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Could Truss be tempted by an early election? – politicalbetting.com

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  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 47,295
    IshmaelZ said:

    Nigelb said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    Nigelb said:

    Michael Shellenberger argues, in his "Apocalypse Never: Why Environmental Alarmism Hurts Us All", that fossil fuels may make sense for very poor people in third world nations. For example, a woman in central Africa may be better off buying a little kerosene for a stove, rather than spending two or three hours each day gathering wood for cooking. In areas that are not always as safe as one would like.

    (I wouldn't be surprised if she created less carbon dioxide with the stove than with the wood, too.)

    Why can’t she have solar electricity ?
    A true let them eat cakeism. Who is going to give her solar panels? Why is it so hard for rich whiteys to understand poor blackery?
    Bollocks.
    Renewables are going to be a very large part of the electrification of Africa. Quite the opposite of cakeism.
    Yes.

    You haven't been to poor Central Africa. I have. You are the one asking why they can't have cake. I know the answer.
    They can if developed nations are prepared to fund it.
    Rural electrification is a route to economic development, and we shouldn’t be leaning it to China to build coal fired power on Africa, which is largely what’s happening.
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 47,295
    TimS said:

    Nigelb said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    Nigelb said:

    Michael Shellenberger argues, in his "Apocalypse Never: Why Environmental Alarmism Hurts Us All", that fossil fuels may make sense for very poor people in third world nations. For example, a woman in central Africa may be better off buying a little kerosene for a stove, rather than spending two or three hours each day gathering wood for cooking. In areas that are not always as safe as one would like.

    (I wouldn't be surprised if she created less carbon dioxide with the stove than with the wood, too.)

    Why can’t she have solar electricity ?
    A true let them eat cakeism. Who is going to give her solar panels? Why is it so hard for rich whiteys to understand poor blackery?
    Bollocks.
    Renewables are going to be a very large part of the electrification of Africa. Quite the opposite of cakeism.
    https://odi.org/en/insights/how-solar-mini-grids-can-bring-cheap-green-electricity-to-rural-africa/

    https://www.un.org/africarenewal/magazine/january-2021/push-renewables-how-africa-building-different-energy-pathway

    RENEWABLE ENERGY MARKET ANALYSIS
    AFRICA AND ITS REGIONS
    https://www.irena.org/-/media/Files/IRENA/Agency/Publication/2022/Jan/IRENA_Market_Africa_2022.pdf
  • williamglennwilliamglenn Posts: 43,344
    EXCLUSIVE: The chief strategist of the Yes campaign in 2014 has urged Nicola Sturgeon to compromise on independence and work towards a more powerful Scotland within the UK

    https://twitter.com/timesscotland/status/1563270544577142786
  • ydoethur said:

    Reading through an old thread, I came across this from 2018:

    Russia's strangehold on energy supplies to Eastern Europe will continue to wane. Norway's gas production is rising, Israel is coming on stream next year, and everyone is building LNG import terminals to benefit from new supplies from the US and Africa. (And the rise of Australian LNG means that gas from the Gulf will be increasingly directed towards Europe.)

    The moves to renewables in Europe - while they have sucked for many consumers - have had a similar effect.

    The Russian noose around Eastern Europe is slowly loosening.


    Ah well, we all make mistakes. But I tactfully won't identify the author!

    Mistakes?

    Seems to be pretty accurate!

    The impact of the Russian switch-off of gas is now very inconvenient, but its not fatal. The noose has just become something that will really chafe to remove, rather than snapping necks.

    Had it not been for the factors mentioned, then Europe as a whole would be a lot, lot more stuffed this year.
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 107,348
    edited August 2022

    EXCLUSIVE: The chief strategist of the Yes campaign in 2014 has urged Nicola Sturgeon to compromise on independence and work towards a more powerful Scotland within the UK

    https://twitter.com/timesscotland/status/1563270544577142786

    He is also now training to be a Roman Catholic Jesuit priest

    https://sen.scot/former-scottish-independence-campaigner-stephen-noon-saying-yes-to-god-was-the-easiest-decision-ive-ever-made/
  • GIN1138 said:

    No election until January 2025

    Everyone f*cked by January 2025! :angry:
    So Leon can stop banging on about Incels?
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 47,295
    The floods in Pakistan look terrifying.
    https://twitter.com/Joyce_Karam/status/1563252444179492866


    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-62684037
    … Earlier, climate minister Sherry Rehman said the country was going through its eighth monsoon cycle "while normally the country only has three to four cycles of rain".
    "The percentages of super flood torrents are shocking," she said.
    Since the summer season began, multiple monsoon cycles have lashed Pakistan, destroying more than 400,000 homes across the country.…

  • DynamoDynamo Posts: 651
    Nadhim Zahawi says the proles in Britain shouldn't use so much energy, because "there is war on our continent". Take the utilities under government administration, then, or nationalise them outright. Because wouldn't it be nice if oligarchs such as Stephen Fitzpatrick who owns energy supplier Ovo could tighten his belt too, rather than telling the population they should cuddle their pets more if they feel cold?

    This war started in 2014, and Bosnia and Chechnya are also in Europe. But never mind the facts.

    It's rob British people blind and blame it on the Russians time.

    Can someone remind me please. Is the reason for supporting the government in Kiev to the death of the last elderly prole in Britain from hypothermia

    a) the risk of Russia attacking NATO countries, or
    b) humanitarianism (which wasn't so noticeable when real genocide was being committed in Rwanda)?

    Or is it more a case of c) only a traitorous c*** would ask such a question?
  • Jim_MillerJim_Miller Posts: 1,059
    Nigelb asks: "Why can’t she have solar electricity ?"

    A poor woman in central Africa is unlikely to have the capital to buy such expensive equipment, given that she earns perhaps two dollars a day.

    Two quick points: Note that the cost of even a simple kerosene stove would take days of her limited income. Note also that to cook in the dark with solar power requires a substantial battery,

    Solar might make sense for lighting and charging simple cellphones, especially if she has a good crop year.

    (Some of you may be able to do a quick back-of-the-envelope estimate of how much a solar power system, capable of supporting cooking, would cost. It's an interesting problem, but not one I can solve quickly.

    There are simple reflector systems that can be used for cooking, but they don't work at night, or in cloudy weather, and they aren't suitable for all foods.)
  • DynamoDynamo Posts: 651

    EXCLUSIVE: The chief strategist of the Yes campaign in 2014 has urged Nicola Sturgeon to compromise on independence and work towards a more powerful Scotland within the UK

    https://twitter.com/timesscotland/status/1563270544577142786

    Why now? "Gizza job, Liz"?
  • EPGEPG Posts: 5,272
    Dynamo said:

    Nadhim Zahawi says the proles in Britain shouldn't use so much energy, because "there is war on our continent". Take the utilities under government administration, then, or nationalise them outright. Because wouldn't it be nice if oligarchs such as Stephen Fitzpatrick who owns energy supplier Ovo could tighten his belt too, rather than telling the population they should cuddle their pets more if they feel cold?

    This war started in 2014, and Bosnia and Chechnya are also in Europe. But never mind the facts.

    It's rob British people blind and blame it on the Russians time.

    Can someone remind me please. Is the reason for supporting the government in Kiev to the death of the last elderly prole in Britain from hypothermia

    a) the risk of Russia attacking NATO countries, or
    b) humanitarianism (which wasn't so noticeable when real genocide was being committed in Rwanda)?

    Or is it more a case of c) only a traitorous c*** would ask such a question?

    Missiles going into the sides of civilian flats. Jog on with your Russian genocide denial.
  • theProletheProle Posts: 706

    Read an interesting comment from a rather annoyed man on Conhome:

    'Astonishing; that you have the brass neck to accuse other people of "not cottoning onto reality" - yet you don't mention the 500 ton elephant in the room. The vast quantities of gas, right under our feet in the Bowland Basin!
    A survey was done in 2013 by the British Geological Survey. If their most conservative estimate of the gas reserves is correct, there's enough gas to supply the whole of the UK at 2018 rates of consumption, for 275 years!'

    @Richard_Tyndall ; @rcs1000 - this is very much at odds with prevailing opinion. Has the commentor got this totally wrong, and if so, how has he got it so wrong? Or is the gas he is referring to just really hard to winkle out?

    Edit: of course anybody else with relevant info or thoughts is welcome to offer an opinion.

    Not sure people understand what is involved in getting gas out by fracking (which is what he is referring to). If I want to access to conventional gas reserves I drill a single hole or a series of holes from one location to drain the reservoir. Fracking involves drilling hundreds or thousands of holes a few hundred yards apart over a vast area. This is why it only really works in places with wide open spaces. Having a fracking site every few hundred yards across the Forest of Bowland is both impractical and probably not going to be too popular.


    Practical question - given directional drilling tech, why don't you start them all from pretty much the same spot rather than one every few hundred yards?
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 49,002
    theProle said:

    Read an interesting comment from a rather annoyed man on Conhome:

    'Astonishing; that you have the brass neck to accuse other people of "not cottoning onto reality" - yet you don't mention the 500 ton elephant in the room. The vast quantities of gas, right under our feet in the Bowland Basin!
    A survey was done in 2013 by the British Geological Survey. If their most conservative estimate of the gas reserves is correct, there's enough gas to supply the whole of the UK at 2018 rates of consumption, for 275 years!'

    @Richard_Tyndall ; @rcs1000 - this is very much at odds with prevailing opinion. Has the commentor got this totally wrong, and if so, how has he got it so wrong? Or is the gas he is referring to just really hard to winkle out?

    Edit: of course anybody else with relevant info or thoughts is welcome to offer an opinion.

    Not sure people understand what is involved in getting gas out by fracking (which is what he is referring to). If I want to access to conventional gas reserves I drill a single hole or a series of holes from one location to drain the reservoir. Fracking involves drilling hundreds or thousands of holes a few hundred yards apart over a vast area. This is why it only really works in places with wide open spaces. Having a fracking site every few hundred yards across the Forest of Bowland is both impractical and probably not going to be too popular.


    Practical question - given directional drilling tech, why don't you start them all from pretty much the same spot rather than one every few hundred yards?
    You will have eight or so wells from each of those drilling spots
  • CatManCatMan Posts: 1,816
    You all love Simpsons Memes don't you?


  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 49,002
    @theProle

    Each of the well sites will look something like this:



    It's incredible how small the area that each well drains.
  • Andy_JSAndy_JS Posts: 20,423
    edited August 2022
    A whopping 85% of UK energy is being generated by gas and nuclear at the moment. What would be happening if we'd closed our nuclear power stations and were relying on Russian gas?

    https://www.gridwatch.templar.co.uk
  • RobDRobD Posts: 58,110
    Andy_JS said:

    A whopping 85% of UK energy is being generated by gas and nuclear at the moment. What would be happening if we'd closed our nuclear power stations and were relying on Russian gas?

    https://www.gridwatch.templar.co.uk

    Is it really “whopping”? It’s dark and the wind isn’t blowing. Of course most of the energy is going to come from gas and nuclear.
This discussion has been closed.