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Our best days are still to come? – politicalbetting.com

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  • GardenwalkerGardenwalker Posts: 16,563
    edited August 22

    McDonalds in Nottingham getting looted. There seems to be an uptick in this kind of thing:

    https://www.twitter.com/Antman0704/status/1561744461151064065

    So they get a criminal record (they are easily identified) for the sake of one £2.99 Big Mac. And the staff are possibly traumatised for good.

    What on earth is the point? And what on earth was the trigger?
    Pure hunger.
    Like typical Pb Tories you lack empathetic imagination.
  • Sunil_PrasannanSunil_Prasannan Posts: 42,597

    Leon said:

    How come Italy has a really good efficient high speed train network all over the country… and we are still struggling to build one line from London to Birmingham which will be finished in 2083 and will cost £298 trn?

    Because you keep voting Tory.
    Non sequitur.
    Nope.

    To Tory is to serially underfund infrastructure, among other things.

    Labour have other issues.

    You, Tory voter, are to blame for public squalor.
    The one thing HS2 isn't is underfunded.

    Maybe engage your brain and put down the bottle.
    Do you seriously believe that UK infrastructure is funded to the same extent as it’s European peers?
    I work in UK infrastructure. It's literally my job. Our infrastructure is world class. We literally have the whole world (including Europe) asking the UK how to do it.

    We've underfunded new nuclear, roads and some regional rail upgrades and enhancements. Strategic rail is ok. Superfast broadband rollout & telecoms is actually pretty good.

    The biggest economic failing is not getting on with Heathrow 3rd runway and Gatwick 2nd runway, coupled with boosting Jet Zero.
    Road, rail, and bus infrastructure outside of London is poor by Western European standards.

    Energy is a debacle; the water companies have been taking the piss for years. I don’t have a view on broadband, others might.

    Streetscenes are tatty, due to underfunded and underpowered local government. Cycling infrastructure is better but not first class.

    It would be churlish for me to ignore notable successes like Crossrail, and the UK is certainly better than the US, but the overall picture is not good and in decline.
    Crossrail isn't quite complete. Bond Street station still hasn't opened after three months, and the connections from Stratford to Whitechapel, and from Paddington low level to Acton are still missing. On the former Great Eastern section, Ilford station still hasn't had its lifts operational yet.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 35,475
    edited August 22
    Leon said:

    How come Italy has a really good efficient high speed train network all over the country… and we are still struggling to build one line from London to Birmingham which will be finished in 2083 and will cost £298 trn?

    Higher IQs in Italy?
  • Sunil_PrasannanSunil_Prasannan Posts: 42,597

    McDonalds in Nottingham getting looted. There seems to be an uptick in this kind of thing:

    https://www.twitter.com/Antman0704/status/1561744461151064065

    So they get a criminal record (they are easily identified) for the sake of one £2.99 Big Mac. And the staff are possibly traumatised for good.

    What on earth is the point? And what on earth was the trigger?
    Dey is ignorant people!
  • GardenwalkerGardenwalker Posts: 16,563
    IshmaelZ said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    geoffw said:

    Phillips P. OBrien
    @PhillipsPOBrien
    9h
    I know nothing about Dugina's death, so have no idea who did it. If the result, however, is Putin using it to crack down more on dissent, but not mobilize Russian society for war, that would logically point to an internal Russian involvement.
    Aug 22, 2022 · 9:45 AM UTC

    Phillips P. OBrien
    @PhillipsPOBrien
    5h
    Final comment--if in the end Putin does nothing--neither uses this as an opportunity to crack down or to mobilize/escalate--that would logically point to the fact that he really doesnt know what to do and that there are elements outside of his control in Russia that did this.

    The only people the Tories are lovebombing are selfish and miserable fogies who like to burn fifty pound notes, paid for by the triple lock, in the faces of their own grandchildren, while sneering about avocados and “wops”.
    You'd be amazed how few 50 notes the triple lock gets you in a winter fuel crisis. You do realise it applies only to the not quite 10,000 a year state pension?
    Aye, but you need to factor in the capital appreciation from near-empty 5-beds in the suburbs.
    Which everyone is issued with on their 67th birthday
    No, they bought them for tuppence ha’penny when they were 23, on single incomes.
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 8,513
    edited August 22
    ydoethur said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    rcs1000 said:

    geoffw said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    How come Italy has a really good efficient high speed train network all over the country… and we are still struggling to build one line from London to Birmingham which will be finished in 2083 and will cost £298 trn?

    Genetics innit.

    Possibly. The Italians have maybe kept a shred of their genetic muscle memory of public works inherited from the romans

    I saw the Roman Forum today. In Rome. Never bothered to check it out close up before. Some of that shit is on a scale which is stupefying even to a 21st century boy

    I also saw this. An original Roman bronze door with a lock that STILL WORKS

    Think of their aqueducts more than 2 millennia ago. Doesn't seem such a big step from that to modern railways.
    I was in Rome six weeks ago. I learned that two of the Roman aqueducts are still in use today providing Rome with water.
    OK but apart from that
    The Via Cloaca, the world's oldest sewer?
    Emperor Superbus. The last of the Kings, cut the ribbon to open it.

    Do they still use parts of it? Some of it certainly still stands to be viewed.
  • IshmaelZIshmaelZ Posts: 21,830

    @stodge is a copper?

    “evening all” everyday was the big give away.
    Ex cop. Ex blade runner. Ex killer.
  • DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 17,293

    McDonalds in Nottingham getting looted. There seems to be an uptick in this kind of thing:

    https://www.twitter.com/Antman0704/status/1561744461151064065

    So they get a criminal record (they are easily identified) for the sake of one £2.99 Big Mac. And the staff are possibly traumatised for good.

    What on earth is the point? And what on earth was the trigger?
    As I said earlier on this thread, the criminal justice system is basically at nought after 12 years of Tory cuts. As I said a day or two back, there is a growing sense that the Cost of Living Crisis justifies stealing food.
  • I don't want to sound hyperbolic but this winter is going to be very, very bad for a lot of people.

    I just do not see how Liz Truss does not do something to help.

    And if she does do something, will you give her credit, or say its not enough no matter what?
  • GardenwalkerGardenwalker Posts: 16,563

    McDonalds in Nottingham getting looted. There seems to be an uptick in this kind of thing:

    https://www.twitter.com/Antman0704/status/1561744461151064065

    So they get a criminal record (they are easily identified) for the sake of one £2.99 Big Mac. And the staff are possibly traumatised for good.

    What on earth is the point? And what on earth was the trigger?
    As I said earlier on this thread, the criminal justice system is basically at nought after 12 years of Tory cuts. As I said a day or two back, there is a growing sense that the Cost of Living Crisis justifies stealing food.
    Food, and period products, and milk powder, and disposable nappies.
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 8,513

    IshmaelZ said:

    @stodge is a copper?

    “evening all” everyday was the big give away.
    Ex cop. Ex blade runner. Ex killer.
    In 1972, Stodge was sent to prison by a military court for a crime he didn't commit. He promptly escaped from a maximum security stockade to the Los Angeles underground. Today, still wanted by the government, he survives as a soldier of fortune.
    I understood he escaped from LA, escaped from New York, and got the does out Efrafa? That’s how us rabbits tell it.
  • stodgestodge Posts: 10,970

    IshmaelZ said:

    @stodge is a copper?

    “evening all” everyday was the big give away.
    Ex cop. Ex blade runner. Ex killer.
    In 1972, Stodge was sent to prison by a military court for a crime he didn't commit. He promptly escaped from a maximum security stockade to the Los Angeles underground. Today, still wanted by the government, he survives as a soldier of fortune.
    If you can find us, if you can afford it, you can hire "The Stodge Squad".
  • StuartinromfordStuartinromford Posts: 7,802
    stodge said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    @stodge is a copper?

    “evening all” everyday was the big give away.
    Ex cop. Ex blade runner. Ex killer.
    In 1972, Stodge was sent to prison by a military court for a crime he didn't commit. He promptly escaped from a maximum security stockade to the Los Angeles underground. Today, still wanted by the government, he survives as a soldier of fortune.
    If you can find us, if you can afford it, you can hire "The Stodge Squad".
    Unfortunately, we can't afford it.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 35,475
    If it really is 4 1/2 years for a rape trial to reach court then it is no wonder that the conviction rate is so low that rapists have got away with it walk amongst us. How is it possible to have a fair trial after such a time?

    I don't blame the barristers for striking, they need to be paid a living and in a timely manner.
  • PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 72,723

    McDonalds in Nottingham getting looted. There seems to be an uptick in this kind of thing:

    https://www.twitter.com/Antman0704/status/1561744461151064065

    So they get a criminal record (they are easily identified) for the sake of one £2.99 Big Mac. And the staff are possibly traumatised for good.

    What on earth is the point? And what on earth was the trigger?
    As I said earlier on this thread, the criminal justice system is basically at nought after 12 years of Tory cuts. As I said a day or two back, there is a growing sense that the Cost of Living Crisis justifies stealing food.
    Food, and period products, and milk powder, and disposable nappies.
    This is not that.
  • Jim_MillerJim_Miller Posts: 883
    There are interesting parallels in what Cyclefree wrote to what has happened in American cities controlled by leftists, such as San Francisco, Portland (Oregon), and Seattle. When they cut back financial -- and perhaps even more important, psychological -- support for the police, crime rose and those who were hurt most were often those who had little to begin with.

    Voters have noticed, and have reacted by, for example, electing a former police captain, Eric Adams, mayor of New York City.

    (There are signs that voters are beginning to catch on in Seattle. Last year, Ann Davison won the election for City Attorney and now is responsible for prosecuting misdemeanors in the city. (It's a nonpartisan office, but she had previously run for office, statewide, as a Republican. She is the first Republican to win a Seattle offfice in many decades.) Under her leadership, the office appears to be making progress, by, among other things, greatly reducing the backlogs. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ann_Davison_(politician) )

    And the city has switched from defunding the police to paying large sign-up bonuses in an attempt to restore previous staffing levels.)
  • GardenwalkerGardenwalker Posts: 16,563
    Pulpstar said:

    McDonalds in Nottingham getting looted. There seems to be an uptick in this kind of thing:

    https://www.twitter.com/Antman0704/status/1561744461151064065

    So they get a criminal record (they are easily identified) for the sake of one £2.99 Big Mac. And the staff are possibly traumatised for good.

    What on earth is the point? And what on earth was the trigger?
    As I said earlier on this thread, the criminal justice system is basically at nought after 12 years of Tory cuts. As I said a day or two back, there is a growing sense that the Cost of Living Crisis justifies stealing food.
    Food, and period products, and milk powder, and disposable nappies.
    This is not that.
    Why not?
  • stodgestodge Posts: 10,970

    IshmaelZ said:

    @stodge is a copper?

    “evening all” everyday was the big give away.
    Ex cop. Ex blade runner. Ex killer.
    In 1972, Stodge was sent to prison by a military court for a crime he didn't commit. He promptly escaped from a maximum security stockade to the Los Angeles underground. Today, still wanted by the government, he survives as a soldier of fortune.
    I understood he escaped from LA, escaped from New York, and got the does out Efrafa? That’s how us rabbits tell it.
    I had some help from Mr Plisken - not ashamed to admit it.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 45,254
    rcs1000 said:

    MISTY said:

    https://twitter.com/SebastianEPayne/status/1561764326935040002?t=YJ2fbf-zZDFIqt267Y_Xqw&s=19

    CoL response immediately according to this with probably a November full budget?

    Is this the new regime talking?

    Today's article from John Redwood is pretty dismissive of the OBR forecasts, for example.
    They do seem to be getting it very wrong very often recently.
    It's not easy being an economic forecaster.

    What will happen in Ukraine? What will happen with Covid in China? Will China's housing market implode?

    Those are just three mega questions that you need to have to have a sensible view on the UK's economic growth, even before we talk about domestic issues.
    FWIW I think that Russia will suffer a series of setbacks in Ukraine but prove pretty much impossible for Ukraine to beat. The result will be a painful and difficult draw which will continue the current sanction regime almost indefinitely. Not good for us or inflation generally.

    On Covid, the Chinese will eventually recognise that zero Covid just doesn't work and start to join the rest of the world in moving on. May still take a while though. Eventually good but medium rather than short term.

    On Chinese housing a bust is surely coming and we are already seeing the consequences with the likes of Evergrande and missed growth targets. Almost certainly bad for us but way worse for the Chinese.

    I agree that each of these have the capacity, on their own, of swinging our growth or recession by at least a couple of percent, probably more. But we remain obsessed with the trivia of Brexit. It's an illness.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 35,475
    The Ukraine defence dept knows how to troll!

    Kerch bridge… we are watching you! https://t.co/B3LVWjOiJi
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 54,699

    ydoethur said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    rcs1000 said:

    geoffw said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    How come Italy has a really good efficient high speed train network all over the country… and we are still struggling to build one line from London to Birmingham which will be finished in 2083 and will cost £298 trn?

    Genetics innit.

    Possibly. The Italians have maybe kept a shred of their genetic muscle memory of public works inherited from the romans

    I saw the Roman Forum today. In Rome. Never bothered to check it out close up before. Some of that shit is on a scale which is stupefying even to a 21st century boy

    I also saw this. An original Roman bronze door with a lock that STILL WORKS

    Think of their aqueducts more than 2 millennia ago. Doesn't seem such a big step from that to modern railways.
    I was in Rome six weeks ago. I learned that two of the Roman aqueducts are still in use today providing Rome with water.
    OK but apart from that
    The Via Cloaca, the world's oldest sewer?
    Emperor Superbus. The last of the Kings, cut the ribbon to open it.

    Do they still use parts of it? Some of it certainly still stands to be viewed.
    I believe it's still in use, although I would be prepared to be told I'm wrong. I'm not an expert on Rome's sewers!
  • kjhkjh Posts: 7,888

    Leon said:

    How come Italy has a really good efficient high speed train network all over the country… and we are still struggling to build one line from London to Birmingham which will be finished in 2083 and will cost £298 trn?

    Because you keep voting Tory.
    Non sequitur.
    Nope.

    To Tory is to serially underfund infrastructure, among other things.

    Labour have other issues.

    You, Tory voter, are to blame for public squalor.
    The one thing HS2 isn't is underfunded.

    Maybe engage your brain and put down the bottle.
    Do you seriously believe that UK infrastructure is funded to the same extent as it’s European peers?
    I work in UK infrastructure. It's literally my job. Our infrastructure is world class. We literally have the whole world (including Europe) asking the UK how to do it.

    We've underfunded new nuclear, roads and some regional rail upgrades and enhancements. Strategic rail is ok. Superfast broadband rollout & telecoms is actually pretty good.

    The biggest economic failing is not getting on with Heathrow 3rd runway and Gatwick 2nd runway, coupled with boosting Jet Zero.
    I forgot this was your job. Can you have a word with hyufd and tell him it isn't a piece of piss as he seems to think. According to him you can build anything massive in a few days if you throw huge resources at it. He has no concept of critical path factors.
  • TheuniondivvieTheuniondivvie Posts: 35,293
    stodge said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    @stodge is a copper?

    “evening all” everyday was the big give away.
    Ex cop. Ex blade runner. Ex killer.
    In 1972, Stodge was sent to prison by a military court for a crime he didn't commit. He promptly escaped from a maximum security stockade to the Los Angeles underground. Today, still wanted by the government, he survives as a soldier of fortune.
    If you can find us, if you can afford it, you can hire "The Stodge Squad".
    Found pretty easily at the donut stand I'm guessing?
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 35,475
    edited August 22
    DavidL said:

    rcs1000 said:

    MISTY said:

    https://twitter.com/SebastianEPayne/status/1561764326935040002?t=YJ2fbf-zZDFIqt267Y_Xqw&s=19

    CoL response immediately according to this with probably a November full budget?

    Is this the new regime talking?

    Today's article from John Redwood is pretty dismissive of the OBR forecasts, for example.
    They do seem to be getting it very wrong very often recently.
    It's not easy being an economic forecaster.

    What will happen in Ukraine? What will happen with Covid in China? Will China's housing market implode?

    Those are just three mega questions that you need to have to have a sensible view on the UK's economic growth, even before we talk about domestic issues.
    FWIW I think that Russia will suffer a series of setbacks in Ukraine but prove pretty much impossible for Ukraine to beat. The result will be a painful and difficult draw which will continue the current sanction regime almost indefinitely. Not good for us or inflation generally.

    On Covid, the Chinese will eventually recognise that zero Covid just doesn't work and start to join the rest of the world in moving on. May still take a while though. Eventually good but medium rather than short term.

    On Chinese housing a bust is surely coming and we are already seeing the consequences with the likes of Evergrande and missed growth targets. Almost certainly bad for us but way worse for the Chinese.

    I agree that each of these have the capacity, on their own, of swinging our growth or recession by at least a couple of percent, probably more. But we remain obsessed with the trivia of Brexit. It's an illness.
    I think the Chinese economy recovers quickly. After all they have the magic ingredient for economic growth that we lack: cheap energy.
  • Sunil_PrasannanSunil_Prasannan Posts: 42,597

    stodge said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    @stodge is a copper?

    “evening all” everyday was the big give away.
    Ex cop. Ex blade runner. Ex killer.
    In 1972, Stodge was sent to prison by a military court for a crime he didn't commit. He promptly escaped from a maximum security stockade to the Los Angeles underground. Today, still wanted by the government, he survives as a soldier of fortune.
    If you can find us, if you can afford it, you can hire "The Stodge Squad".
    Unfortunately, we can't afford it.
    I've seen the future, I can't afford it
    Tell me the truth sir, someone just bought it
    Say Mr. Whispers! Here come the click of dice
    Roulette and blackjacks - gonna build us a paradise
    Larger than life and twice as ugly
    If we have to live there, you'll have to drug me
    Maybe these luxuries can only compensate
    For all the cards you were dealt at the hands of fate
    So tell me
    Tell me! tell me! How to be a millionaire
    Tell me! tell me! How to be a millionaire!
    Millionaire! Billionaire! Trillionaire!
    Hardly surprising if you might consider
    Loyalties go to the highest of bidders
    What's my opinion? I'd give you ten to one
    Give me a million, a franchise on fun
    But there are millions who often get nowhere
    And there's just one secret I think you should share
    Maybe these luxuries can only compensate
    For all the cards you were dealt at the hands of fate
    So tell me
    Tell me! tell me! How to be a millionaire
    Tell me! tell me! How to be a millionaire!
    Who wants to be millionaire?
    I do! - I don't! - I do!
    Who wants to be millionaire?
    I do! - I don't!
    I've seen the future and I can't afford it
  • stodgestodge Posts: 10,970

    There are interesting parallels in what Cyclefree wrote to what has happened in American cities controlled by leftists, such as San Francisco, Portland (Oregon), and Seattle. When they cut back financial -- and perhaps even more important, psychological -- support for the police, crime rose and those who were hurt most were often those who had little to begin with.

    Voters have noticed, and have reacted by, for example, electing a former police captain, Eric Adams, mayor of New York City.

    (There are signs that voters are beginning to catch on in Seattle. Last year, Ann Davison won the election for City Attorney and now is responsible for prosecuting misdemeanors in the city. (It's a nonpartisan office, but she had previously run for office, statewide, as a Republican. She is the first Republican to win a Seattle offfice in many decades.) Under her leadership, the office appears to be making progress, by, among other things, greatly reducing the backlogs. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ann_Davison_(politician) )

    And the city has switched from defunding the police to paying large sign-up bonuses in an attempt to restore previous staffing levels.)

    The funding models aren't the same in the US and the UK so the parallel doesn't work. Electing a former Policeman as Mayor of London (let's say) wouldn't make much odds - the Police work with the Boroughs and are funded by a number of sources.

    So much of this is about re-establishing the relationship between the Police and the community - the notion the Police isn't part of the community begins the process of a downward spiral of confidence.
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 8,513
    ydoethur said:

    ydoethur said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    rcs1000 said:

    geoffw said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    How come Italy has a really good efficient high speed train network all over the country… and we are still struggling to build one line from London to Birmingham which will be finished in 2083 and will cost £298 trn?

    Genetics innit.

    Possibly. The Italians have maybe kept a shred of their genetic muscle memory of public works inherited from the romans

    I saw the Roman Forum today. In Rome. Never bothered to check it out close up before. Some of that shit is on a scale which is stupefying even to a 21st century boy

    I also saw this. An original Roman bronze door with a lock that STILL WORKS

    Think of their aqueducts more than 2 millennia ago. Doesn't seem such a big step from that to modern railways.
    I was in Rome six weeks ago. I learned that two of the Roman aqueducts are still in use today providing Rome with water.
    OK but apart from that
    The Via Cloaca, the world's oldest sewer?
    Emperor Superbus. The last of the Kings, cut the ribbon to open it.

    Do they still use parts of it? Some of it certainly still stands to be viewed.
    I believe it's still in use, although I would be prepared to be told I'm wrong. I'm not an expert on Rome's sewers!
    No worries, I’ve got access to the internet.

    Even today, more than 2500 years after it was originally built, the Cloaca Maxima is still used to transport storm water away from the city and into the Tiber River.
  • stodgestodge Posts: 10,970

    stodge said:


    If you can find us, if you can afford it, you can hire "The Stodge Squad".

    Found pretty easily at the donut stand I'm guessing?
    A tad harsh, sir, Currently doing undercover work at Chinese all-you-can-eat buffets and at Toby Carvery (lunchtimes Monday to Saturday only, large plates).
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 45,254
    Foxy said:

    DavidL said:

    rcs1000 said:

    MISTY said:

    https://twitter.com/SebastianEPayne/status/1561764326935040002?t=YJ2fbf-zZDFIqt267Y_Xqw&s=19

    CoL response immediately according to this with probably a November full budget?

    Is this the new regime talking?

    Today's article from John Redwood is pretty dismissive of the OBR forecasts, for example.
    They do seem to be getting it very wrong very often recently.
    It's not easy being an economic forecaster.

    What will happen in Ukraine? What will happen with Covid in China? Will China's housing market implode?

    Those are just three mega questions that you need to have to have a sensible view on the UK's economic growth, even before we talk about domestic issues.
    FWIW I think that Russia will suffer a series of setbacks in Ukraine but prove pretty much impossible for Ukraine to beat. The result will be a painful and difficult draw which will continue the current sanction regime almost indefinitely. Not good for us or inflation generally.

    On Covid, the Chinese will eventually recognise that zero Covid just doesn't work and start to join the rest of the world in moving on. May still take a while though. Eventually good but medium rather than short term.

    On Chinese housing a bust is surely coming and we are already seeing the consequences with the likes of Evergrande and missed growth targets. Almost certainly bad for us but way worse for the Chinese.

    I agree that each of these have the capacity, on their own, of swinging our growth or recession by at least a couple of percent, probably more. But we remain obsessed with the trivia of Brexit. It's an illness.
    I think the Chinese economy recovers quickly. After all they have the magic ingredient for economic growth that we lack: cheap energy.
    It is the biggest bubble in the history of the world by several orders of magnitude. They may well recover fast but jeez, it will make 2008 look like a local disturbance.
  • Jim_MillerJim_Miller Posts: 883
    Here are two numbers that may impress you: " After months of tenuous debate, the Seattle City Council voted 7-3 to approve a slate in hiring and retention incentives for the Seattle Police Department.

    The plan calls for a hiring bonus of $30,000 for a lateral transfer of an experienced officer into the department, and up to a maximum of $7,500 for a new recruit."
    source: https://www.q13fox.com/news/city-council-approves-seattle-police-hiring-incentives
    (The "tenuous" is probably just a mistake.)

    (Officers hired must stay with the department for at least five years to receive the full bonus.)
  • TheuniondivvieTheuniondivvie Posts: 35,293
    edited August 22
    stodge said:

    stodge said:


    If you can find us, if you can afford it, you can hire "The Stodge Squad".

    Found pretty easily at the donut stand I'm guessing?
    A tad harsh, sir, Currently doing undercover work at Chinese all-you-can-eat buffets and at Toby Carvery (lunchtimes Monday to Saturday only, large plates).
    Sorry, a bit personal. I was really referring to US cops' love of a donut, discerned from viewing 70s cop series onwards.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 35,475
    DavidL said:

    Foxy said:

    DavidL said:

    rcs1000 said:

    MISTY said:

    https://twitter.com/SebastianEPayne/status/1561764326935040002?t=YJ2fbf-zZDFIqt267Y_Xqw&s=19

    CoL response immediately according to this with probably a November full budget?

    Is this the new regime talking?

    Today's article from John Redwood is pretty dismissive of the OBR forecasts, for example.
    They do seem to be getting it very wrong very often recently.
    It's not easy being an economic forecaster.

    What will happen in Ukraine? What will happen with Covid in China? Will China's housing market implode?

    Those are just three mega questions that you need to have to have a sensible view on the UK's economic growth, even before we talk about domestic issues.
    FWIW I think that Russia will suffer a series of setbacks in Ukraine but prove pretty much impossible for Ukraine to beat. The result will be a painful and difficult draw which will continue the current sanction regime almost indefinitely. Not good for us or inflation generally.

    On Covid, the Chinese will eventually recognise that zero Covid just doesn't work and start to join the rest of the world in moving on. May still take a while though. Eventually good but medium rather than short term.

    On Chinese housing a bust is surely coming and we are already seeing the consequences with the likes of Evergrande and missed growth targets. Almost certainly bad for us but way worse for the Chinese.

    I agree that each of these have the capacity, on their own, of swinging our growth or recession by at least a couple of percent, probably more. But we remain obsessed with the trivia of Brexit. It's an illness.
    I think the Chinese economy recovers quickly. After all they have the magic ingredient for economic growth that we lack: cheap energy.
    It is the biggest bubble in the history of the world by several orders of magnitude. They may well recover fast but jeez, it will make 2008 look like a local disturbance.
    On the other hand the current heatwave there is quite a problem.

    https://twitter.com/ScottDuncanWX/status/1561040349535113217?t=sUqSyjVPuS_ZD2zAIrA-mw&s=19
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 45,254
    Something really weird going on at OT....
  • What a crap start to the season.

    First fifteen minutes I thought United deserved their goal to be fair, but LFC ought to have got at least an equaliser since. 2-0 now is extremely disappointing.
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 8,513
    That looked offside to me, just like that second for Arsenal clearly was. VAR very Flaky this weekend.

    So it’s Liverpool to be relegated with Bournemouth and Leeds, not Utd. What a turnup!
  • IcarusIcarus Posts: 766
    Foxy said:

    If it really is 4 1/2 years for a rape trial to reach court then it is no wonder that the conviction rate is so low that rapists have got away with it walk amongst us. How is it possible to have a fair trial after such a time?

    I don't blame the barristers for striking, they need to be paid a living and in a timely manner.

    Sorry but 15% for Barristers -which they have rejected will not play well against 4 or 5% for nurses. Makes 7% (+£500 one off) for dockers look miserable.

  • MexicanpeteMexicanpete Posts: 18,481
    edited August 22
    ydoethur said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    rcs1000 said:

    geoffw said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    How come Italy has a really good efficient high speed train network all over the country… and we are still struggling to build one line from London to Birmingham which will be finished in 2083 and will cost £298 trn?

    Genetics innit.

    Possibly. The Italians have maybe kept a shred of their genetic muscle memory of public works inherited from the romans

    I saw the Roman Forum today. In Rome. Never bothered to check it out close up before. Some of that shit is on a scale which is stupefying even to a 21st century boy

    I also saw this. An original Roman bronze door with a lock that STILL WORKS

    Think of their aqueducts more than 2 millennia ago. Doesn't seem such a big step from that to modern railways.
    I was in Rome six weeks ago. I learned that two of the Roman aqueducts are still in use today providing Rome with water.
    OK but apart from that
    The Via Cloaca, the world's oldest sewer?
    Really. Does the Conservative Party not pre-date the Romans?
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 45,254
    Foxy said:

    DavidL said:

    Foxy said:

    DavidL said:

    rcs1000 said:

    MISTY said:

    https://twitter.com/SebastianEPayne/status/1561764326935040002?t=YJ2fbf-zZDFIqt267Y_Xqw&s=19

    CoL response immediately according to this with probably a November full budget?

    Is this the new regime talking?

    Today's article from John Redwood is pretty dismissive of the OBR forecasts, for example.
    They do seem to be getting it very wrong very often recently.
    It's not easy being an economic forecaster.

    What will happen in Ukraine? What will happen with Covid in China? Will China's housing market implode?

    Those are just three mega questions that you need to have to have a sensible view on the UK's economic growth, even before we talk about domestic issues.
    FWIW I think that Russia will suffer a series of setbacks in Ukraine but prove pretty much impossible for Ukraine to beat. The result will be a painful and difficult draw which will continue the current sanction regime almost indefinitely. Not good for us or inflation generally.

    On Covid, the Chinese will eventually recognise that zero Covid just doesn't work and start to join the rest of the world in moving on. May still take a while though. Eventually good but medium rather than short term.

    On Chinese housing a bust is surely coming and we are already seeing the consequences with the likes of Evergrande and missed growth targets. Almost certainly bad for us but way worse for the Chinese.

    I agree that each of these have the capacity, on their own, of swinging our growth or recession by at least a couple of percent, probably more. But we remain obsessed with the trivia of Brexit. It's an illness.
    I think the Chinese economy recovers quickly. After all they have the magic ingredient for economic growth that we lack: cheap energy.
    It is the biggest bubble in the history of the world by several orders of magnitude. They may well recover fast but jeez, it will make 2008 look like a local disturbance.
    On the other hand the current heatwave there is quite a problem.

    https://twitter.com/ScottDuncanWX/status/1561040349535113217?t=sUqSyjVPuS_ZD2zAIrA-mw&s=19
    That's a story I have not even seen before, thanks for the link.
  • geoffwgeoffw Posts: 6,775
    edited August 22
    DavidL said:

    Foxy said:

    DavidL said:

    rcs1000 said:

    MISTY said:

    https://twitter.com/SebastianEPayne/status/1561764326935040002?t=YJ2fbf-zZDFIqt267Y_Xqw&s=19

    CoL response immediately according to this with probably a November full budget?

    Is this the new regime talking?

    Today's article from John Redwood is pretty dismissive of the OBR forecasts, for example.
    They do seem to be getting it very wrong very often recently.
    It's not easy being an economic forecaster.

    What will happen in Ukraine? What will happen with Covid in China? Will China's housing market implode?

    Those are just three mega questions that you need to have to have a sensible view on the UK's economic growth, even before we talk about domestic issues.
    FWIW I think that Russia will suffer a series of setbacks in Ukraine but prove pretty much impossible for Ukraine to beat. The result will be a painful and difficult draw which will continue the current sanction regime almost indefinitely. Not good for us or inflation generally.

    On Covid, the Chinese will eventually recognise that zero Covid just doesn't work and start to join the rest of the world in moving on. May still take a while though. Eventually good but medium rather than short term.

    On Chinese housing a bust is surely coming and we are already seeing the consequences with the likes of Evergrande and missed growth targets. Almost certainly bad for us but way worse for the Chinese.

    I agree that each of these have the capacity, on their own, of swinging our growth or recession by at least a couple of percent, probably more. But we remain obsessed with the trivia of Brexit. It's an illness.
    I think the Chinese economy recovers quickly. After all they have the magic ingredient for economic growth that we lack: cheap energy.
    It is the biggest bubble in the history of the world by several orders of magnitude. They may well recover fast but jeez, it will make 2008 look like a local disturbance.
    China looks to me more like an example of the Lewis model of development growth with perfectly elastic labour supply as huge numbers migrate from rural agriculture to urban manufacturing. It is not a bubble in the normal sense of the word.

  • EabhalEabhal Posts: 2,697
    What a weird premier league season.
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 8,513

    What a crap start to the season.

    First fifteen minutes I thought United deserved their goal to be fair, but LFC ought to have got at least an equaliser since. 2-0 now is extremely disappointing.

    They’ve sold all the Mane out the side. 🤭
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 27,947
    geoffw said:

    DavidL said:

    Foxy said:

    DavidL said:

    rcs1000 said:

    MISTY said:

    https://twitter.com/SebastianEPayne/status/1561764326935040002?t=YJ2fbf-zZDFIqt267Y_Xqw&s=19

    CoL response immediately according to this with probably a November full budget?

    Is this the new regime talking?

    Today's article from John Redwood is pretty dismissive of the OBR forecasts, for example.
    They do seem to be getting it very wrong very often recently.
    It's not easy being an economic forecaster.

    What will happen in Ukraine? What will happen with Covid in China? Will China's housing market implode?

    Those are just three mega questions that you need to have to have a sensible view on the UK's economic growth, even before we talk about domestic issues.
    FWIW I think that Russia will suffer a series of setbacks in Ukraine but prove pretty much impossible for Ukraine to beat. The result will be a painful and difficult draw which will continue the current sanction regime almost indefinitely. Not good for us or inflation generally.

    On Covid, the Chinese will eventually recognise that zero Covid just doesn't work and start to join the rest of the world in moving on. May still take a while though. Eventually good but medium rather than short term.

    On Chinese housing a bust is surely coming and we are already seeing the consequences with the likes of Evergrande and missed growth targets. Almost certainly bad for us but way worse for the Chinese.

    I agree that each of these have the capacity, on their own, of swinging our growth or recession by at least a couple of percent, probably more. But we remain obsessed with the trivia of Brexit. It's an illness.
    I think the Chinese economy recovers quickly. After all they have the magic ingredient for economic growth that we lack: cheap energy.
    It is the biggest bubble in the history of the world by several orders of magnitude. They may well recover fast but jeez, it will make 2008 look like a local disturbance.
    China looks to me more like an example of the Lewis model of development growth with perfectly elastic labour supply as huge numbers migrate from rural agriculture to urban manufacturing. It is not a bubble in the normal sense of the word.

    Isle of Lewis?
  • CyclefreeCyclefree Posts: 23,128
    Icarus said:

    Foxy said:

    If it really is 4 1/2 years for a rape trial to reach court then it is no wonder that the conviction rate is so low that rapists have got away with it walk amongst us. How is it possible to have a fair trial after such a time?

    I don't blame the barristers for striking, they need to be paid a living and in a timely manner.

    Sorry but 15% for Barristers -which they have rejected will not play well against 4 or 5% for nurses. Makes 7% (+£500 one off) for dockers look miserable.

    It's not. It's 6% in reality because of the way barristers doing Legal Aid cases are paid and they won't get it for another 2 years at least.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 45,254
    geoffw said:

    DavidL said:

    Foxy said:

    DavidL said:

    rcs1000 said:

    MISTY said:

    https://twitter.com/SebastianEPayne/status/1561764326935040002?t=YJ2fbf-zZDFIqt267Y_Xqw&s=19

    CoL response immediately according to this with probably a November full budget?

    Is this the new regime talking?

    Today's article from John Redwood is pretty dismissive of the OBR forecasts, for example.
    They do seem to be getting it very wrong very often recently.
    It's not easy being an economic forecaster.

    What will happen in Ukraine? What will happen with Covid in China? Will China's housing market implode?

    Those are just three mega questions that you need to have to have a sensible view on the UK's economic growth, even before we talk about domestic issues.
    FWIW I think that Russia will suffer a series of setbacks in Ukraine but prove pretty much impossible for Ukraine to beat. The result will be a painful and difficult draw which will continue the current sanction regime almost indefinitely. Not good for us or inflation generally.

    On Covid, the Chinese will eventually recognise that zero Covid just doesn't work and start to join the rest of the world in moving on. May still take a while though. Eventually good but medium rather than short term.

    On Chinese housing a bust is surely coming and we are already seeing the consequences with the likes of Evergrande and missed growth targets. Almost certainly bad for us but way worse for the Chinese.

    I agree that each of these have the capacity, on their own, of swinging our growth or recession by at least a couple of percent, probably more. But we remain obsessed with the trivia of Brexit. It's an illness.
    I think the Chinese economy recovers quickly. After all they have the magic ingredient for economic growth that we lack: cheap energy.
    It is the biggest bubble in the history of the world by several orders of magnitude. They may well recover fast but jeez, it will make 2008 look like a local disturbance.
    China looks to me more like an example of the Lewis model of development growth with perfectly elastic labour supply as huge numbers migrate from rural agriculture to urban manufacturing. It is not a bubble in the normal sense of the word.

    That's how it started. I do not think that is where we are now or have been for some years.
  • geoffwgeoffw Posts: 6,775
    Carnyx said:

    geoffw said:

    DavidL said:

    Foxy said:

    DavidL said:

    rcs1000 said:

    MISTY said:

    https://twitter.com/SebastianEPayne/status/1561764326935040002?t=YJ2fbf-zZDFIqt267Y_Xqw&s=19

    CoL response immediately according to this with probably a November full budget?

    Is this the new regime talking?

    Today's article from John Redwood is pretty dismissive of the OBR forecasts, for example.
    They do seem to be getting it very wrong very often recently.
    It's not easy being an economic forecaster.

    What will happen in Ukraine? What will happen with Covid in China? Will China's housing market implode?

    Those are just three mega questions that you need to have to have a sensible view on the UK's economic growth, even before we talk about domestic issues.
    FWIW I think that Russia will suffer a series of setbacks in Ukraine but prove pretty much impossible for Ukraine to beat. The result will be a painful and difficult draw which will continue the current sanction regime almost indefinitely. Not good for us or inflation generally.

    On Covid, the Chinese will eventually recognise that zero Covid just doesn't work and start to join the rest of the world in moving on. May still take a while though. Eventually good but medium rather than short term.

    On Chinese housing a bust is surely coming and we are already seeing the consequences with the likes of Evergrande and missed growth targets. Almost certainly bad for us but way worse for the Chinese.

    I agree that each of these have the capacity, on their own, of swinging our growth or recession by at least a couple of percent, probably more. But we remain obsessed with the trivia of Brexit. It's an illness.
    I think the Chinese economy recovers quickly. After all they have the magic ingredient for economic growth that we lack: cheap energy.
    It is the biggest bubble in the history of the world by several orders of magnitude. They may well recover fast but jeez, it will make 2008 look like a local disturbance.
    China looks to me more like an example of the Lewis model of development growth with perfectly elastic labour supply as huge numbers migrate from rural agriculture to urban manufacturing. It is not a bubble in the normal sense of the word.

    Isle of Lewis?
    Sir Arthur C Lewis

  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 27,947
    Icarus said:

    Foxy said:

    If it really is 4 1/2 years for a rape trial to reach court then it is no wonder that the conviction rate is so low that rapists have got away with it walk amongst us. How is it possible to have a fair trial after such a time?

    I don't blame the barristers for striking, they need to be paid a living and in a timely manner.

    Sorry but 15% for Barristers -which they have rejected will not play well against 4 or 5% for nurses. Makes 7% (+£500 one off) for dockers look miserable.

    But from a very badly depressed position, so some way to catch up on. That was evident 3-4 years ago.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 45,254

    That looked offside to me, just like that second for Arsenal clearly was. VAR very Flaky this weekend.

    So it’s Liverpool to be relegated with Bournemouth and Leeds, not Utd. What a turnup!

    Leeds? After their 3-0 demolition of Chelsea? I think not.
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 27,947

    ydoethur said:

    ydoethur said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    rcs1000 said:

    geoffw said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    How come Italy has a really good efficient high speed train network all over the country… and we are still struggling to build one line from London to Birmingham which will be finished in 2083 and will cost £298 trn?

    Genetics innit.

    Possibly. The Italians have maybe kept a shred of their genetic muscle memory of public works inherited from the romans

    I saw the Roman Forum today. In Rome. Never bothered to check it out close up before. Some of that shit is on a scale which is stupefying even to a 21st century boy

    I also saw this. An original Roman bronze door with a lock that STILL WORKS

    Think of their aqueducts more than 2 millennia ago. Doesn't seem such a big step from that to modern railways.
    I was in Rome six weeks ago. I learned that two of the Roman aqueducts are still in use today providing Rome with water.
    OK but apart from that
    The Via Cloaca, the world's oldest sewer?
    Emperor Superbus. The last of the Kings, cut the ribbon to open it.

    Do they still use parts of it? Some of it certainly still stands to be viewed.
    I believe it's still in use, although I would be prepared to be told I'm wrong. I'm not an expert on Rome's sewers!
    No worries, I’ve got access to the internet.

    Even today, more than 2500 years after it was originally built, the Cloaca Maxima is still used to transport storm water away from the city and into the Tiber River.
    There's at least one Roman sewer still functioning in Bath, to take the water from the spring and baths complex.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 35,475
    DavidL said:

    Foxy said:

    DavidL said:

    Foxy said:

    DavidL said:

    rcs1000 said:

    MISTY said:

    https://twitter.com/SebastianEPayne/status/1561764326935040002?t=YJ2fbf-zZDFIqt267Y_Xqw&s=19

    CoL response immediately according to this with probably a November full budget?

    Is this the new regime talking?

    Today's article from John Redwood is pretty dismissive of the OBR forecasts, for example.
    They do seem to be getting it very wrong very often recently.
    It's not easy being an economic forecaster.

    What will happen in Ukraine? What will happen with Covid in China? Will China's housing market implode?

    Those are just three mega questions that you need to have to have a sensible view on the UK's economic growth, even before we talk about domestic issues.
    FWIW I think that Russia will suffer a series of setbacks in Ukraine but prove pretty much impossible for Ukraine to beat. The result will be a painful and difficult draw which will continue the current sanction regime almost indefinitely. Not good for us or inflation generally.

    On Covid, the Chinese will eventually recognise that zero Covid just doesn't work and start to join the rest of the world in moving on. May still take a while though. Eventually good but medium rather than short term.

    On Chinese housing a bust is surely coming and we are already seeing the consequences with the likes of Evergrande and missed growth targets. Almost certainly bad for us but way worse for the Chinese.

    I agree that each of these have the capacity, on their own, of swinging our growth or recession by at least a couple of percent, probably more. But we remain obsessed with the trivia of Brexit. It's an illness.
    I think the Chinese economy recovers quickly. After all they have the magic ingredient for economic growth that we lack: cheap energy.
    It is the biggest bubble in the history of the world by several orders of magnitude. They may well recover fast but jeez, it will make 2008 look like a local disturbance.
    On the other hand the current heatwave there is quite a problem.

    https://twitter.com/ScottDuncanWX/status/1561040349535113217?t=sUqSyjVPuS_ZD2zAIrA-mw&s=19
    That's a story I have not even seen before, thanks for the link.
    I can see that China may start to get serious about climate change soon. Not soon enough though.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 54,699

    ydoethur said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    rcs1000 said:

    geoffw said:

    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    How come Italy has a really good efficient high speed train network all over the country… and we are still struggling to build one line from London to Birmingham which will be finished in 2083 and will cost £298 trn?

    Genetics innit.

    Possibly. The Italians have maybe kept a shred of their genetic muscle memory of public works inherited from the romans

    I saw the Roman Forum today. In Rome. Never bothered to check it out close up before. Some of that shit is on a scale which is stupefying even to a 21st century boy

    I also saw this. An original Roman bronze door with a lock that STILL WORKS

    Think of their aqueducts more than 2 millennia ago. Doesn't seem such a big step from that to modern railways.
    I was in Rome six weeks ago. I learned that two of the Roman aqueducts are still in use today providing Rome with water.
    OK but apart from that
    The Via Cloaca, the world's oldest sewer?
    Really. Does the Conservative Party not pre-date the Romans?
    No, it just feels like it.
  • That looked offside to me, just like that second for Arsenal clearly was. VAR very Flaky this weekend.

    So it’s Liverpool to be relegated with Bournemouth and Leeds, not Utd. What a turnup!

    It looked offside to me too, was surprised it came up saying onside.
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 27,947
    Cyclefree said:

    ydoethur said:

    A great header Cyclefree, but one quibble:

    'all these complaints – lack of funding, effective cuts in pay, a lack of resources, demonisation of those raising concerns, a refusal to implement recommendations, even to meet – could be made, justifiably, by many others: medical professionals, for instance, or teachers or social care workers or many others providing vital services.'

    What do you mean by 'could be?' We ARE making these complaints. (I say we - it only applies to me for nine more days because I got so fed up with them.)

    Incidentally the individual responsible for many of the issues at Courts and Probation you highlight was 'failed upwards' and is now Permanent Secretary at - the DfE.

    Says it all, I fear.

    I didn't mean anything by it. Just wrote this v quickly. I know other sectors are making the same points. That's why I didn't want just to concentrate on the criminal bar because this is a wider issue - a failure to take seriously the state's fundamental functions and carry them out competently.
    Many thanks for doing the piece. It's been a concern for years now, so evidently even worse.
  • IcarusIcarus Posts: 766
    Erik ten Hag now favourite to last longer than Truss!!
  • OnlyLivingBoyOnlyLivingBoy Posts: 10,340

    I don't want to sound hyperbolic but this winter is going to be very, very bad for a lot of people.

    I just do not see how Liz Truss does not do something to help.

    And if she does do something, will you give her credit, or say its not enough no matter what?
    Are we allowed to say it's not enough if, for instance, it's not enough? I mean, she is obviously going to do something.
  • stodgestodge Posts: 10,970
    DavidL said:

    Foxy said:


    On the other hand the current heatwave there is quite a problem.

    https://twitter.com/ScottDuncanWX/status/1561040349535113217?t=sUqSyjVPuS_ZD2zAIrA-mw&s=19

    That's a story I have not even seen before, thanks for the link.
    If you look at the weather models, there is a huge area of intense heat (850s in excess of 28c) stretching from China round the globe to North Africa.

    There's a similar large heat pool in the south western United States extending north to the Rockies.

    That's literally hundreds of millions of people enduring the kind of heat we had for 48 hours last month but having to do so for weeks.
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 8,513
    edited August 22
    DavidL said:

    That looked offside to me, just like that second for Arsenal clearly was. VAR very Flaky this weekend.

    So it’s Liverpool to be relegated with Bournemouth and Leeds, not Utd. What a turnup!

    Leeds? After their 3-0 demolition of Chelsea? I think not.
    They haven’t strengthened David, sure to get stuck in the slump when it comes.

    My Dads 442 has them finishing 17th.
  • I don't want to sound hyperbolic but this winter is going to be very, very bad for a lot of people.

    I just do not see how Liz Truss does not do something to help.

    And if she does do something, will you give her credit, or say its not enough no matter what?
    Are we allowed to say it's not enough if, for instance, it's not enough? I mean, she is obviously going to do something.
    Hence the caveat "no matter what" but CHB is acting as if Truss is nailed on to do nothing.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 35,475
    Icarus said:

    Foxy said:

    If it really is 4 1/2 years for a rape trial to reach court then it is no wonder that the conviction rate is so low that rapists have got away with it walk amongst us. How is it possible to have a fair trial after such a time?

    I don't blame the barristers for striking, they need to be paid a living and in a timely manner.

    Sorry but 15% for Barristers -which they have rejected will not play well against 4 or 5% for nurses. Makes 7% (+£500 one off) for dockers look miserable.

    Nurses are getting 3%.

    It is why they will vote for a strike in September. Junior doctors are getting 2%. They too will be voting to strike.

    This government has no empathy and no clue.
  • geoffwgeoffw Posts: 6,775
    DavidL said:

    geoffw said:

    DavidL said:

    Foxy said:

    DavidL said:

    rcs1000 said:

    MISTY said:

    https://twitter.com/SebastianEPayne/status/1561764326935040002?t=YJ2fbf-zZDFIqt267Y_Xqw&s=19

    CoL response immediately according to this with probably a November full budget?

    Is this the new regime talking?

    Today's article from John Redwood is pretty dismissive of the OBR forecasts, for example.
    They do seem to be getting it very wrong very often recently.
    It's not easy being an economic forecaster.

    What will happen in Ukraine? What will happen with Covid in China? Will China's housing market implode?

    Those are just three mega questions that you need to have to have a sensible view on the UK's economic growth, even before we talk about domestic issues.
    FWIW I think that Russia will suffer a series of setbacks in Ukraine but prove pretty much impossible for Ukraine to beat. The result will be a painful and difficult draw which will continue the current sanction regime almost indefinitely. Not good for us or inflation generally.

    On Covid, the Chinese will eventually recognise that zero Covid just doesn't work and start to join the rest of the world in moving on. May still take a while though. Eventually good but medium rather than short term.

    On Chinese housing a bust is surely coming and we are already seeing the consequences with the likes of Evergrande and missed growth targets. Almost certainly bad for us but way worse for the Chinese.

    I agree that each of these have the capacity, on their own, of swinging our growth or recession by at least a couple of percent, probably more. But we remain obsessed with the trivia of Brexit. It's an illness.
    I think the Chinese economy recovers quickly. After all they have the magic ingredient for economic growth that we lack: cheap energy.
    It is the biggest bubble in the history of the world by several orders of magnitude. They may well recover fast but jeez, it will make 2008 look like a local disturbance.
    China looks to me more like an example of the Lewis model of development growth with perfectly elastic labour supply as huge numbers migrate from rural agriculture to urban manufacturing. It is not a bubble in the normal sense of the word.

    That's how it started. I do not think that is where we are now or have been for some years.
    Up to the Covid crisis there was still huge movement from countryside to cities, the cause of the huge growth in urban housing. Covid has put a stop to that and that by itself probably causes a crash in the housing market as planned development commitments are abandoned.

  • Carnyx said:

    Icarus said:

    Foxy said:

    If it really is 4 1/2 years for a rape trial to reach court then it is no wonder that the conviction rate is so low that rapists have got away with it walk amongst us. How is it possible to have a fair trial after such a time?

    I don't blame the barristers for striking, they need to be paid a living and in a timely manner.

    Sorry but 15% for Barristers -which they have rejected will not play well against 4 or 5% for nurses. Makes 7% (+£500 one off) for dockers look miserable.

    But from a very badly depressed position, so some way to catch up on. That was evident 3-4 years ago.
    But how can the government give in here? The govt can't agree to more than 15% without encouraging everyone else to pay hardball.
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 27,947
    edited August 22
    Fishing said:

    Leon said:

    How come Italy has a really good efficient high speed train network all over the country… and we are still struggling to build one line from London to Birmingham which will be finished in 2083 and will cost £298 trn?

    Because you keep voting Tory.
    Non sequitur.
    Nope.

    To Tory is to serially underfund infrastructure, among other things.

    Labour have other issues.

    You, Tory voter, are to blame for public squalor.
    The one thing HS2 isn't is underfunded.

    Maybe engage your brain and put down the bottle.
    Do you seriously believe that UK infrastructure is funded to the same extent as it’s European peers?
    HS2 is supposed to cost about £45-90m/km, whereas Frog schemes cost £10-20m/km in comparable prices, according to a Parliamentary report.

    https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/ld201415/ldselect/ldeconaf/134/13406.htm

    As Casino Royale said, whatever Boris did with HS2, he didn't underfund it. He loved his huge infrastructure projects.
    My Modern Railways has just arrived. I get the impression from the cover that the cost of the TransPennine improvement - not new line vide HS2 - is mind-blowing even by those standards.

    "TRANS-PENNINE COST SHOCK
    • £9bn for 76-mile project
    • Most expensive upgrade ever?"
    https://www.modernrailways.com/article/modern-railways-september-2022

    Which I make to be £74m per km.

    Have yet to read it to find out what the cover meant, but this might be worth keeping an eye on.
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 27,947
    edited August 22

    Carnyx said:

    Icarus said:

    Foxy said:

    If it really is 4 1/2 years for a rape trial to reach court then it is no wonder that the conviction rate is so low that rapists have got away with it walk amongst us. How is it possible to have a fair trial after such a time?

    I don't blame the barristers for striking, they need to be paid a living and in a timely manner.

    Sorry but 15% for Barristers -which they have rejected will not play well against 4 or 5% for nurses. Makes 7% (+£500 one off) for dockers look miserable.

    But from a very badly depressed position, so some way to catch up on. That was evident 3-4 years ago.
    But how can the government give in here? The govt can't agree to more than 15% without encouraging everyone else to pay hardball.
    That's their problem, after their behaving for years as if young lawyers were all posh self-funders* from Eton etc. who didn't really need any income. And the problem, I fear, of anyone who has anything to do with the courts.

    * Or Mummy and Daddy-funded.
  • OnlyLivingBoyOnlyLivingBoy Posts: 10,340

    I don't want to sound hyperbolic but this winter is going to be very, very bad for a lot of people.

    I just do not see how Liz Truss does not do something to help.

    And if she does do something, will you give her credit, or say its not enough no matter what?
    Are we allowed to say it's not enough if, for instance, it's not enough? I mean, she is obviously going to do something.
    Hence the caveat "no matter what" but CHB is acting as if Truss is nailed on to do nothing.
    Didn't he say the exact opposite, "I just do not see how Liz Truss does not do something to help"? She will clearly do something, probably quite a lot. If she doesn't she can expect civil unrest on a massive scale. She's not an idiot.
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 8,513
    edited August 22

    That looked offside to me, just like that second for Arsenal clearly was. VAR very Flaky this weekend.

    So it’s Liverpool to be relegated with Bournemouth and Leeds, not Utd. What a turnup!

    It looked offside to me too, was surprised it came up saying onside.
    I swear the machines wonky!

    I don’t like the refs waving play on after clear fouls last season either, that’s bad preparation for Englands World Cup where refs will whistle on every touch and drop.
  • geoffwgeoffw Posts: 6,775
    geoffw said:

    Carnyx said:

    geoffw said:

    DavidL said:

    Foxy said:

    DavidL said:

    rcs1000 said:

    MISTY said:

    https://twitter.com/SebastianEPayne/status/1561764326935040002?t=YJ2fbf-zZDFIqt267Y_Xqw&s=19

    CoL response immediately according to this with probably a November full budget?

    Is this the new regime talking?

    Today's article from John Redwood is pretty dismissive of the OBR forecasts, for example.
    They do seem to be getting it very wrong very often recently.
    It's not easy being an economic forecaster.

    What will happen in Ukraine? What will happen with Covid in China? Will China's housing market implode?

    Those are just three mega questions that you need to have to have a sensible view on the UK's economic growth, even before we talk about domestic issues.
    FWIW I think that Russia will suffer a series of setbacks in Ukraine but prove pretty much impossible for Ukraine to beat. The result will be a painful and difficult draw which will continue the current sanction regime almost indefinitely. Not good for us or inflation generally.

    On Covid, the Chinese will eventually recognise that zero Covid just doesn't work and start to join the rest of the world in moving on. May still take a while though. Eventually good but medium rather than short term.

    On Chinese housing a bust is surely coming and we are already seeing the consequences with the likes of Evergrande and missed growth targets. Almost certainly bad for us but way worse for the Chinese.

    I agree that each of these have the capacity, on their own, of swinging our growth or recession by at least a couple of percent, probably more. But we remain obsessed with the trivia of Brexit. It's an illness.
    I think the Chinese economy recovers quickly. After all they have the magic ingredient for economic growth that we lack: cheap energy.
    It is the biggest bubble in the history of the world by several orders of magnitude. They may well recover fast but jeez, it will make 2008 look like a local disturbance.
    China looks to me more like an example of the Lewis model of development growth with perfectly elastic labour supply as huge numbers migrate from rural agriculture to urban manufacturing. It is not a bubble in the normal sense of the word.

    Isle of Lewis?
    Sir Arthur C Lewis

    Sorry @Carnyx, Sir W. Arthur Lewis.

  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 8,513
    Chicken Tikka Mo Salah.

    A draw from here’s a defeat for Utd.
  • IshmaelZIshmaelZ Posts: 21,830
    stodge said:

    stodge said:


    If you can find us, if you can afford it, you can hire "The Stodge Squad".

    Found pretty easily at the donut stand I'm guessing?
    A tad harsh, sir, Currently doing undercover work at Chinese all-you-can-eat buffets and at Toby Carvery (lunchtimes Monday to Saturday only, large plates).
    Sushi. That's what my ex-wife called me - cold fish.
  • Well deserved goal for Salah. Might be too little, too late though.
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 27,947
    geoffw said:

    geoffw said:

    Carnyx said:

    geoffw said:

    DavidL said:

    Foxy said:

    DavidL said:

    rcs1000 said:

    MISTY said:

    https://twitter.com/SebastianEPayne/status/1561764326935040002?t=YJ2fbf-zZDFIqt267Y_Xqw&s=19

    CoL response immediately according to this with probably a November full budget?

    Is this the new regime talking?

    Today's article from John Redwood is pretty dismissive of the OBR forecasts, for example.
    They do seem to be getting it very wrong very often recently.
    It's not easy being an economic forecaster.

    What will happen in Ukraine? What will happen with Covid in China? Will China's housing market implode?

    Those are just three mega questions that you need to have to have a sensible view on the UK's economic growth, even before we talk about domestic issues.
    FWIW I think that Russia will suffer a series of setbacks in Ukraine but prove pretty much impossible for Ukraine to beat. The result will be a painful and difficult draw which will continue the current sanction regime almost indefinitely. Not good for us or inflation generally.

    On Covid, the Chinese will eventually recognise that zero Covid just doesn't work and start to join the rest of the world in moving on. May still take a while though. Eventually good but medium rather than short term.

    On Chinese housing a bust is surely coming and we are already seeing the consequences with the likes of Evergrande and missed growth targets. Almost certainly bad for us but way worse for the Chinese.

    I agree that each of these have the capacity, on their own, of swinging our growth or recession by at least a couple of percent, probably more. But we remain obsessed with the trivia of Brexit. It's an illness.
    I think the Chinese economy recovers quickly. After all they have the magic ingredient for economic growth that we lack: cheap energy.
    It is the biggest bubble in the history of the world by several orders of magnitude. They may well recover fast but jeez, it will make 2008 look like a local disturbance.
    China looks to me more like an example of the Lewis model of development growth with perfectly elastic labour supply as huge numbers migrate from rural agriculture to urban manufacturing. It is not a bubble in the normal sense of the word.

    Isle of Lewis?
    Sir Arthur C Lewis

    Sorry @Carnyx, Sir W. Arthur Lewis.

    Thanks! - I did wonder iun view of Lever's major subsistence-to-(sort of) manufacturing scheme on Lewis and Harris.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leverburgh
  • StuartinromfordStuartinromford Posts: 7,802
    Foxy said:

    Icarus said:

    Foxy said:

    If it really is 4 1/2 years for a rape trial to reach court then it is no wonder that the conviction rate is so low that rapists have got away with it walk amongst us. How is it possible to have a fair trial after such a time?

    I don't blame the barristers for striking, they need to be paid a living and in a timely manner.

    Sorry but 15% for Barristers -which they have rejected will not play well against 4 or 5% for nurses. Makes 7% (+£500 one off) for dockers look miserable.

    Nurses are getting 3%.

    It is why they will vote for a strike in September. Junior doctors are getting 2%. They too will be voting to strike.

    This government has no empathy and no clue.
    Some of that is simply events overtaking an agreement, which is one of the things that makes inflationary spirals difficult to stop. The harder thing is that, even if you don't like barristers, even if you think they are overpaid and spend too much time thwarting the People's Will, they still cost what they cost.
  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 55,094

    stodge said:

    DavidL said:

    Foxy said:


    On the other hand the current heatwave there is quite a problem.

    https://twitter.com/ScottDuncanWX/status/1561040349535113217?t=sUqSyjVPuS_ZD2zAIrA-mw&s=19

    That's a story I have not even seen before, thanks for the link.
    If you look at the weather models, there is a huge area of intense heat (850s in excess of 28c) stretching from China round the globe to North Africa.

    There's a similar large heat pool in the south western United States extending north to the Rockies.

    That's literally hundreds of millions of people enduring the kind of heat we had for 48 hours last month but having to do so for weeks.
    In1989/90 I spent a year working in the Empty Quarter in Arabia. Temperatures would regularly approach 50 degrees there. People don't seem to realise how utterly bone sappingly difficult that sort of heat is. At one point because of H2S from the wells we had to wear BA sets all he time we were working. No one can last long doing that and we quickly switched to night time only working. Although even with AC the days in camp trying to sleep were interminable.

    The Empty Quarter is perhaps one of the most beautiful places I have ever been on earth but I am in no rush at all to go back. At my age I am not sure I would survive.

    Chinese hydropower being effected iirc.

    Still, good to know 1,000+ scientists have signed a new declaration that this is all normal and no need to worry about the climate.
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 24,335
    Klopp out!
  • londonpubmanlondonpubman Posts: 2,003
    dixiedean said:

    Klopp out!

    Liverpool season over! :lol:
  • Well done United. 😣
  • turbotubbsturbotubbs Posts: 10,525

    Well done United. 😣

    Sadio Mane starting to look a very big loss.
  • Luckyguy1983Luckyguy1983 Posts: 19,508
    ...

    I don't want to sound hyperbolic but this winter is going to be very, very bad for a lot of people.

    I just do not see how Liz Truss does not do something to help.

    And if she does do something, will you give her credit, or say its not enough no matter what?
    Are we allowed to say it's not enough if, for instance, it's not enough? I mean, she is obviously going to do something.
    Hence the caveat "no matter what" but CHB is acting as if Truss is nailed on to do nothing.
    Didn't he say the exact opposite, "I just do not see how Liz Truss does not do something to help"? She will clearly do something, probably quite a lot. If she doesn't she can expect civil unrest on a massive scale. She's not an idiot.
    A fair few people in recent threads, perhaps even this one, have suggested that whistling and ignoring it will be Truss's response to col. You are of course correct; she'll address it, and I am glad she and her team are taking the time to work on it.
  • FrankBoothFrankBooth Posts: 7,115
    Will take some time to fully digest but thank you Cyclefree for an excellent piece. The rape trial figure seems astonishing.
  • Big_G_NorthWalesBig_G_NorthWales Posts: 55,035

    Well done United. 😣

    Fair play and what a turn around for United - very unexpected
  • GallowgateGallowgate Posts: 18,586
    Always good to see the bin dippers lose
  • StuartDicksonStuartDickson Posts: 11,243
    Hmmm…. there’s something missing. No mention of his party. Not even the right colour. Wonder why?

    https://twitter.com/cattler/status/1561678625862189062?s=21&t=6yvEoRYNfiff3ibM6bH2fQ
  • LostPasswordLostPassword Posts: 10,474

    McDonalds in Nottingham getting looted. There seems to be an uptick in this kind of thing:

    https://www.twitter.com/Antman0704/status/1561744461151064065

    So they get a criminal record (they are easily identified) for the sake of one £2.99 Big Mac. And the staff are possibly traumatised for good.

    What on earth is the point? And what on earth was the trigger?
    Crowd dynamics are fascinating, and sometimes a bit scary.

    Suppose they were busy and understaffed, so people in the queue were a bit discontented. The staff are under pressure and start making mistakes. One of the people in the queue loses patience and just grabs something, or someone who has had a mistake made in their order feels they're justified in grabbing something as recompense, and gets away with it.

    That then gives several other people permission to do likewise, and then further people join in. No point in queueing anymore, if you don't simply take some food you're not going to get any.

    This is why it's so important for leaders to lead by example. People are social beings and follow the example around them. If they see other people not following the rules they will believe they have no option but to break the rules themselves. They'd be mugs not to. This is one reason why Johnson was such an awful Prime Minister, exactly as Aaron Bell asked in the Commons - he made us all feel like fools for having followed the rules.

    It would be a miracle if that didn't have an effect on law-breaking in general.
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 27,947
    edited August 22

    Hmmm…. there’s something missing. No mention of his party. Not even the right colour. Wonder why?

    https://twitter.com/cattler/status/1561678625862189062?s=21&t=6yvEoRYNfiff3ibM6bH2fQ

    Hmm, the ScoTories really are in a dire strait if they have to pretend to be Greens. (That really would surprise me. Blue is blue, as any Sevco fan knows.)

  • FrankBoothFrankBooth Posts: 7,115
    DavidL said:

    rcs1000 said:

    MISTY said:

    https://twitter.com/SebastianEPayne/status/1561764326935040002?t=YJ2fbf-zZDFIqt267Y_Xqw&s=19

    CoL response immediately according to this with probably a November full budget?

    Is this the new regime talking?

    Today's article from John Redwood is pretty dismissive of the OBR forecasts, for example.
    They do seem to be getting it very wrong very often recently.
    It's not easy being an economic forecaster.

    What will happen in Ukraine? What will happen with Covid in China? Will China's housing market implode?

    Those are just three mega questions that you need to have to have a sensible view on the UK's economic growth, even before we talk about domestic issues.
    FWIW I think that Russia will suffer a series of setbacks in Ukraine but prove pretty much impossible for Ukraine to beat. The result will be a painful and difficult draw which will continue the current sanction regime almost indefinitely. Not good for us or inflation generally.

    On Covid, the Chinese will eventually recognise that zero Covid just doesn't work and start to join the rest of the world in moving on. May still take a while though. Eventually good but medium rather than short term.

    On Chinese housing a bust is surely coming and we are already seeing the consequences with the likes of Evergrande and missed growth targets. Almost certainly bad for us but way worse for the Chinese.

    I agree that each of these have the capacity, on their own, of swinging our growth or recession by at least a couple of percent, probably more. But we remain obsessed with the trivia of Brexit. It's an illness.
    I sense Russia CAN be beaten. The more interesting question is whether the west really wants them to be beaten. The military aid from Germany, France, Spain and Italy has not been very substantial.
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 48,400
    geoffw said:

    DavidL said:

    Foxy said:

    DavidL said:

    rcs1000 said:

    MISTY said:

    https://twitter.com/SebastianEPayne/status/1561764326935040002?t=YJ2fbf-zZDFIqt267Y_Xqw&s=19

    CoL response immediately according to this with probably a November full budget?

    Is this the new regime talking?

    Today's article from John Redwood is pretty dismissive of the OBR forecasts, for example.
    They do seem to be getting it very wrong very often recently.
    It's not easy being an economic forecaster.

    What will happen in Ukraine? What will happen with Covid in China? Will China's housing market implode?

    Those are just three mega questions that you need to have to have a sensible view on the UK's economic growth, even before we talk about domestic issues.
    FWIW I think that Russia will suffer a series of setbacks in Ukraine but prove pretty much impossible for Ukraine to beat. The result will be a painful and difficult draw which will continue the current sanction regime almost indefinitely. Not good for us or inflation generally.

    On Covid, the Chinese will eventually recognise that zero Covid just doesn't work and start to join the rest of the world in moving on. May still take a while though. Eventually good but medium rather than short term.

    On Chinese housing a bust is surely coming and we are already seeing the consequences with the likes of Evergrande and missed growth targets. Almost certainly bad for us but way worse for the Chinese.

    I agree that each of these have the capacity, on their own, of swinging our growth or recession by at least a couple of percent, probably more. But we remain obsessed with the trivia of Brexit. It's an illness.
    I think the Chinese economy recovers quickly. After all they have the magic ingredient for economic growth that we lack: cheap energy.
    It is the biggest bubble in the history of the world by several orders of magnitude. They may well recover fast but jeez, it will make 2008 look like a local disturbance.
    China looks to me more like an example of the Lewis model of development growth with perfectly elastic labour supply as huge numbers migrate from rural agriculture to urban manufacturing. It is not a bubble in the normal sense of the word.

    I think @DavidL is talking about the Chinese residential housing market.

    It is - by a significant margin - the largest market in the world.

    It is bigger than the US equity market. It is bigger than the US, UK and German residential housing markets, combined, despite people being very substantially poorer. The house-prices-to-incomes ratio is about 20x.

  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 104,947
    edited August 22
    It should be pointed out the median income for all criminal barristers is £79,800, even after expenses comfortably over £50,000.

    Despite lower earnings at the junior end

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-62629776
  • GallowgateGallowgate Posts: 18,586
    HYUFD said:

    It should be pointed out the median income for all criminal barristers is £79,800, even after expenses comfortably over £50,000.

    Despite lower earnings at the junior end

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-62629776

    So?
  • kinabalukinabalu Posts: 32,121
    Well there you are see. Man U top 4 @ 8s looking rather good now.

    Always bet against overreaction money. 🙂
  • MoonRabbitMoonRabbit Posts: 8,513

    Well done United. 😣

    Fair play and what a turn around for United - very unexpected
    Doesn’t make the fundamental problems go away though? Like a centre back too small to play centre back. And with Maguire and Ron watching on moodily, this could all be a bit of a flash in the pan unless the manager ships them put the dressing room this week? Panicking Chelsea sniffing around one of, if not both?

    For Liverpool, first domestic defeat of 2022 hides the fact they are off the boil stretching back into last season? I think they are crying out for fresh signings too, though Klopp disagrees apparently, one of Bellingham, Diaby or Pino could give the club a lift right now.
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 27,947
    HYUFD said:

    It should be pointed out the median income for all criminal barristers is £79,800, even after expenses comfortably over £50,000.

    Despite lower earnings at the junior end

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-62629776

    "median", there, not "mean". Always a warning of something odd about the distribution.

    And it's juniors who do most of the donkey work in courts and legal aid. "the median pay for a junior barrister was £12,700 per year."

    What's not clear to me is if this is take home or if their chambers gets a cut.
  • StuartDicksonStuartDickson Posts: 11,243
    Ruth Davidson confirms the Sun writes “utter bollocks”.

    https://twitter.com/ruthdavidsonpc/status/1561729021951582211?s=21&t=6yvEoRYNfiff3ibM6bH2fQ
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 104,947
    edited August 22

    HYUFD said:

    It should be pointed out the median income for all criminal barristers is £79,800, even after expenses comfortably over £50,000.

    Despite lower earnings at the junior end

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-62629776

    So?
    Once they get past the first few years the average criminal barrister will earn significantly more than the average member of the UK population even if less than corporate lawyers do. However it is mainly the average member of the UK population who pays their fees through taxes paying for CPS and legal aid
  • DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 17,293
    kinabalu said:

    Well there you are see. Man U top 4 @ 8s looking rather good now.

    Always bet against overreaction money. 🙂

    I very nearly did, but when I checked my accounts just now, it became sadly clear I'd not got round to putting the bet on. Still, I cashed out a couple of Rishi bets, so there's that.
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 27,947
    edited August 22
    HYUFD said:

    HYUFD said:

    It should be pointed out the median income for all criminal barristers is £79,800, even after expenses comfortably over £50,000.

    Despite lower earnings at the junior end

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-62629776

    So?
    Once they get past the first few years the average barrister will earn significantly more than the average member of the UK population even if less than corporate lawyers do. However it is mainly the average member of the UK population who pays their fees through taxes paying for CPS and legal aid
    That's how the Tory Party keeps nice lawyers' jobs for nice wealthy Tory Party members' children.

    While the Party members don't pay their fair share of taxes.
  • kinabalukinabalu Posts: 32,121
    edited August 22

    What a crap start to the season.

    First fifteen minutes I thought United deserved their goal to be fair, but LFC ought to have got at least an equaliser since. 2-0 now is extremely disappointing.

    I know. And c'mon it's Liverpool Football Club we're talking about here. Anfield. The Kop. Shankly, Paisley ... the Boot Room, You'll Never Walk Alone, Liverpool Football Club. The reds. LFC. Liverpool.
  • Big_G_NorthWalesBig_G_NorthWales Posts: 55,035

    Well done United. 😣

    Fair play and what a turn around for United - very unexpected
    Doesn’t make the fundamental problems go away though? Like a centre back too small to play centre back. And with Maguire and Ron watching on moodily, this could all be a bit of a flash in the pan unless the manager ships them put the dressing room this week? Panicking Chelsea sniffing around one of, if not both?

    For Liverpool, first domestic defeat of 2022 hides the fact they are off the boil stretching back into last season? I think they are crying out for fresh signings too, though Klopp disagrees apparently, one of Bellingham, Diaby or Pino could give the club a lift right now.
    Martinez is receiving huge compliments tonight for his fantastic display

    Ronaldo and Maguire are not going to regain their places and Chelsea can have them both
  • CookieCookie Posts: 7,778
    On the grounds that it's probably cheaper than heating my house for a week, I've just booked a family holiday for October half term. We're going to Dunkeld. Youngest has a bee in her bonnet about Scotland, and about seeing a mountain, and I'm keen to indulge her.
    I'm very pleased. Have been hunting about holiday parks, and one is too remote, another not remote enough ... this is just the right balance between pleasant small town, the edges of Highland scenery, Edinburgh, Glasgow and Stirling relatively accessible. Following, I think, DavidL's advice, if we get some good weather we may go to the Cairnwell (I think?). Or possibly Ben Vrackie. We may find a castle to visit.
    I have just shown her the pictures, and some pictures of the surrounding area, and she is delighted.
    As am I. I haven't been to Scotland for about 20 years.

    The idiot ginger cat has celebrated this development by bringing a live mouse in. Sigh.
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 48,400
    HYUFD said:

    HYUFD said:

    It should be pointed out the median income for all criminal barristers is £79,800, even after expenses comfortably over £50,000.

    Despite lower earnings at the junior end

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-62629776

    So?
    Once they get past the first few years the average criminal barrister will earn significantly more than the average member of the UK population even if less than corporate lawyers do. However it is mainly the average member of the UK population who pays their fees through taxes paying for CPS and legal aid
    More than half of all income tax in the UK comes from top 10% of earners, so technically it isn't really the average member of the UK population who pays.
This discussion has been closed.