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Johnsons needs to be more careful about off the cuff comments like this – politicalbetting.com

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Comments

  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 34,708
    Foxy said:

    stodge said:

    Evening all :)

    Margaret Thatcher understood the threat of climate change and the impact on the environment - her speech to the UN in November 1989 was unfortunately overshadowed by the small matter of the fall of the Berlin Wall 24 hours later.

    The cynic might of course argue it was a response to the surge in popularity of the Greens at the 1989 European elections but at least Thatcher started to see the issue.

    After that, however, environmental issues faded out of the limelight and some in the Conservative Party, possibly those who had affiliations to the fossil fuel industry, opted to peddle some of the climate change denial lines and I can honestly not remember a single Labour politician talking much about the environment during the Blair years.

    David Cameron was the first Conservative I can recall after Thatcher saying anything about the environment though again the cynic might argue it was both about trying to get LD votes and a change from "banging on about Europe".

    Johnson sounds confident if not cocky. Perhaps he believes he can say anything and there will be plenty to defend him or excuse him or seek to justify him. To be fair, a GE victory and an 80-seat majority will do that and I suspect he looks at the short-term post-Covid environment with happy people and a surging economy and he thinks it's all going his way.

    Well, that's hubris for you - doesn't often end well.

    I think that a little unfair on Ed Miliband who was the first minister for Climate Change, and acted on the basis of the 2006 Stern review.

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2008/oct/16/11

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stern_Review
    Was it the Stern Review that assigned a zero discount rate to the inter-generational cost of capital?
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 22,384

    O/T:

    @DavidL, I seem to recall you are a Scottish lawyer (apols if I have got that wrong).

    Do you or any other PB posters know if there's a way to find out details of Sheriff Court judgements? I am specifically interested in a case from this monday, 2nd August, at Jedburgh Sheriff Court .

    Thanks in anticipation.

    If DavidL is not around, it should be on this somewhere

    https://www.scotcourts.gov.uk/

    Written judgements, if they are provided at all, seem to be on this in my experience

    https://www.scotcourts.gov.uk/search-judgments/sheriff-court
  • mwadamsmwadams Posts: 1,647
    Foxy said:

    stodge said:

    Evening all :)

    Margaret Thatcher understood the threat of climate change and the impact on the environment - her speech to the UN in November 1989 was unfortunately overshadowed by the small matter of the fall of the Berlin Wall 24 hours later.

    The cynic might of course argue it was a response to the surge in popularity of the Greens at the 1989 European elections but at least Thatcher started to see the issue.

    After that, however, environmental issues faded out of the limelight and some in the Conservative Party, possibly those who had affiliations to the fossil fuel industry, opted to peddle some of the climate change denial lines and I can honestly not remember a single Labour politician talking much about the environment during the Blair years.

    David Cameron was the first Conservative I can recall after Thatcher saying anything about the environment though again the cynic might argue it was both about trying to get LD votes and a change from "banging on about Europe".

    Johnson sounds confident if not cocky. Perhaps he believes he can say anything and there will be plenty to defend him or excuse him or seek to justify him. To be fair, a GE victory and an 80-seat majority will do that and I suspect he looks at the short-term post-Covid environment with happy people and a surging economy and he thinks it's all going his way.

    Well, that's hubris for you - doesn't often end well.

    I think that a little unfair on Ed Miliband who was the first minister for Climate Change, and acted on the basis of the 2006 Stern review.

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2008/oct/16/11

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stern_Review
    To be equally fair, that was in the Brown administration, not the Blair years.
  • StuartDicksonStuartDickson Posts: 8,732
    stodge said:

    Evening all :)

    Margaret Thatcher understood the threat of climate change and the impact on the environment - her speech to the UN in November 1989 was unfortunately overshadowed by the small matter of the fall of the Berlin Wall 24 hours later.

    The cynic might of course argue it was a response to the surge in popularity of the Greens at the 1989 European elections but at least Thatcher started to see the issue.

    After that, however, environmental issues faded out of the limelight and some in the Conservative Party, possibly those who had affiliations to the fossil fuel industry, opted to peddle some of the climate change denial lines and I can honestly not remember a single Labour politician talking much about the environment during the Blair years.

    David Cameron was the first Conservative I can recall after Thatcher saying anything about the environment though again the cynic might argue it was both about trying to get LD votes and a change from "banging on about Europe".

    Johnson sounds confident if not cocky. Perhaps he believes he can say anything and there will be plenty to defend him or excuse him or seek to justify him. To be fair, a GE victory and an 80-seat majority will do that and I suspect he looks at the short-term post-Covid environment with happy people and a surging economy and he thinks it's all going his way.

    Well, that's hubris for you - doesn't often end well.

    Nemesis can’t come too soon for that useless lump.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 42,783

    O/T:

    @DavidL, I seem to recall you are a Scottish lawyer (apols if I have got that wrong).

    Do you or any other PB posters know if there's a way to find out details of Sheriff Court judgements? I am specifically interested in a case from this monday, 2nd August, at Jedburgh Sheriff Court .

    Thanks in anticipation.

    Well a lot of people have had their doubts over the years but that's the claim. If the decision is significant it may be reported on the Scottish Courts website https://scotcourts.gov.uk/ If its a verbal decision or not of particular importance you can try contacting the Sheriff Clerk at Jedburgh to see if the judgment is available. If it is being decided in the court that day then its worth asking the Sheriff Clerk if there is remote access for the case. Technically cases take place in a public court so the Covid equivalent is remote viewing.

    Hope that is some help.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 32,276
    TOPPING said:

    Foxy said:

    stodge said:

    Evening all :)

    Margaret Thatcher understood the threat of climate change and the impact on the environment - her speech to the UN in November 1989 was unfortunately overshadowed by the small matter of the fall of the Berlin Wall 24 hours later.

    The cynic might of course argue it was a response to the surge in popularity of the Greens at the 1989 European elections but at least Thatcher started to see the issue.

    After that, however, environmental issues faded out of the limelight and some in the Conservative Party, possibly those who had affiliations to the fossil fuel industry, opted to peddle some of the climate change denial lines and I can honestly not remember a single Labour politician talking much about the environment during the Blair years.

    David Cameron was the first Conservative I can recall after Thatcher saying anything about the environment though again the cynic might argue it was both about trying to get LD votes and a change from "banging on about Europe".

    Johnson sounds confident if not cocky. Perhaps he believes he can say anything and there will be plenty to defend him or excuse him or seek to justify him. To be fair, a GE victory and an 80-seat majority will do that and I suspect he looks at the short-term post-Covid environment with happy people and a surging economy and he thinks it's all going his way.

    Well, that's hubris for you - doesn't often end well.

    I think that a little unfair on Ed Miliband who was the first minister for Climate Change, and acted on the basis of the 2006 Stern review.

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2008/oct/16/11

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stern_Review
    Was it the Stern Review that assigned a zero discount rate to the inter-generational cost of capital?
    No idea, I just cited it as evidence of Labour being interested in Climate change.
  • StuartDicksonStuartDickson Posts: 8,732
    DavidL said:

    Surely SKS has been all over this showing that Labour shut more mines than Thatcher? Or something.

    Labour don’t have a leg to stand on. Blair despised ordinary working class communities just as much as Thatcher.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 42,783
    Carnyx said:

    O/T:

    @DavidL, I seem to recall you are a Scottish lawyer (apols if I have got that wrong).

    Do you or any other PB posters know if there's a way to find out details of Sheriff Court judgements? I am specifically interested in a case from this monday, 2nd August, at Jedburgh Sheriff Court .

    Thanks in anticipation.

    If DavidL is not around, it should be on this somewhere

    https://www.scotcourts.gov.uk/

    Written judgements, if they are provided at all, seem to be on this in my experience

    https://www.scotcourts.gov.uk/search-judgments/sheriff-court
    Its not comprehensive unfortunately. The cases they choose to report are pretty random.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 32,276
    mwadams said:

    Foxy said:

    stodge said:

    Evening all :)

    Margaret Thatcher understood the threat of climate change and the impact on the environment - her speech to the UN in November 1989 was unfortunately overshadowed by the small matter of the fall of the Berlin Wall 24 hours later.

    The cynic might of course argue it was a response to the surge in popularity of the Greens at the 1989 European elections but at least Thatcher started to see the issue.

    After that, however, environmental issues faded out of the limelight and some in the Conservative Party, possibly those who had affiliations to the fossil fuel industry, opted to peddle some of the climate change denial lines and I can honestly not remember a single Labour politician talking much about the environment during the Blair years.

    David Cameron was the first Conservative I can recall after Thatcher saying anything about the environment though again the cynic might argue it was both about trying to get LD votes and a change from "banging on about Europe".

    Johnson sounds confident if not cocky. Perhaps he believes he can say anything and there will be plenty to defend him or excuse him or seek to justify him. To be fair, a GE victory and an 80-seat majority will do that and I suspect he looks at the short-term post-Covid environment with happy people and a surging economy and he thinks it's all going his way.

    Well, that's hubris for you - doesn't often end well.

    I think that a little unfair on Ed Miliband who was the first minister for Climate Change, and acted on the basis of the 2006 Stern review.

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2008/oct/16/11

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stern_Review
    To be equally fair, that was in the Brown administration, not the Blair years.
    It was under Blair that the Stern Review was commissioned.
  • FrankBoothFrankBooth Posts: 6,026
    Looking forward to hearing Boris apologise for Thatcher closing the mines.

    We have continued to import coal have we not?
  • CyclefreeCyclefree Posts: 22,250

    kle4 said:

    This case looks meritless eveb from the statement of the losmg party.

    A family-run farm has won a legal battle against the multimillion-pound makers of plant milk, Oatly, which accused it of trademark infringement.

    Oatly brought legal action against Glebe Farm Foods, in Cambridgeshire, saying their product PureOaty took "unfair advantage" of their own drink.

    A High Court judge ruled in favour of the farm saying he did not see "any risk of injury to the distinctive character" of the Oatly brand...

    A spokeswoman for Oatly said the company would not be appealing the decision.

    "For us, this case has always been about protecting our trademark and how the single letter Y creates too much of a similarity between Oaty and Oatly."


    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cambridgeshire-58102252

    A good friend of mine was on the inside at Glebe Farm. Baseless doesn't cover it - absolutely bloody absurd from Oatly.
    My food industry analyst friend spits venom at the mere mention of Oatly's name. Says there is more to come out about them.
  • BenpointerBenpointer Posts: 20,878
    DavidL said:

    O/T:

    @DavidL, I seem to recall you are a Scottish lawyer (apols if I have got that wrong).

    Do you or any other PB posters know if there's a way to find out details of Sheriff Court judgements? I am specifically interested in a case from this monday, 2nd August, at Jedburgh Sheriff Court .

    Thanks in anticipation.

    Well a lot of people have had their doubts over the years but that's the claim. If the decision is significant it may be reported on the Scottish Courts website https://scotcourts.gov.uk/ If its a verbal decision or not of particular importance you can try contacting the Sheriff Clerk at Jedburgh to see if the judgment is available. If it is being decided in the court that day then its worth asking the Sheriff Clerk if there is remote access for the case. Technically cases take place in a public court so the Covid equivalent is remote viewing.

    Hope that is some help.
    Yes, many thanks.

    I doubt the case I am interested in is of any wider significance. I am somewhat surprised however that there is not an online record these days of every judgement. If an individual is convicted of an offence, where is the record of that conviction?
  • StuartDicksonStuartDickson Posts: 8,732
    Leon said:

    Carnyx said:

    Leon said:

    Carnyx said:

    Nigelb said:

    Leon said:

    fpt on this Speccie thing


    I have no dog in this fight, but that magazine has boasted some amazing writers in its 2 centuries of publication.

    Douglas Murray went through ALL 200 years of them and chose the four best articles ever. And, when you read them, it is hard not to sit back with a certain awed, dumbstruck admiration. Just pure journalistic genius. The kind of stuff you cannot fake.

    Occasionally, one simply has to stand, and applaud.

    https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/four-of-the-best-spectator-pieces-i-ve-ever-read

    Self pleasuring to excess is undeniably emblematic of Spectator journalism, I suppose.
    Some reading for Fraser Nelson and his voyeurs:

    “Frequent or rough masturbation can cause minor skin irritation. Forcefully bending an erect penis can rupture the chambers that fill with blood, a rare but gruesome condition called penile fracture.

    Köhler has seen guys with it after vigorous masturbation. "Afterward, the penis looks like an eggplant," he says. "It's purple and swollen." Most men need surgery to repair it.”

    Ouch! Take care Fraser!

    https://www.webmd.com/men/guide/male-masturbation-5-things-you-didnt-know
    Please don't. Aubergine, hot smoked salmon, capers and onions, with scrambled egg and tagliatelli, is a staple chez Carnyx.
    You strike me a bit of a gourmet

    Have you encountered Dr Trouble's hot chili sauce?

    Matthew Parris has, apparently, been banging on about it for months. It's made in Zimbabwe of all places, and it is utter genius. Very smoky, very rich, must be used sparingly, but omg

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dr-Trouble-African-Lemon-Chilli/dp/B07QVFYDBG?th=1

    I prefer the double oak smoked chile to the lemon version. Both are Wow

    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/dr-troubles-sauce-is-gift-that-keeps-on-giving-cm3thlbh6
    Interesting!
    It is honestly fantastic. Matthew Parris may be a mad Remainer but he is totally right about this. It is the best hot sauce in the world.

    I had a ham and cheese sourdough toastie the other day - thick lovely ham, tangy mature Cheddar, some tiger tomatoes, I took out the Dijon mustard and added Dr Trouble and flash fried the result

    SENSATIONAL
    Fat and drunk. You’re some catch Sean.
  • DavidL said:

    O/T:

    @DavidL, I seem to recall you are a Scottish lawyer (apols if I have got that wrong).

    Do you or any other PB posters know if there's a way to find out details of Sheriff Court judgements? I am specifically interested in a case from this monday, 2nd August, at Jedburgh Sheriff Court .

    Thanks in anticipation.

    Well a lot of people have had their doubts over the years but that's the claim. If the decision is significant it may be reported on the Scottish Courts website https://scotcourts.gov.uk/ If its a verbal decision or not of particular importance you can try contacting the Sheriff Clerk at Jedburgh to see if the judgment is available. If it is being decided in the court that day then its worth asking the Sheriff Clerk if there is remote access for the case. Technically cases take place in a public court so the Covid equivalent is remote viewing.

    Hope that is some help.
    Yes, many thanks.

    I doubt the case I am interested in is of any wider significance. I am somewhat surprised however that there is not an online record these days of every judgement. If an individual is convicted of an offence, where is the record of that conviction?
    On the Police National Computer.
  • CyclefreeCyclefree Posts: 22,250
    BTW on books Hilary Mantel must be one of the most overrated writers around. How she even got onto the Booker short list let alone won it twice is a mystery. I find her quite unreadable.

    And whenever she's interviewed she comes across as most unpleasant as well.

    That William Trevor never won the Booker is to the Booker's eternal discredit.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 42,783

    DavidL said:

    O/T:

    @DavidL, I seem to recall you are a Scottish lawyer (apols if I have got that wrong).

    Do you or any other PB posters know if there's a way to find out details of Sheriff Court judgements? I am specifically interested in a case from this monday, 2nd August, at Jedburgh Sheriff Court .

    Thanks in anticipation.

    Well a lot of people have had their doubts over the years but that's the claim. If the decision is significant it may be reported on the Scottish Courts website https://scotcourts.gov.uk/ If its a verbal decision or not of particular importance you can try contacting the Sheriff Clerk at Jedburgh to see if the judgment is available. If it is being decided in the court that day then its worth asking the Sheriff Clerk if there is remote access for the case. Technically cases take place in a public court so the Covid equivalent is remote viewing.

    Hope that is some help.
    Yes, many thanks.

    I doubt the case I am interested in is of any wider significance. I am somewhat surprised however that there is not an online record these days of every judgement. If an individual is convicted of an offence, where is the record of that conviction?
    Sorry I was talking about Civil cases. Criminal cases almost never have written judgments until they get to the appeal courts. Frankly the local newspaper is probably your best bet.
  • LeonLeon Posts: 20,815

    Leon said:

    Carnyx said:

    Leon said:

    Carnyx said:

    Nigelb said:

    Leon said:

    fpt on this Speccie thing


    I have no dog in this fight, but that magazine has boasted some amazing writers in its 2 centuries of publication.

    Douglas Murray went through ALL 200 years of them and chose the four best articles ever. And, when you read them, it is hard not to sit back with a certain awed, dumbstruck admiration. Just pure journalistic genius. The kind of stuff you cannot fake.

    Occasionally, one simply has to stand, and applaud.

    https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/four-of-the-best-spectator-pieces-i-ve-ever-read

    Self pleasuring to excess is undeniably emblematic of Spectator journalism, I suppose.
    Some reading for Fraser Nelson and his voyeurs:

    “Frequent or rough masturbation can cause minor skin irritation. Forcefully bending an erect penis can rupture the chambers that fill with blood, a rare but gruesome condition called penile fracture.

    Köhler has seen guys with it after vigorous masturbation. "Afterward, the penis looks like an eggplant," he says. "It's purple and swollen." Most men need surgery to repair it.”

    Ouch! Take care Fraser!

    https://www.webmd.com/men/guide/male-masturbation-5-things-you-didnt-know
    Please don't. Aubergine, hot smoked salmon, capers and onions, with scrambled egg and tagliatelli, is a staple chez Carnyx.
    You strike me a bit of a gourmet

    Have you encountered Dr Trouble's hot chili sauce?

    Matthew Parris has, apparently, been banging on about it for months. It's made in Zimbabwe of all places, and it is utter genius. Very smoky, very rich, must be used sparingly, but omg

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dr-Trouble-African-Lemon-Chilli/dp/B07QVFYDBG?th=1

    I prefer the double oak smoked chile to the lemon version. Both are Wow

    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/dr-troubles-sauce-is-gift-that-keeps-on-giving-cm3thlbh6
    Interesting!
    It is honestly fantastic. Matthew Parris may be a mad Remainer but he is totally right about this. It is the best hot sauce in the world.

    I had a ham and cheese sourdough toastie the other day - thick lovely ham, tangy mature Cheddar, some tiger tomatoes, I took out the Dijon mustard and added Dr Trouble and flash fried the result

    SENSATIONAL
    Fat and drunk. You’re some catch Sean.
    Not fat, not even drunk, and, you know, at least I'm not a Scot Nat Blood-and-Soil NAZI like you. So there's that?

    With such things I am consoled
  • StuartDicksonStuartDickson Posts: 8,732
    Carnyx said:

    Starmer urges Labour to embrace Blair’s legacy

    https://www.ft.com/content/34ec43b9-5dcd-46cd-b284-093e8f13714d

    Ha ha. I’m almost beginning to feel sorry for poor Anas.
    Can't get at it. What's in there to trouble the Glaswegian supermarket magnate shareholder-as-was?
    The last thing Anas needs is for London Labour to go all Blairite.
  • BenpointerBenpointer Posts: 20,878
    edited August 2021

    DavidL said:

    O/T:

    @DavidL, I seem to recall you are a Scottish lawyer (apols if I have got that wrong).

    Do you or any other PB posters know if there's a way to find out details of Sheriff Court judgements? I am specifically interested in a case from this monday, 2nd August, at Jedburgh Sheriff Court .

    Thanks in anticipation.

    Well a lot of people have had their doubts over the years but that's the claim. If the decision is significant it may be reported on the Scottish Courts website https://scotcourts.gov.uk/ If its a verbal decision or not of particular importance you can try contacting the Sheriff Clerk at Jedburgh to see if the judgment is available. If it is being decided in the court that day then its worth asking the Sheriff Clerk if there is remote access for the case. Technically cases take place in a public court so the Covid equivalent is remote viewing.

    Hope that is some help.
    Yes, many thanks.

    I doubt the case I am interested in is of any wider significance. I am somewhat surprised however that there is not an online record these days of every judgement. If an individual is convicted of an offence, where is the record of that conviction?
    On the Police National Computer.
    Ah ok thanks. I will have a go at hacking into that one later 😉.

    More seriously though, presumably a criminal records check requires the consent of the subject?
  • Starmer urges Labour to embrace Blair’s legacy

    https://www.ft.com/content/34ec43b9-5dcd-46cd-b284-093e8f13714d

    Ha ha. I’m almost beginning to feel sorry for poor Anas.
    Scottish Labour won their highest percentage of Scottish seats under Blair, in 1997 and 2001.
    Historical events A and B do not prove future hypothesis C. Just ask arch-Blairite Jim Murphy.

    GE Scots seats %seats Boss

    1970 44/71 61.9% Wilson
    1974F 40/71 56.3% Wilson
    1974O 41/71 57.7% Wilson
    1979 44/71 61.9% Callaghan
    1983 41/72 56.9% Foot
    1987 50/72 69.4% Kinnock
    1992 49/72 68.1% Kinnock
    1997 56/72 77.8% Blair
    2001 56/72 77.8% Blair

    2005 41/59 69.5% Blair
    2010 41/59 69.5% Brown
    2015 1/59 1.6% Miliband
    2017 7/59 11.9% Corbyn
    2019 1/59 1.6% Corbyn
  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 34,708
    Foxy said:

    TOPPING said:

    Foxy said:

    stodge said:

    Evening all :)

    Margaret Thatcher understood the threat of climate change and the impact on the environment - her speech to the UN in November 1989 was unfortunately overshadowed by the small matter of the fall of the Berlin Wall 24 hours later.

    The cynic might of course argue it was a response to the surge in popularity of the Greens at the 1989 European elections but at least Thatcher started to see the issue.

    After that, however, environmental issues faded out of the limelight and some in the Conservative Party, possibly those who had affiliations to the fossil fuel industry, opted to peddle some of the climate change denial lines and I can honestly not remember a single Labour politician talking much about the environment during the Blair years.

    David Cameron was the first Conservative I can recall after Thatcher saying anything about the environment though again the cynic might argue it was both about trying to get LD votes and a change from "banging on about Europe".

    Johnson sounds confident if not cocky. Perhaps he believes he can say anything and there will be plenty to defend him or excuse him or seek to justify him. To be fair, a GE victory and an 80-seat majority will do that and I suspect he looks at the short-term post-Covid environment with happy people and a surging economy and he thinks it's all going his way.

    Well, that's hubris for you - doesn't often end well.

    I think that a little unfair on Ed Miliband who was the first minister for Climate Change, and acted on the basis of the 2006 Stern review.

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2008/oct/16/11

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stern_Review
    Was it the Stern Review that assigned a zero discount rate to the inter-generational cost of capital?
    No idea, I just cited it as evidence of Labour being interested in Climate change.
    Take a moment to see what is in the review perhaps before pronouncing it an unalloyed good thing.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 42,783

    Looking forward to hearing Boris apologise for Thatcher closing the mines.

    We have continued to import coal have we not?

    And a range of manufactured goods.
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 22,384
    DavidL said:

    Carnyx said:

    O/T:

    @DavidL, I seem to recall you are a Scottish lawyer (apols if I have got that wrong).

    Do you or any other PB posters know if there's a way to find out details of Sheriff Court judgements? I am specifically interested in a case from this monday, 2nd August, at Jedburgh Sheriff Court .

    Thanks in anticipation.

    If DavidL is not around, it should be on this somewhere

    https://www.scotcourts.gov.uk/

    Written judgements, if they are provided at all, seem to be on this in my experience

    https://www.scotcourts.gov.uk/search-judgments/sheriff-court
    Its not comprehensive unfortunately. The cases they choose to report are pretty random.
    Thanks, that's useful to know. One case involved people I know (or rather, the abuse thereof) and was most illuminating - but that depended on the written judgement.
  • BenpointerBenpointer Posts: 20,878
    DavidL said:

    DavidL said:

    O/T:

    @DavidL, I seem to recall you are a Scottish lawyer (apols if I have got that wrong).

    Do you or any other PB posters know if there's a way to find out details of Sheriff Court judgements? I am specifically interested in a case from this monday, 2nd August, at Jedburgh Sheriff Court .

    Thanks in anticipation.

    Well a lot of people have had their doubts over the years but that's the claim. If the decision is significant it may be reported on the Scottish Courts website https://scotcourts.gov.uk/ If its a verbal decision or not of particular importance you can try contacting the Sheriff Clerk at Jedburgh to see if the judgment is available. If it is being decided in the court that day then its worth asking the Sheriff Clerk if there is remote access for the case. Technically cases take place in a public court so the Covid equivalent is remote viewing.

    Hope that is some help.
    Yes, many thanks.

    I doubt the case I am interested in is of any wider significance. I am somewhat surprised however that there is not an online record these days of every judgement. If an individual is convicted of an offence, where is the record of that conviction?
    Sorry I was talking about Civil cases. Criminal cases almost never have written judgments until they get to the appeal courts. Frankly the local newspaper is probably your best bet.
    Ok thanks - good call. There were dozens of cases listed for Jedburgh on Monday (all for 10:00am, oddly). They must rattle through them at a fair lick to get through them in the day.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 42,783

    Leon said:

    Carnyx said:

    Leon said:

    Carnyx said:

    Nigelb said:

    Leon said:

    fpt on this Speccie thing


    I have no dog in this fight, but that magazine has boasted some amazing writers in its 2 centuries of publication.

    Douglas Murray went through ALL 200 years of them and chose the four best articles ever. And, when you read them, it is hard not to sit back with a certain awed, dumbstruck admiration. Just pure journalistic genius. The kind of stuff you cannot fake.

    Occasionally, one simply has to stand, and applaud.

    https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/four-of-the-best-spectator-pieces-i-ve-ever-read

    Self pleasuring to excess is undeniably emblematic of Spectator journalism, I suppose.
    Some reading for Fraser Nelson and his voyeurs:

    “Frequent or rough masturbation can cause minor skin irritation. Forcefully bending an erect penis can rupture the chambers that fill with blood, a rare but gruesome condition called penile fracture.

    Köhler has seen guys with it after vigorous masturbation. "Afterward, the penis looks like an eggplant," he says. "It's purple and swollen." Most men need surgery to repair it.”

    Ouch! Take care Fraser!

    https://www.webmd.com/men/guide/male-masturbation-5-things-you-didnt-know
    Please don't. Aubergine, hot smoked salmon, capers and onions, with scrambled egg and tagliatelli, is a staple chez Carnyx.
    You strike me a bit of a gourmet

    Have you encountered Dr Trouble's hot chili sauce?

    Matthew Parris has, apparently, been banging on about it for months. It's made in Zimbabwe of all places, and it is utter genius. Very smoky, very rich, must be used sparingly, but omg

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dr-Trouble-African-Lemon-Chilli/dp/B07QVFYDBG?th=1

    I prefer the double oak smoked chile to the lemon version. Both are Wow

    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/dr-troubles-sauce-is-gift-that-keeps-on-giving-cm3thlbh6
    Interesting!
    It is honestly fantastic. Matthew Parris may be a mad Remainer but he is totally right about this. It is the best hot sauce in the world.

    I had a ham and cheese sourdough toastie the other day - thick lovely ham, tangy mature Cheddar, some tiger tomatoes, I took out the Dijon mustard and added Dr Trouble and flash fried the result

    SENSATIONAL
    Fat and drunk. You’re some catch Sean.
    You on the sauce yourself tonight Stuart? You are being quite gratuitously unpleasant.
  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 34,708
    Cyclefree said:

    BTW on books Hilary Mantel must be one of the most overrated writers around. How she even got onto the Booker short list let alone won it twice is a mystery. I find her quite unreadable.

    And whenever she's interviewed she comes across as most unpleasant as well.

    That William Trevor never won the Booker is to the Booker's eternal discredit.

    Wrong on that. The Wolf Hall books are amazing. Not so keen on her French Revolution one that said but I forgive her, Mantel, all for the Cromwell ones.
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 22,384

    Carnyx said:

    Starmer urges Labour to embrace Blair’s legacy

    https://www.ft.com/content/34ec43b9-5dcd-46cd-b284-093e8f13714d

    Ha ha. I’m almost beginning to feel sorry for poor Anas.
    Can't get at it. What's in there to trouble the Glaswegian supermarket magnate shareholder-as-was?
    The last thing Anas needs is for London Labour to go all Blairite.
    I know I am being dense, but why?
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 32,276
    TOPPING said:

    Foxy said:

    TOPPING said:

    Foxy said:

    stodge said:

    Evening all :)

    Margaret Thatcher understood the threat of climate change and the impact on the environment - her speech to the UN in November 1989 was unfortunately overshadowed by the small matter of the fall of the Berlin Wall 24 hours later.

    The cynic might of course argue it was a response to the surge in popularity of the Greens at the 1989 European elections but at least Thatcher started to see the issue.

    After that, however, environmental issues faded out of the limelight and some in the Conservative Party, possibly those who had affiliations to the fossil fuel industry, opted to peddle some of the climate change denial lines and I can honestly not remember a single Labour politician talking much about the environment during the Blair years.

    David Cameron was the first Conservative I can recall after Thatcher saying anything about the environment though again the cynic might argue it was both about trying to get LD votes and a change from "banging on about Europe".

    Johnson sounds confident if not cocky. Perhaps he believes he can say anything and there will be plenty to defend him or excuse him or seek to justify him. To be fair, a GE victory and an 80-seat majority will do that and I suspect he looks at the short-term post-Covid environment with happy people and a surging economy and he thinks it's all going his way.

    Well, that's hubris for you - doesn't often end well.

    I think that a little unfair on Ed Miliband who was the first minister for Climate Change, and acted on the basis of the 2006 Stern review.

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2008/oct/16/11

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stern_Review
    Was it the Stern Review that assigned a zero discount rate to the inter-generational cost of capital?
    No idea, I just cited it as evidence of Labour being interested in Climate change.
    Take a moment to see what is in the review perhaps before pronouncing it an unalloyed good thing.
    I didn't say it was an unalloyed good thing. Where on earth did you get that idea?

    I merely pointed out that it was objective evidence of Labour taking the subject of Climate Change seriously.
  • StuartDicksonStuartDickson Posts: 8,732
    Carnyx said:

    Heathener said:

    stodge said:

    Evening all :)

    Margaret Thatcher understood the threat of climate change and the impact on the environment - her speech to the UN in November 1989 was unfortunately overshadowed by the small matter of the fall of the Berlin Wall 24 hours later.

    The cynic might of course argue it was a response to the surge in popularity of the Greens at the 1989 European elections but at least Thatcher started to see the issue.

    That speech is dynamite. An incredible tour de force. I think she's quite wrong that the solution lay in the private sector but it's an amazingly brilliant speech nonetheless. Astonishing foresight. I wonder how much of it she wrote herself? I wouldn't be surprised if the answer is, the whole thing.

    She was a political giant, for all her faults. Wow she would have been good in charge with the pandemic.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VnAzoDtwCBg&t=10s
    I wonder how much it contributed to her overthrow by the Tories? Never even considered that possibility before; could be not at all.
    Not at all.

    The backbenchers looked at the polling numbers and filled their breeks. The Cabinet knew she was stark raving bonkers. Mind, that Michael Forsyth bloke thocht she wis richt braw.
  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 34,708
    Foxy said:

    TOPPING said:

    Foxy said:

    TOPPING said:

    Foxy said:

    stodge said:

    Evening all :)

    Margaret Thatcher understood the threat of climate change and the impact on the environment - her speech to the UN in November 1989 was unfortunately overshadowed by the small matter of the fall of the Berlin Wall 24 hours later.

    The cynic might of course argue it was a response to the surge in popularity of the Greens at the 1989 European elections but at least Thatcher started to see the issue.

    After that, however, environmental issues faded out of the limelight and some in the Conservative Party, possibly those who had affiliations to the fossil fuel industry, opted to peddle some of the climate change denial lines and I can honestly not remember a single Labour politician talking much about the environment during the Blair years.

    David Cameron was the first Conservative I can recall after Thatcher saying anything about the environment though again the cynic might argue it was both about trying to get LD votes and a change from "banging on about Europe".

    Johnson sounds confident if not cocky. Perhaps he believes he can say anything and there will be plenty to defend him or excuse him or seek to justify him. To be fair, a GE victory and an 80-seat majority will do that and I suspect he looks at the short-term post-Covid environment with happy people and a surging economy and he thinks it's all going his way.

    Well, that's hubris for you - doesn't often end well.

    I think that a little unfair on Ed Miliband who was the first minister for Climate Change, and acted on the basis of the 2006 Stern review.

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2008/oct/16/11

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stern_Review
    Was it the Stern Review that assigned a zero discount rate to the inter-generational cost of capital?
    No idea, I just cited it as evidence of Labour being interested in Climate change.
    Take a moment to see what is in the review perhaps before pronouncing it an unalloyed good thing.
    I didn't say it was an unalloyed good thing. Where on earth did you get that idea?

    I merely pointed out that it was objective evidence of Labour taking the subject of Climate Change seriously.
    Ah ok so we agree Ed M acting on the basis of it was not a good idea. Apols.

  • DavidL said:

    O/T:

    @DavidL, I seem to recall you are a Scottish lawyer (apols if I have got that wrong).

    Do you or any other PB posters know if there's a way to find out details of Sheriff Court judgements? I am specifically interested in a case from this monday, 2nd August, at Jedburgh Sheriff Court .

    Thanks in anticipation.

    Well a lot of people have had their doubts over the years but that's the claim. If the decision is significant it may be reported on the Scottish Courts website https://scotcourts.gov.uk/ If its a verbal decision or not of particular importance you can try contacting the Sheriff Clerk at Jedburgh to see if the judgment is available. If it is being decided in the court that day then its worth asking the Sheriff Clerk if there is remote access for the case. Technically cases take place in a public court so the Covid equivalent is remote viewing.

    Hope that is some help.
    Yes, many thanks.

    I doubt the case I am interested in is of any wider significance. I am somewhat surprised however that there is not an online record these days of every judgement. If an individual is convicted of an offence, where is the record of that conviction?
    On the Police National Computer.
    Ah ok thanks. I will have a go at hacking into that one later 😉.

    More seriously though, presumably a criminal records check requires the consent of the subject?
    It does.

    There's a couple of exemptions but you're best bet is to go through the police if you think something illegal/dodgy is going on.
  • MrEdMrEd Posts: 5,188
    Cyclefree said:

    kle4 said:

    This case looks meritless eveb from the statement of the losmg party.

    A family-run farm has won a legal battle against the multimillion-pound makers of plant milk, Oatly, which accused it of trademark infringement.

    Oatly brought legal action against Glebe Farm Foods, in Cambridgeshire, saying their product PureOaty took "unfair advantage" of their own drink.

    A High Court judge ruled in favour of the farm saying he did not see "any risk of injury to the distinctive character" of the Oatly brand...

    A spokeswoman for Oatly said the company would not be appealing the decision.

    "For us, this case has always been about protecting our trademark and how the single letter Y creates too much of a similarity between Oaty and Oatly."


    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cambridgeshire-58102252

    A good friend of mine was on the inside at Glebe Farm. Baseless doesn't cover it - absolutely bloody absurd from Oatly.
    My food industry analyst friend spits venom at the mere mention of Oatly's name. Says there is more to come out about them.
    Any firm that names its CEO as "Employee of the Month" and puts that on the side of the carton is bound to be dubious
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 42,783
    Leon said:

    Heathener said:

    stodge said:

    Evening all :)

    Margaret Thatcher understood the threat of climate change and the impact on the environment - her speech to the UN in November 1989 was unfortunately overshadowed by the small matter of the fall of the Berlin Wall 24 hours later.

    The cynic might of course argue it was a response to the surge in popularity of the Greens at the 1989 European elections but at least Thatcher started to see the issue.

    That speech is dynamite. An incredible tour de force. I think she's quite wrong that the solution lay in the private sector but it's an amazingly brilliant speech nonetheless. Astonishing foresight. I wonder how much of it she wrote herself? I wouldn't be surprised if the answer is, the whole thing.

    She was a political giant, for all her faults. Wow she would have been good in charge with the pandemic.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VnAzoDtwCBg&t=10s
    Tremendous authority. Confident, articulate, never dumbing down, sigh
    Surrounded herself with clever, able people. Regarded independent thinking, indeed thinking, as a good thing. Those were the days.
  • CarnyxCarnyx Posts: 22,384

    Carnyx said:

    Heathener said:

    stodge said:

    Evening all :)

    Margaret Thatcher understood the threat of climate change and the impact on the environment - her speech to the UN in November 1989 was unfortunately overshadowed by the small matter of the fall of the Berlin Wall 24 hours later.

    The cynic might of course argue it was a response to the surge in popularity of the Greens at the 1989 European elections but at least Thatcher started to see the issue.

    That speech is dynamite. An incredible tour de force. I think she's quite wrong that the solution lay in the private sector but it's an amazingly brilliant speech nonetheless. Astonishing foresight. I wonder how much of it she wrote herself? I wouldn't be surprised if the answer is, the whole thing.

    She was a political giant, for all her faults. Wow she would have been good in charge with the pandemic.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VnAzoDtwCBg&t=10s
    I wonder how much it contributed to her overthrow by the Tories? Never even considered that possibility before; could be not at all.
    Not at all.

    The backbenchers looked at the polling numbers and filled their breeks. The Cabinet knew she was stark raving bonkers. Mind, that Michael Forsyth bloke thocht she wis richt braw.
    No breeks to fill. I can recall him in a kilt trailing after the Stone of Scone up the Royal Mile in a smirr of rain. Or is that false memory?
  • StuartDicksonStuartDickson Posts: 8,732

    I just accidentally clicked on Johnson on the thread header and the dictionary defined it as a man's penis.. interesting if spooky....

    Well, it wouldn’t be a woman’s penis.
    Scottish Nationalism: The home of transphobia.
    British Nationalism: The home of Jockophobia..
    There you go again.

    Conflating criticism of the SNP with criticism of Scotland.

    Fortunately the majority of Scots know that too.
    Yeah, that’s right, BritNats like you are so in tune with “the majority of Scots”.
    I accurately forecast that Scotland would vote No in 2014 when you said the clueless wonders on here were in for a shock. I believe 55% of Scots constitutes a majority of Scots.

    I also accurately predicted that Alba would do shite in the Holyrood elections when one of your fellow Nats was predicting 12%-14% minimum for Alba on the list.

    I also successfully tipped the SCons would get over 9.5 seats in 2017 at 20/1.
    I love it how punters are always so willing to tell you about the ones they guessed right, but never about the long list of failures. Stopped clocks.

    I’m such a successful political punter that I’m typically restricted to max wagers of about 50p. The very fact that you’re still allowed to bet shows that the bookies are winning.
  • CyclefreeCyclefree Posts: 22,250
    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    BTW on books Hilary Mantel must be one of the most overrated writers around. How she even got onto the Booker short list let alone won it twice is a mystery. I find her quite unreadable.

    And whenever she's interviewed she comes across as most unpleasant as well.

    That William Trevor never won the Booker is to the Booker's eternal discredit.

    Wrong on that. The Wolf Hall books are amazing. Not so keen on her French Revolution one that said but I forgive her, Mantel, all for the Cromwell ones.
    It's not a question of being right or wrong. It's a matter of taste. I just about finished the French Revolution one.

    But Wolf Hall was just turgid. She has a little talent but maybe as a poet. Not a novelist. She badly needs a very good editor.

    I very rarely leave a book unfinished. Mantel is one of the few. TBH I don't think the Booker is particularly reliable these days as a pick of good fiction.
  • BenpointerBenpointer Posts: 20,878


    DavidL said:

    O/T:

    @DavidL, I seem to recall you are a Scottish lawyer (apols if I have got that wrong).

    Do you or any other PB posters know if there's a way to find out details of Sheriff Court judgements? I am specifically interested in a case from this monday, 2nd August, at Jedburgh Sheriff Court .

    Thanks in anticipation.

    Well a lot of people have had their doubts over the years but that's the claim. If the decision is significant it may be reported on the Scottish Courts website https://scotcourts.gov.uk/ If its a verbal decision or not of particular importance you can try contacting the Sheriff Clerk at Jedburgh to see if the judgment is available. If it is being decided in the court that day then its worth asking the Sheriff Clerk if there is remote access for the case. Technically cases take place in a public court so the Covid equivalent is remote viewing.

    Hope that is some help.
    Yes, many thanks.

    I doubt the case I am interested in is of any wider significance. I am somewhat surprised however that there is not an online record these days of every judgement. If an individual is convicted of an offence, where is the record of that conviction?
    On the Police National Computer.
    Ah ok thanks. I will have a go at hacking into that one later 😉.

    More seriously though, presumably a criminal records check requires the consent of the subject?
    It does.

    There's a couple of exemptions but you're best bet is to go through the police if you think something illegal/dodgy is going on.
    Thanks.

    At this stage we're just trying to protect my vulnerable elderly father-in-law from one of his grandchildren who is a bit of a ne'er-do-well con artist. Trying to gauge the extent to which he (the grandchild) may be desperate for funds, since a conviction would probably cost him his livelihood. I suspect we will soon hear one way or another anyway.
  • I just accidentally clicked on Johnson on the thread header and the dictionary defined it as a man's penis.. interesting if spooky....

    Well, it wouldn’t be a woman’s penis.
    Scottish Nationalism: The home of transphobia.
    British Nationalism: The home of Jockophobia..
    There you go again.

    Conflating criticism of the SNP with criticism of Scotland.

    Fortunately the majority of Scots know that too.
    Yeah, that’s right, BritNats like you are so in tune with “the majority of Scots”.
    I accurately forecast that Scotland would vote No in 2014 when you said the clueless wonders on here were in for a shock. I believe 55% of Scots constitutes a majority of Scots.

    I also accurately predicted that Alba would do shite in the Holyrood elections when one of your fellow Nats was predicting 12%-14% minimum for Alba on the list.

    I also successfully tipped the SCons would get over 9.5 seats in 2017 at 20/1.
    I love it how punters are always so willing to tell you about the ones they guessed right, but never about the long list of failures. Stopped clocks.

    I’m such a successful political punter that I’m typically restricted to max wagers of about 50p. The very fact that you’re still allowed to bet shows that the bookies are winning.
    Again you're so wrong about me. It's so funny.

    The premium charge says hello.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 32,276
    TOPPING said:

    Foxy said:

    TOPPING said:

    Foxy said:

    TOPPING said:

    Foxy said:

    stodge said:

    Evening all :)

    Margaret Thatcher understood the threat of climate change and the impact on the environment - her speech to the UN in November 1989 was unfortunately overshadowed by the small matter of the fall of the Berlin Wall 24 hours later.

    The cynic might of course argue it was a response to the surge in popularity of the Greens at the 1989 European elections but at least Thatcher started to see the issue.

    After that, however, environmental issues faded out of the limelight and some in the Conservative Party, possibly those who had affiliations to the fossil fuel industry, opted to peddle some of the climate change denial lines and I can honestly not remember a single Labour politician talking much about the environment during the Blair years.

    David Cameron was the first Conservative I can recall after Thatcher saying anything about the environment though again the cynic might argue it was both about trying to get LD votes and a change from "banging on about Europe".

    Johnson sounds confident if not cocky. Perhaps he believes he can say anything and there will be plenty to defend him or excuse him or seek to justify him. To be fair, a GE victory and an 80-seat majority will do that and I suspect he looks at the short-term post-Covid environment with happy people and a surging economy and he thinks it's all going his way.

    Well, that's hubris for you - doesn't often end well.

    I think that a little unfair on Ed Miliband who was the first minister for Climate Change, and acted on the basis of the 2006 Stern review.

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2008/oct/16/11

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stern_Review
    Was it the Stern Review that assigned a zero discount rate to the inter-generational cost of capital?
    No idea, I just cited it as evidence of Labour being interested in Climate change.
    Take a moment to see what is in the review perhaps before pronouncing it an unalloyed good thing.
    I didn't say it was an unalloyed good thing. Where on earth did you get that idea?

    I merely pointed out that it was objective evidence of Labour taking the subject of Climate Change seriously.
    Ah ok so we agree Ed M acting on the basis of it was not a good idea. Apols.
    No, I don't agree that either. I have not expressed any view over the measures that New Labour took on the issue one way or the other. Merely that they tried to address the issue.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 42,783

    DavidL said:

    DavidL said:

    O/T:

    @DavidL, I seem to recall you are a Scottish lawyer (apols if I have got that wrong).

    Do you or any other PB posters know if there's a way to find out details of Sheriff Court judgements? I am specifically interested in a case from this monday, 2nd August, at Jedburgh Sheriff Court .

    Thanks in anticipation.

    Well a lot of people have had their doubts over the years but that's the claim. If the decision is significant it may be reported on the Scottish Courts website https://scotcourts.gov.uk/ If its a verbal decision or not of particular importance you can try contacting the Sheriff Clerk at Jedburgh to see if the judgment is available. If it is being decided in the court that day then its worth asking the Sheriff Clerk if there is remote access for the case. Technically cases take place in a public court so the Covid equivalent is remote viewing.

    Hope that is some help.
    Yes, many thanks.

    I doubt the case I am interested in is of any wider significance. I am somewhat surprised however that there is not an online record these days of every judgement. If an individual is convicted of an offence, where is the record of that conviction?
    Sorry I was talking about Civil cases. Criminal cases almost never have written judgments until they get to the appeal courts. Frankly the local newspaper is probably your best bet.
    Ok thanks - good call. There were dozens of cases listed for Jedburgh on Monday (all for 10:00am, oddly). They must rattle through them at a fair lick to get through them in the day.
    If it is a cited court there can be up to 100 cases calling. These will either result in guilty pleas, the fixing of trials, continuations without plea for investigation etc. I once did 100 intermediate diets in just over an hour as a procurator fiscal with a sheriff who is now thankfully retired. Anyone not present got a warrant issued for their arrest. It got quite funny when those in the public benches were literally running for the dock to make sure that warrant was not issued but any correlation with justice was entirely coincidental. He was a prat.
  • StuartDicksonStuartDickson Posts: 8,732
    DavidL said:

    I just accidentally clicked on Johnson on the thread header and the dictionary defined it as a man's penis.. interesting if spooky....

    Well, it wouldn’t be a woman’s penis.
    Scottish Nationalism: The home of transphobia.
    British Nationalism: The home of Jockophobia..
    There you go again.

    Conflating criticism of the SNP with criticism of Scotland.

    Fortunately the majority of Scots know that too.
    Yeah, that’s right, BritNats like you are so in tune with “the majority of Scots”.
    Only 52% of them in fairness.
    The three British Nationalist parties only won 44% of the seats in the May general election.

  • DavidL said:

    O/T:

    @DavidL, I seem to recall you are a Scottish lawyer (apols if I have got that wrong).

    Do you or any other PB posters know if there's a way to find out details of Sheriff Court judgements? I am specifically interested in a case from this monday, 2nd August, at Jedburgh Sheriff Court .

    Thanks in anticipation.

    Well a lot of people have had their doubts over the years but that's the claim. If the decision is significant it may be reported on the Scottish Courts website https://scotcourts.gov.uk/ If its a verbal decision or not of particular importance you can try contacting the Sheriff Clerk at Jedburgh to see if the judgment is available. If it is being decided in the court that day then its worth asking the Sheriff Clerk if there is remote access for the case. Technically cases take place in a public court so the Covid equivalent is remote viewing.

    Hope that is some help.
    Yes, many thanks.

    I doubt the case I am interested in is of any wider significance. I am somewhat surprised however that there is not an online record these days of every judgement. If an individual is convicted of an offence, where is the record of that conviction?
    On the Police National Computer.
    Ah ok thanks. I will have a go at hacking into that one later 😉.

    More seriously though, presumably a criminal records check requires the consent of the subject?
    It does.

    There's a couple of exemptions but you're best bet is to go through the police if you think something illegal/dodgy is going on.
    Thanks.

    At this stage we're just trying to protect my vulnerable elderly father-in-law from one of his grandchildren who is a bit of a ne'er-do-well con artist. Trying to gauge the extent to which he (the grandchild) may be desperate for funds, since a conviction would probably cost him his livelihood. I suspect we will soon hear one way or another anyway.
    If you want to discuss this privately Vanilla message me.

    I have so experience in this field sadly, a carer who was looking after the elderly grandparent of a friend managed to swipe funds from my friend's grandparent.

    Messy and stressy doesn't even cover it.
  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 34,708
    Cyclefree said:

    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    BTW on books Hilary Mantel must be one of the most overrated writers around. How she even got onto the Booker short list let alone won it twice is a mystery. I find her quite unreadable.

    And whenever she's interviewed she comes across as most unpleasant as well.

    That William Trevor never won the Booker is to the Booker's eternal discredit.

    Wrong on that. The Wolf Hall books are amazing. Not so keen on her French Revolution one that said but I forgive her, Mantel, all for the Cromwell ones.
    It's not a question of being right or wrong. It's a matter of taste. I just about finished the French Revolution one.

    But Wolf Hall was just turgid. She has a little talent but maybe as a poet. Not a novelist. She badly needs a very good editor.

    I very rarely leave a book unfinished. Mantel is one of the few. TBH I don't think the Booker is particularly reliable these days as a pick of good fiction.
    Nah. You're wrong on that one. She is or can be magnificent.

    And as mentioned earlier the Booker is a good steer for good literature. Not perfect but a good steer.
  • Richard_NabaviRichard_Nabavi Posts: 30,007
    Leon said:

    I just want to spend the rest of my life drinking Nyetimber rose

    Is that too much to ask of a cruel, cold world?

    It's really good, isn't it? It was served at a posh reception I went to. I had no idea what they were serving, and I feared the worst. In general, anything pink and sparkling is either revolting, or at best an inferior but more expensive version of the equivalent sparkling white. As soon as I tried it I realised it was in a different league.

    In fact sparkling pinks are a particular strength of English wine producers. Balfour Hush Heath is another real goody, albeit so pale as to be scarcely a rosé.
  • BenpointerBenpointer Posts: 20,878
    Cyclefree said:

    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    BTW on books Hilary Mantel must be one of the most overrated writers around. How she even got onto the Booker short list let alone won it twice is a mystery. I find her quite unreadable.

    And whenever she's interviewed she comes across as most unpleasant as well.

    That William Trevor never won the Booker is to the Booker's eternal discredit.

    Wrong on that. The Wolf Hall books are amazing. Not so keen on her French Revolution one that said but I forgive her, Mantel, all for the Cromwell ones.
    It's not a question of being right or wrong. It's a matter of taste. I just about finished the French Revolution one.

    But Wolf Hall was just turgid. She has a little talent but maybe as a poet. Not a novelist. She badly needs a very good editor.

    I very rarely leave a book unfinished. Mantel is one of the few. TBH I don't think the Booker is particularly reliable these days as a pick of good fiction.
    Therein lies the beauty of literature - one person's 'rubbish' is another's pure gold. I loved Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies.

    Having said that Mrs. P. has read The Mirror and the Light and put me off bothering with that one - a book too far I suspect.
  • StuartDicksonStuartDickson Posts: 8,732
    Leon said:

    Heathener said:

    stodge said:

    Evening all :)

    Margaret Thatcher understood the threat of climate change and the impact on the environment - her speech to the UN in November 1989 was unfortunately overshadowed by the small matter of the fall of the Berlin Wall 24 hours later.

    The cynic might of course argue it was a response to the surge in popularity of the Greens at the 1989 European elections but at least Thatcher started to see the issue.

    That speech is dynamite. An incredible tour de force. I think she's quite wrong that the solution lay in the private sector but it's an amazingly brilliant speech nonetheless. Astonishing foresight. I wonder how much of it she wrote herself? I wouldn't be surprised if the answer is, the whole thing.

    She was a political giant, for all her faults. Wow she would have been good in charge with the pandemic.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VnAzoDtwCBg&t=10s
    Tremendous authority. Confident, articulate, never dumbing down, sigh
    And utterly ignored at the time. Exhuming it is a sign of current Tory weakness.
  • Pagan2Pagan2 Posts: 4,916
    Cyclefree said:

    BTW on books Hilary Mantel must be one of the most overrated writers around. How she even got onto the Booker short list let alone won it twice is a mystery. I find her quite unreadable.

    And whenever she's interviewed she comes across as most unpleasant as well.

    That William Trevor never won the Booker is to the Booker's eternal discredit.

    The booker like all such prizes is awarded on style not substance. It doesn't seem to matter if its telling a good story merely that it is written in some poncey turgid style. I know plenty of people that buy these books so they can be thought by friends as intellectual when the shelves are scanned. Books like a brief history of time are the same....bought for display not consumption. Soon becomes clear most of the people doing the buying have merely read the wikipedia precis
  • LeonLeon Posts: 20,815
    Cyclefree said:

    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    BTW on books Hilary Mantel must be one of the most overrated writers around. How she even got onto the Booker short list let alone won it twice is a mystery. I find her quite unreadable.

    And whenever she's interviewed she comes across as most unpleasant as well.

    That William Trevor never won the Booker is to the Booker's eternal discredit.

    Wrong on that. The Wolf Hall books are amazing. Not so keen on her French Revolution one that said but I forgive her, Mantel, all for the Cromwell ones.
    It's not a question of being right or wrong. It's a matter of taste. I just about finished the French Revolution one.

    But Wolf Hall was just turgid. She has a little talent but maybe as a poet. Not a novelist. She badly needs a very good editor.

    I very rarely leave a book unfinished. Mantel is one of the few. TBH I don't think the Booker is particularly reliable these days as a pick of good fiction.
    I'm with you, cyclefree. Mantel is a sometimes brilliant prose stylist, and she can write many fine paragraphs, on the trot, but it is too often OVER-written. Turgid is about right. The plot is lost beneath the purple wording

    And I speak as a huge fan of Joyce, Ulysses is possibly the only novel I've ever read twice. So I am not averse to high minded, "poetical" prose

    Mantel doesn't do it for me. I accept that many others adore her.

    And yes the Booker is increasingly unreliable
  • Who could have predicted this, I mean Gavin Williamson is awesome right?

    Universities are turning to entrance exams because they can no longer rely on A-levels to find the brightest students amid a "tsunami" of top grades.

    Exams in secondary schools have been cancelled for a second year in a row because of the Covid pandemic, with predicted grades given out by teachers.

    The Government has admitted the disruption to exams will continue next year, leading to fears that the "pass all" culture that has arisen will become the norm.

    A major report warns on Friday that exam grade inflation could be even higher this year than last – when, for the first time in the 70-year history of A-levels, the pass rate reached 100 per cent. Thousands of teenagers will receive their results on Tuesday.

    Vice-chancellors have told The Telegraph of their growing frustration at the lack of an objective measure by which to judge the academic ability of school-leavers.

    Some of the country's most prestigious universities and competitive courses have already brought in their own assessments, and experts believe this trend will continue in the coming years as admissions tutors feel they can no longer rely on A-level grades alone.


    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2021/08/05/universities-set-entrance-exams-amid-a-level-chaos/
  • FrankBoothFrankBooth Posts: 6,026
    Cyclefree said:

    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    BTW on books Hilary Mantel must be one of the most overrated writers around. How she even got onto the Booker short list let alone won it twice is a mystery. I find her quite unreadable.

    And whenever she's interviewed she comes across as most unpleasant as well.

    That William Trevor never won the Booker is to the Booker's eternal discredit.

    Wrong on that. The Wolf Hall books are amazing. Not so keen on her French Revolution one that said but I forgive her, Mantel, all for the Cromwell ones.
    It's not a question of being right or wrong. It's a matter of taste. I just about finished the French Revolution one.

    But Wolf Hall was just turgid. She has a little talent but maybe as a poet. Not a novelist. She badly needs a very good editor.

    I very rarely leave a book unfinished. Mantel is one of the few. TBH I don't think the Booker is particularly reliable these days as a pick of good fiction.
    You'd probably like Eight Months of Ghazzah Street - the only book I've been able to finish.
  • CharlesCharles Posts: 35,758
    kle4 said:

    How does any major, successful club get themselves into such a pathetic financial position?

    Barcelona say Lionel Messi will not be staying at the club "because of financial and structural obstacles"...

    Barcelona had said Messi was poised to extend his 21-year career with the club by signing the new deal on Thursday, and blame La Liga for the failure to do so.

    He had reached an agreement to stay with the Catalan side until 2026 - but La Liga said the club must reduce wages before he and any new players can be registered.

    "Despite FC Barcelona and Lionel Messi having reached an agreement and the clear intention of both parties to sign a new contract today, this cannot happen because of financial and structural obstacles [Spanish La Liga regulations]," the club said.


    https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/58108298

    Signs on at Spurs and loaned back to Barca for a 10% premium?
  • BenpointerBenpointer Posts: 20,878


    DavidL said:

    O/T:

    @DavidL, I seem to recall you are a Scottish lawyer (apols if I have got that wrong).

    Do you or any other PB posters know if there's a way to find out details of Sheriff Court judgements? I am specifically interested in a case from this monday, 2nd August, at Jedburgh Sheriff Court .

    Thanks in anticipation.

    Well a lot of people have had their doubts over the years but that's the claim. If the decision is significant it may be reported on the Scottish Courts website https://scotcourts.gov.uk/ If its a verbal decision or not of particular importance you can try contacting the Sheriff Clerk at Jedburgh to see if the judgment is available. If it is being decided in the court that day then its worth asking the Sheriff Clerk if there is remote access for the case. Technically cases take place in a public court so the Covid equivalent is remote viewing.

    Hope that is some help.
    Yes, many thanks.

    I doubt the case I am interested in is of any wider significance. I am somewhat surprised however that there is not an online record these days of every judgement. If an individual is convicted of an offence, where is the record of that conviction?
    On the Police National Computer.
    Ah ok thanks. I will have a go at hacking into that one later 😉.

    More seriously though, presumably a criminal records check requires the consent of the subject?
    It does.

    There's a couple of exemptions but you're best bet is to go through the police if you think something illegal/dodgy is going on.
    Thanks.

    At this stage we're just trying to protect my vulnerable elderly father-in-law from one of his grandchildren who is a bit of a ne'er-do-well con artist. Trying to gauge the extent to which he (the grandchild) may be desperate for funds, since a conviction would probably cost him his livelihood. I suspect we will soon hear one way or another anyway.
    If you want to discuss this privately Vanilla message me.

    I have so experience in this field sadly, a carer who was looking after the elderly grandparent of a friend managed to swipe funds from my friend's grandparent.

    Messy and stressy doesn't even cover it.
    Thanks, very much appreciated. I will wait to see how things develop.

    My father-in-law is vulnerable due to his age (90) and total inability or desire to use technology. But he is fortunately quite canny and not a pushover, and also has no illusions about his grandson. We will just keep an eye open for any unexpected contact from said grandson at this stage.

    All very sad really. Whether through genes or upbringing, or a combination of the two, some people just seem to end up as 'baduns'.
  • StuartDicksonStuartDickson Posts: 8,732
    Cyclefree said:

    kle4 said:

    This case looks meritless eveb from the statement of the losmg party.

    A family-run farm has won a legal battle against the multimillion-pound makers of plant milk, Oatly, which accused it of trademark infringement.

    Oatly brought legal action against Glebe Farm Foods, in Cambridgeshire, saying their product PureOaty took "unfair advantage" of their own drink.

    A High Court judge ruled in favour of the farm saying he did not see "any risk of injury to the distinctive character" of the Oatly brand...

    A spokeswoman for Oatly said the company would not be appealing the decision.

    "For us, this case has always been about protecting our trademark and how the single letter Y creates too much of a similarity between Oaty and Oatly."


    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cambridgeshire-58102252

    A good friend of mine was on the inside at Glebe Farm. Baseless doesn't cover it - absolutely bloody absurd from Oatly.
    My food industry analyst friend spits venom at the mere mention of Oatly's name. Says there is more to come out about them.
    The oat “milk” fraudsters of Sweden have been getting a bad press. These new brands seem to attract the most dodgy characters.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 75,357
    Cyclefree said:

    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    BTW on books Hilary Mantel must be one of the most overrated writers around. How she even got onto the Booker short list let alone won it twice is a mystery. I find her quite unreadable.

    And whenever she's interviewed she comes across as most unpleasant as well.

    That William Trevor never won the Booker is to the Booker's eternal discredit.

    Wrong on that. The Wolf Hall books are amazing. Not so keen on her French Revolution one that said but I forgive her, Mantel, all for the Cromwell ones.
    It's not a question of being right or wrong. It's a matter of taste. I just about finished the French Revolution one.

    But Wolf Hall was just turgid. She has a little talent but maybe as a poet. Not a novelist. She badly needs a very good editor.

    I very rarely leave a book unfinished. Mantel is one of the few. TBH I don't think the Booker is particularly reliable these days as a pick of good fiction.
    I couldn't see what people loved so much about Wolf Hall. It didn't seem exceptional in quality in any way compared to other historical novels of the period, and I found both the characterisation lacking and the plot oddly anemic, as if it was just...stuff happening. I'm sure it is actually a fine book, but I've read a lot of historical novels and why that one is the one people rave about I had no idea.
  • LeonLeon Posts: 20,815

    Leon said:

    I just want to spend the rest of my life drinking Nyetimber rose

    Is that too much to ask of a cruel, cold world?

    It's really good, isn't it? It was served at a posh reception I went to. I had no idea what they were serving, and I feared the worst. In general, anything pink and sparkling is either revolting, or at best an inferior but more expensive version of the equivalent sparkling white. As soon as I tried it I realised it was in a different league.

    In fact sparkling pinks are a particular strength of English wine producers. Balfour Hush Heath is another real goody, albeit so pale as to be scarcely a rosé.
    Yes!

    For me "pink champagne" or "blush whatever" has always meant something too sweet, too girly, but maybe fun in the sun, let's have a laugh, very forgettable

    Nyetimber Rose is exceptional. It's actually better than their classic cuvee "white" English Fizz (which is already excellent). It's an amazing wine right now. I cannot think of a champagne that compares. Yes it costs but this is actually a £35 bottle that is worth every penny
  • turbotubbsturbotubbs Posts: 7,930
    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    BTW on books Hilary Mantel must be one of the most overrated writers around. How she even got onto the Booker short list let alone won it twice is a mystery. I find her quite unreadable.

    And whenever she's interviewed she comes across as most unpleasant as well.

    That William Trevor never won the Booker is to the Booker's eternal discredit.

    Wrong on that. The Wolf Hall books are amazing. Not so keen on her French Revolution one that said but I forgive her, Mantel, all for the Cromwell ones.
    I liked wolf hall but found it hard to follow who was speaking, but then she over corrected that in the second one. Very good books though, as long as you remember that they are fiction.
  • CharlesCharles Posts: 35,758
    IshmaelZ said:

    Leon said:

    Foxy said:

    Leon said:

    I just want to spend the rest of my life drinking Nyetimber rose

    Is that too much to ask of a cruel, cold world?

    I reckon half a case could do it if you drink quickly.
    You think 3 bottles of fizz could kill me?! I reckon I could even do 6

    Half of 12 is 3?
    Fizz is sold in cases of 6
  • DougSealDougSeal Posts: 7,219
    edited August 2021

    I just accidentally clicked on Johnson on the thread header and the dictionary defined it as a man's penis.. interesting if spooky....

    Well, it wouldn’t be a woman’s penis.
    Scottish Nationalism: The home of transphobia.
    British Nationalism: The home of Jockophobia..
    There you go again.

    Conflating criticism of the SNP with criticism of Scotland.

    Fortunately the majority of Scots know that too.
    Yeah, that’s right, BritNats like you are so in tune with “the majority of Scots”.
    I accurately forecast that Scotland would vote No in 2014 when you said the clueless wonders on here were in for a shock. I believe 55% of Scots constitutes a majority of Scots.

    I also accurately predicted that Alba would do shite in the Holyrood elections when one of your fellow Nats was predicting 12%-14% minimum for Alba on the list.

    I also successfully tipped the SCons would get over 9.5 seats in 2017 at 20/1.
    I love it how punters are always so willing to tell you about the ones they guessed right, but never about the long list of failures. Stopped clocks.

    I’m such a successful political punter that I’m typically restricted to max wagers of about 50p. The very fact that you’re still allowed to bet shows that the bookies are winning.
    That’s nothing. I’m such a successful political punter that I’m paid seven figure sums to both refrain from it and refrain from giving tips on it. So successful am I that I am forced to hide behind the assumed identity of a semi aquatic marine mammal that practices labour law while laughing at you amateurs on here. Stick around Dickson, I might teach you a few things.
  • CyclefreeCyclefree Posts: 22,250
    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    BTW on books Hilary Mantel must be one of the most overrated writers around. How she even got onto the Booker short list let alone won it twice is a mystery. I find her quite unreadable.

    And whenever she's interviewed she comes across as most unpleasant as well.

    That William Trevor never won the Booker is to the Booker's eternal discredit.

    Wrong on that. The Wolf Hall books are amazing. Not so keen on her French Revolution one that said but I forgive her, Mantel, all for the Cromwell ones.
    It's not a question of being right or wrong. It's a matter of taste. I just about finished the French Revolution one.

    But Wolf Hall was just turgid. She has a little talent but maybe as a poet. Not a novelist. She badly needs a very good editor.

    I very rarely leave a book unfinished. Mantel is one of the few. TBH I don't think the Booker is particularly reliable these days as a pick of good fiction.
    Nah. You're wrong on that one. She is or can be magnificent.

    And as mentioned earlier the Booker is a good steer for good literature. Not perfect but a good steer.
    I am not wrong. Nor are you right.

    I am expressing my opinion. As are you. You like her writing. I don't.

  • kle4kle4 Posts: 75,357

    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    BTW on books Hilary Mantel must be one of the most overrated writers around. How she even got onto the Booker short list let alone won it twice is a mystery. I find her quite unreadable.

    And whenever she's interviewed she comes across as most unpleasant as well.

    That William Trevor never won the Booker is to the Booker's eternal discredit.

    Wrong on that. The Wolf Hall books are amazing. Not so keen on her French Revolution one that said but I forgive her, Mantel, all for the Cromwell ones.
    I liked wolf hall but found it hard to follow who was speaking
    Yes, I remember this now. It was pretty odd, and probably coloured my general impression of the book.

    A similar issue annoyed me about Normal People (ok, there was a lot that annoyed me about that one), with its lack of speech marks. I'm sure there was an artsy, pretentious reason for it but it just made it harder to follow.
  • BenpointerBenpointer Posts: 20,878
    edited August 2021

    Cyclefree said:

    kle4 said:

    This case looks meritless eveb from the statement of the losmg party.

    A family-run farm has won a legal battle against the multimillion-pound makers of plant milk, Oatly, which accused it of trademark infringement.

    Oatly brought legal action against Glebe Farm Foods, in Cambridgeshire, saying their product PureOaty took "unfair advantage" of their own drink.

    A High Court judge ruled in favour of the farm saying he did not see "any risk of injury to the distinctive character" of the Oatly brand...

    A spokeswoman for Oatly said the company would not be appealing the decision.

    "For us, this case has always been about protecting our trademark and how the single letter Y creates too much of a similarity between Oaty and Oatly."


    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cambridgeshire-58102252

    A good friend of mine was on the inside at Glebe Farm. Baseless doesn't cover it - absolutely bloody absurd from Oatly.
    My food industry analyst friend spits venom at the mere mention of Oatly's name. Says there is more to come out about them.
    The oat “milk” fraudsters of Sweden have been getting a bad press. These new brands seem to attract the most dodgy characters.
    Shouldn't the dairy industry sue Oatly (and the others) for using the term 'milk'?
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 75,357
    Cyclefree said:

    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    BTW on books Hilary Mantel must be one of the most overrated writers around. How she even got onto the Booker short list let alone won it twice is a mystery. I find her quite unreadable.

    And whenever she's interviewed she comes across as most unpleasant as well.

    That William Trevor never won the Booker is to the Booker's eternal discredit.

    Wrong on that. The Wolf Hall books are amazing. Not so keen on her French Revolution one that said but I forgive her, Mantel, all for the Cromwell ones.
    It's not a question of being right or wrong. It's a matter of taste. I just about finished the French Revolution one.

    But Wolf Hall was just turgid. She has a little talent but maybe as a poet. Not a novelist. She badly needs a very good editor.

    I very rarely leave a book unfinished. Mantel is one of the few. TBH I don't think the Booker is particularly reliable these days as a pick of good fiction.
    Nah. You're wrong on that one. She is or can be magnificent.

    And as mentioned earlier the Booker is a good steer for good literature. Not perfect but a good steer.
    I am not wrong. Nor are you right.

    I am expressing my opinion. As are you. You like her writing. I don't.

    I shall remember that whilst extolling the virtues of fantasy and sci-fi novels :)
  • turbotubbsturbotubbs Posts: 7,930
    kle4 said:

    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    BTW on books Hilary Mantel must be one of the most overrated writers around. How she even got onto the Booker short list let alone won it twice is a mystery. I find her quite unreadable.

    And whenever she's interviewed she comes across as most unpleasant as well.

    That William Trevor never won the Booker is to the Booker's eternal discredit.

    Wrong on that. The Wolf Hall books are amazing. Not so keen on her French Revolution one that said but I forgive her, Mantel, all for the Cromwell ones.
    I liked wolf hall but found it hard to follow who was speaking
    Yes, I remember this now. It was pretty odd, and probably coloured my general impression of the book.

    A similar issue annoyed me about Normal People (ok, there was a lot that annoyed me about that one), with its lack of speech marks. I'm sure there was an artsy, pretentious reason for it but it just made it harder to follow.
    It was a lot clearer in bring up the bodies, but the constant ‘he, Cromwell’ really began to grate.
  • CyclefreeCyclefree Posts: 22,250
    kle4 said:

    Cyclefree said:

    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    BTW on books Hilary Mantel must be one of the most overrated writers around. How she even got onto the Booker short list let alone won it twice is a mystery. I find her quite unreadable.

    And whenever she's interviewed she comes across as most unpleasant as well.

    That William Trevor never won the Booker is to the Booker's eternal discredit.

    Wrong on that. The Wolf Hall books are amazing. Not so keen on her French Revolution one that said but I forgive her, Mantel, all for the Cromwell ones.
    It's not a question of being right or wrong. It's a matter of taste. I just about finished the French Revolution one.

    But Wolf Hall was just turgid. She has a little talent but maybe as a poet. Not a novelist. She badly needs a very good editor.

    I very rarely leave a book unfinished. Mantel is one of the few. TBH I don't think the Booker is particularly reliable these days as a pick of good fiction.
    Nah. You're wrong on that one. She is or can be magnificent.

    And as mentioned earlier the Booker is a good steer for good literature. Not perfect but a good steer.
    I am not wrong. Nor are you right.

    I am expressing my opinion. As are you. You like her writing. I don't.

    I shall remember that whilst extolling the virtues of fantasy and sci-fi novels :)
    Touché, my darling!

    I don't like them. But if you do, enjoy.

    Good night all.
  • StuartDicksonStuartDickson Posts: 8,732

    Starmer urges Labour to embrace Blair’s legacy

    https://www.ft.com/content/34ec43b9-5dcd-46cd-b284-093e8f13714d

    Ha ha. I’m almost beginning to feel sorry for poor Anas.
    Scottish Labour won their highest percentage of Scottish seats under Blair, in 1997 and 2001.
    Historical events A and B do not prove future hypothesis C. Just ask arch-Blairite Jim Murphy.

    GE Scots seats %seats Boss

    1970 44/71 61.9% Wilson
    1974F 40/71 56.3% Wilson
    1974O 41/71 57.7% Wilson
    1979 44/71 61.9% Callaghan
    1983 41/72 56.9% Foot
    1987 50/72 69.4% Kinnock
    1992 49/72 68.1% Kinnock
    1997 56/72 77.8% Blair
    2001 56/72 77.8% Blair

    2005 41/59 69.5% Blair
    2010 41/59 69.5% Brown
    2015 1/59 1.6% Miliband
    2017 7/59 11.9% Corbyn
    2019 1/59 1.6% Corbyn
    Historical events A and B do not prove future hypothesis C. Just ask arch-Blairite Jim Murphy.
  • turbotubbsturbotubbs Posts: 7,930
    kle4 said:

    Cyclefree said:

    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    BTW on books Hilary Mantel must be one of the most overrated writers around. How she even got onto the Booker short list let alone won it twice is a mystery. I find her quite unreadable.

    And whenever she's interviewed she comes across as most unpleasant as well.

    That William Trevor never won the Booker is to the Booker's eternal discredit.

    Wrong on that. The Wolf Hall books are amazing. Not so keen on her French Revolution one that said but I forgive her, Mantel, all for the Cromwell ones.
    It's not a question of being right or wrong. It's a matter of taste. I just about finished the French Revolution one.

    But Wolf Hall was just turgid. She has a little talent but maybe as a poet. Not a novelist. She badly needs a very good editor.

    I very rarely leave a book unfinished. Mantel is one of the few. TBH I don't think the Booker is particularly reliable these days as a pick of good fiction.
    Nah. You're wrong on that one. She is or can be magnificent.

    And as mentioned earlier the Booker is a good steer for good literature. Not perfect but a good steer.
    I am not wrong. Nor are you right.

    I am expressing my opinion. As are you. You like her writing. I don't.

    I shall remember that whilst extolling the virtues of fantasy and sci-fi novels :)
    It was revealing how long it took for Terry Pratchett to achieve the acclaim he deserved because of the fantasy tag.
  • FairlieredFairliered Posts: 1,440
    Can’t see Johnson’s comments having more than a very marginal effect in Scotland. May have more effect in the Red Wall.
  • StuartDicksonStuartDickson Posts: 8,732
    DavidL said:

    Leon said:

    Carnyx said:

    Leon said:

    Carnyx said:

    Nigelb said:

    Leon said:

    fpt on this Speccie thing


    I have no dog in this fight, but that magazine has boasted some amazing writers in its 2 centuries of publication.

    Douglas Murray went through ALL 200 years of them and chose the four best articles ever. And, when you read them, it is hard not to sit back with a certain awed, dumbstruck admiration. Just pure journalistic genius. The kind of stuff you cannot fake.

    Occasionally, one simply has to stand, and applaud.

    https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/four-of-the-best-spectator-pieces-i-ve-ever-read

    Self pleasuring to excess is undeniably emblematic of Spectator journalism, I suppose.
    Some reading for Fraser Nelson and his voyeurs:

    “Frequent or rough masturbation can cause minor skin irritation. Forcefully bending an erect penis can rupture the chambers that fill with blood, a rare but gruesome condition called penile fracture.

    Köhler has seen guys with it after vigorous masturbation. "Afterward, the penis looks like an eggplant," he says. "It's purple and swollen." Most men need surgery to repair it.”

    Ouch! Take care Fraser!

    https://www.webmd.com/men/guide/male-masturbation-5-things-you-didnt-know
    Please don't. Aubergine, hot smoked salmon, capers and onions, with scrambled egg and tagliatelli, is a staple chez Carnyx.
    You strike me a bit of a gourmet

    Have you encountered Dr Trouble's hot chili sauce?

    Matthew Parris has, apparently, been banging on about it for months. It's made in Zimbabwe of all places, and it is utter genius. Very smoky, very rich, must be used sparingly, but omg

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dr-Trouble-African-Lemon-Chilli/dp/B07QVFYDBG?th=1

    I prefer the double oak smoked chile to the lemon version. Both are Wow

    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/dr-troubles-sauce-is-gift-that-keeps-on-giving-cm3thlbh6
    Interesting!
    It is honestly fantastic. Matthew Parris may be a mad Remainer but he is totally right about this. It is the best hot sauce in the world.

    I had a ham and cheese sourdough toastie the other day - thick lovely ham, tangy mature Cheddar, some tiger tomatoes, I took out the Dijon mustard and added Dr Trouble and flash fried the result

    SENSATIONAL
    Fat and drunk. You’re some catch Sean.
    You on the sauce yourself tonight Stuart? You are being quite gratuitously unpleasant.
    Nope. In the interests of balance, I expect you’re now going to tell Sean off for calling me a Nazi? Hardly seems proportionate for me pointing out that he has a well self-advertised alcohol problem.
  • LostPasswordLostPassword Posts: 7,852
    edited August 2021

    kle4 said:

    Cyclefree said:

    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    BTW on books Hilary Mantel must be one of the most overrated writers around. How she even got onto the Booker short list let alone won it twice is a mystery. I find her quite unreadable.

    And whenever she's interviewed she comes across as most unpleasant as well.

    That William Trevor never won the Booker is to the Booker's eternal discredit.

    Wrong on that. The Wolf Hall books are amazing. Not so keen on her French Revolution one that said but I forgive her, Mantel, all for the Cromwell ones.
    It's not a question of being right or wrong. It's a matter of taste. I just about finished the French Revolution one.

    But Wolf Hall was just turgid. She has a little talent but maybe as a poet. Not a novelist. She badly needs a very good editor.

    I very rarely leave a book unfinished. Mantel is one of the few. TBH I don't think the Booker is particularly reliable these days as a pick of good fiction.
    Nah. You're wrong on that one. She is or can be magnificent.

    And as mentioned earlier the Booker is a good steer for good literature. Not perfect but a good steer.
    I am not wrong. Nor are you right.

    I am expressing my opinion. As are you. You like her writing. I don't.

    I shall remember that whilst extolling the virtues of fantasy and sci-fi novels :)
    It was revealing how long it took for Terry Pratchett to achieve the acclaim he deserved because of the fantasy tag.
    I think that must have been some grand bargain to get him to start using chapters.
  • LeonLeon Posts: 20,815

    DavidL said:

    Leon said:

    Carnyx said:

    Leon said:

    Carnyx said:

    Nigelb said:

    Leon said:

    fpt on this Speccie thing


    I have no dog in this fight, but that magazine has boasted some amazing writers in its 2 centuries of publication.

    Douglas Murray went through ALL 200 years of them and chose the four best articles ever. And, when you read them, it is hard not to sit back with a certain awed, dumbstruck admiration. Just pure journalistic genius. The kind of stuff you cannot fake.

    Occasionally, one simply has to stand, and applaud.

    https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/four-of-the-best-spectator-pieces-i-ve-ever-read

    Self pleasuring to excess is undeniably emblematic of Spectator journalism, I suppose.
    Some reading for Fraser Nelson and his voyeurs:

    “Frequent or rough masturbation can cause minor skin irritation. Forcefully bending an erect penis can rupture the chambers that fill with blood, a rare but gruesome condition called penile fracture.

    Köhler has seen guys with it after vigorous masturbation. "Afterward, the penis looks like an eggplant," he says. "It's purple and swollen." Most men need surgery to repair it.”

    Ouch! Take care Fraser!

    https://www.webmd.com/men/guide/male-masturbation-5-things-you-didnt-know
    Please don't. Aubergine, hot smoked salmon, capers and onions, with scrambled egg and tagliatelli, is a staple chez Carnyx.
    You strike me a bit of a gourmet

    Have you encountered Dr Trouble's hot chili sauce?

    Matthew Parris has, apparently, been banging on about it for months. It's made in Zimbabwe of all places, and it is utter genius. Very smoky, very rich, must be used sparingly, but omg

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dr-Trouble-African-Lemon-Chilli/dp/B07QVFYDBG?th=1

    I prefer the double oak smoked chile to the lemon version. Both are Wow

    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/dr-troubles-sauce-is-gift-that-keeps-on-giving-cm3thlbh6
    Interesting!
    It is honestly fantastic. Matthew Parris may be a mad Remainer but he is totally right about this. It is the best hot sauce in the world.

    I had a ham and cheese sourdough toastie the other day - thick lovely ham, tangy mature Cheddar, some tiger tomatoes, I took out the Dijon mustard and added Dr Trouble and flash fried the result

    SENSATIONAL
    Fat and drunk. You’re some catch Sean.
    You on the sauce yourself tonight Stuart? You are being quite gratuitously unpleasant.
    Nope. In the interests of balance, I expect you’re now going to tell Sean off for calling me a Nazi? Hardly seems proportionate for me pointing out that he has a well self-advertised alcohol problem.
    1. I'm not Sean

    2. lol

    3. Earlier on you actually wished death on me, so, frankly, "blood-and-soil Scot Nat Nazi" seems like fair comment, especially as you, er, are
  • Richard_NabaviRichard_Nabavi Posts: 30,007
    Leon said:

    Leon said:

    I just want to spend the rest of my life drinking Nyetimber rose

    Is that too much to ask of a cruel, cold world?

    It's really good, isn't it? It was served at a posh reception I went to. I had no idea what they were serving, and I feared the worst. In general, anything pink and sparkling is either revolting, or at best an inferior but more expensive version of the equivalent sparkling white. As soon as I tried it I realised it was in a different league.

    In fact sparkling pinks are a particular strength of English wine producers. Balfour Hush Heath is another real goody, albeit so pale as to be scarcely a rosé.
    Yes!

    For me "pink champagne" or "blush whatever" has always meant something too sweet, too girly, but maybe fun in the sun, let's have a laugh, very forgettable

    Nyetimber Rose is exceptional. It's actually better than their classic cuvee "white" English Fizz (which is already excellent). It's an amazing wine right now. I cannot think of a champagne that compares. Yes it costs but this is actually a £35 bottle that is worth every penny
    Pink champagne is something to serve your mistress, if you have one, or are hoping to acquire one. Otherwise stick with the white, in general. There are a few exceptions.
  • Starmer urges Labour to embrace Blair’s legacy

    https://www.ft.com/content/34ec43b9-5dcd-46cd-b284-093e8f13714d

    Ha ha. I’m almost beginning to feel sorry for poor Anas.
    Scottish Labour won their highest percentage of Scottish seats under Blair, in 1997 and 2001.
    Historical events A and B do not prove future hypothesis C. Just ask arch-Blairite Jim Murphy.

    GE Scots seats %seats Boss

    1970 44/71 61.9% Wilson
    1974F 40/71 56.3% Wilson
    1974O 41/71 57.7% Wilson
    1979 44/71 61.9% Callaghan
    1983 41/72 56.9% Foot
    1987 50/72 69.4% Kinnock
    1992 49/72 68.1% Kinnock
    1997 56/72 77.8% Blair
    2001 56/72 77.8% Blair

    2005 41/59 69.5% Blair
    2010 41/59 69.5% Brown
    2015 1/59 1.6% Miliband
    2017 7/59 11.9% Corbyn
    2019 1/59 1.6% Corbyn
    Historical events A and B do not prove future hypothesis C. Just ask arch-Blairite Jim Murphy.
    Scottish Labour won their highest percentage of Scottish seats under Blair, in 1997 and 2001.
  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 34,708

    kle4 said:

    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    BTW on books Hilary Mantel must be one of the most overrated writers around. How she even got onto the Booker short list let alone won it twice is a mystery. I find her quite unreadable.

    And whenever she's interviewed she comes across as most unpleasant as well.

    That William Trevor never won the Booker is to the Booker's eternal discredit.

    Wrong on that. The Wolf Hall books are amazing. Not so keen on her French Revolution one that said but I forgive her, Mantel, all for the Cromwell ones.
    I liked wolf hall but found it hard to follow who was speaking
    Yes, I remember this now. It was pretty odd, and probably coloured my general impression of the book.

    A similar issue annoyed me about Normal People (ok, there was a lot that annoyed me about that one), with its lack of speech marks. I'm sure there was an artsy, pretentious reason for it but it just made it harder to follow.
    It was a lot clearer in bring up the bodies, but the constant ‘he, Cromwell’ really began to grate.
    I very much liked it. It was a neat device.
  • turbotubbsturbotubbs Posts: 7,930
    TOPPING said:

    kle4 said:

    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    BTW on books Hilary Mantel must be one of the most overrated writers around. How she even got onto the Booker short list let alone won it twice is a mystery. I find her quite unreadable.

    And whenever she's interviewed she comes across as most unpleasant as well.

    That William Trevor never won the Booker is to the Booker's eternal discredit.

    Wrong on that. The Wolf Hall books are amazing. Not so keen on her French Revolution one that said but I forgive her, Mantel, all for the Cromwell ones.
    I liked wolf hall but found it hard to follow who was speaking
    Yes, I remember this now. It was pretty odd, and probably coloured my general impression of the book.

    A similar issue annoyed me about Normal People (ok, there was a lot that annoyed me about that one), with its lack of speech marks. I'm sure there was an artsy, pretentious reason for it but it just made it harder to follow.
    It was a lot clearer in bring up the bodies, but the constant ‘he, Cromwell’ really began to grate.
    I very much liked it. It was a neat device.
    On the whole I preferred it to having to track back half a page to work out who was saying what, but I found it a bit clunky at times.
  • StuartDicksonStuartDickson Posts: 8,732
    edited August 2021
    Carnyx said:

    Carnyx said:

    Heathener said:

    stodge said:

    Evening all :)

    Margaret Thatcher understood the threat of climate change and the impact on the environment - her speech to the UN in November 1989 was unfortunately overshadowed by the small matter of the fall of the Berlin Wall 24 hours later.

    The cynic might of course argue it was a response to the surge in popularity of the Greens at the 1989 European elections but at least Thatcher started to see the issue.

    That speech is dynamite. An incredible tour de force. I think she's quite wrong that the solution lay in the private sector but it's an amazingly brilliant speech nonetheless. Astonishing foresight. I wonder how much of it she wrote herself? I wouldn't be surprised if the answer is, the whole thing.

    She was a political giant, for all her faults. Wow she would have been good in charge with the pandemic.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VnAzoDtwCBg&t=10s
    I wonder how much it contributed to her overthrow by the Tories? Never even considered that possibility before; could be not at all.
    Not at all.

    The backbenchers looked at the polling numbers and filled their breeks. The Cabinet knew she was stark raving bonkers. Mind, that Michael Forsyth bloke thocht she wis richt braw.
    No breeks to fill. I can recall him in a kilt trailing after the Stone of Scone up the Royal Mile in a smirr of rain. Or is that false memory?
    Probably the most surreally comical event in Scottish current affairs in our lifetime. Her Maj must deeply regret giving the nod to the Forsyth buffoon’s jape.
  • Cyclefree said:

    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    BTW on books Hilary Mantel must be one of the most overrated writers around. How she even got onto the Booker short list let alone won it twice is a mystery. I find her quite unreadable.

    And whenever she's interviewed she comes across as most unpleasant as well.

    That William Trevor never won the Booker is to the Booker's eternal discredit.

    Wrong on that. The Wolf Hall books are amazing. Not so keen on her French Revolution one that said but I forgive her, Mantel, all for the Cromwell ones.
    It's not a question of being right or wrong. It's a matter of taste. I just about finished the French Revolution one.

    But Wolf Hall was just turgid. She has a little talent but maybe as a poet. Not a novelist. She badly needs a very good editor.

    I very rarely leave a book unfinished. Mantel is one of the few. TBH I don't think the Booker is particularly reliable these days as a pick of good fiction.
    Nah. You're wrong on that one. She is or can be magnificent.

    And as mentioned earlier the Booker is a good steer for good literature. Not perfect but a good steer.
    I am not wrong. Nor are you right.

    I am expressing my opinion. As are you. You like her writing. I don't.

    Fascinating intersection of views: I agree with @Cyclefree about the Booker generally (as I mentioned before, disagreeing with @TOPPING ), but disagree with her significantly over the Wolf Hall books, which I loved. I wonder if it is (for me, no idea for cyclefree), something to do with my familiarity with Shakespeare's style - I found the writing in Wolf Hall to be very Shakespearean, and hence very readable, and indeed voiceable: there are very clear distinctions between the rhythms and vocabulary of each of the main characters.

    But I do agree with cyclefree that both sides are equally right, and wrong - it's very subjective. I had a long conversation about books with a friend the other week - our tastes are very congruent, except that his favourite book is one I loathed. Doesn't mean we couldn't agree on every other book!
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 71,216
    edited August 2021
    AstraZeneca vaccine ‘may give longer immunity’ meaning Covid booster jabs could be unnecessary, suggests boss of UK drugs giant

    Mr Soriot said: ‘We hope that the Oxford-AstraZeneca will provide longer term protection. The science so far suggests that our vaccine provides a strong T cell response which I hope means its effects will last longer. So, it looks good but we don’t yet know for sure whether you will need a booster. Time will tell.’

    AstraZeneca believes it will have authoritative data by October or November.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9866531/AstraZeneca-vaccine-longer-immunity-suggests-boss-UK-drugs-giant.html

    Pseudo scientific quasi-effective nonsense....
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 71,216
    edited August 2021
    MrEd said:

    Cyclefree said:

    kle4 said:

    This case looks meritless eveb from the statement of the losmg party.

    A family-run farm has won a legal battle against the multimillion-pound makers of plant milk, Oatly, which accused it of trademark infringement.

    Oatly brought legal action against Glebe Farm Foods, in Cambridgeshire, saying their product PureOaty took "unfair advantage" of their own drink.

    A High Court judge ruled in favour of the farm saying he did not see "any risk of injury to the distinctive character" of the Oatly brand...

    A spokeswoman for Oatly said the company would not be appealing the decision.

    "For us, this case has always been about protecting our trademark and how the single letter Y creates too much of a similarity between Oaty and Oatly."


    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cambridgeshire-58102252

    A good friend of mine was on the inside at Glebe Farm. Baseless doesn't cover it - absolutely bloody absurd from Oatly.
    My food industry analyst friend spits venom at the mere mention of Oatly's name. Says there is more to come out about them.
    Any firm that names its CEO as "Employee of the Month" and puts that on the side of the carton is bound to be dubious
    I love the way that Jeopardy in the US needed a new host, so the executive producers set about finding a new one, tried some out, and after an exhaustive search decided that a current executive producer should get the gig.
  • Andy_JSAndy_JS Posts: 16,985
    Leon said:

    I just want to spend the rest of my life drinking Nyetimber rose

    Is that too much to ask of a cruel, cold world?

    Never heard of it until now. About £40 a bottle, it seems.
  • turbotubbsturbotubbs Posts: 7,930

    AstraZeneca vaccine ‘may give longer immunity’ meaning Covid booster jabs could be unnecessary, suggests boss of UK drugs giant

    Mr Soriot said: ‘We hope that the Oxford-AstraZeneca will provide longer term protection. The science so far suggests that our vaccine provides a strong T cell response which I hope means its effects will last longer. So, it looks good but we don’t yet know for sure whether you will need a booster. Time will tell.’

    AstraZeneca believes it will have authoritative data by October or November.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9866531/AstraZeneca-vaccine-longer-immunity-suggests-boss-UK-drugs-giant.html

    Pseudo scientific quasi-effective nonsense....

    I would love, just love it, if AZ turns out better than the rest in the long run (with apologies to Kevin Keegan).
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 32,276

    Cyclefree said:

    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    BTW on books Hilary Mantel must be one of the most overrated writers around. How she even got onto the Booker short list let alone won it twice is a mystery. I find her quite unreadable.

    And whenever she's interviewed she comes across as most unpleasant as well.

    That William Trevor never won the Booker is to the Booker's eternal discredit.

    Wrong on that. The Wolf Hall books are amazing. Not so keen on her French Revolution one that said but I forgive her, Mantel, all for the Cromwell ones.
    It's not a question of being right or wrong. It's a matter of taste. I just about finished the French Revolution one.

    But Wolf Hall was just turgid. She has a little talent but maybe as a poet. Not a novelist. She badly needs a very good editor.

    I very rarely leave a book unfinished. Mantel is one of the few. TBH I don't think the Booker is particularly reliable these days as a pick of good fiction.
    Nah. You're wrong on that one. She is or can be magnificent.

    And as mentioned earlier the Booker is a good steer for good literature. Not perfect but a good steer.
    I am not wrong. Nor are you right.

    I am expressing my opinion. As are you. You like her writing. I don't.

    Fascinating intersection of views: I agree with @Cyclefree about the Booker generally (as I mentioned before, disagreeing with @TOPPING ), but disagree with her significantly over the Wolf Hall books, which I loved. I wonder if it is (for me, no idea for cyclefree), something to do with my familiarity with Shakespeare's style - I found the writing in Wolf Hall to be very Shakespearean, and hence very readable, and indeed voiceable: there are very clear distinctions between the rhythms and vocabulary of each of the main characters.

    But I do agree with cyclefree that both sides are equally right, and wrong - it's very subjective. I had a long conversation about books with a friend the other week - our tastes are very congruent, except that his favourite book is one I loathed. Doesn't mean we couldn't agree on every other book!
    Looking back, I think that I have only read two Booker winners from the last 20 years, though I have read one or more from most of the shortlists. I enjoyed "This Mournable Body from last year which dissected modern Southern Africa very well indeed.

    Some are unreadable though. I have started Midnight's Children a couple of times, but have given up swiftly each time.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 71,216
    edited August 2021
    Andy_JS said:

    Leon said:

    I just want to spend the rest of my life drinking Nyetimber rose

    Is that too much to ask of a cruel, cold world?

    Never heard of it until now. About £40 a bottle, it seems.
    Its good stuff, widely discussed on here in the past. I believe on offer at Waitrose at the moment for £27.
  • Richard_NabaviRichard_Nabavi Posts: 30,007

    AstraZeneca vaccine ‘may give longer immunity’ meaning Covid booster jabs could be unnecessary, suggests boss of UK drugs giant

    Mr Soriot said: ‘We hope that the Oxford-AstraZeneca will provide longer term protection. The science so far suggests that our vaccine provides a strong T cell response which I hope means its effects will last longer. So, it looks good but we don’t yet know for sure whether you will need a booster. Time will tell.’

    AstraZeneca believes it will have authoritative data by October or November.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9866531/AstraZeneca-vaccine-longer-immunity-suggests-boss-UK-drugs-giant.html

    Pseudo scientific quasi-effective nonsense....

    That does seem to be the case. Pfizer is effective more quickly, which can be a big advantage, but AZ seems to build up longer protection.

    Of course, there is also the question of the dosing interval. It may well be that Pfizer gives better long term protection with a longer interval.
  • BenpointerBenpointer Posts: 20,878

    AstraZeneca vaccine ‘may give longer immunity’ meaning Covid booster jabs could be unnecessary, suggests boss of UK drugs giant

    Mr Soriot said: ‘We hope that the Oxford-AstraZeneca will provide longer term protection. The science so far suggests that our vaccine provides a strong T cell response which I hope means its effects will last longer. So, it looks good but we don’t yet know for sure whether you will need a booster. Time will tell.’

    AstraZeneca believes it will have authoritative data by October or November.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9866531/AstraZeneca-vaccine-longer-immunity-suggests-boss-UK-drugs-giant.html

    Pseudo scientific quasi-effective nonsense....

    I would love, just love it, if AZ turns out better than the rest in the long run (with apologies to Kevin Keegan).
    Not a good one to quote - it didn't turn out well for Keegan.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 75,357
    My ratio of non-fiction to fiction books is way up this year compared to last (albeit with fewer books overall being read) - I must be growing up at last.
  • SandyRentoolSandyRentool Posts: 16,688
    Just been in the kitchen to do some research.

    Oatly does not have the word 'milk' on the carton.

    Minor Figures use the term 'm*lk' .

    Minor Figures Oat M*lk is available from Able & Cole, btw.

    I prefer mil*
  • StuartDicksonStuartDickson Posts: 8,732

    Cyclefree said:

    kle4 said:

    This case looks meritless eveb from the statement of the losmg party.

    A family-run farm has won a legal battle against the multimillion-pound makers of plant milk, Oatly, which accused it of trademark infringement.

    Oatly brought legal action against Glebe Farm Foods, in Cambridgeshire, saying their product PureOaty took "unfair advantage" of their own drink.

    A High Court judge ruled in favour of the farm saying he did not see "any risk of injury to the distinctive character" of the Oatly brand...

    A spokeswoman for Oatly said the company would not be appealing the decision.

    "For us, this case has always been about protecting our trademark and how the single letter Y creates too much of a similarity between Oaty and Oatly."


    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cambridgeshire-58102252

    A good friend of mine was on the inside at Glebe Farm. Baseless doesn't cover it - absolutely bloody absurd from Oatly.
    My food industry analyst friend spits venom at the mere mention of Oatly's name. Says there is more to come out about them.
    The oat “milk” fraudsters of Sweden have been getting a bad press. These new brands seem to attract the most dodgy characters.
    Shouldn't the dairy industry sue Oatly (and the others) for using the term 'milk'?
    Yes.

    In Sweden Oatly were forced to relabel their revolting gunge from ”havremjölk” (oat milk) to ”havredryck” (oat drink).

    They are also widely condemned for the loss of insect and bird habitats, especially pollinators. Oat fields are horrific deserts for these creatures, whereas cow pasture can be a rich environment.
  • SandyRentoolSandyRentool Posts: 16,688

    Andy_JS said:

    Leon said:

    I just want to spend the rest of my life drinking Nyetimber rose

    Is that too much to ask of a cruel, cold world?

    Never heard of it until now. About £40 a bottle, it seems.
    Its good stuff, widely discussed on here in the past. I believe on offer at Waitrose at the moment for £27.
    You could get a dozen bottles of decent ale for that.
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 98,860
    edited August 2021

    Starmer urges Labour to embrace Blair’s legacy

    https://www.ft.com/content/34ec43b9-5dcd-46cd-b284-093e8f13714d

    Ha ha. I’m almost beginning to feel sorry for poor Anas.
    Scottish Labour won their highest percentage of Scottish seats under Blair, in 1997 and 2001.
    Historical events A and B do not prove future hypothesis C. Just ask arch-Blairite Jim Murphy.

    GE Scots seats %seats Boss

    1970 44/71 61.9% Wilson
    1974F 40/71 56.3% Wilson
    1974O 41/71 57.7% Wilson
    1979 44/71 61.9% Callaghan
    1983 41/72 56.9% Foot
    1987 50/72 69.4% Kinnock
    1992 49/72 68.1% Kinnock
    1997 56/72 77.8% Blair
    2001 56/72 77.8% Blair

    2005 41/59 69.5% Blair
    2010 41/59 69.5% Brown
    2015 1/59 1.6% Miliband
    2017 7/59 11.9% Corbyn
    2019 1/59 1.6% Corbyn
    Historical events A and B do not prove future hypothesis C. Just ask arch-Blairite Jim Murphy.
    Scottish Labour won their highest percentage of Scottish seats under Blair, in 1997 and 2001.
    Correct Sunil, the 45.6% Blair got in Scotland in 1997 was Labour's highest Scottish voteshare since 1966.

    It was also slightly higher than the 45% Sturgeon got in 2019.

    Most Scots are not socialist but centrist, moderately social democratic
  • StuartDicksonStuartDickson Posts: 8,732

    Can’t see Johnson’s comments having more than a very marginal effect in Scotland. May have more effect in the Red Wall.

    I dunno. A lot of people - eg Goldie, Davidson and Ross - have worked very hard over the last three decades to remove the stench of Thatcherism from the SCon brand. Johnson just befouled their efforts.

    But I agree that much, much more is at stake for the Tories in England’s Red Wall. A lot of northern Tories will be concerned tonight.
  • IshmaelZIshmaelZ Posts: 16,947

    Just been in the kitchen to do some research.

    Oatly does not have the word 'milk' on the carton.

    Minor Figures use the term 'm*lk' .

    Minor Figures Oat M*lk is available from Able & Cole, btw.

    I prefer mil*

    If you make porr*dge by soaking oats in the fr*dge overn*ght, and pour off the liquid in the morn*ng, you've got oatly, but cheaper.
  • TheuniondivvieTheuniondivvie Posts: 33,410
    HYUFD said:

    Starmer urges Labour to embrace Blair’s legacy

    https://www.ft.com/content/34ec43b9-5dcd-46cd-b284-093e8f13714d

    Ha ha. I’m almost beginning to feel sorry for poor Anas.
    Scottish Labour won their highest percentage of Scottish seats under Blair, in 1997 and 2001.
    Historical events A and B do not prove future hypothesis C. Just ask arch-Blairite Jim Murphy.

    GE Scots seats %seats Boss

    1970 44/71 61.9% Wilson
    1974F 40/71 56.3% Wilson
    1974O 41/71 57.7% Wilson
    1979 44/71 61.9% Callaghan
    1983 41/72 56.9% Foot
    1987 50/72 69.4% Kinnock
    1992 49/72 68.1% Kinnock
    1997 56/72 77.8% Blair
    2001 56/72 77.8% Blair

    2005 41/59 69.5% Blair
    2010 41/59 69.5% Brown
    2015 1/59 1.6% Miliband
    2017 7/59 11.9% Corbyn
    2019 1/59 1.6% Corbyn
    Historical events A and B do not prove future hypothesis C. Just ask arch-Blairite Jim Murphy.
    Scottish Labour won their highest percentage of Scottish seats under Blair, in 1997 and 2001.
    Correct Sunil, the 45.6% Blair got in Scotland in 1997 was Labour's highest Scottish voteshare since 1966.

    It was also slightly higher than the 45% Sturgeon got in 2019.

    Most Scots are not socialist but centrist, moderately social democratic
    Just largely immune to the racists and xenophobes driving English politics for the last 20 years it appears.
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 98,860
    edited August 2021

    Can’t see Johnson’s comments having more than a very marginal effect in Scotland. May have more effect in the Red Wall.

    I dunno. A lot of people - eg Goldie, Davidson and Ross - have worked very hard over the last three decades to remove the stench of Thatcherism from the SCon brand. Johnson just befouled their efforts.

    But I agree that much, much more is at stake for the Tories in England’s Red Wall. A lot of northern Tories will be concerned tonight.
    Thatcher got 31% in Scotland in 1979, higher than Davidson ever got and 28% in 1983, the same as May and Davidson got in 2017.

    Even in 1987 she still got 24% which was more than Goldie and Ross ever got.

    About a quarter to a third of Scots are Thatcherites, indeed when Salmond was SNP leader some Scottish Thatcherites voted SNP, especially in the North East
  • BenpointerBenpointer Posts: 20,878

    Andy_JS said:

    Leon said:

    I just want to spend the rest of my life drinking Nyetimber rose

    Is that too much to ask of a cruel, cold world?

    Never heard of it until now. About £40 a bottle, it seems.
    Its good stuff, widely discussed on here in the past. I believe on offer at Waitrose at the moment for £27.
    Not the rose - that's £41.99 at Waitrose.

    (Waitrose Wine Director has obviously been watching the Nyetimber ramping going on here tonight!)
  • Andy_JS said:

    Leon said:

    I just want to spend the rest of my life drinking Nyetimber rose

    Is that too much to ask of a cruel, cold world?

    Never heard of it until now. About £40 a bottle, it seems.
    Its good stuff, widely discussed on here in the past. I believe on offer at Waitrose at the moment for £27.
    Not the rose - that's £41.99 at Waitrose.

    (Waitrose Wine Director has obviously been watching the Nyetimber ramping going on here tonight!)
    I don't have a mistress so I don't drink that ;-)
  • BenpointerBenpointer Posts: 20,878
    Anyone tried the Camel Valley Pinot Noir Rosé Brut?
  • StuartDicksonStuartDickson Posts: 8,732
    Leon said:

    DavidL said:

    Leon said:

    Carnyx said:

    Leon said:

    Carnyx said:

    Nigelb said:

    Leon said:

    fpt on this Speccie thing


    I have no dog in this fight, but that magazine has boasted some amazing writers in its 2 centuries of publication.

    Douglas Murray went through ALL 200 years of them and chose the four best articles ever. And, when you read them, it is hard not to sit back with a certain awed, dumbstruck admiration. Just pure journalistic genius. The kind of stuff you cannot fake.

    Occasionally, one simply has to stand, and applaud.

    https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/four-of-the-best-spectator-pieces-i-ve-ever-read

    Self pleasuring to excess is undeniably emblematic of Spectator journalism, I suppose.
    Some reading for Fraser Nelson and his voyeurs:

    “Frequent or rough masturbation can cause minor skin irritation. Forcefully bending an erect penis can rupture the chambers that fill with blood, a rare but gruesome condition called penile fracture.

    Köhler has seen guys with it after vigorous masturbation. "Afterward, the penis looks like an eggplant," he says. "It's purple and swollen." Most men need surgery to repair it.”

    Ouch! Take care Fraser!

    https://www.webmd.com/men/guide/male-masturbation-5-things-you-didnt-know
    Please don't. Aubergine, hot smoked salmon, capers and onions, with scrambled egg and tagliatelli, is a staple chez Carnyx.
    You strike me a bit of a gourmet

    Have you encountered Dr Trouble's hot chili sauce?

    Matthew Parris has, apparently, been banging on about it for months. It's made in Zimbabwe of all places, and it is utter genius. Very smoky, very rich, must be used sparingly, but omg

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dr-Trouble-African-Lemon-Chilli/dp/B07QVFYDBG?th=1

    I prefer the double oak smoked chile to the lemon version. Both are Wow

    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/dr-troubles-sauce-is-gift-that-keeps-on-giving-cm3thlbh6
    Interesting!
    It is honestly fantastic. Matthew Parris may be a mad Remainer but he is totally right about this. It is the best hot sauce in the world.

    I had a ham and cheese sourdough toastie the other day - thick lovely ham, tangy mature Cheddar, some tiger tomatoes, I took out the Dijon mustard and added Dr Trouble and flash fried the result

    SENSATIONAL
    Fat and drunk. You’re some catch Sean.
    You on the sauce yourself tonight Stuart? You are being quite gratuitously unpleasant.
    Nope. In the interests of balance, I expect you’re now going to tell Sean off for calling me a Nazi? Hardly seems proportionate for me pointing out that he has a well self-advertised alcohol problem.
    1. I'm not Sean

    2. lol

    3. Earlier on you actually wished death on me, so, frankly, "blood-and-soil Scot Nat Nazi" seems like fair comment, especially as you, er, are
    So, Sean’s not in the mood for desisting with the gratuitous unpleasantness. Glad we cleared that up.
  • SandyRentoolSandyRentool Posts: 16,688
    IshmaelZ said:

    Just been in the kitchen to do some research.

    Oatly does not have the word 'milk' on the carton.

    Minor Figures use the term 'm*lk' .

    Minor Figures Oat M*lk is available from Able & Cole, btw.

    I prefer mil*

    If you make porr*dge by soaking oats in the fr*dge overn*ght, and pour off the liquid in the morn*ng, you've got oatly, but cheaper.
    That doesn't quite work for those of us who make their porridge with milk, not water.
  • williamglennwilliamglenn Posts: 40,417
    HYUFD said:

    Can’t see Johnson’s comments having more than a very marginal effect in Scotland. May have more effect in the Red Wall.

    I dunno. A lot of people - eg Goldie, Davidson and Ross - have worked very hard over the last three decades to remove the stench of Thatcherism from the SCon brand. Johnson just befouled their efforts.

    But I agree that much, much more is at stake for the Tories in England’s Red Wall. A lot of northern Tories will be concerned tonight.
    Thatcher got 31% in Scotland in 1979, higher than Davidson ever got and 28% in 1983, the same as May and Davidson got in 2017.

    Even in 1987 she still got 24% which was more than Goldie and Ross ever got.

    About a quarter to a third of Scots are Thatcherites, indeed when Salmond was SNP leader some Scottish Thatcherites voted SNP, especially in the North East
    Isn't @malcolmg basically a Thatcherite?
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