spent lots more on really average meals in both countries.
    In Italy the iron law is: the poorer the region, the better the food

    The best food of all is probably in Calabria. If you go to high end Calabrian places you pay mid-range Roman prices and get sublime food. The Ndrangheta like to be well fed

    Behind Calabria come Sicily, Naples, and so on. Yummy

    In the richer areas it is not so good. The super touristy places can be severely disappointing. Florence, Venice, Capri. Milan can be mediocre, too

    The exception to this law is the far north and Trentino, Friuli etc. Quite wealthy, or very wealthy, and the food is great
    Too far North and you get into all that awful Alpine bacony cheesy lardy kinda stuff

    Contemplating popping over to Calabria next week. Will report.
    The mountain food can be hearty, yes, but generally delicious. A lot of speck, to be sure

    But Bolzano has brilliant food. And they have this fabulous street market in the middle. Mmmmmmmmm

    And the food on the Slovenian border is fascinating. And don't forget Trieste with its boiled testicles! And James Joyce's favourite cafes!
    I ate fighting bulls' bollocks in
    Leon said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    Leon said:

    kjh said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Quick question:

    Off to Paris for the weekend late September. Anyone got any restaurant/brasserie recommendations. Maxish 130 euros per person.

    I'd love small eatery somewhere quiet, very French, candles etc... Any ideas?

    In my experience, Parisian food is really hit and miss, and all the places that are like you describe: quiet, candles, French - are either horribly twee and touristy or very expensive, or both, and the food is STILL variable

    Sorry not to be more help

    The most reliable good food in Paris is the big old fashioned brasseries with the red banquettes (which are undergoing a revival). Stick to the classics: oysters, foie gras and gingerbread, turbot and veg. Yummy

    But they are noisy and boozy
    Gingerbread?!?
    Yeah, I know, but it's an ancien regime brasserie classic, and when you have it you see why. Sweetness works with foie gras - cf Sauternes

    https://www.laclassedecuisine.com/recipes/appetizers/foie-gras-and-gingerbread-canapes/
    New one on me tbf. I was wondering if it was a recipe created by Stable Diffusion.

    Anyway, I am looking forward to seeing if the Brittany Ferries on-ship restaurant is still any good as we head to France on Thursday night - it's been about 10 years since we were regulars on the Portsmouth-St Malo crossing.

    Then driving down to the Italian Lakes with a few stops either way in France for the next fortnight. Looking to settle the age-old question of whether French or Italian food is best (well, not 'settle', just do a lot of sampling tbh).
    I would normally say Italian food is significantly better, but my recent trip to Florence and Rome was disappointing. I have honestly had better Italian food in London, easily. Indeed my daughter remarked: "you can get a better tiramisu in Sainsburys". And she's right

    Maybe the food has not declined it's just that Brits are now spoiled with great food, especially in supermarkets - which are so diverse and competitive here. So we are less easily impressed

    We have discussed the stagnation in French food several times. I'll be interested to hear your verdict
    Generally in the UK you get what you pay for. In France and Italy I have had some average meals, but then every so often you get a humdinger for a reasonable price. I got a fantastic meal at a workman's cafe in France. No choice. In Florence, we were in a hotel on the outskirts and asked for a recommendation. We ate there every night for the 3 nights we were there it was so good. In France a back street cafe served me a simple duck and salad, but it was beautiful. All these meals were dirt cheap. Spent lots more on really average meals in both countries.
    In Italy the iron law is: the poorer the region, the better the food

    The best food of all is probably in Calabria. If you go to high end Calabrian places you pay mid-range Roman prices and get sublime food. The Ndrangheta like to be well fed

    Behind Calabria come Sicily, Naples, and so on. Yummy

    In the richer areas it is not so good. The super touristy places can be severely disappointing. Florence, Venice, Capri. Milan can be mediocre, too

    The exception to this law is the far north and Trentino, Friuli etc. Quite wealthy, or very wealthy, and the food is great
    Too far North and you get into all that awful Alpine bacony cheesy lardy kinda stuff

    Contemplating popping over to Calabria next week. Will report.
    The mountain food can be hearty, yes, but generally delicious. A lot of speck, to be sure

    But Bolzano has brilliant food. And they have this fabulous street market in the middle. Mmmmmmmmm

    And the food on the Slovenian border is fascinating. And don't forget Trieste with its boiled testicles! And James Joyce's favourite cafes!
    I ate fighting bulls' bollocks in Ciudad Rodrigo and excellent they were too. Off to Riga next week, there seems to be a few high end restaurants and I will pick one at random and report back. And lots of craft beer bars too.
  • LeonLeon Posts: 28,532
    IshmaelZ said:

    Leon said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    Leon said:

    kjh said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Quick question:

    Off to Paris for the weekend late September. Anyone got any restaurant/brasserie recommendations. Maxish 130 euros per person.

    I'd love small eatery somewhere quiet, very French, candles etc... Any ideas?

    In my experience, Parisian food is really hit and miss, and all the places that are like you describe: quiet, candles, French - are either horribly twee and touristy or very expensive, or both, and the food is STILL variable

    Sorry not to be more help

    The most reliable good food in Paris is the big old fashioned brasseries with the red banquettes (which are undergoing a revival). Stick to the classics: oysters, foie gras and gingerbread, turbot and veg. Yummy

    But they are noisy and boozy
    Gingerbread?!?
    Yeah, I know, but it's an ancien regime brasserie classic, and when you have it you see why. Sweetness works with foie gras - cf Sauternes

    https://www.laclassedecuisine.com/recipes/appetizers/foie-gras-and-gingerbread-canapes/
    New one on me tbf. I was wondering if it was a recipe created by Stable Diffusion.

    Anyway, I am looking forward to seeing if the Brittany Ferries on-ship restaurant is still any good as we head to France on Thursday night - it's been about 10 years since we were regulars on the Portsmouth-St Malo crossing.

    Then driving down to the Italian Lakes with a few stops either way in France for the next fortnight. Looking to settle the age-old question of whether French or Italian food is best (well, not 'settle', just do a lot of sampling tbh).
    I would normally say Italian food is significantly better, but my recent trip to Florence and Rome was disappointing. I have honestly had better Italian food in London, easily. Indeed my daughter remarked: "you can get a better tiramisu in Sainsburys". And she's right

    Maybe the food has not declined it's just that Brits are now spoiled with great food, especially in supermarkets - which are so diverse and competitive here. So we are less easily impressed

    We have discussed the stagnation in French food several times. I'll be interested to hear your verdict
    Generally in the UK you get what you pay for. In France and Italy I have had some average meals, but then every so often you get a humdinger for a reasonable price. I got a fantastic meal at a workman's cafe in France. No choice. In Florence, we were in a hotel on the outskirts and asked for a recommendation. We ate there every night for the 3 nights we were there it was so good. In France a back street cafe served me a simple duck and salad, but it was beautiful. All these meals were dirt cheap. Spent lots more on really average meals in both countries.
    In Italy the iron law is: the poorer the region, the better the food

    The best food of all is probably in Calabria. If you go to high end Calabrian places you pay mid-range Roman prices and get sublime food. The Ndrangheta like to be well fed

    Behind Calabria come Sicily, Naples, and so on. Yummy

    In the richer areas it is not so good. The super touristy places can be severely disappointing. Florence, Venice, Capri. Milan can be mediocre, too

    The exception to this law is the far north and Trentino, Friuli etc. Quite wealthy, or very wealthy, and the food is great
    Too far North and you get into all that awful Alpine bacony cheesy lardy kinda stuff

    Contemplating popping over to Calabria next week. Will report.
    I found this article on Calabria very useful


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/secret-italy-discover-the-glorious-coast-of-calabria-x07bxwnfd
    Interesting.

    Equally, I am halfway down a bottle of Montepulciano and wondering what Abruzzo is like...
    I've heard great things about Abruzzo. Never been. Undiscovered like Calabria: but without the terrible Mafia shit

    I have a very good wise friend on the Italian tourist board who is super honest about Italy, its pluses and minuses. She adores London, so I trust her judgement

    And she says Abruzzo is fab. So it probably IS. Go if you can. Tho Calabria is exhilarating too, but in a WTF way
  • DM_AndyDM_Andy Posts: 216
    A good day for the centre-right alliance in Swedish opinion polls, the three daily trackers all had Sweden Democrats and Liberals up and Social Democrats and Moderates down. That trims the average seat projection down to 177-172.


  • JohnLilburneJohnLilburne Posts: 5,778
    IshmaelZ said:

    rcs1000 said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    Leon said:

    kjh said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Quick question:

    Off to Paris for the weekend late September. Anyone got any restaurant/brasserie recommendations. Maxish 130 euros per person.

    I'd love small eatery somewhere quiet, very French, candles etc... Any ideas?

    In my experience, Parisian food is really hit and miss, and all the places that are like you describe: quiet, candles, French - are either horribly twee and touristy or very expensive, or both, and the food is STILL variable

    Sorry not to be more help

    The most reliable good food in Paris is the big old fashioned brasseries with the red banquettes (which are undergoing a revival). Stick to the classics: oysters, foie gras and gingerbread, turbot and veg. Yummy

    But they are noisy and boozy
    Gingerbread?!?
    Yeah, I know, but it's an ancien regime brasserie classic, and when you have it you see why. Sweetness works with foie gras - cf Sauternes

    https://www.laclassedecuisine.com/recipes/appetizers/foie-gras-and-gingerbread-canapes/
    New one on me tbf. I was wondering if it was a recipe created by Stable Diffusion.

    Anyway, I am looking forward to seeing if the Brittany Ferries on-ship restaurant is still any good as we head to France on Thursday night - it's been about 10 years since we were regulars on the Portsmouth-St Malo crossing.

    Then driving down to the Italian Lakes with a few stops either way in France for the next fortnight. Looking to settle the age-old question of whether French or Italian food is best (well, not 'settle', just do a lot of sampling tbh).
    I would normally say Italian food is significantly better, but my recent trip to Florence and Rome was disappointing. I have honestly had better Italian food in London, easily. Indeed my daughter remarked: "you can get a better tiramisu in Sainsburys". And she's right

    Maybe the food has not declined it's just that Brits are now spoiled with great food, especially in supermarkets - which are so diverse and competitive here. So we are less easily impressed

    We have discussed the stagnation in French food several times. I'll be interested to hear your verdict
    Generally in the UK you get what you pay for. In France and Italy I have had some average meals, but then every so often you get a humdinger for a reasonable price. I got a fantastic meal at a workman's cafe in France. No choice. In Florence, we were in a hotel on the outskirts and asked for a recommendation. We ate there every night for the 3 nights we were there it was so good. In France a back street cafe served me a simple duck and salad, but it was beautiful. All these meals were dirt cheap. Spent lots more on really average meals in both countries.
    In Italy the iron law is: the poorer the region, the better the food

    The best food of all is probably in Calabria. If you go to high end Calabrian places you pay mid-range Roman prices and get sublime food. The Ndrangheta like to be well fed

    Behind Calabria come Sicily, Naples, and so on. Yummy

    In the richer areas it is not so good. The super touristy places can be severely disappointing. Florence, Venice, Capri. Milan can be mediocre, too

    The exception to this law is the far north and Trentino, Friuli etc. Quite wealthy, or very wealthy, and the food is great
    Too far North and you get into all that awful Alpine bacony cheesy lardy kinda stuff

    Contemplating popping over to Calabria next week. Will report.
    What's wrong with cheese and bacon?
    Nothing, if you have burned that much calories fighting off the cold and skiing dem black runz.
    The worst thing in tartiflette is the potatoes. Cheese, cream and fatty pork are good for you.
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 8,508
    If anyone can get news about the stricken carrier out the tight lipped ministry it had to be the military leaders house paper the Daily Telegraph.

    Lack of grease my have stalled carrier, on tomorrows front page.

    Perhaps they should have had a word with the Swiss Navy?
  • IshmaelZIshmaelZ Posts: 21,830
    MrEd said:



    +1000 @IshmaelZ

    She is truly an awful individual. Me, me, me, me etc etc.

    She plays the race card left, right and centre but, at the end of the day, she's just an absolutely awful t.

    PS If you think I'm harsh, you haven't heard MrsEd - who's black / mexican, comes from LA as well (and from a similar background) and who has some choice words about her...so sorry @Foxy, it's not a race thing.


    IshmaelZ said:

    Foxy said:

    stodge said:

    Evening all :)

    I'm used to being in a minority of one on most things - I quite like Harry and Meghan. They seem a pretty well-adjusted couple who have chosen to live the life they want rather than play their part in the Royal Family theme park.

    I've no real issue with them living in California and her views don't bother me in the least.

    Why they attract such anger and ridicule is beyond me - I realise the money might anger some people but in the cosmic scheme of things does it matter that much?

    It is fairly simple. There are still plenty of people who don't like independent women with opinions, particularly when foreign to boot.

    If the Royals and Tabloids really were bothered by her "attention seeking" then they should ignore her. Instead it is the Two Minute Hate every month.

    I think Meghan and Harry are fairly well meaning celebs who don't really fir anymore in either tinsel town or stuffy heritage Britain. They will find their own place.
    Really tedious gammon dressed as wokery, why not say the same about Prince Andrew, substituting "fat white male" as appropriate?

    I read the Meghan interview so you don't have to. Point one, she accuses senior palace staff of using "the N word" about her children, and I would go to the stake about that being a lie. If she wanted to make claims about subtle, perhaps unconscious racism I'd give her a hearing, but N? Naah. Secondly, she said her objection to being in the RF was being deprived of the opportunity to tell her love story. I mean, f me, do you or did you or your wife at a comparable age feel an unbearable compulsion to relay their love story to complete strangers? Or anyone you have ever met or read about? Does wishing to do so count as an opinion?

    You should pay heed to the words of MLK and judge this atrociously awful woman by the content of her character rather than the colour of her skin.
    BLOODY HELL MATE

    edit the C word out of that NOW or you will be banned
  • Andy_JSAndy_JS Posts: 19,934

    IshmaelZ said:

    ...

    He’s knocked Bori and Dori off the front! 🫢
    Grauniad clearly pissed at having to shrink its ALL THE POOR ARE GOING TO STARVE TO DEATH headline to make room.
    Food banks running out of food, already taking measures to ration what they can give, is a worthy news story in my humble opinion, it’s the first one I noticed and started reading.

    The juxtaposition with the vanity of Boris “we got all the big calls right” tour just sums up the “in it for myself, and I’m doing alright Jack” mentality of some of our fellow Britons, to put these clowns in power in the first place.
    Tories are utterly fecked when the food banks run out.

    We are talking civil unrest.
    How did people cope in the 1940s/1950s under rationing? I'm sure there was less food about then than now.
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 8,508
    Tory NHS APP will allow patients to avoid long NHS waits, boasts the Times.

    Surely if you have 60 in one queue and 20 in another but the same diminishing processing power, you now shuffle it to have 40 in both, that’s as good as it gets?
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 8,508

    Andy_JS said:

    nico679 said:

    Andy_JS said:

    Good politics from Truss. When you're ahead don't give any opportunities for things to go wrong.

    What could go wrong . She’s miles ahead according to the polls and the membership have made up their minds . She could do a Sharon Stone during the interview whilst at the same time telling Robinson she’s going to abolish the Royal family and it won’t make a blind difference .

    I don’t think it’s good politics to look spineless and afraid of a BBC interview !
    I agree from an ordinary point of view. But in terms of ruthless politics it's the right decision.
    I'm afraid I'm with @nico679 on this one. Looks weak, very weak.
    Being frit worked well for May in 2017.
  • DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 17,283

    If anyone can get news about the stricken carrier out the tight lipped ministry it had to be the military leaders house paper the Daily Telegraph.

    Lack of grease my have stalled carrier, on tomorrows front page.

    Perhaps they should have had a word with the Swiss Navy?

    HMS Prince of Wales, the £3bn pride of the Navy, grinds to halt over ‘failure to grease propeller shaft’
    ... big snip ...
    Naval sources have told The Telegraph initial thoughts are pointing to a lack of lubrication on the starboard side at the point the propeller shaft leaves the interior of the hull.

    Any overheating at this point due to friction could have damaged the metal shaft, sources have said.

    A better understanding of the problem, upon which navy chiefs can make decisions, is not expected before the end of the week.

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2022/08/30/hms-prince-wales-warship-grinds-halt-failure-grease-propeller/ (£££)

  • MrEdMrEd Posts: 5,578

    Unfortunately, I have no idea how to as I'm on an iPhone and don't know how to edit. However, for the record, I change to a c**t.

    However, she is truly an awful individual. Very happy to cause suffering to plenty of others as long as she promotes herself. So I stand by the sentiment.
    IshmaelZ said:

    MrEd said:



    +1000 @IshmaelZ

    She is truly an awful individual. Me, me, me, me etc etc.

    She plays the race card left, right and centre but, at the end of the day, she's just an absolutely awful t.

    PS If you think I'm harsh, you haven't heard MrsEd - who's black / mexican, comes from LA as well (and from a similar background) and who has some choice words about her...so sorry @Foxy, it's not a race thing.


    IshmaelZ said:

    Foxy said:

    stodge said:

    Evening all :)

    I'm used to being in a minority of one on most things - I quite like Harry and Meghan. They seem a pretty well-adjusted couple who have chosen to live the life they want rather than play their part in the Royal Family theme park.

    I've no real issue with them living in California and her views don't bother me in the least.

    Why they attract such anger and ridicule is beyond me - I realise the money might anger some people but in the cosmic scheme of things does it matter that much?

    It is fairly simple. There are still plenty of people who don't like independent women with opinions, particularly when foreign to boot.

    If the Royals and Tabloids really were bothered by her "attention seeking" then they should ignore her. Instead it is the Two Minute Hate every month.

    I think Meghan and Harry are fairly well meaning celebs who don't really fir anymore in either tinsel town or stuffy heritage Britain. They will find their own place.
    Really tedious gammon dressed as wokery, why not say the same about Prince Andrew, substituting "fat white male" as appropriate?

    I read the Meghan interview so you don't have to. Point one, she accuses senior palace staff of using "the N word" about her children, and I would go to the stake about that being a lie. If she wanted to make claims about subtle, perhaps unconscious racism I'd give her a hearing, but N? Naah. Secondly, she said her objection to being in the RF was being deprived of the opportunity to tell her love story. I mean, f me, do you or did you or your wife at a comparable age feel an unbearable compulsion to relay their love story to complete strangers? Or anyone you have ever met or read about? Does wishing to do so count as an opinion?

    You should pay heed to the words of MLK and judge this atrociously awful woman by the content of her character rather than the colour of her skin.
    BLOODY HELL MATE

    edit the C word out of that NOW or you will be banned
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 8,508
    I’m onto the FT now, Sunak’s last days as a contender seem based around just one argument - markets losing faith in the British economy under his opponent.

    But just how bad can it get if British Government decisions mean markets lose faith in British economy, I’m guessing the main one is costs of borrowing for UK government goes up as we are judged more of a risk on paying the money back, but just how impactful is that really, they will still give us the wonga when we ask? Is that all what Sunak means, or are there other impacts of slashing government income whilst spending more contrary to what markets want to see?

    Is he even right, would the markets take fright if we slashed income whilst increase spending?
  • DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 17,283
    Andy_JS said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    ...

    He’s knocked Bori and Dori off the front! 🫢
    Grauniad clearly pissed at having to shrink its ALL THE POOR ARE GOING TO STARVE TO DEATH headline to make room.
    Food banks running out of food, already taking measures to ration what they can give, is a worthy news story in my humble opinion, it’s the first one I noticed and started reading.

    The juxtaposition with the vanity of Boris “we got all the big calls right” tour just sums up the “in it for myself, and I’m doing alright Jack” mentality of some of our fellow Britons, to put these clowns in power in the first place.
    Tories are utterly fecked when the food banks run out.

    We are talking civil unrest.
    How did people cope in the 1940s/1950s under rationing? I'm sure there was less food about then than now.
    There was rationing. That's the point. It applied to everyone, not just the poor (with a few edge-case exceptions). What food there was, was shared out equally by the ration system. Right now, the main problem is affordability rather than availability.
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 8,508

    Andy_JS said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    ...

    He’s knocked Bori and Dori off the front! 🫢
    Grauniad clearly pissed at having to shrink its ALL THE POOR ARE GOING TO STARVE TO DEATH headline to make room.
    Food banks running out of food, already taking measures to ration what they can give, is a worthy news story in my humble opinion, it’s the first one I noticed and started reading.

    The juxtaposition with the vanity of Boris “we got all the big calls right” tour just sums up the “in it for myself, and I’m doing alright Jack” mentality of some of our fellow Britons, to put these clowns in power in the first place.
    Tories are utterly fecked when the food banks run out.

    We are talking civil unrest.
    How did people cope in the 1940s/1950s under rationing? I'm sure there was less food about then than now.
    There was rationing. That's the point. It applied to everyone, not just the poor (with a few edge-case exceptions). What food there was, was shared out equally by the ration system. Right now, the main problem is affordability rather than availability.
    Maybe an element of how much of income went on rent/mortgages in those days? Also how much did gas, electricity and petrol bills drain out of the same income?
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 48,368
    Ah hem.

    Nobody use the "c" word please.

  • DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 17,283

    Tory NHS APP will allow patients to avoid long NHS waits, boasts the Times.

    Surely if you have 60 in one queue and 20 in another but the same diminishing processing power, you now shuffle it to have 40 in both, that’s as good as it gets?

    Yes but if that gets waiting times down from above to below whatever arbitrary marker is used, then that will save some ministerial embarrassment and possibly the odd life or two.

    There were stories earlier that Brexit data gurus had been pointed towards the NHS. Perhaps this is one outcome: we'd need to check names and dates. #ClassicDom.
  • DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 17,283

    Andy_JS said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    ...

    He’s knocked Bori and Dori off the front! 🫢
    Grauniad clearly pissed at having to shrink its ALL THE POOR ARE GOING TO STARVE TO DEATH headline to make room.
    Food banks running out of food, already taking measures to ration what they can give, is a worthy news story in my humble opinion, it’s the first one I noticed and started reading.

    The juxtaposition with the vanity of Boris “we got all the big calls right” tour just sums up the “in it for myself, and I’m doing alright Jack” mentality of some of our fellow Britons, to put these clowns in power in the first place.
    Tories are utterly fecked when the food banks run out.

    We are talking civil unrest.
    How did people cope in the 1940s/1950s under rationing? I'm sure there was less food about then than now.
    There was rationing. That's the point. It applied to everyone, not just the poor (with a few edge-case exceptions). What food there was, was shared out equally by the ration system. Right now, the main problem is affordability rather than availability.
    Maybe an element of how much of income went on rent/mortgages in those days? Also how much did gas, electricity and petrol bills drain out of the same income?
    Petrol was rationed, and most people did not have cars in the first place. Rent was often cheaper, especially if you only rented one or two rooms. Gas and electricity (and water) supplies were liable to interruption by the Luftwaffe.
  • LostPasswordLostPassword Posts: 10,471
    Reports/videos on Twitter of destroyed Ukrainian tanks in Kherson, so suggestive of the counter offensive being relatively sizeable and suffering some degree of losses.
  • DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 17,283
    OT Emma Raducanu vs Alize Cornet. The players are on the pitch and will kick off shortly. The Telegraph reports Raducanu's hand was taped earlier, so she is still plagued by blisters. I'm downstreaming the match from Betfair. Who can afford tellies with the Cost of Living crisis?
  • Andy_JSAndy_JS Posts: 19,934

    OT Emma Raducanu vs Alize Cornet. The players are on the pitch and will kick off shortly. The Telegraph reports Raducanu's hand was taped earlier, so she is still plagued by blisters. I'm downstreaming the match from Betfair. Who can afford tellies with the Cost of Living crisis?

    Surprised that Emma is 27 to win the tournament.

    https://www.betfair.com/exchange/plus/en/tennis/us-open-2022/womens-tournament-betting-30898921
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 48,368
    Leon said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    Leon said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    Leon said:

    kjh said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Quick question:

    Off to Paris for the weekend late September. Anyone got any restaurant/brasserie recommendations. Maxish 130 euros per person.

    I'd love small eatery somewhere quiet, very French, candles etc... Any ideas?

    In my experience, Parisian food is really hit and miss, and all the places that are like you describe: quiet, candles, French - are either horribly twee and touristy or very expensive, or both, and the food is STILL variable

    Sorry not to be more help

    The most reliable good food in Paris is the big old fashioned brasseries with the red banquettes (which are undergoing a revival). Stick to the classics: oysters, foie gras and gingerbread, turbot and veg. Yummy

    But they are noisy and boozy
    Gingerbread?!?
    Yeah, I know, but it's an ancien regime brasserie classic, and when you have it you see why. Sweetness works with foie gras - cf Sauternes

    https://www.laclassedecuisine.com/recipes/appetizers/foie-gras-and-gingerbread-canapes/
    New one on me tbf. I was wondering if it was a recipe created by Stable Diffusion.

    Anyway, I am looking forward to seeing if the Brittany Ferries on-ship restaurant is still any good as we head to France on Thursday night - it's been about 10 years since we were regulars on the Portsmouth-St Malo crossing.

    Then driving down to the Italian Lakes with a few stops either way in France for the next fortnight. Looking to settle the age-old question of whether French or Italian food is best (well, not 'settle', just do a lot of sampling tbh).
    I would normally say Italian food is significantly better, but my recent trip to Florence and Rome was disappointing. I have honestly had better Italian food in London, easily. Indeed my daughter remarked: "you can get a better tiramisu in Sainsburys". And she's right

    Maybe the food has not declined it's just that Brits are now spoiled with great food, especially in supermarkets - which are so diverse and competitive here. So we are less easily impressed

    We have discussed the stagnation in French food several times. I'll be interested to hear your verdict
    Generally in the UK you get what you pay for. In France and Italy I have had some average meals, but then every so often you get a humdinger for a reasonable price. I got a fantastic meal at a workman's cafe in France. No choice. In Florence, we were in a hotel on the outskirts and asked for a recommendation. We ate there every night for the 3 nights we were there it was so good. In France a back street cafe served me a simple duck and salad, but it was beautiful. All these meals were dirt cheap. Spent lots more on really average meals in both countries.
    In Italy the iron law is: the poorer the region, the better the food

    The best food of all is probably in Calabria. If you go to high end Calabrian places you pay mid-range Roman prices and get sublime food. The Ndrangheta like to be well fed

    Behind Calabria come Sicily, Naples, and so on. Yummy

    In the richer areas it is not so good. The super touristy places can be severely disappointing. Florence, Venice, Capri. Milan can be mediocre, too

    The exception to this law is the far north and Trentino, Friuli etc. Quite wealthy, or very wealthy, and the food is great
    Too far North and you get into all that awful Alpine bacony cheesy lardy kinda stuff

    Contemplating popping over to Calabria next week. Will report.
    I found this article on Calabria very useful


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/secret-italy-discover-the-glorious-coast-of-calabria-x07bxwnfd
    Interesting.

    Equally, I am halfway down a bottle of Montepulciano and wondering what Abruzzo is like...
    I've heard great things about Abruzzo. Never been. Undiscovered like Calabria: but without the terrible Mafia shit

    I have a very good wise friend on the Italian tourist board who is super honest about Italy, its pluses and minuses. She adores London, so I trust her judgement

    And she says Abruzzo is fab. So it probably IS. Go if you can. Tho Calabria is exhilarating too, but in a WTF way
    In my recent Italian travels, I've found Florence has deteriorated a lot; Rome was always secretly a shithole, and so I don't think there's much that has negatively changed there.

    Up North, although the food is poor, things seem still pretty prosperous: Milan, Verona, etc. (Although Genoa is also a shithole.)
  • DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 17,283
    edited August 31
    Andy_JS said:

    OT Emma Raducanu vs Alize Cornet. The players are on the pitch and will kick off shortly. The Telegraph reports Raducanu's hand was taped earlier, so she is still plagued by blisters. I'm downstreaming the match from Betfair. Who can afford tellies with the Cost of Living crisis?

    Surprised that Emma is 27 to win the tournament.

    https://www.betfair.com/exchange/plus/en/tennis/us-open-2022/womens-tournament-betting-30898921
    For months I'd been planning to back a repeat US Open win but her continual niggling injury problems have put me off, aside from a token fiver.

    ETA and Raducanu might soon lose the British number one slot to Harriet Dart who, as the papers remind us, now has the coach Emma discarded.
  • CiceroCicero Posts: 1,485
    Although M. S. Gorbachev made many mistakes and was responsible for many deaths, in Lithuania, Georgia, Latvia ans elsewhere, it is hard to view his legacy as evil. He will perhaps be remembered as a man with honest intentions, who nevertheless failed to understand the historical tides of his times. V. V. Putin, on the other hand, whose contempt for everything Gorbachev hoped and intended is palpable, will be remembered as a murderous and immoral criminal.
  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 42,739
    IshmaelZ said:

    Leon said:

    kjh said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Quick question:

    Off to Paris for the weekend late September. Anyone got any restaurant/brasserie recommendations. Maxish 130 euros per person.

    I'd love small eatery somewhere quiet, very French, candles etc... Any ideas?

    In my experience, Parisian food is really hit and miss, and all the places that are like you describe: quiet, candles, French - are either horribly twee and touristy or very expensive, or both, and the food is STILL variable

    Sorry not to be more help

    The most reliable good food in Paris is the big old fashioned brasseries with the red banquettes (which are undergoing a revival). Stick to the classics: oysters, foie gras and gingerbread, turbot and veg. Yummy

    But they are noisy and boozy
    Gingerbread?!?
    Yeah, I know, but it's an ancien regime brasserie classic, and when you have it you see why. Sweetness works with foie gras - cf Sauternes

    https://www.laclassedecuisine.com/recipes/appetizers/foie-gras-and-gingerbread-canapes/
    New one on me tbf. I was wondering if it was a recipe created by Stable Diffusion.

    Anyway, I am looking forward to seeing if the Brittany Ferries on-ship restaurant is still any good as we head to France on Thursday night - it's been about 10 years since we were regulars on the Portsmouth-St Malo crossing.

    Then driving down to the Italian Lakes with a few stops either way in France for the next fortnight. Looking to settle the age-old question of whether French or Italian food is best (well, not 'settle', just do a lot of sampling tbh).
    I would normally say Italian food is significantly better, but my recent trip to Florence and Rome was disappointing. I have honestly had better Italian food in London, easily. Indeed my daughter remarked: "you can get a better tiramisu in Sainsburys". And she's right

    Maybe the food has not declined it's just that Brits are now spoiled with great food, especially in supermarkets - which are so diverse and competitive here. So we are less easily impressed

    We have discussed the stagnation in French food several times. I'll be interested to hear your verdict
    Generally in the UK you get what you pay for. In France and Italy I have had some average meals, but then every so often you get a humdinger for a reasonable price. I got a fantastic meal at a workman's cafe in France. No choice. In Florence, we were in a hotel on the outskirts and asked for a recommendation. We ate there every night for the 3 nights we were there it was so good. In France a back street cafe served me a simple duck and salad, but it was beautiful. All these meals were dirt cheap. Spent lots more on really average meals in both countries.
    In Italy the iron law is: the poorer the region, the better the food

    The best food of all is probably in Calabria. If you go to high end Calabrian places you pay mid-range Roman prices and get sublime food. The Ndrangheta like to be well fed

    Behind Calabria come Sicily, Naples, and so on. Yummy

    In the richer areas it is not so good. The super touristy places can be severely disappointing. Florence, Venice, Capri. Milan can be mediocre, too

    The exception to this law is the far north and Trentino, Friuli etc. Quite wealthy, or very wealthy, and the food is great
    Too far North and you get into all that awful Alpine bacony cheesy lardy kinda stuff


    Spend the morning doing some strenuous hiking in the mountains, and you will appreciate it more :)
  • DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 17,283

    Betfair next prime minister
    1.05 Liz Truss 95%
    17 Rishi Sunak 6%

    Next Conservative leader
    1.05 Liz Truss 95%
    18 Rishi Sunak 6%

    Betfair next prime minister
    1.06 Liz Truss 94%
    17 Rishi Sunak 6%

    Next Conservative leader
    1.06 Liz Truss 94%
    17 Rishi Sunak 6%
  • carnforthcarnforth Posts: 1,307
    rcs1000 said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    Leon said:

    kjh said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Quick question:

    Off to Paris for the weekend late September. Anyone got any restaurant/brasserie recommendations. Maxish 130 euros per person.

    I'd love small eatery somewhere quiet, very French, candles etc... Any ideas?

    In my experience, Parisian food is really hit and miss, and all the places that are like you describe: quiet, candles, French - are either horribly twee and touristy or very expensive, or both, and the food is STILL variable

    Sorry not to be more help

    The most reliable good food in Paris is the big old fashioned brasseries with the red banquettes (which are undergoing a revival). Stick to the classics: oysters, foie gras and gingerbread, turbot and veg. Yummy

    But they are noisy and boozy
    Gingerbread?!?
    Yeah, I know, but it's an ancien regime brasserie classic, and when you have it you see why. Sweetness works with foie gras - cf Sauternes

    https://www.laclassedecuisine.com/recipes/appetizers/foie-gras-and-gingerbread-canapes/
    New one on me tbf. I was wondering if it was a recipe created by Stable Diffusion.

    Anyway, I am looking forward to seeing if the Brittany Ferries on-ship restaurant is still any good as we head to France on Thursday night - it's been about 10 years since we were regulars on the Portsmouth-St Malo crossing.

    Then driving down to the Italian Lakes with a few stops either way in France for the next fortnight. Looking to settle the age-old question of whether French or Italian food is best (well, not 'settle', just do a lot of sampling tbh).
    I would normally say Italian food is significantly better, but my recent trip to Florence and Rome was disappointing. I have honestly had better Italian food in London, easily. Indeed my daughter remarked: "you can get a better tiramisu in Sainsburys". And she's right

    Maybe the food has not declined it's just that Brits are now spoiled with great food, especially in supermarkets - which are so diverse and competitive here. So we are less easily impressed

    We have discussed the stagnation in French food several times. I'll be interested to hear your verdict
    Generally in the UK you get what you pay for. In France and Italy I have had some average meals, but then every so often you get a humdinger for a reasonable price. I got a fantastic meal at a workman's cafe in France. No choice. In Florence, we were in a hotel on the outskirts and asked for a recommendation. We ate there every night for the 3 nights we were there it was so good. In France a back street cafe served me a simple duck and salad, but it was beautiful. All these meals were dirt cheap. Spent lots more on really average meals in both countries.
    In Italy the iron law is: the poorer the region, the better the food

    The best food of all is probably in Calabria. If you go to high end Calabrian places you pay mid-range Roman prices and get sublime food. The Ndrangheta like to be well fed

    Behind Calabria come Sicily, Naples, and so on. Yummy

    In the richer areas it is not so good. The super touristy places can be severely disappointing. Florence, Venice, Capri. Milan can be mediocre, too

    The exception to this law is the far north and Trentino, Friuli etc. Quite wealthy, or very wealthy, and the food is great
    Too far North and you get into all that awful Alpine bacony cheesy lardy kinda stuff

    Contemplating popping over to Calabria next week. Will report.
    What's wrong with cheese and bacon?
    In general nothing, but halfway through a plate of Swiss Spaetzle, pleasure turns to chore remarkably quickly.
  • CiceroCicero Posts: 1,485

    Leon said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    Leon said:

    kjh said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Quick question:

    Off to Paris for the weekend late September. Anyone got any restaurant/brasserie recommendations. Maxish 130 euros per person.

    I'd love small eatery somewhere quiet, very French, candles etc... Any ideas?

    In my experience, Parisian food is really hit and miss, and all the places that are like you describe: quiet, candles, French - are either horribly twee and touristy or very expensive, or both, and the food is STILL variable

    Sorry not to be more help

    The most reliable good food in Paris is the big old fashioned brasseries with the red banquettes (which are undergoing a revival). Stick to the classics: oysters, foie gras and gingerbread, turbot and veg. Yummy

    But they are noisy and boozy
    Gingerbread?!?
    Yeah, I know, but it's an ancien regime brasserie classic, and when you have it you see why. Sweetness works with foie gras - cf Sauternes

    https://www.laclassedecuisine.com/recipes/appetizers/foie-gras-and-gingerbread-canapes/
    New one on me tbf. I was wondering if it was a recipe created by Stable Diffusion.

    Anyway, I am looking forward to seeing if the Brittany Ferries on-ship restaurant is still any good as we head to France on Thursday night - it's been about 10 years since we were regulars on the Portsmouth-St Malo crossing.

    Then driving down to the Italian Lakes with a few stops either way in France for the next fortnight. Looking to settle the age-old question of whether French or Italian food is best (well, not 'settle', just do a lot of sampling tbh).
    I would normally say Italian food is significantly better, but my recent trip to Florence and Rome was disappointing. I have honestly had better Italian food in London, easily. Indeed my daughter remarked: "you can get a better tiramisu in Sainsburys". And she's right

    Maybe the food has not declined it's just that Brits are now spoiled with great food, especially in supermarkets - which are so diverse and competitive here. So we are less easily impressed

    We have discussed the stagnation in French food several times. I'll be interested to hear your verdict
    Generally in the UK you get what you pay for. In France and Italy I have had some average meals, but then every so often you get a humdinger for a reasonable price. I got a fantastic meal at a workman's cafe in France. No choice. In Florence, we were in a hotel on the outskirts and asked for a recommendation. We ate there every night for the 3 nights we were there it was so good. In France a back street cafe served me a simple duck and salad, but it was beautiful. All these meals were dirt cheap. Spent lots more on really average meals in both countries.
    In Italy the iron law is: the poorer the region, the better the food

    The best food of all is probably in Calabria. If you go to high end Calabrian places you pay mid-range Roman prices and get sublime food. The Ndrangheta like to be well fed

    Behind Calabria come Sicily, Naples, and so on. Yummy

    In the richer areas it is not so good. The super touristy places can be severely disappointing. Florence, Venice, Capri. Milan can be mediocre, too

    The exception to this law is the far north and Trentino, Friuli etc. Quite wealthy, or very wealthy, and the food is great
    Too far North and you get into all that awful Alpine bacony cheesy lardy kinda stuff

    Contemplating popping over to Calabria next week. Will report.
    The mountain food can be hearty, yes, but generally delicious. A lot of speck, to be sure

    But Bolzano has brilliant food. And they have this fabulous street market in the middle. Mmmmmmmmm

    And the food on the Slovenian border is fascinating. And don't forget Trieste with its boiled testicles! And James Joyce's favourite cafes!
    I ate fighting bulls' bollocks in Ciudad Rodrigo and excellent they were too.

    Off to Riga next week, there
    Leon said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    Leon said:

    kjh said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Quick question:

    Off to Paris for the weekend late September. Anyone got any restaurant/brasserie recommendations. Maxish 130 euros per person.

    I'd love small eatery somewhere quiet, very French, candles etc... Any ideas?

    In my experience, Parisian food is really hit and miss, and all the places that are like you describe: quiet, candles, French - are either horribly twee and touristy or very expensive, or both, and the food is STILL variable

    Sorry not to be more help

    The most reliable good food in Paris is the big old fashioned brasseries with the red banquettes (which are undergoing a revival). Stick to the classics: oysters, foie gras and gingerbread, turbot and veg. Yummy

    But they are noisy and boozy
    Gingerbread?!?
    Yeah, I know, but it's an ancien regime brasserie classic, and when you have it you see why. Sweetness works with foie gras - cf Sauternes

    https://www.laclassedecuisine.com/recipes/appetizers/foie-gras-and-gingerbread-canapes/
    New one on me tbf. I was wondering if it was a recipe created by Stable Diffusion.

    Anyway, I am looking forward to seeing if the Brittany Ferries on-ship restaurant is still any good as we head to France on Thursday night - it's been about 10 years since we were regulars on the Portsmouth-St Malo crossing.

    Then driving down to the Italian Lakes with a few stops either way in France for the next fortnight. Looking to settle the age-old question of whether French or Italian food is best (well, not 'settle', just do a lot of sampling tbh).
    I would normally say Italian food is significantly better, but my recent trip to Florence and Rome was disappointing. I have honestly had better Italian food in London, easily. Indeed my daughter remarked: "you can get a better tiramisu in Sainsburys". And she's right

    Maybe the food has not declined it's just that Brits are now spoiled with great food, especially in supermarkets - which are so diverse and competitive here. So we are less easily impressed

    We have discussed the stagnation in French food several times. I'll be interested to hear your verdict
    Generally in the UK you get what you pay for. In France and Italy I have had some average meals, but then every so often you get a humdinger for a reasonable price. I got a fantastic meal at a workman's cafe in France. No choice. In Florence, we were in a hotel on the outskirts and asked for a recommendation. We ate there every night for the 3 nights we were there it was so good. In France a back street cafe served me a simple duck and salad, but it was beautiful. All these meals were dirt cheap. Spent lots more on really average meals in both countries.
    In Italy the iron law is: the poorer the region, the better the food

    The best food of all is probably in Calabria. If you go to high end Calabrian places you pay mid-range Roman prices and get sublime food. The Ndrangheta like to be well fed

    Behind Calabria come Sicily, Naples, and so on. Yummy

    In the richer areas it is not so good. The super touristy places can be severely disappointing. Florence, Venice, Capri. Milan can be mediocre, too

    The exception to this law is the far north and Trentino, Friuli etc. Quite wealthy, or very wealthy, and the food is great
    Too far North and you get into all that awful Alpine bacony cheesy lardy kinda stuff

    Contemplating popping over to Calabria next week. Will report.
    The mountain food can be hearty, yes, but generally delicious. A lot of speck, to be sure

    But Bolzano has brilliant food. And they have this fabulous street market in the middle. Mmmmmmmmm

    And the food on the Slovenian border is fascinating. And don't forget Trieste with its boiled testicles! And James Joyce's favourite cafes!
    I ate fighting bulls' bollocks in
    Leon said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    Leon said:

    kjh said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    Quick question:

    Off to Paris for the weekend late September. Anyone got any restaurant/brasserie recommendations. Maxish 130 euros per person.

    I'd love small eatery somewhere quiet, very French, candles etc... Any ideas?

    In my experience, Parisian food is really hit and miss, and all the places that are like you describe: quiet, candles, French - are either horribly twee and touristy or very expensive, or both, and the food is STILL variable

    Sorry not to be more help

    The most reliable good food in Paris is the big old fashioned brasseries with the red banquettes (which are undergoing a revival). Stick to the classics: oysters, foie gras and gingerbread, turbot and veg. Yummy

    But they are noisy and boozy
    Gingerbread?!?
    Yeah, I know, but it's an ancien regime brasserie classic, and when you have it you see why. Sweetness works with foie gras - cf Sauternes

    https://www.laclassedecuisine.com/recipes/appetizers/foie-gras-and-gingerbread-canapes/
    New one on me tbf. I was wondering if it was a recipe created by Stable Diffusion.

    Anyway, I am looking forward to seeing if the Brittany Ferries on-ship restaurant is still any good as we head to France on Thursday night - it's been about 10 years since we were regulars on the Portsmouth-St Malo crossing.

    Then driving down to the Italian Lakes with a few stops either way in France for the next fortnight. Looking to settle the age-old question of whether French or Italian food is best (well, not 'settle', just do a lot of sampling tbh).
    I would normally say Italian food is significantly better, but my recent trip to Florence and Rome was disappointing. I have honestly had better Italian food in London, easily. Indeed my daughter remarked: "you can get a better tiramisu in Sainsburys". And she's right

    Maybe the food has not declined it's just that Brits are now spoiled with great food, especially in supermarkets - which are so diverse and competitive here. So we are less easily impressed

    We have discussed the stagnation in French food several times. I'll be interested to hear your verdict
    Generally in the UK you get what you pay for. In France and Italy I have had some average meals, but then every so often you get a humdinger for a reasonable price. I got a fantastic meal at a workman's cafe in France. No choice. In Florence, we were in a hotel on the outskirts and asked for a recommendation. We ate there every night for the 3 nights we were there it was so good. In France a back street cafe served me a simple duck and salad, but it was beautiful. All these meals were dirt cheap. Spent lots more on really average meals in both countries.
    In Italy the iron law is: the poorer the region, the better the food

    The best food of all is probably in Calabria. If you go to high end Calabrian places you pay mid-range Roman prices and get sublime food. The Ndrangheta like to be well fed

    Behind Calabria come Sicily, Naples, and so on. Yummy

    In the richer areas it is not so good. The super touristy places can be severely disappointing. Florence, Venice, Capri. Milan can be mediocre, too

    The exception to this law is the far north and Trentino, Friuli etc. Quite wealthy, or very wealthy, and the food is great
    Too far North and you get into all that awful Alpine bacony cheesy lardy kinda stuff

    Contemplating popping over to Calabria next week. Will report.
    The mountain food can be hearty, yes, but generally delicious. A lot of speck, to be sure

    But Bolzano has brilliant food. And they have this fabulous street market in the middle. Mmmmmmmmm

    And the food on the Slovenian border is fascinating. And don't forget Trieste with its boiled testicles! And James Joyce's favourite cafes!
    I ate fighting bulls' bollocks in Ciudad Rodrigo and excellent they were too. Off to Riga next week, there seems to be a few high end restaurants and I will pick one at random and report back. And lots of craft beer bars too.
    Ignore the craft beer scene, Latvia has amazing traditional beers (often unpasteurized), so find the most Latvian bar you can... Good start is the touristy, but very very fun bar, Ala Pagrabs.
  • DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 17,283

    Andy_JS said:

    OT Emma Raducanu vs Alize Cornet. The players are on the pitch and will kick off shortly. The Telegraph reports Raducanu's hand was taped earlier, so she is still plagued by blisters. I'm downstreaming the match from Betfair. Who can afford tellies with the Cost of Living crisis?

    Surprised that Emma is 27 to win the tournament.

    https://www.betfair.com/exchange/plus/en/tennis/us-open-2022/womens-tournament-betting-30898921
    For months I'd been planning to back a repeat US Open win but her continual niggling injury problems have put me off, aside from a token fiver.

    ETA and Raducanu might soon lose the British number one slot to Harriet Dart who, as the papers remind us, now has the coach Emma discarded.
    She's lost; she's out.
  • Andy_JSAndy_JS Posts: 19,934
    Disappointing performance from Emma.
  • Andy_JSAndy_JS Posts: 19,934

    Betfair next prime minister
    1.05 Liz Truss 95%
    17 Rishi Sunak 6%

    Next Conservative leader
    1.05 Liz Truss 95%
    18 Rishi Sunak 6%

    Betfair next prime minister
    1.06 Liz Truss 94%
    17 Rishi Sunak 6%

    Next Conservative leader
    1.06 Liz Truss 94%
    17 Rishi Sunak 6%
    Thanks John for keeping us updated on the latest odds.
  • DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 17,283
    Andy_JS said:

    Disappointing performance from Emma.

    Blisters on Emma Raducanu's right hand, again!
  • DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 17,283
    Tory leadership hustings tonight. The last one, London, 7-9 pm.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 54,613

    ydoethur said:

    ydoethur said:

    ydoethur said:

    Gorbachev has died.

    One of the giants of the 20th Century.
    The second best leader of the Russian Empire,* after Khrushchev.

    Which given he oversaw its collapse, says a lot about the others and not in at all a good way.

    *AKA the Soviet Union from 1922 to 1991.
    “The second best leader of the Russian Empire,* after Khrushchev”

    Whaaaaaaaaat? What about Catherine?

    I’ll allow you to swap Russia for Soviet.

    Huzzah!
    Catherine was German.
    Darling - "Look, I'm as British as Queen Victoria!"
    Blackadder - "So your father's German, you're half-German, and you married a German?"
    Darling, not George.
    "Funny name for a guy, isn't it? Last person I called "Darling" was pregnant 20 seconds later!" - Flashheart.
    Ducking the issue again?

    'Dinner time Fido!'
    My moneys on George not Darling, it sounds so obviously from the third.
    @MoonRabbit you lose your money.

    https://youtu.be/Iu6YFBQOB3c

    In any case, Blackadder III was set *before* the reign of Queen Victoria.
  • DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 17,283
    New thread.
This discussion has been closed.